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COMMITTEE A ND DELEGATION REPORTS

Orders of the day

1   Economics—Standing Committee—REPORT—the review of the reserve bank of australia annual report 2007 (second report)—MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 24 November 2008 ) on the motion of Mr C. R. Thomson—That the House take note of the report. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless  

re-accorded priority on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays after 15 June 2009.
)

2   Economics—Standing Committee—REPORT—competition in the banking and non-banking sectors—MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 27 November 2008 ) on the motion of Mr C. R. Thomson—That the House take note of the report. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays after 15 June 2009. )

 
 
 

BUSINE SS ACCORDED PRIORITY—MAIN COMMITTEE

MONDAY, 15 JUNE 2009 (6.55 TO 8.30 PM)

PRIVATE MEMBERS’ BUSINESS

Notices

1   Dr Stone: To move—That the House:

(1) notes that under section 417 of the Migration Act 1958 , the Minister for Immigration and Citizenship may intervene personally making decisions in relation to individuals;

(2) encourages the Minister for Immigration and Citizenship to urgently resolve his ambivalence about using these ministerial powers of intervention, given the consequences for individuals and families whose urgent requests for intervention remain unresolved, in some cases for nearly a year; and

(3) requests that the Minister for Immigration and Citizenship responds to the report he commissioned analysing the use of ministerial powers (the Elizabeth Proust Report) which has been with him since 29 January 2008. ( Notice given 25 November 2008 . Time allowed—20 minutes. )

2   Mr Scott: To move—That the House:

(1) notes that the report of the Beale review of Australia’s quarantine and biosecurity arrangements, One Biosecurity: a working partnership , includes recommendation 59 relating to the importation, subject to strict conditions, of the live foot and mouth virus for use in research;

(2) recognises that the risks associated with such importation far outweigh the possible benefits of research; and

(3) calls on the:

(a) Minister for Agriculture, Fishe ries and Forestry to unequivocally and indefinitely reject recommendation 59 of the ‘Beale Report’; and

(b) Government to indefinitely and wholly prohibit the introduction of any live culture sample of foot and mouth disease for research or any other purpose. ( Notice given 10 February 2009. Time allowed—40 minutes. )

3   Mr Neumann: To move—That the House:

(1) notes the Federal Government’s ‘Saving Lives in the Water’ measure a nnounced in the 2008-09 Budget and the priorities identified in the Australian Water Safety Strategy 2008-2011 ;

(2) calls on the Federal Government to:

(a) create and implement an annual National Drowning and Prevention, Awareness and Memorial Day;

(b)  provide assistance to schools and other education facilities so they are fully resourced to provide Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) and First Aid training, and better able to educate students on water safety;

(c) establish a national code for pool compliance, legislating that all pool owners be trained, certified and up to date in CPR as part of their pool compliance;

(d) devise and support programs to teach water safety to children and toddlers; and

(e) implement a national rural and regional swimming program to better equip parents, carers and children in isolated communities. ( Notice given 10 February 2009. Time allowed—remaining private Members’ Business time prior to 8.30 p.m. )

 
 
 

BUSINESS ACCORDED PRIORITY—HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES CHAMBER

MONDAY, 15 JUNE 2009 (8 .40 TO 9.30 PM)

COMMITTEE AND DELEGATION REPORTS continued

Presentation and statements

1   Intelligence and Security—Parliamentary Joint Committee: Review of the re-listing of Ansar al-Islam, AAA, IAA, IMU, JeM and LeJ as terrorist organisations ( Statements to conclude by 8.50 p.m. )

2   Treaties—Joint Standing Committee: Report 101: Treaties tabled on 3 February 2009 ( Statements to conclude by 8.55 p.m. )

3   Legal and Constitutional Affairs—Standing Committee: Disability access standards. ( Statements to conclude by 9.05 p.m. )

PRIVATE MEMBERS’ BUSINESS

Notices

1   Ms Rishworth: To move—That the House:

(1) recognises the importance of sound urban planning for the long term future of our towns and cities;

(2) acknowledges that:

(a) planning new communities and regenerating older communities must maximise the ‘liveability’ of these communities;

(b) local planning should ensure that:

(i) local employment is available close to the local communities;

(ii) transport options are well connected and integrated, including the availability of public transport and bike paths to reduce car dependency and promote healthy alternatives such as walking and cycling;

(iii) housing and local infrastructure are designed to minimise the environmental footprint, including options to promote water and energy conservation;

  1. community services are available; and

(v) local infrastructure facilitates a sense of community and place; and

(c) urban planing of our communities must maximise the social, economic and environmental outcomes for local residents; and

(3) urges all levels of government, industry, associated professions and the community to work together to ensure that we have healthy, happy, safe and sus tainable communities. ( Notice given 19 March 2009. Time allowed—remaining private Members’ Business time prior to 9.30 p.m. )

 
 
 

PRIVATE MEMBERS’ BUSINESS continued

No tices given for Monday 15 June 2009

*1   Mr K. J. Thomson: To move—That the House:

(1) deplores the Myanmar military regime for pressing new and spurious charges against Dr Aung San Suu Kyi a nd for her ongoing detention and persecution;

(2) condemns the Myanmar regime for continuing to deny the fundamental human rights of Dr Suu Kyi, notably those rights enshrined in Articles 9, 10 and 19 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, which prohibit arbitrary arrest and detention, guarantee the right to fair trial, and guarantee the right to freedom of opinion and expression;

(3) demands that the Myanmar regime drop the current set of charges against Dr Suu Kyi, and immediately and unconditionally release her from detention;

(4) applauds Dr Suu Kyi for her courage in peacefully protesting for the democratic rights of the people of Myanmar over many years and with great dignity and civility; and

(5) calls on the Myanmar regime to ensure that the elections it proposes to conduct in 2010 are truly free and fair. ( Notice given 4 June 2009. )

*2   Mr Dreyfus: To move—That the House, as recommended in the Human Rights and Equal Opportunity Commission’s Bringing Them Home report tabled in the Senate on 26 May 1997, recognises that 26 May is National Sorry Day, a day of remembrance each year to commemorate the history of forcible removal of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children and its effects on individuals, families and communities. ( Notice given 4 June 2009. )

Notices —continued

3   Mr Secker: To move—That the House notes that:

(1) curren tly low flow conditions and over allocations are having an extreme impact on the River Murray, Lower Lakes and Coorong;

(2) the region is fast approaching environmental collapse, industries are being lost and communities are suffering;

(3) current predictions of low inflows indicate that the Lakes will drop to even lower levels and that River flow to the Coorong will not occur in the foreseeable future;

(4) the short term challenge under current and likely low flow conditions for 2008 is to use what water is available, after critical human needs, to prevent irretrievable damage to the river systems; and

(5) the long term challenge is to implement strategies that protect the environment and maximise the productive use of water resource while maintaining a sustainable river from source to mouth. ( Notice given 11 November 2008. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on the next sitting Monday after 15 June 2009. )

4   Mr Marles: To move—That the House:

(1) acknowledges the importance of the Australian car industry and recogni ses its important role in the economy as a:

(a) provider of employment;

(b) major exporter; and

(c) basis of high technology manufacturing; and

(2) supports the Government’s initiative for a package of measures for the car industry designed to improve the international competitiveness of the Australian car industry and to promote the manufacture of greener cars. ( Notice given 11 November 2008. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on the next sitting Monday after 15 June 2009. )

5   Mr Secker: To move—That the House notes that:

(1) a group of dedicated Australians has established the Zimbabwe Outreach Program and Orphanages Mutare (ZOPOM) Foundation;

( 2) the Murwira Orphanage caters for children from a few months old to twelve years of age in Mutare, an area of desperate need in Zimbabwe where one in five children are orphans and 100 babies become HIV positive every day;

(3) Paula Leen, a 74 year old United States citizen, single-handedly runs the Murwira Orphanage and her outreach program feeds over 2,000 destitute people a month;

(4) the ZOPOM Foundation in Australia under the umbrella of the Global Development Group aims to fund Paula Leen’s work with donations;

(5) the ZOPOM Foundation provides Australians with a chance to assist in a small way with all funds going directly to the Murwira Orphanage and Outreach program; and

(6) the humanitarium crisis in Zimbabwe is presently so critical that the immediate ZOPOM Foundation aim is to urgently purchase food from South Africa to send to the Murwira Orphanage. ( Notice given 11 November 2008. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on the next sitting Monday after 15 June 2009. )

6   Mr Dreyfus: To move—That the House:

(1)  notes that 2008 marks the 70 th anniversary of the Evian Conference, convened by President Roosevelt 11-18 July 1938 in France, as an inter-governmental meeting to discuss and formulate an adequate international response to the plight of European Jewry in need of refuge from persecution under the Nazi regime in Germany;

(2) recalls that:

(a)  an estimated 6 million Jews and millions of others died during the Holocaust as a result of Nazi policies of the ‘final solution’ carried out until 1945;

(b) the Australian Minister for Trade and Customs, Lieutenant-Colonel T W White stated at the Evian Conference: ‘It will no doubt be appreciated also that, as we have no real racial problems, we are not desirous of importing one by encouraging any scheme of large-scale foreign migration.’; and

(c) the attitude of the Nazi Government to the response of Australia was to note how ‘astounding’ it was that foreign countries criticised Germany for their treatment of the Jews, but none of them wanted to open the doors to them when ‘the opportunity [was] offer[ed]’;

(3) notes that:

(a)  the Holocaust constitutes one of the most heinous acts of genocide in history;

(b) it remains insufficiently known and acknowledged by the world community that the decisions made at the Evian Conference resulted in the abandonment of the opportunity to save the lives of millions of Jewish people who ultimately perished;

(c)  Lieutenant-Colonel White’s statement on behalf of the Government of Australia is still visible at the Yad Vashem Holocaust Memorial in Jerusalem, as the single representative response for all other nations’ responses of indifference at the Evian Conference, and is viewed by thousands of tourists annually; and

(d) the 9 December 2008 marks the 60 th anniversary of the signing at the United Nations of the Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide, to which Australia was one of the first signatories;

(4)  honours the memory of all those who lost their lives in the Holocaust; and

(5) calls for the Australian Government to send to the Government of Israel a statement of recognition of and regret for the decisions made by Australia at the Evian Conference in 1938, stating Australia’s present friendship with Israel, acknowledging past wrongs, remembering the 70 th anniversary of the Evian Conference, and commemorating the 60 th anniversary of the State of Israel, written on a plaque to be given to the Yad Vashem Holocaust Memorial in Jerusalem, with a request that the plaque be displayed. ( Notice given 24 November 2008 . Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays after 15 June 2009 .)

7   Mr Hartsuyker: To move—That the House:

(1) condemns the decision by the New South Wales (NSW) Government to charge private hospitals for the supply of blood and blood pro ducts; and

(2) expresses its concern that:

(a) this decision to turn the supply of blood and blood products into a State money-making enterprise will deter all those who voluntarily donate blood; and

(b) any extra charge to private patients will result in an extra burden on the public health service in NSW which is already unable to cope with demand. ( Notice given 2 December 2008. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays after 15 June 2009. )

8   Ms Parke: To move—That the House:

(1) notes that:

(a) three young Australians, Scott Rush, Andrew Chan and Myuran Sukumaran, are currently facing the death penalty in Indonesia;

(b) the right to life is a fundamental human right recognised in:

(i) the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, which celebrates its 60 th anniversary on 10 December 2008;

(ii) the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, to which both Australia and Indonesia are parties, and

  1. Article 28A of the Indonesian Constitution ;
  1. respect for human life and dignity are values common to Australia and Indonesia;
  1. abhorrence of the death penalty is a fundamenta l value in Australian society—Australia is a party to the Second Optional Protocol to the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, which is aimed at the universal abolition of the death penalty;
  2. there is bipartisan support for the universal abolition of the death penalty within the Au stralian Parliament—the Cross-Party Working Group Against the Death Penalty has been re-established during this parliamentary sitting, with Chris Hayes MP and Senator Gary Humphries as co-convenors; and

(f) the Australian Government will in the near futur e co-sponsor a resolution in the United Nations General Assembly seeking a global moratorium on capital punishment, as it has done in previous years;

(2) believes that abolition of the death penalty contributes to the enhancement of human dignity and prog ressive development of human rights;

(3) requests that:

(a) the House incorporate into domestic law the Second Optional Protocol to the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, to prevent any government in Australia in the future from reintroducing the death penalty and to communicate Australia’s position on the death penalty to the world at large;

(b) the Indonesian Government favourably consider the Indonesian Constitutional Court’s recommendation of 30 October 2007 in the majority reasoning at paragraph 3.26, in particular sub-paragraph (b), which says that the death penalty should be able to be imposed with a probation period of ten years, so that, in a case where a prisoner shows good behaviour, it can be amended to a life-long sentence or imprisonment for 20 years; and

(c) in the event that remaining legal processes fail in respect of any persons facing the death penalty in Indonesia, the President of Indonesia extend clemency by commuting their sentences to terms of imprisonment; and

(4) records the importance to Aust ralia of its continuing excellent relationship with our near neighbour, the Republic of Indonesia. ( Notice given 3 December 2008 . Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays after 15 June 2009. )

9   Mr Danby: To move—That the House:

(1) celebrates and commends the achievements of the Turkish Community here in the Commonwealth of Australia that has been created as a result of the Formal Agreement between the Government of the Commonwealth of Australia and the Government of the Republic of Turkey concerning the Residence and Employment of Turkish Citizens in Australia, in the 40 years since its implementation;

(2) notes that:

(a) once enemies on the battlefields of Gallipoli, the Commonwealth of Australia and the Republic of Turkey have established a unique relationship and bond forged in the blood of young men from both nations; and

(b) this uniqueness at the core of deep ro oted relations between two countries gained even more momentum by the unforgettable reconciliatory remarks of the Founder of the Modern Turkish Republic Mustafa Kemal Ataturk to the mothers of fallen Anzacs: ‘…You, the mothers, who sent their sons from far away countries wipe away your tears; your sons are now lying in our bosom and are in peace. After having lost their lives on this land they have become our sons as well.’;

(3) recognises that the Turkish nation is now a friendly power and members of the Turkish community have now integrated into Australian society;

(4) acknowledges the unique relationship that exists between Australia and Turkey; a bond highlighted by both nations’ commitment to the rights and liberties of our citizens and the pursuit of a just world, highlighted by the Statement of Ataturk: ‘Peace at Home, Peace in the World’;

(5) commends the Republic of Turkey’s commitment to democracy, the Rule of Law and secularism; and

(6) on this 40 th anniversary of this agreement, pledges our friendship, commitment and enduring support to the people of Turkey as we celebrate this important occasion together. ( Notice given 4 December 2008. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays after 15 June 2009. )

10   Mr Hayes: To move—That the House:

(1) focuses on the pressing need for organ and tissue donation for transplantation as we approach Australian Organ Donor Awareness Week (AODAW) between 21 and 28 February 2009;

(2) recognises that there are almost 2000 people in Australia on organ transplant waiting lists at any given time;

(3) notes that recent figures available on the international comparison of donor rates indicate that Australia has one of the lowest donation rates, yet surveys indicate that there is widespread support, showing 90 per cent of Australians are in favour of organ donation;

(4) acknowledges and thanks the efforts of the States and Territories across the nation in coordinating activities and sharing best practice to increase donation rates nationally;

(5) congratulates the organisers of AODAW in promoting the registration of consent on the Australian Organ Donor Register;

(6) supports the effor ts of the Prime Minister and the Minister for Health and Ageing to increase the rate of organ donations in Australia; and

(7) encourages members to actively encourage Australians in their electorates to register to become organ donors. ( Notice given 10 February 2009 . Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays after 15 June 2009. )

11   Mrs Mirabella: To move—That the House:

(1) condemns the Government for its failure to publicly release childcare vacancy data in light of the current crisis which has been unfolding in the industry with the collapse of ABC Learning;

(2) notes that childcare operators are required to provide their vacancy data to the Rudd Government on a weekly basis;

(3) acknowledges that the childcare industry cannot possibly undertake long term planning without data that will allow it to determine the location of demand hotspots or areas of chronic undersupply;

(4) calls on the Government to inform the industry what data and information it used to identify the location of the first 38 of its Early Learning and Care Centres and what data and information it intends to use to locate the remaining 222 Early Learning and Care Centres; and

(5) notes that the Government has provided $56 million worth of taxpayers’ funds to maintain ABC Learning childcare centres, 55 of which have been closed, and more which will be forced to close by 31 March, at the same time as it continues to implement its policy of building 260 new Early Learning and Care Centres. ( Notice given 23 February 2009 . Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays after 15 June 2009. )

12   Dr Stone: To move—That the House:

(1) recognises the crisis now facing the dairy industry supplying export markets, as they are forced to take prices close to or below the costs of production; and

(2) calls on the Government to:

(a) provide the immediate assistance needed to ensure these dairy farmers are not forced to sell their herds or their water, destroying the prospects for recovery of this industry when export markets recover; and

(b) remember how swiftly it responded to the crisis in Australia’s automotive and retail sectors, as it considers support of the multi-billion dollar dairy export sector which employs some 30,000 workers. ( Notice given 24 February 2009. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays after 15 June 2009. )

13   Ms Hall: To move—That the House:

(1) recognises the extraordinary deeds of John Simpson Kirkpatrick who demonstrated courage above and beyond the call of duty when he and his donkeys rescued injured soldiers from the battle fields of Gallipoli;

(2) calls for t he Government to award a posthumous Victoria Cross to ‘Simpson’ in accordance with the wishes of his World War I Commanding Officers and the many thousands of Australians both young and old who demand this recognition for his acts of bravery;

(3) believes it is a travesty of justice that he has been denied the award of the Victoria Cross for all these years; and

(4) notes that all Australians would strongly support the posthumous awarding of his honour. ( Notice given 10 March 2009. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays after 15 June 2009. )

14   Ms Hall: To move—That the House:

(1) is made aware that Juvenile Idiopathi c Arthritis (JIA) affects as many as 1 in 250 Australian children, and that its associated eye disease is the leading cause of childhood blindness in Australia today;

(2) recognises the physical, emotional, and financial burden that this chronic disease places upon the family unit; and

(3) calls on the Government to:

(a) establish a National Database for JIA, so that early diagnosis and professional support can be given to these families through the Australian Paediatric Rheumatology Group; and

(b) impl ement specialised clinics with Visiting Medical Officers at major regional hospitals throughout Australia. ( Notice given 10 March 2009. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays after 15 June 2009. )

15   Mr Katter: To move—That, recognising the necessity to preserve manufacturing in Australia to address rising unemployment and the plight of people about to be dismissed at Pacific Brands, the House:

(1) calls on the Government to:

(a) introduce ‘an emergency measure under WTO rules’ to provide an interim 15 per cent tariff on goods that are imported to replace textile clothing and footwear (TCF) items such as those produced at Pacific Brands; and

(b) abandon its intention to abolish the existing TCF tariff regime; and

(2) directs the Government to finance a loan to allow Pacific Brands workers to purchase significant shareholdings in the company through salary-sacrifice arrangements in order to p urchase a share issue made to provide the refinancing funds needed to enable continued manufacturing by Pacific Brands in Australia. ( Notice given 10 March 2009. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays after 15 June 2009. )

16   Mr Katter: To present a bill for an Act to amend the Trade Practices Act 1974 . ( Trade Practices Amendment Bill 2009 ) ( Notice given 10 March 2009. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays after 15 June 2009. )

17   Mr Katter: To present a bill for an Act to amend the Quarantine Proclamation 1998 . ( Quarantine Proclamation Amendment Bill 2009 ) ( Notice given 10 March 2009. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays after 15 June 2009. )

18   Mr Hartsuyker: To move—That the House:

(1) condemns the Government’s decision to allow the importation of bananas from the Philippines in view of the direct threat such imports pose to the disease-free nature of the Australian banana-growing industry; and

(2) expresses concern that:

(a) there is a high prevalence of banana pests and diseases in the Philippines;

(b) the decision has apparently been taken in disregard of previous failings by the Austra lian Quarantine and Inspection Service to secure our borders against damaging infections and diseases; and

(c) the health of the Australian banana-growing industry will now depend on the inspection regime in the Philippines. ( Notice given 10 March 2009. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays after 15 June 2009. )

19   Mr Baldwin: To move—That the House:

(1) notes that:

(a) in February 2009, the Rudd Labor Government awarded a $40 million dollar contract to an American Company for the development of nine Joint Light Tactical Vehicle prototypes; and

(b) the Rudd Labor Government failed to consider an Australian Defence I ndustry Manufacturer as a possible supplier;

(2) condemns the Rudd Labor Government for failing to recognise Australian defence industry’s capability and expertise in delivering Military Vehicles;

(3) acknowledges that the contract for 1300 vehicles will be in excess of $1.3 billion and would support over 250 direct jobs and hundreds more indirect jobs in Australia;

(4) acknowledges the economic and social contribution to the Bendigo community of the successful Bushmaster project; and

(5) calls on the Rudd Labor Government to immediately provide funding to the Bushmaster plan at Bendigo to enable it to progress Australian designed and built prototypes for consideration in the replacement program. ( Notice given 17 March 2009 . Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays after 15 June 2009. )

20   Mr Hayes: To move—That the House:

(1) r ecognises that a major bottleneck in the rail freight network currently exists in the south west of Sydney, where freight trains share existing rail lines with the Sydney metropolitan passenger services operated by Railcorp;

(2) notes that the Australian Rail Track Corporation (ARTC) Ltd has commenced construction of the Southern Sydney Freight Line (SSFL) which will provide a dedicated freight line for a distance of 36 kilometres between Macarthur and Sefton;

(3) acknowledges that the SSFL is an essential piece of infrastructure that will significantly benefit the economy of New South Wales (NSW), in particular Sydney;

(4) supports the concerns of the local residents who reside along the rail corridor between Casula and Liverpool who currently experience excessive rail noise and who are concerned about the noise and the environmental impacts related to the SSFL;

(5) u nderstands that residents along the rail corridor between Casula and Liverpool expect suitable sound abatement measures to be provided to protect their quality of life and wellbeing;

(6) appreciates the current conditions of approval to not allow for the construction of sound barriers by the ARTC as part of the SSFL project along this corridor; and

(7) calls on the NSW Government and the ARTC to examine the mitigation of all excessive rail noise as part of the SSFL project and review the existing conditions of approval that do not allow the construction of sound barriers along the rail corridor between Casula and Liverpool. ( Notice given 18 March 2009. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays after 15 June 2009. )

21   Mr Ripoll: To move—That the House:

(1) notes that:

(a) a comprehensive and accessible rail transport system is an important link in the Australian tr ansport chain that joins communities and strengthens industry; and

(b) the Australian Government has invested an unprecedented $26.4 billion investment in road and rail infrastructure through the Nation Building Program over the six year period from 2008-09 to 2013-14; and

(2) supports:

(a) the Australian Government’s budget announcement of more than $25 billion for key road, rail and port projects;

(b) fiscal strategies and major infrastructure projects that aim to create jobs and boost long term produ ctivity; and

(c) the continued encouragement of private involvement in delivering new infrastructure. ( Notice given 12 May 2009 . Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays after 15 June 2009. )

22   Mr Champion: To move—That the House:

(1) notes with concern that the incidence of problem gambling has increased since the introduction of electronic gaming machines in communi ties around Australia, particularly due to the design and structural features of the electronic gaming machines;

(2) recognises that the current legislation and regulation of electronic gaming machines do not provide adequate protection to consumers;

(3) notes with deep concern that the availability of treatment services for problem gamblers is inadequate;

(4) acknowledges that problem gambling associated with the use of electronic gaming machines causes financial and emotional damage to individual gamblers and their families; and

(5) calls upon State governments and the gambling industry to work together to limit the harm caused to problem gamblers from electronic gaming machines. ( Notice given 14 May 2009. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays after 15 June 2009. )

23   Mr Danby: To move—That the House:

(1) notes that:

(a) 4 June 2009 is the 20 th anniversary of the Tiananmen Square massacre in Beijing, in which an estimated 2,000 to 3,000 peaceful protesters were killed by the Chinese armed forces under the direction of the Chinese Communist Party leaders;

(b) in the 20 years since Tiananmen Square the Chinese Communist Party has continued to deny the Chinese people a voice in their own government, and has continued to repress arbitrarily those calling for greater openness, democracy and freedom in China; and

(c) China continues to deny Chinese workers the right to form free and independent trade unions, resulting in the continuing exploitation of Chinese workers and an unacceptably high rate of workplace deaths and injuries; and

(2) calls on the Chinese Government to cease repression against political and religiou s dissidents and its citizens generally, and to announce a timetable for a transition to democratic government in China. ( Notice given 26 May 2009 . Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays after 15 June 2009. )

24   Mr Danby: To move—That the House:

(1)  notes that 4 June 2009 is the 20 th anniversary of the free elections in Poland, elections which were the beginning of the end of communist party rule not only in Poland but in all the countries of central and eastern Europe, and eventually also in the republics of the Soviet Union;

(2) congratulates the people of Poland for their courageous struggle over more than 40 years to reclaim their independence and to restore democracy and freedom, and on the increasing security, prosperity and freedom which Poland has enjoyed since 1989; and

(3) recalls that it was the Solidarity free trade union which led the successful struggle of the Polish people to achieve independence and democracy in Poland. ( Notice given 26 May 2009 . Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays after 15 June 2009. )

25   Ms Saffin: To move—That the House:

(1) notes:

(a) that 27 May is the 19 th anniversary of the National League for Democracy’s (NLD) overwhelming election victory in Burma’s first democratically held elections in many decades; and

(b) that the NLD is led by General Secretary and Nobel Peace Laureate Daw Aung San Suu Kyi, Burma’s highly regarded and respected political leader, both in her own country and internationally;

(2) condemns the State Peace and Development Council led by General Than Shwe, for not honouring the 1990 election, which violates both domestic and international law and n orms;

(3) notes with deep concern that Daw Aung San Suu Kyi and U Tin Oo were detained, following an assassination attempt on their lives on 30 May 2003, being charged under the Orwellian sounding law, The Law to Safeguard the State Against the Dangers of Those Desiring to Cause Subversive Acts 1975, also called the State Protection Act , and that their sentences have both been increased, extra-legally;

(4) condemns:

(a) General Than Shwe for the above incident and the continued unlawful incarceration, wh ich the United Nations Working Group on Arbitrary Detention has issued Opinions finding in both cases that the deprivation of their liberty is arbitrary, inter alia; and

(b) General Than Shwe’s actions for orchestrating the current trumped up charges, against Daw Aung San Suu Kyi, and her companions Daw Khin Khin Win and Daw Win Ma Ma;

(5) calls upon General Than Shwe to:

(a) immediately and unconditionally release political prisoner Daw Aung San Suu Kyi, her companions Daw Khin Khin Win and Daw Win Ma Ma and her fellow political prisoners, including NLD Executive Members U Tin Oo and U Win Htein, and Shan Nationalities League for Democracy Leader Hkun Htun Oo, and up to the 2,000 others reported, according to Amnesty International; and

(b) do the right thing and enter into talks with all parties so that the national reconciliation that has evaded Burma’s people, including the large population of Ethnic Nationalities, can begin to take place; and

(6) notes:

(a) the statement issued by the Association o f Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) chairman stating inter alia that ‘with the eyes of the international community on Burma at the present, the honour and credibility of the Burmese regime were at stake’, and further expressing grave concern over the treatment of Daw Aung San Suu Kyi, and expressing support for ASEAN nations including Indonesia, Malaysia and The Philippines who have spoken out on this matter;

(b) that the Secretary General said inter alia that he ‘…believes that Daw Aung San Suu Kyi is an essential partner for dialogue in Myanmar’s national reconciliation and calls on the Government not to take any further action that could undermine this important process…’;

(c) the press statement issued on 22 May 2009 by the Security Council with its President for the month of May, Ambassador Vitaly Churkin of Russia, stating: ‘The members of the Security Council express their concern about the political impact of recent developments relating to Daw Aung San Suu Kyi.’ and ‘The members of the Security Council reiterate the need for the Government of Myanmar [Burma] to create the necessary conditions for a genuine dialogue with Daw Aung San Suu Kyi and all concerned parties and ethnic groups in order to achieve an inclusive national reconciliation with the support of the United Nations.’, and which reaffirms the sentiments of two previous statements issued by the Security Council in 2007 and 2008; and

(d) the Australian Government’s condemnation of Daw Aung San Suu Kyi’s detention, and its calls for her immediate release, as well as the Australian Government’s financial sanctions targeting senior members of the regime, their immediate families and asso ciates. ( Notice given 27 May 2009 . Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays after 15 June 2009. )

26   Mr Turnbull: To move—That the House expresses its concern that:

(1) the Government will increase the national public debt by 2013 to an unprecedented $315 billion;

(2) the Government’s interest bill on this debt, as yet undisclosed, will be a continuing burden on Austral ian families for future generations;

(3) despite claims that the Government will pay off its debt by 2022, the Government has refused to provide any modelling to substantiate this claim; and

(4) the high level of Government borrowing will place an ongoing and upward pressure on interest rates for Australian families. ( Notice given 2 June 2009. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays after 15 June 2009. )

27   Mrs Irwin: To move—That the House:

(1) notes:

(a) that despite declarations from both sides of politics that they will not build an airport at Badgerys Creek, the airport designation for the site is still in place;

(b) that residents and landholders in the designated area are unable to develop property unless buildings comply with airport zoning requirements;

(c) the financial hardship and emotional stress endured by residents and landholders affected by the Badgerys Creek airport designation; and

(d) the adverse impact on planning and economic development in Western Sydney caused by the Badgerys Creek airport designation; and

(2) calls on the Government to immediately lift the airport designation on the Badgery s Creek airport site . ( Notice given 3 June 2009. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays after 15 June 2009. )

Orders of the day

1   united nations: Resumption of debate ( from 20 October 2008—Mrs B. K. Bishop , in continuation ) on the motion of Ms Parke—That the House:

( 1)  notes that the 24 October is United Nations Day, celebrating the entry into force of the United Nations Charter on 24 October 1945;

(2) celebrates Australia’s key role in the formation of the United Nations and the drafting of the United Nations Charter;

(3) recognises that Australia has been a consistent and long-term contributor to United Nations’ efforts to safeguard international peace and security and to promote human rights, for example, by being the thirteenth largest contributor to the United Nations’ budget; by contributing to many United Nations’ peacekeeping operations; and by firmly committing to increasing Australia’s development assistance and seeking real progress towards the Millennium Development Goals;

(4) notes further the Australian Government’s commitment to the multilateral system as one of the three fundamental pillars of Australia’s foreign policy; that Australia is determined to work through the United Nations to enhance security and economic well-being worldwide; and to uphold the purposes and principles of the United Nations Charter;

(5) notes that as the only truly global organisation, the United Nations plays a critical role in addressing the global challenges that no country can resolve on its own and that Australia is determined to play its part within the United Nations to help address serious global challenges, including conflict prevention, international development, climate change, terrorism and the threat posed by weapons of mass destruction;

(6) notes also Australia’s commitment to, and support for, reform of the United Nations’ system in order to ensure that the organisation reflects today's world and is able to function efficiently and effectively; and

(7) reaffirms the faith of the Australian people in the purposes and principles of the United Nations Charter. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on 15 June 2009. )

2   climate protection bill 2008 ( Mr Windsor ) : Second reading ( from 10 November 2008 ). ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on the next sitting Monday after 15 June 2009. )

3   housing: Resumption of debate ( from 10 November 2008 ) on the motion of Mrs Moylan—That the House:

(1)  recognises the serious state of housing availability and affordability in the public, not for profit and private sector in many cities and towns in Australia and the hardship it causes those on low and fixed incomes;

(2) notes that:

(a) it is having a serious impact on many in the com munity including those on low and fixed incomes, pensioners, disability pensioners, veterans, young families and students;

(b) the situation has been exacerbated by the dereliction of duty of State governments in failing to maintain adequate stocks of public rental properties, with unacceptably long waiting-lists for public housing;

(c) in Western Australia (WA), for example, it has been reported that there are 16,000 families on the Homeswest waiting list in May 2008 with similar trends in other states;

(d) there has been a contraction of approximately 30,000 public dwellings, which, factoring in population growth over the last decade, amounts to a loss of 100,000 dwellings in the public sector;

(e) this dereliction of duty is increasing the reliance on the private rental market where housing is in short supply, new building approvals are plummeting and rental vacancy rates are at the lowest levels in 20 years;

(f) Commonwealth Rent Assistance (CRA) is not adequately addressing the gap between the high level of rent being paid and what is affordable and that in many areas there are few, if any, housing choices available;

(g) despite the twice yearly adjustment of CRA to the Consumer Price Index of 4.3 per cent, the average rental increase has been 7.1 per cent;

(h) the median weekly rent of three bedroom houses has increased on a nationally weighted average by 46.75 per cent, and in fact, from June 1998 to June 2007 rents have increased by 93.55 per cent in WA and by 105.88 per cent in the Australian Capital Territory (ACT);

(i) rent assistance as a percentage of median weekly rent in WA has dropped from 31.8 per cent in June 2001 to 20.4 per cent in June 2007 and in the ACT from 25.6 per cent in June 1998 to 17.4 per cent in June 2007;

(j) overall, renting has become less affordable nationally even for those in receipt of CRA;

(k) according to national figures from the Australian Government Housing data set in June 2006, over one-third of CRA recipients pay more than 30 per cent of their income on rent, after CRA is factored in; and

(l) public housing approvals have plummeted to 131 new council approvals in March 2008, well short of the Australian Bureau of Statistics’ decade average of 350 new public housing approvals monthly; and

(3) calls on the F ederal Government to:

(a) work with State governments through COAG to urgently address the national shortage of public, not for profit and private housing including delays in local government development approvals;

(b) urgently review the adequacy of CRA paid to those on low and fixed incomes;

(c) investigate making CRA or similar payment available to eligible recipients who are purchasing their own homes and who are experiencing severe mortgage stress, with the aim of keeping people in their own homes and taking some of the pressures off the public and private sector rental market;

(d) consider changing the CRA formula to reflect the lack of choice and the increasing cost of rent beyond inflation, by linking CRA to actual rent using the highest median rent in each area;

(e) target a proportion of assistance for development of housing in high employment growth areas, in recognition that for those looking for work in areas of high labour demand, high rents are acting as a disincentive for some people to escape the poverty cycle; and

(f) pay particular attention to development options for multi-dwelling supported accommodation models to provide for those with disabilities who may formally have been housed in institutions. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on the next sitting Monday after 15 June 2009. )

4   zimbabwe: Resumption of debate ( from 10 November 2008—Mrs Moylan , in continuation ) on the motion of Mr Danby—That the House:

(1) congratulates Mr Morgan Tsvangirai, leader of the Movement for Democratic Change (MDC), on his appointment as Prime Minister of Zimbabwe, which is a just recognition of his long struggle for democracy and reform in Zimbabwe;

(2) acknowledges the courage of the people of Zimbabwe in defying the thuggery and intimidation of the Mugabe regime in voting for a change of regime at the Zimbabwe elections of March 2008;

(3) condemns the Mugabe regime for instituting a reign of violence and intimidation which forced Mr Tsvangirai to withdraw from the second round of the presidential election, despite his clear lead in the first round;

(4) calls on the international community, and particularly Zimbabwe’s African neighbours and its fellow members of the Commonwealth, to maintain pressure on the Mugabe regime to ensure that it carries out the terms of the power-sharing agreement between the regime and the MDC; and

(5) calls on the Australian Government to render every assi stance to Mr Tsvangirai in carrying out the reforms urgently needed to restore democratic elections, good government and economic prosperity to the long-suffering people of Zimbabwe. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on the next sitting Monday after 15 June 2009. )

5   white ribbon day: Resumption of debate ( from 24 November 2008—Dr Stone , in continuation ) on the motion of Mr Georganas—That the House:

(1) 25 November 2008 marks White Ribbon Day in Australia;

(2) in 1999, the United Nations General Assembly declared November 25 the International Day for the Elimination of Violence Against Women and the White Ribb on has become the symbol for the day; and

(3) the White Ribbon Foundation of Australia aims to eliminate violence against women by promoting culture change around the issue. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays after 15 June 2009. )

6   Saving the Goulburn and Murray Rivers Bill 2008 ( Fran Bailey ) : Second reading ( from 1 December 2008 ). ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays after 15 June 2009. )

7   health services in regional, rural and remote areas: Resumption of debate ( from 23 February 2009—Mr Ripoll , in continuation ) on the motion of Ms Ley—That the House:

(1) supports long term viability of regional and rural medical practices, hospitals and serv ices;

(2) notes with concern the failure of State governments to provide adequate health services for Australians living in regional, rural and remote areas, particularly in relation to cross border health;

(3) acknowledges the Royal Flying Doctor Service and the significant contribution it makes by providing aeromedical emergency and primary health care services to people who live, work and travel in regional and remote Australia;

(4) calls on the Australian Government to eliminate inequality in healthcare access and services experienced by those living in rural and remote areas by:

(a) increasing the recruitment and retention of rural medical practitioners and health care professionals;

(b) assisting Australians who live in regional, rural and remote areas with the cost of travel to specialist medical appointments in capital cities and regional centres; and

(c) providing adequate funding to maintain and expand small rural hospitals and health services and their maternity and other procedural services. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays after 15 June 2009. )

8   financial literacy and financial counselling: Resumption of debate ( from 23 February 2009—Mr Hartsuyker , in continuation ) on the motion of Mr Clare—That the House:

(1) recognises the heightened importance of financial literacy and financial counselling given the global economic recession and its impact on the Australian economy;

(2) supports the actions the Government has taken to improve financial litera cy and provide additional financial counselling services for people struggling to make ends meet; and

(3) calls on Australian banks and financial institutions to assist Australian families by providing additional support for financial literacy programs and financial counselling. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays after 15 June 2009. )

9   housing: Resumption of debate ( from 16 March 2009—Mr Robert , in continuation ) on the motion of Mr Clare—That the House:

(1) welcomes the drop in home repossessions and the increase in housing sales in Western Sydney in the last few months;

( 2) recognises the importance of the Rudd Government’s First Home Owner’s Boost and interest rate cuts in improving housing affordability; and

(3) condemns the Coalition for their criticism of this important stimulus to the economy and its opposition to the Nation Building and Jobs Plan. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays after 15 June 2009. )

10   Equal rights and opportunities: Resumption of debate ( from 25 May 2009 ) on the motion of Mr Georgiou—That the House:

(1) reaffirms its commitment to the right of all Australians to enjoy equal rights and opportunities and be treated with equal respect regardless of race, colour, culture, creed or ethnic origin;

(2) reaffirms its commitment to maintaining an immigration policy wholly non-discriminatory on grounds of race, colour, culture, creed or ethnic origin;

(3) reaffirms its commitment to the process of reconciliation between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians, and to closing the gap that lies between us in life expectancy, educational achievement and economic opportunity;

(4) reaffirms its commitment to multiculturalism and to maintaining Australia as a culturally diverse, tolerant and open society, united by an overriding loyalty to our nation, obedience to its laws, and commitment to its democratic beliefs and institutions; and

(5) denounces intolerance in any form on the grounds of race, colour, culture, creed or ethnic origin as incompatible with the kind of society we are and want to be. ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays after 15 June 2009. )

 
 
 

COMMITTEE AND DELEGATION REPORTS AND PRIVATE MEMBERS’ BUSINESS (standing orders 34, 35 and 192): Presentation and consideration of committee and delegation reports and private Members’ business have precedence each Monday from 8.40 to 9.30 p.m. in the House of Representatives Chamber and from 6.55 to 8.30 p.m. in the Main Committee.

The whips are responsible for determining the order of precedence and allotting time for debate on consideration of committee and delegation reports and private Members’ business. Their recommendations for today, adopted by the House, are shown under “Business Accorded Priority” for the House and Main Committee. Any private Members’ business not called on, or consideration of private Members’ business or committee and delegation reports which has been interrupted and not re-accorded priority by the whips on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays, shall be removed from the Notice Paper (standing order 42).