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PRIVATE MEMBERS’ BUSINESS

Notices given for Wednesday, 13 May 2020

      *1    Mr Wilkie : To present a Bill for an Act to amend the Interactive Gambling Act 2001 , and for related purposes. ( Interactive Gambling Amendment (Banning Social Casinos and Other Measures) Bill 2020 )

              ( Notice given 12 May 2020. )

    *2    Mr Gorman : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes that Australia’s arts sector is an essential part of our economy, our community and our identity;

(2)         recognises that the impacts of coronavirus COVID-19 has destroyed the livelihoods of thousands of working artists in a diverse range of arts including, but not limited to performers, writers, designers, illustrators, musicians, fine artists, filmmakers and children’s entertainers;

(3)         further notes that many of the existing support mechanisms, including JobKeeper and JobSeeker, do not recognise the unique needs or economics of the arts sector;

(4)         believes that protecting our arts sector now is vital for Australia to achieve a sustainable economic recovery from COVID-19; and

(5)         calls on the national cabinet to work urgently in collaboration with the arts sector to:

(a)         enact a tailored package of support to the arts sector;

(b)         ensure that working artists are able to access appropriate income support; and

(c)         consider how commonwealth, state, territory and local governments can assist the arts sector for the medium to long term economic impacts of COVID-19.

              ( Notice given 12 May 2020. )

Notices —continued

       1    Ms Claydon : To move—That this House:

(1)         acknowledges that:

(a)         an effective public service relies on skilled public servants who have fair and equitable conditions of employment and job security;

(b)         the Government’s arbitrary average staffing level (ASL) policy is:

(i)           driving privatisation as it forces agencies to outsource their core functions;

(ii)         causing a blowout in spending on contractors, consultants and labour hire; and

(iii)        leading to a hollowing out of the public service; and

(c)         evidence to the Australian Public Service (APS) Review indicates that contractors cost 40 per cent more than permanent APS employees;

(2)         notes that:

(a)         the Australian National Audit Office Information Report No 19 of 2017-18, Australian Government Procurement Contract Reporting , indicates that in 2016-17:

(i)           Government spending on consultants was close to $700 million, up from around $380 million in 2013;

(ii)         ‘the big four’ had 1,617 consultancy contracts worth $502.1 million since 2012-13;

(b)         more than $400 million has been spent on privatising Department of Human Services call centres, including a $135 million contract for Stellar Asia Pacific, $132 million to Concentrix Services, $120 million to Datacom Connect and $36 million to Serco Citizen Services;

(c)         the National Disability Insurance Agency:

(i)           recorded a 600 per cent increase in consultants and contractors over two years—from $70 million in 2016 to $430 million in 2018; and

(ii)         has previously stated its staffing levels would be 10,595 staff in 2018-2019—this is now capped at 3,230 in the 2019-20 budget with core functions such as local area coordinators outsourced; and

(d)         the Government’s billion dollar plan to privatise Australia’s visa system will lead to increased visa costs, data and national security risks and job losses; and

(3)         calls on the Government to:

(a)         abolish the arbitrary and damaging ASL policy;

(b)         ensure that workers doing the same job get the same pay to stop the use of labour hire from undermining the pay and conditions of existing workers; and

(c)         end the secrecy on government spending on contractors, consultants and labour hire firms.

              ( Notice given 15 October 2019. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on 17 August 2020. )

       2    Mr Katter : To move—That this House:

(1)         recognises that the Australian dairy industry is facing decimation as a result of the failure of government deregulation;

(2)         acknowledges that:

(a)         successive governments have contributed to failure in the dairy industry and that the dairy industry will continue its decline if policy is driven by ideology;

(b)         the time is up for our Australian dairy industry with national herds being sold for slaughter, farm foreclosures and employees now trapped in destitution in rural towns;

(c)         in Queensland, the number of dairy farms has dropped from 1,305 in 2000-01 to 393 in 2017-18;

(d)         Australia had 12,896 dairy farms in the year 2000 and as of 2018 there were just 5,699, a reduction of 57 per cent;

(e)         farmers are, in general, not receiving the full 10 cent levy promised by the supermarkets; and

(f)          in 2001-02 our national herd produced 11.3 billion litres of whole milk, and in 2017-18 Australia produced 8.8 billion litres, a 22 per cent reduction of 2.5 billion litres; and

(3)         calls on the Government to:

(a)         reintroduce the minimum price scheme, which delivered orderly marketing and fairness for nearly a century to Australia’s farmers, contractors and employees; or

(b)         secure from supermarket chains a 25 cent price rise (since they are able to set a 10 cent price rise), and oversee the mechanics of ensuring that this 25 cents goes back to the farm gate.

              ( Notice given 15 October 2019. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on 17 August 2020. )

       3    Mr Gorman : To move—That this House:

(1)         recognises:

(a)         that all Australian school students should have the same opportunity of access to the nation’s democratic, cultural and historical institutions; and

(b)         Parliament House and the Australian War Memorial are nationally significant institutions which all Australian school students should visit;

(2)         acknowledges:

(a)         the Parliament and Civics Education Rebate (PACER) program provides inadequate financial support for Australian students to travel to Canberra to engage in civics education in the nation’s capital;

(b)         the rebate provides schools with no more than $340 to cover flights, accommodation and transport per student;

(c)         such a rebate is dramatically insufficient for students travelling extensive distances from regional Australia and from Western Australia, South Australia and the Northern Territory;

(d)         students from Western Australia, South Australia and the Northern Territory are underrepresented in the PACER program; and

(e)         in 2018-19, fewer than four per cent of the students who visited the Federal Parliament were from Western Australia, despite Western Australia representing more than ten per cent of the national student population; and only 0.5 per cent of students visited from the Northern Territory, despite the Northern Territory accounting for one per cent of Australian students;

(3)         notes that:

(a)         more than 1.5 million enrolled electors failed to vote at the federal election on 18 May 2019;

(b)         fewer than 41 per cent of Australian citizens are satisfied with the way democracy works in Australia, according to research from the University of Canberra; and

(c)         it is essential that the Parliament promote democratic values to future generations and engage them in their democracy; and

(4)         calls on the Government to:

(a)         review and increase the Parliament and Civics Education Rebate to cover the total cost of school travel to the capital including Parliament House and the Australian War Memorial;

(b)         ensure equal access for all Australian students to observe Australia’s political system; and

(c)         invest in Australia’s democratic institutions to build trust amongst young Australians.

              ( Notice given 22 October 2019. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays including 17 August 2020. )

       4    Dr Leigh : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         charities are the most trusted sector in Australian public life; and

(b)         the Government’s failure to act on fundraising reform is costing Australian charities over $1 million every month;

(2)         acknowledges that:

(a)         Australia’s current framework of fundraising regulation creates unnecessary problems for charities and organisations who rely on donations from Australian supporters;

(b)         current fundraising laws no longer meet the objectives that guided the decision to regulate donations;

(c)         current fundraising compliance regimes do not allow charities to cultivate donor activity and make optimal use of the resources donors provide;

(d)         meeting the requirements of Australia’s seven different fundraising regimes is causing needless productivity loss for thousands of Australian charities and not-for-profits;

(e)         Australia’s current frameworks for investigation and enforcement have failed to adapt to the contemporary fundraising environment;

(f)          current fundraising laws do not meet the donor-focused expectations and requirements that should govern fundraising regulation in the 21st century; and

(g)         the mechanisms that regulate third party fundraisers should ensure the culture of third party fundraisers matches community perceptions of their clients;

(3)         recognises that:

(a)         for several years, the charity and not-for-profit sector has been calling for reform of Australia’s fundraising laws;

(b)         Treasury’s five year review of the Australian Charities and Not-for-profits Commission, delivered on 31 May 2018, identified fundraising law as the major reporting burden on charities and recommended that fundraising law be harmonised across the country;

(c)         in February 2019, the Senate Select Committee into Charitable Fundraising in the 21st Century called on Parliament to harmonise fundraising law within two years;

(d)         that inquiry, chaired by Labor Senator Catryna Bilyk, delivered a unanimous report, with its recommendations being supported by Greens Senator Rachel Siewert, Liberal Senators Eric Abetz and Amanda Stoker, former Labor Senator David Smith, and former United Australia Party Senator Brian Burston; and

(e)         postponing fundraising reform has had significant costs to the charity and not-for profit sector, with the committee estimating that the annual cost to charities and their donors is around $15 million; and

(4)         calls on the Government to:

(a)         support Australian charities by ending unnecessary waste of their precious resources;

(b)         support the generous Australian donors who donate money to our charities, by ensuring their donations are not needlessly eroded by redundant administrative and regulatory costs;

(c)         work with state and territory governments and the not-for-profit sector to deliver a consistent national model for regulating not-for-profit and charitable fundraising activities before February 2021; and

(d)         immediately provide a public response to the recommendations made in the review panel’s report, Strengthening for Purpose: Australian Charities and Not-for-profits Commission Legislation Review , which was provided to the Government on 31 May 2018.

              ( Notice given 22 October 2019. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays including 17 August 2020. )

       5    Ms Swanson : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes:

(a)         the rampant use of casual labour hire in Australia’s coal mining industry, in some areas up to half the workforce;

(b)         the impact of the increasing use of labour hire by the coal mining industry in driving down wages and conditions;

(c)         that many labour hire mineworkers are employed as casuals for years on end; and

(d)         that labour hire mineworkers employed as casuals are often paid much less than permanent employees for doing the same work;

(2)         condemns the Government for failing to act in support of permanent coal mining industry jobs, and;

(3)         calls on the Government to legislate to ensure that workers employed through a labour hire company will receive the same pay and conditions as people employed directly.

              ( Notice given 25 November 2019. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 17 August 2020. )

       6    Mr O’Connor : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes the tragic and premature death of Mr David Smith, National Secretary of the Australian Services Union on 22 November 2019; and

(2)         extends its sympathies to Mr Smith’s family and friends, and the broader union movement.

              ( Notice given 25 November 2019. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 17 August 2020. )

       7    Dr Freelander : To move—That this House:

(1)         acknowledges the life work of Professor Colin Tatz AO, who sadly passed away on 19 November 2019;

(2)         notes Professor Colin Tatz’s contributions to society in:

(a)         promoting health and welfare in Indigenous communities;

(b)         promoting sporting prowess in Indigenous communities, including through publications such as his book, Obstacle Race: Aborigines in Sport; and

(c)         his activism against racism, specifically through his work as a director of the Australian Institute for Holocaust and Genocide Studies; and

(3)         expresses its sympathy and condolences to the family and loved ones of Professor Tatz, who will be sorely missed.

              ( Notice given 26 November 2019. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 17 August 2020. )

       8    Mr Wilkie : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         the Tasmanian public health system is fundamentally broken;

(b)         Tasmanian hospitals are the worst-performing in the country, despite heroic efforts of staff;

(c)         the Richardson Report (2004), Tasmania’s Health Plan (2007), Report of the Commission on Delivery of Health Services in Tasmania (2013) and the One State, One Health System, Better Outcomes reform package (2015) all found that, compared to the rest of Australia, Tasmania has the most rapidly ageing, geographically-dispersed population with the highest rates of chronic disease, rising costs and the worst performing public health system;

(d)         in April 2019, emergency doctors highlighted that bed-block and ambulance ramping at the Royal Hobart Hospital is injuring and killing patients;

(e)         in 2018-19 more than 1,800 patients waited longer than 24 hours in the emergency department at the Royal Hobart Hospital;

(f)          the 2018 Report on Government Services by the Productivity Commission found that in 2016-17 the percentage of people on waiting lists for elective surgery in Tasmania was 11.12 per cent higher than the national average;

(g)         Tasmania has the lowest percentage of acute mental health beds in the country;

(h)         in 2016 the Tasmanian Government reduced the number of mental health beds from 42 to 32, despite calls from health professionals for an increase;

(i)           on 15 November 2019, 17 people in mental health crises were waiting in the emergency department at the Royal Hobart Hospital, some whom had been waiting more than three days;

(j)          in July 2018 a suicidal man chopped off his own finger so that he would be admitted to the Royal Hobart Hospital because the hospital had refused to admit him as a mental health patient on two previous occasions;

(k)         independent Tasmanian public policy analyst Martyn Goddard estimates that, since the Tasmanian Government came to power in 2014, health and hospitals have been short-changed by approximately $2 billion, including diverting $1.6 billion of GST money from Tasmania’s health system;

(l)           the Tasmanian health system has received more funding from the federal government than the national average, but still underperforms;

(m)       the Australian College for Emergency Medicine has said that throwing more money at hospitals in Tasmania is not necessarily the solution because there are deep systemic cultural and management issues that must be addressed;

(n)         there is precedence for the federal government to intervene in the Tasmanian health system, for instance the take-over and hand-back of the Mersey Hospital; and

(o)         people are dying because of the failings of the Tasmanian public health system;

(2)         calls on the Government to refer Tasmania’s failing health system to the Productivity Commission; and

(3)         calls on the Productivity Commission to:

(a)         conduct a Tasmanian-specific public inquiry to identify the root causes of Tasmania’s failing health system; and

(b)         formulate a solution to fix the systemic and cultural problems within the Tasmanian health system.

              ( Notice given 26 November 2019. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 17 August 2020. )

       9    Mr Giles : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes that the:

(a)         Government has failed refugees and humanitarian entrants in Australia;

(b)         Government for the past six years has failed to provide effective policy in regard to employment and settlement outcomes for refugees and humanitarian entrants;

(c)         Shergold report, Investing in Refugees, Investing in Australia , was finished in February 2019, and the Government refused to release the report for 10 months;

(d)         the Shergold report highlights the concerning failures of important programs such as the Adult Migrant English Program and Jobactive in supporting social and economic participation; and

(e)         the Shergold report highlights the absence of an effective place-based community sponsorship policy which harnesses the collective strength of whole communities partnering with their local governments, service providers and community organisations; and

(2)         recognises the:

(a)         failure of the Government to provide leadership and policy coordination;

(b)         contribution of state, territory and local governments, front-line service providers and community organisations in supporting refugees and humanitarian entrants; and

(c)         significant social and economic contribution made by refugees and humanitarian entrants in Australia.

              ( Notice given 27 November 2019. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 17 August 2020. )

    10    Mr Zappia : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         Australian postage rates for standard letters have near doubled over the past decade;

(b)         Australia Post parcel delivery rates increased in October 2019;

(c)         increased postal rates directly impact on business viability and competitiveness with overseas suppliers;

(d)         higher postal charges are inevitably passed on to Australian households by providers of goods and services; and

(e)         high postal rates have a disproportionate impact on older Australians and migrants because they have a greater reliance on postal services; and

(2)         calls on the Government to consider the whole of society impact when considering future postage rate increases.

              ( Notice given 3 December 2019. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays including 17 August 2020. )

    11    Ms T. M. Butler : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes:

(a)         the devastating effect of drought on water supplies in Australian local communities; and

(b)         that the recent bushfire crisis has compounded water insecurity in affected areas;

(2)         further notes:

(a)         the Eurobodalla Shire Council’s 2016 proposal for a second water storage facility in the southern part of the shire would add 3,000 mega litres of water storage to the region;

(b)         that the project has support from local and state governments, with the NSW state Government committing $26.3 million in October 2019;

(c)         that the Eurobodalla Shire Council has called for a $51 million commitment from the Government to build the dam, noting they will fund the rest of the $105 million project; and

(d)         all supporting parties should ensure the project is environmentally sound;

(3)         notes that:

(a)         Australians and regional communities are rightly sceptical about the Government’s track record on water infrastructure and drought policy;

(b)         in 2013, Prime Minister Abbott said he would build 100 dams across Australia—three terms later and in its seventh year of power, the Government has failed to fulfil its promise;

(c)         Prime Minister Morrison was caught out for being loose with the truth in October 2019 when he claimed his government was contributing more investment in NSW dam infrastructure than they actually were; and

(d)         more than two years after the announcement of the $2 billion National Water Infrastructure Facility, not a single dollar has been spent;

(4)         further notes that the Eurobodalla community has been waiting for a response from the Government since October 2019 in relation to their water storage proposal; and

(5)         calls on the Government to urgently respond to the Eurobodalla Shire Council’s request for funds for the Southern Water Supply Storage project.

              ( Notice given 10 February 2020. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 17 August 2020. )

    12    Mr Zappia : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         South Australia has had the highest unemployment rate in Australia;

(b)         the seasonally adjusted unemployment rate for South Australia in December was 6.4 per cent;

(c)         the South Australian economy has stagnated since the closure of General Motors Holden and the associated auto industries; and

(d)         the recent bushfires and the coronavirus will further impact the South Australian economy; and

(2)         calls on the Government to:

(a)         remain committed to the Murray Darling Basin Plan;

(b)         ensure federal fire assistance funding to South Australia is provided without delay or difficult processes; and

(c)         bring forward federal funding for South Australian infrastructure projects.

              ( Notice given 11 February 2020. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 17 August 2020. )

    13    Mrs Phillips : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes:

(a)         the devastating impact of the bushfires on the Australian community;

(b)         the heartbreaking loss of 33 lives and more than one billion animals;

(c)         the loss of 2,439 homes, 265 facilities and 5,388 outbuildings in NSW; and

(d)         a further 1,024 homes, 197 facilities and 2,017 outbuildings damaged in NSW;

(2)         further notes the ongoing impact of the fires on:

(a)         the small businesses and tourism operators and their employees on the NSW South Coast and other bushfire areas; and

(b)         farmers and primary producers on the NSW South Coast and other bushfire areas that have also been impacted by the ongoing drought;

(3)         acknowledges that immediate action is needed to prevent the closure of hundreds of businesses on the NSW South Coast and other bushfire areas, and the loss of thousands of associated jobs;

(4)         calls on the Prime Minister to urgently visit the NSW South Coast to meet with local small business owners, primary producers and workers; and

(5)         calls on the Government to:

(a)         improve the speed and quality of the Government response to the bushfire crisis;

(b)         address gaps in the available financial assistance for casual workers employed during the tourist season; and

(c)         develop a plan to address the economic impact on businesses that have lost upwards of 80 per cent of their yearly income as a result of the bushfires.

              ( Notice given 11 February 2020. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 17 August 2020. )

    14    Mr Katter : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes with concern that, in 2015, the Northern Territory Government awarded a 99-year lease of the Port of Darwin to Shandong Landbridge Group, a privately-held company with ties to the Chinese Government and Communist Party of China;

(2)         affirms that foreign ownership of the Port of Darwin represents a significant threat to Australia’s strategic interests; and

(3)         calls on the Government to:

(a)         prioritise Australia’s sovereignty and strategic interests;

(b)         take steps to purchase the Port of Darwin; and

(c)         ensure that the Port of Darwin stays in the hands of the Australian Government indefinitely.

              ( Notice given 11 February 2020. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 17 August 2020. )

    15    Mr Shorten : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         on 11 February 2020 the interim report by the Senate Community Affairs References Committee inquiry into Centrelink’s compliance program was tabled in the Senate; and

(b)         the interim report recommended that there be laid on the table by the Minister representing the Minister for Government Services no later than 10 am on 24 February 2020, responses to all questions placed on notice by Senators Siewert and O’Neill relating to legal advice and Centrelink’s compliance program, including, but not limited to, questions about:

(i)           meetings and/or briefings between the Minister and Services Australia in relation to the current legal proceedings regarding Centrelink’s compliance program;

(ii)         the frequency and dates of legal advice obtained by Services Australia from the Solicitor-General, Australian Government Solicitor, departmental lawyers, and external counsel and/or solicitors in relation to any aspect of the compliance program and, specifically, whether a debt or debt components is able to be founded on extrapolations from Australian Taxation Office (ATO) records;

(iii)        legal advice about the lawfulness of debt or debt components solely based on extrapolations from ATO records;

(iv)       legal advice in relation to liability for the death of any Australian who received a debt notice under the compliance program; and

(v)         the cost of legal advice in relation to the compliance program;

(2)         further notes that:

(a)         in relation to Government’s Income Compliance Program, or ‘robodebt’ scheme, the Federal Court made orders, agreed to by both parties, in the matter of Amato v the Commonwealth that the averaging process using ATO income data to calculate Deanna Amato’s robodebt was unlawful;

(b)         the outcome of the Amato case confirms that a compliance debt calculated using only averaging of ATO income data is unlawful;

(c)         the Government conceded its robodebt scheme is unlawful through its action to suspend income averaging as a sole proof point to raise debts in November 2019;

(d)         email correspondence between departmental legal counsel, made public through the Centrelink’s compliance program inquiry, confirms the Government is aware the robodebt scheme has no legal basis; and

(e)         the Government has failed to sufficiently outline grounds for public interest immunity on the basis of legal professional privilege, and should release legal advices obtained by the Commonwealth and related details in connection with the Income Compliance Program; and

(3)         calls on the Government to:

(a)         acknowledge it made a mistake by designing and administering the robodebt scheme over the past three years without valid legal authority;

(b)         apologise to those affected by the unlawful aspects of the program; and

(c)         outline its plan to remediate those affected Australians.

              ( Notice given 12 February 2020. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 17 August 2020. )

    16    Mr Shorten : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         on 3 February 2020 changes to National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) transport funding were welcomed by the disability sector, including people with disability, service providers and carers;

(b)         there was insufficient information available about these changes in the immediate period following the announcement, including details about who was eligible, how providers would be able to process claims, and general implementation; and

(c)         the failure to provide supporting information is consistent with previous announcements made by the National Disability Insurance Agency and the Minister for the National Disability Insurance Scheme; and

(2)         calls on the Government to:

(a)         ensure that further information about these changes is made available as soon as possible; and

(b)         communicate supplementary information about future NDIS changes to providers, participants and disability sector stakeholders immediately following their announcement.

              ( Notice given 12 February 2020. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 17 August 2020. )

    17    Mr Watts : To move—that this House:

(1)         acknowledges the role of Federal Government leadership in ensuring the productivity and liveability of Australian cities; and

(2)         notes:

(a)         the importance of public transport infrastructure in shaping cities and regions;

(b)         the record funding commitments for urban public transport infrastructure made under the previous Federal Labor Government, including $3.2 billion for the Regional Rail Link project and a further $3 billion committed to the Melbourne Metro Rail Tunnel;

(c)         the recent Infrastructure Australia report, Future Cities: Planning For Our Growing Population which highlights the need for Australian governments to increase investment in public transport in areas experiencing rapid population growth, including in Melbourne’s west;

(d)         that if an appropriate route is selected, the construction of an airport rail link to Melbourne Airport through Melbourne’s west has the potential to create social and economic benefits across the region; and

(e)         that further public transport infrastructure projects for fast growing regions like Melbourne’s west will be needed in the near future to meet the challenge of population growth.

              ( Notice given 27 February 2020. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 17 August 2020. )

    18    Mrs McIntosh : To move—That this House:

(1)         recognises the importance of environmental management and conservation in our local communities;

(2)         acknowledges the importance of local environmental volunteer groups who devote their time to look after our natural environment;

(3)         congratulates our local volunteers on their dedication to supporting our local communities and our environment; and

(4)         acknowledges the Government’s continued support of environmental groups through the Communities Environment Program, which provides each of the 151 electorates across Australia with up to $150,000 to fund small, community-led environment projects, totalling $22.65 million.

              ( Notice given 2 March 2020. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 17 August 2020. )

    19    Mr Young : To move—That this House:

(1)         commends the Government’s Pacific Step-up and its focus on building prosperity across the regions, including by encouraging close links between Australian business and investors with the Pacific;

(2)         recognises that the Pacific is part of Australia’s family and that we have a special relationship with our Pacific neighbours; and

(3)         notes that the significant Australian investment in key infrastructure projects, such as the Coral Sea Cable, is providing positive economic and social opportunities to communities in the Pacific.

              ( Notice given 2 March 2020. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 17 August 2020. )

    20    Mr Entsch : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         24 March is World Tuberculosis (TB) Day;

(b)         TB is contagious and airborne and is the world’s leading infectious disease killer and kills more people than HIV/AIDS;

(c)         according to the World Health Organization, in 2018 alone, an estimated 10 million people became ill with TB;

(d)         according to estimates from Australian researchers, there are 1 million people in Australia infected with latent TB (dormant TB) and thus at risk of developing TB disease;

(e)         12 out of the 30 countries with the highest number of TB cases are in the Asia Pacific Region, accounting for more than 62 per cent of the world’s TB burden; and

(f)          Papua-New Guinea has one of the highest rates of TB infection in the Pacific, with an estimated 37,000 total cases including 2,000 drug-resistant cases, in 2018;

(2)         further notes with concern that drug-resistant forms of TB are a major contributor to deaths from antimicrobial resistance globally and anti-microbial resistance is a threat to achieving the health-related Sustainable Development Goals;

(3)         notes that:

(a)         the impact of TB goes beyond death or illness for individuals, and includes effects on economies and communities, health systems, and threats to health security; and

(b)         committed funding for TB diagnosis and care fell short by US $3.3 billion in 2019;

(4)         recognises:

(a)         the Australian Government has contributed $242 million to the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, TB and Malaria for 2020 to 2022;

(b)         the provision of $75 million over five years for Product Development Partnerships in the Indo-Pacific Health Security initiative;

(c)         the provision of $13 million to help support global efforts in eradicating tuberculosis in the Pacific region; and

(d)         Australia and other countries committed at the UN High-Level Meeting on TB in September 2018 to mobilise sufficient and sustainable financing, with the aim of increasing overall global research and development investments to US$2 billion; and

(5)         calls on the Government to:

(a)         develop an action plan to demonstrate progress towards the targets and commitment made at the UN High-Level Meeting on TB; and

(b)         support the international adoption of the target to spend 0.1 per cent of its annual Gross Domestic Expenditure on Research and Development on TB research in order to close the global TB research and development funding gap.

              ( Notice given 2 March 2020. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 17 August 2020. )

    21    Mr Ramsey : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes that there are:

(a)         1.3 million Australians with diabetes registered on the National Diabetes Services Scheme, with over 280 new people diagnosed and registered each day and an estimated 500,000 Australians with type 2 diabetes which remain undiagnosed; and

(b)         an estimated 2 million Australians with pre-diabetes and at high risk of developing type 2 diabetes in the next 5-10 years;

(2)         acknowledges:

(a)         diabetes is a complex metabolic disorder, which if not diagnosed early and treated well may lead to serious health complications such as blindness, limb amputation, heart disease and stroke, and kidney disease; and

(b)         the Government’s long standing commitment to improving the treatment and care of people with diabetes through establishing the Australian National Diabetes Strategy, the roll out of continuous glucose monitors and flash monitors to children, young adults, health care card holders and women with type 1 diabetes who are pregnant, while noting the need for all type 1 diabetics to have affordable access to this important technology, as well as the recently launched Diabetes in Schools program, the KeepSight program, and programs to prevent diabetes related amputations;

(3)         congratulates Australian of the Year 2020, Dr James Muecke AM for his work as an ophthalmologist working in many poor and developing nations, and for raising public awareness of the need to prevent type 2 diabetes through encouraging healthier lifestyles and healthier environments; and

(4)         calls on all state and federal governments to re-commit to a refreshed Australian National Diabetes Strategy and to fund and develop a national diabetes prevention program.

              ( Notice given 2 March 2020. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 17 August 2020. )

    22    Mrs McIntosh : To move—That this House:

(1)         acknowledges that this year marks the 80th anniversary of the establishment of formal diplomatic relations between the Commonwealth of Australia and the United States of America;

(2)         recognises the diplomatic relationship is the foundation of the broader strategic, defence and economic partnerships between Australia and the United States;

(3)         acknowledges:

(a)         the significance of the recent state dinner between President Trump and Prime Minister Morrison on 20 September 2019; and

(b)         the appointment of United States Ambassador to Australia, Mr Arthur Culvahouse Jnr, on 19 February 2019;

(4)         encourages that the anniversary be a reaffirmation of our shared commitment to promote and uphold democratic values, freedoms and the rule of law at home and abroad;

(5)         further acknowledges that a strong, bilateral relationship is vital for our continued shared economic prosperity and national security, as Australia and the United States:

(a)         face increasingly complex and frequent threats that aim to undermine the integrity of democratic institutions and national sovereignty; and

(b)         share the benefits of a robust trade and investment relationship valued at US $1.1 trillion that creates and sustains jobs; and

(6)         commemorates the bravery, service and sacrifice of United States firefighters Captain Ian H McBeth, First Officer Paul Clyde Hudson, and Flight Engineer Rick A DeMorgan Jr who tragically lost their lives while fighting bushfires in the Snowy Monaro area, New South Wales, on 23 January 2020.

              ( Notice given 2 March 2020. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 17 August 2020. )

    23    Mrs Archer : To move—That this House:

(1)         acknowledges that Headspace was established by the Howard Government in 2006;

(2)         notes that:

(a)         there are currently 113 headspace services operating nationally, including 54 services located in rural and regional Australia; and

(b)         in 2018-19, the Government provided $95.7 million to commission Headspace services in rural areas;

(3)         further acknowledges that in the 2019-20 Budget, the Youth Mental Health and Suicide Prevention Plan was outlined with funding of $509 million; and

(4)         congratulates the Government for announcing a further $64 million to provide suicide prevention and mental health initiatives.

              ( Notice given 2 March 2020. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 17 August 2020. )

      24    Mr Perrett : To present a Bill for an Act to amend the Family Law Act 1975 , and for related purposes. ( Family Law Amendment (A Step Towards a Safer Family Law System) Bill 2020 )

              ( Notice given 2 March 2020. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 17 August 2020. )

    25    Dr Webster : To move—That this House:

(1)         recognises the importance of the Country Women’s Association (CWA) in the lives of rural and regional towns across Australia;

(2)         notes that the mission statement of the CWA is ‘to advance the rights and equity of women, families and communities in Australia through advocacy and empowerment, especially for those living in regional, rural and remote Australia’;

(3)         acknowledges the:

(a)         CWA has over 44,000 members in 1855 branches across Australia; and

(b)         vision of the founder of the CWA, Ruth Fairfax OBE; and

(4)         congratulates the CWA on almost a centenary of service to rural and regional Australia.

              ( Notice given 2 March 2020. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 17 August 2020. )

    26    Mr Conaghan : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes the heartfelt and touching support from across the Pacific including in fundraising, in assisting Australia during the recent bushfire season;

(2)         particularly acknowledges and thanks Papua New Guinea and Fiji for the military support provided, and notes the warm welcome they received from Australians as they assisted in the bushfire relief efforts; and

(3)         extends its warmest thanks to all of our Pacific family for the support and prayers offered to Australia.

              ( Notice given 2 March 2020. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 17 August 2020. )

    27    Mr Ramsey : To move—That this House:

(1)         recognises the long-term business investment General Motors has made in Australia over 72 years and the impact its decision to withdraw from the Australian market will have on more than 200 Holden dealerships across Australia;

(2)         asks that as General Motors terminates Holden sales in Australia that it demonstrates the respect the Holden brand deserves;

(3)         acknowledges General Motors has been the beneficiary of more than $2 billion of Australian taxpayers subsidies;

(4)         recognises the potential job impact on Holden dealerships who employ around 9,000 people, including sales people, service technicians, finance and insurance professionals and back office functions and calls on General Motors to ensure that adequate compensation is offered to Holden dealers around the country who have invested significant capital in showroom facilities, service and repair equipment, stock and parts and ensure also that dealerships have assistance for redundancy payments;

(5)         notes that when General Motors ceased vehicle and engine production in Australia in 2017, the company committed to retaining 1000 direct staff plus 6000 people across the 200 strong national dealer network; and

(6)         further recognises there are 1.6 million Holdens currently on Australia’s roads and customers deserve to have confidence they will have ongoing support from General Motors in servicing and spare parts for the future.

              ( Notice given 2 March 2020. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 17 August 2020. )

      28    Ms Steggall : To present a Bill for an Act to establish a national climate change adaptation and mitigation framework, and to establish the Climate Change Commission, and for related purposes. ( Climate Change (National Framework for Adaptation and Mitigation) Bill 2020 )

              ( Notice given 3 March 2020. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 17 August 2020. )

      29    Ms Steggall : To present a Bill for an Act to create duties to consider climate change impacts and to deal with consequential and transitional matters arising from the enactment of the Climate Change (National Framework for Adaptation and Mitigation) Act 2020 , and for related purposes. ( Climate Change (National Framework for Adaptation and Mitigation) (Consequential and Transitional Provisions) Bill 2020 )

              ( Notice given 3 March 2020. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 17 August 2020. )

    30    Mr Connelly : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes the Census and Statistics Amendment (Statistical Information) Regulations 2020 tabled in Parliament on 11 February 2020 seek to ask a question in the 2021 census about whether someone has served in the Australian Defence Force (ADF); and

(2)         recognises that having a census question around the ADF service will:

(a)         for the first time, give a complete picture of the number of veterans in Australia; and

(b)         allow governments of all levels to deliver the right services in the right areas to support veterans and their families.

              ( Notice given 3 March 2020. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 17 August 2020. )

    31    Mr Christensen : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes:

(a)         Mr Julian Assange is a citizen of Australia and not the United States of America or the United Kingdom;

(b)         foreign courts should not be determining whether or not Australian citizens should be extradited to other countries;

(c)         Mr Assange was not resident in the United States when he allegedly committed the crimes of which he has been accused;

(d)         foreign nations should not be seeking to extradite an Australian citizen to face charges for alleged crimes when that Australian is not a citizen or a resident of that foreign nation, nor have they committed any alleged crimes while physically in that foreign nation and, more so, when the alleged crimes are intrinsically linked to journalistic endeavours;

(e)         the conditions in which Mr Assange is currently being held are not appropriate for someone who has not been accused or convicted of a violent crime and are impeding his ability to adequately prepare his defence;

(f)          Mr Assange should not be held in prison in the United Kingdom as he has served his time for a bail violation (based on allegations which have since been dropped) and, more so, he has not been charged with any current crime committed within the United Kingdom;

(g)         according to both medical practitioners and the United Nations Special Rapporteur on Torture, Mr Assange has exhibited signs of being the victim of psychological torture as per the internationally-recognised Istanbul Protocol, and as such should not be held in conditions that exacerbate his impaired psychological state;

(h)         Mr Assange has been subjected to protracted and perhaps illegal surveillance, including privileged communications with his lawyers, and as such, his due process rights have been violated; and

(i)           the judicial authority overseeing the extradition matter has a conflict of interest, placing Mr Assange’s due process rights in jeopardy; and

(2)         calls upon:

(a)         the United States to drop its charges against Mr Assange;

(b)         the United Kingdom to terminate its extradition hearings against Mr Assange and release him from prison;

(c)         the Australian Government to urgently engage in diplomatic efforts to have the United States drop its charges against Mr Assange and have the United Kingdom terminate its extradition hearings against Mr Assange and release Mr Assange from prison.

              ( Notice given 3 March 2020. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 17 August 2020. )

    32    Ms Flint : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes that cultural and creative activity plays an important role in:

(a)         the lives of 98 per cent of Australians, who engage with the arts by making art, viewing, attending or going online to experience arts and culture;

(b)         Australia’s international tourism industry, with 43 per cent of all international tourists engaging with the arts while in Australia, who are travelling further, staying longer and spending more than other tourists;

(c)         Australia’s domestic tourism industry, with Australians taking 12.3 million arts day trips and 13.4 million arts overnight trips within Australia that include arts activities—this travel will play a role in helping communities rebuild and recover from disasters by supporting local jobs and economies; and

(d)         Australia’s economy, contributing more than $112 billion to our economy this year, or over 6 per cent of our gross domestic product, and this has increased by 30 per cent since 2008-09; and

(2)         further notes that the Government is providing a record amount of funding to the arts, of around $750 million.

              ( Notice given 3 March 2020. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 17 August 2020. )

    33    Mr Alexander : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes that between 1 and 2 per cent of the Australian population suffers from heart failure, with this proportion higher in Indigenous communities;

(2)         acknowledges with concern the rising cost of care for the growing number of Australians with heart failure, including the duration and frequency of hospitalisation, medical management and health complications;

(3)         further notes that research from the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare states that over 60,000 heart failure hospital admissions, amounting to over 400,000 bed days and a cost to the healthcare system of $3.9 billion are potentially preventable;

(4)         welcomes the arrival of proven technologies, including trans catheter mitral valve repair, which have demonstrated transformative improvements in addressing underlying causes of heart failure including functional and degenerative mitral regurgitation;

(5)         commends the support given by clinicians, advocates, carers and families of Australians suffering from heart failure;

(6)         welcomes with appreciation the announcement of the Government’s commitment of $220 million over 10 years for the Cardiovascular Mission under the Medical Research Fund;

(7)         acknowledges the Government’s commitment to address all forms of heart disease under the National Action Plan for Heart and Stroke;

(8)         notes the current consideration by the Medical Services Advisory Committee of transcatheter mitral valve repair; and

(9)         calls on the Government to ensure all Australians have early access to proven procedures and technologies, such as transcatheter mitral valve repair, where indicated, to address the rising healthcare burden and premature mortality represented by heart failure.

              ( Notice given 3 March 2020. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 17 August 2020. )

    34    Mr Thompson : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes:

(a)         the work the Government is doing to address the issue of veteran suicide with the announcement of an independent National Commissioner for Defence and Veteran Suicide;

(b)         that a new independent National Commissioner will be appointed to identify and investigate suicide amongst Australian Defence Force and veteran population; and

(c)         that a new Veteran Family Advocate will be appointed to lead engagement, liaison and advocacy amongst families and will be at the heart of policy and decision making with the Department of Veterans’ Affairs; and

(2)         recognises mental health and suicide are complex issues, but issues that are everyone’s business—families, friends, employers, community organisations, governments and the ex-service community.

              ( Notice given 3 March 2020. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 17 August 2020. )

      35    Mr Bandt : To present a Bill for an Act to establish Renew Australia and restrict activities in relation to thermal coal, and for related purposes. ( Green New Deal (Quit Coal and Renew Australia) Bill 2020 )

              ( Notice given 3 March 2020. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 17 August 2020. )

    36    Mr Gorman : To move—That this House:

(1)         recognises that Australia’s tourism sector is vital to a strong, growing economy;

(2)         notes:

(a)         that 2020 has seen an incredibly tough start to the year for tourism operators with devastating bushfires, an inevitable Coronavirus pandemic and a sluggish domestic economy; 

(b)         Australia is a tourism dependent economy with the Australian Bureau of Statistics noting a $60 billion contribution to gross domestic product; and

(c)         666,000 people worked in tourism in Australia in 2018-19;

(3)         encourages Australians to support our local tourism operators and where possible holiday here, at home, in the best country in the world;

(4)         commits Members of this House to work with members of the tourism industry and local operators and encourage the development of new tourism businesses and assets; and

(5)         agrees that Australia is the best country in the world and a must visit country for any international tourist.

              ( Notice given 3 March 2020. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 17 August 2020. )

    37    Mr Pearce : To move—That this House:

(1)         recognises the importance of working with our Pacific neighbours to deliver a region that is secure and sovereign; and

(2)         notes:

(a)         the Government’s Pacific Maritime Security Program is providing the region with a modem and coordinated security capability; and

(b)         the Government is delivering important infrastructure projects that will enhance their security capability—this includes:

(i)           Fiji’s Blackrock Peacekeeping and Humanitarian Assistance and Disaster Relief Camp;

(ii)         gifting of Guardian Class Patrol Boats; and

(iii)        the joint initiative with Papua New Guinea and the Lombrum Naval Base.

              ( Notice given 3 March 2020. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 17 August 2020. )

    38    Mr Zappia : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         between 2013 and 2019 apprenticeship numbers fell by almost 140,000 from 412,787 to 276,248;

(b)         in 2018-19, Australia recruited around 110,000 skilled permanent migrants and 41,220 temporary skilled visa migrants to fill skills shortages;

(c)         around 730,000 people are unemployed and 1.2 million people are underemployed;

(d)         government funding cuts to skills and apprenticeship training are preventing Australians from pursuing skills and trade occupations;

(e)         the failure to invest in skills training will impact on future national capability; and

(f)          claims are being made that there is a shortage of skilled workers for the submarine replacement program; and

(2)         calls on the Government to invest in Australian skills training and reverse the loss of Australian trade and skills training opportunities.

              ( Notice given 3 March 2020. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 17 August 2020. )

    39    Mr Wilkie : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         the trial and extradition of Mr Julian Assange are inconsistent with international law, and Australian legal standards, and contravene the individual rights and protections for which these laws and standards provide;

(b)         the United Nations Special Rapporteur on Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment has found that Mr Assange ‘showed all symptoms typical for prolonged exposure to psychological torture, including extreme stress, chronic anxiety and intense psychological trauma’;

(c)         several medical reports find that Mr Assange is in ill-health due to prolonged arbitrary confinement, and indeed the United Nations Working Group on Arbitrary Detention ruled that the 50-week sentence of Mr Assange for bail violation, which formally ended on 21 September 2019, was punitive and disproportionate given the nature of the offence and usual sentences;

(d)         Mr Assange is facing extradition for an alleged political offence, which is expressly prohibited by Article 4(1) of the Anglo-US Extradition Treaty and an abuse of power; and

(e)         Mr Assange is an Australian citizen and, if convicted in the US, faces 175 years in prison, which would be in effect a death sentence;

(2)         acknowledges that Mr Assange is a publisher and journalist, as recognised by his 2011 Walkley award and 17 other awards for excellence in journalism and promoting human rights, and that his charges:

(a)         are a direct assault on press freedom; and

(b)         threaten the protection of others who publish classified information in the public interest; and

(3)         calls for Mr Assange to be allowed to return to Australia.

              ( Notice given 3 March 2020. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 17 August 2020. )

    40    Dr Haines : To move—That this House:

(1)         congratulates the Government on its 2018 commitment and 2019 election promise to introduce a Federal Integrity Commission;

(2)         notes with dismay that the Government has missed its own deadline for releasing legislation to establish such a commission;

(3)         recognises that establishing a robust Federal Integrity Commission is essential to arresting the declining public trust in institutions and restoring Australians’ faith in the democratic system;

(4)         recognises that in 1853, a group of miners gathered in Beechworth to protest against corruption in the colonial government, and to launch Australia’s first petition calling for the right for people of all races to vote;

(5)         celebrates Australia’s long history of democratic reform of which the 1853 Beechworth protest forms a part, and invokes this same tradition to call for a Federal Integrity Commission;

(6)         affirms that in order to fulfil its purpose, a Federal Integrity Commission must have:

(a)         broad jurisdiction to ensure that everyone involved in Federal public service is subject to independent scrutiny and that federal public servants, politicians, their staff and any private entity carrying out public functions is obliged to report corruption and wrongdoing and be protected when they do;

(b)         common rules to ensure that all persons are held to a single, high standard of behaviour and to ensure that the commission is able to investigate any behaviour, whether criminal or not, which does or could adversely affect public confidence in the honest, open and fair exercise of public power;

(c)         appropriate powers for the commission to be able to properly do its job, including the ability to receive referrals from the public, government agencies and whistle-blowers, carry out corruption-prevention activity and coordinate with state and other bodies, protecting individuals from arbitrary use of coercive powers, initiate its own investigations, use search and surveillance powers, subpoena documents, compel witnesses, investigate past misconduct, make recommendations, and refer criminal conduct for prosecution;

(d)         fair hearings such that investigations are conducted openly when in the public interest and subject to ensuring natural justice for those under investigation and due process of law, and ensuring that the commission can publicly report its findings of fact and recommendations when in the public interest; and

(e)         accountability to the people so that the commission remains accountable to public, not political interests including by ensuring that the Commissioner be independent officer of the Parliament appointed only on recommendation of a cross-parliamentary standing committee of Members and Senators; and

(7)         calls on the Government to introduce a Federal Integrity Commission consistent with these Beechworth principles.

              ( Notice given 3 March 2020. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 17 August 2020. )

    41    Ms Stanley : To move—That this House:

(1)         acknowledges:

(a)         the importance of South-Western Sydney to the Australian economy;

(b)         the importance of the Western Sydney International Airport and aerotropolis to the region and to Australia; and

(c)         the critical nature of appropriate planning, budgeting and forecasting of the supporting infrastructure, including adequate transportation, for the operation of Western Sydney International Airport; and

(2)         notes the:

(a)         consistent budgetary and completion time blow-outs of the NSW State Government in delivering infrastructure projects;

(b)         significant investment in the Western Sydney International Airport precinct;

(c)         revelation that there will be no public transport rail service to Western Sydney International Airport when it commences operation; and

(d)         significant impact the failure to deliver this vital public transport rail service will have on congestion of surrounding roads; and

(3)         calls on the Commonwealth and NSW State Governments to have completed, before the operation of Western Sydney International Airport commences:

(a)         a south-west rail line extension from Leppington through to Western Sydney International Airport;

(b)         a north-south rail link from Western Sydney Airport to Macarthur;

(c)         a rapid transit link along 15th Avenue from the Liverpool CBD to Western Sydney International Airport; and

(d)         the construction of a fuel pipeline to the airport.

              ( Notice given 4 March 2020. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 17 August 2020. )

    42    Ms Thwaites : To move—That this House notes that:

(1)         the closure of the AAP newswire means the loss of an independent and trusted news source and further consolidation of the Australian media landscape; and

(2)         the Government’s failure to support independent news and public interest journalism has serious consequences for Australia’s democracy.

              ( Notice given 5 March 2020. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays including 17 August 2020. )

Orders of the day

         1    Coal Prohibition (Quit Coal) Bill 2019 ( Mr Bandt ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  14 October 2019 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on 17 August 2020. )

         2    Crimes Legislation Amendment (Age of Criminal Responsibility) Bill 2019 ( Ms Sharkie ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  14 October 2019 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on 17 August 2020. )

         3    Visa processing system: Resumption of debate ( from  14 October 2019 ) on the motion of Mr Giles —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         the Government plans to privatise Australia’s visa processing system;

(b)         under the Government’s plan, a private tenderer will be given licence to run Australia’s visa processing system as a for-profit business; and

(c)         the Government will decide the winning tenderer in October 2019;

(2)         acknowledges that:

(a)         visa and citizenship processing times have blown out under this Government;

(b)         more than 230,000 people are on bridging visas;

(c)         more than 220,000 people are on waiting lists for their citizenship; and

(d)         the Government has failed to preserve and enhance the integrity of Australia’s visa processing system; and

(3)         calls on the Government to stop its privatisation of Australia’s visa processing system.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on 17 August 2020. )

         4    Refugee Protection Bill 2019 ( Mr Wilkie ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  21 October 2019 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays including 17 August 2020. )

         5    Commonwealth Electoral Amendment (Lowering Voting Age and Increasing Voter Participation) Bill 2019 ( Mr Bandt ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  21 October 2019 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays including 17 August 2020. )

         6    Climate change: Resumption of debate ( from  21 October 2019 ) on the motion of Mr M. C. Butler —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         climate change is a significant threat to our economy, natural environment, farming communities and national security;

(b)         Australia’s annual emissions have been rising in recent years;

(c)         as a global problem, the solution to climate change requires concerted international cooperation to limit the production of greenhouse gases;

(d)         as the only global agreement designed to address climate change, the Paris Accords must play a central role in addressing climate change;

(e)         the Paris Accords require signatory countries to deliver actions consistent with keeping the global temperature rise this century to well below 2 degrees Celsius above preindustrial levels and to pursue efforts to limit the temperature increase to 1.5 degrees Celsius;

(f)          based on the latest scientific advice, the world is currently on track for warming of above 3 degrees, and efforts to cut greenhouse gas emissions need to be strengthened to avoid catastrophic climate change impacts; and

(g)         as a result of the threat posed by climate change, the United Kingdom, Canada, France, Portugal, Argentina and the Republic of Ireland have declared a climate emergency; and

(2)         therefore, affirms that:

(a)         Australia remains committed to delivering on its obligations under the Paris Accords;

(b)         failing to meet the goals of the Paris Accords would have unprecedented and devastating environmental, economic, societal and health impacts for Australia; and

(c)         the threat posed by climate change on the future prosperity and security of Australia and the globe constitutes a climate change emergency.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays including 17 August 2020. )

         7    Education funding: Resumption of debate ( from  21 October 2019 ) on the motion of Ms Hammond —That this House:

(1)         recognises that after more than twelve years at school, year 12 students will soon complete their final examinations and transition to the next phase of their lives—this may include pursuing higher education, engaging with vocational education and training (VET) or entering the workforce;

(2)         acknowledges the valuable contribution hard working teachers have made in our communities in educating, nurturing, encouraging and motivating our 2019 school leavers;

(3)         notes the Government’s record investment in education funding including:

(a)         a record $21.3 billion for state schools, catholic schools and independent schools for the 2020 school year, an increase in funding of $8.5 billion since 2013;

(b)         a record $8.6 billion for child care and $17.7 billion for the university sector in the 2019-20 budget;

(c)         $30.2 million in 2019-20 to establish the Local School Community Fund to support priority projects in local schools that benefit students and their communities;

(d)         $71.6 million to improve outcomes for very remote students by encouraging teachers to teach and stay longer in their schools through remitting the HELP debt; and

(e)         a commitment to support the VET sector through a $525.3 million Skills Package; and

(4)         congratulates the Government on its continued commitment and investment in education from early learning through to higher education and VET to ensure our young people have the opportunity to succeed, gain employment and live their best lives.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays including 17 August 2020. )

         8    Private Health Insurance Legislation Amendment (Fairer Rules for General Treatments) Bill 2019 ( Mr Wilkie ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  25 November 2019 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 17 August 2020. )

         9    Public housing: Resumption of debate ( from  25 November 2019 ) on the motion of Mr Burns —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         access to adequate housing is a fundamental right under Article 11 of the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights which Australia has ratified;

(b)         adequate housing requires safe, secure and affordable accommodation be accessible to all;

(c)         116,427 Australians were homeless on the last census night;

(d)         homelessness affects Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders disproportionately;

(e)         homelessness includes those in crisis accommodation, improvised dwellings, temporary accommodation, boarding houses and other insecure forms of housing;

(f)          inadequate provision of public housing is a major cause of homelessness;

(g)         public housing is a central tenant of an equitable Australia where a fair go requires access to secure accommodation;

(h)         public housing is a determinative factor in education, employment, and health outcomes; and

(i)           public housing is a means of social mobility and opportunity; and

(2)         calls on the Government to help build more affordable homes and ensure every Australian has their own safe place to live.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 17 August 2020. )

      10    Geneva Conventions of 1949: Resumption of debate ( from  25 November 2019 ) on the motion of Mr Falinski —That this House:

(1)         recognises that 12 August 2019 marked the 70th anniversary of the opening for signature of the four Geneva Conventions in 1949;

(2)         notes that the Geneva Conventions of 1949, the foundation of modern international humanitarian law, remain as fundamental and relevant to armed conflict today as when they were opened for signature 70 years ago;

(3)         acknowledges that the Geneva Conventions, while universally accepted, are not being uniformly respected in times of war, underscoring the need for ongoing advocacy;

(4)         recalls that the Conventions and their Additional Protocols protect those who are not fighting, such as civilians, medical personnel, chaplains and humanitarians as well as non-military places such as hospitals;

(5)         honours the continuing role of Australian Red Cross in:

(a)         disseminating international humanitarian law;

(b)         assisting successive Australian Governments to ensure respect for and disseminate international humanitarian law; and

(c)         educating the general public about the correct use of the red cross emblem;

(6)         pays respect to the continuing global leadership role of the International Committee of the Red Cross in assisting the victims of armed conflict and working for the greater understanding and advancement of international humanitarian law;

(7)         determines that Australia should remain, now as always, a global leader in advocacy for, and implementation of, the four Geneva Conventions of 1949 and all that they stand for; and

(8)         resolves that this resolution has effect and continues in force unless and until amended or rescinded by the houses in this or a subsequent parliament.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 17 August 2020. )

      11    Australian Banks (Government Audit) Bill 2019 ( Mr Katter ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  2 December 2019 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays including 17 August 2020. )

      12    Live Animal Export Prohibition (Ending Cruelty) Bill 2019 ( Mr Wilkie ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  2 December 2019 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays including 17 August 2020. )

      13    Climate Change Authority Amendment (Impact of 3 Degrees of Global Warming on Australia) Bill 2019 ( Mr Bandt ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  2 December 2019 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays including 17 August 2020. )

      14    Commonwealth Electoral Amendment (Lowering the Donation Disclosure Threshold) Bill 2019 ( Ms Sharkie ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  2 December 2019 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays including 17 August 2020. On 5 February 2020, the Selection Committee made a determination that this bill be referred to the Joint Standing Committee on Electoral Matters. )

      15    People with disability: Resumption of debate ( from  2 December 2019 ) on the motion of Ms Stanley —That this House:

(1)         acknowledges:

(a)         3 December 2019 is International Day of People with Disability; and

(b)         the Human Rights Commission estimates the number of Australians with a disability to be around four million;

(2)         respects the rights of all:

(a)         people with disability in Australia, including having access to services and freedom from discrimination;

(b)         persons with a disability to be welcomed as equal and positive contributors to Australian society; and

(c)         people with disability to have choice and control in relation to any support services they receive; and

(3)         encourages all:

(a)         persons with disability as their own self-advocates;

(b)         groups and individuals that advocate on behalf of people with disabilities; and

(c)         Australians to respect the basic rights of all persons with disabilities.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays including 17 August 2020. )

      16    The Honourable Dr Brendan Nelson AO: Resumption of debate ( from  2 December 2019 ) on the motion of Ms Flint —That this House:

(1)         notes:

(a)         the importance of the Australian War Memorial to our nation in commemorating, acknowledging and recording the service of our defence force personnel; and

(b)         that after seven years of service to the Australian War Memorial, the Hon Dr Brendan Nelson AO is retiring as its director;

(2)         acknowledges the outstanding leadership Dr Nelson has provided at the Australian War Memorial, including:

(a)         introducing the daily Last Post ceremony;

(b)         leading the Memorial through the:

(i)           Centenary of ANZAC and World War I commemorations; and

(ii)         50th Anniversary of the Vietnam War commemorations;

(c)         renovating the First World War galleries;

(d)         recognising the need to incorporate the service of our 100,000 younger veterans and therefore introducing the Afghanistan exhibition;

(e)         advocating for and securing, with Australian War Memorial Chairman Mr Kerry Stokes AC, a $500 million investment to expand the memorial to enable the stories of younger veterans to be told; and

(f)          strengthening the relationship the Australian people have with the memorial and the men and women who have served our nation; and

(3)         congratulates and sincerely thanks Dr Nelson for his service to the Australian War Memorial and the nation.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays including 17 August 2020. )

      17    Australian Capital Territory (Self-Government) Amendment (ACT Integrity Commission Powers) Bill 2020 ( Dr Leigh ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  24 February 2020 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 17 August 2020. )

      18    National Greenhouse and Energy Reporting Amendment (Transparency in Carbon Emissions Accounting) Bill 2020 ( Mr Wilkie ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  24 February 2020 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 17 August 2020. On 27 February 2020, the Selection Committee made a determination that this bill be referred to the Standing Committee on the Environment and Energy. )

      19    Liability for Climate Change Damage (Make the Polluters Pay) Bill 2020 ( Mr Bandt ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  24 February 2020 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 17 August 2020. )

      20    Representation Amendment (6 Regions Per State, 2 Senators Per Region) Bill 2020 ( Mr Joyce ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  24 February 2020 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 17 August 2020. )

      21    Foreign Acquisitions and Takeovers Amendment (Strategic Assets) Bill 2020 ( Mr Katter ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  24 February 2020 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 17 August 2020. )

      22    Economy: Resumption of debate ( from  24 February 2020 ) on the motion of Dr Mulino —That this House notes the Government’s economic mismanagement and its sustained failure to deliver improved economic outcomes for Australians during its seven year term in office, measured by:

(1)         wage stagnation;

(2)         near record levels of underemployment;

(3)         high and rising rates of labour underutilisation, particularly for young people and in regional areas;

(4)         high levels of youth unemployment;

(5)         Australia’s higher unemployment relative to peer nations;

(6)         weak consumption growth;

(7)         weak business investment; and

(8)         weak and declining productivity growth.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 17 August 2020. )

      23    Roads to Recovery Program: Resumption of debate ( from  24 February 2020 —Dr Haines, in continuation ) on the motion of Mr R. J. Wilson —That this House:

(1)         notes:

(a)         that from 2013-14 to 2023-24, the Government will provide a record $6.2 billion under the Roads to Recovery Program, with an ongoing commitment of $500 million each year following; and

(b)         the significant benefits to the 128 Local Government Areas which will receive an additional $138.9 million in Roads to Recovery drought support funding; and

(2)         recognises the real and meaningful difference Roads to Recovery is making to communities right across the country.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 17 August 2020. )

      24    Climate Emergency Declaration Bill 2020 ( Mr Bandt ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  2 March 2020 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 17 August 2020. )

      25    Gender equality: Resumption of debate ( from  2 March 2020 ) on the motion of Ms Claydon —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         International Women’s Day will be held on Sunday, 8 March 2020; and

(b)         the theme for 2020 is ‘Each for Equality’, which calls on all of us to ‘Celebrate women’s achievement. Raise awareness against bias. Take action for equality’;

(2)         recognises that entrenched gender inequities remain, including:

(a)         high rates of family and domestic violence, sexual violence and harassment;

(b)         the under-representation of women in leadership roles; and

(c)         pay inequity and the undervaluation of work in traditionally female industries; and

(3)         calls on the Government to:

(a)         make gender equality a central priority;

(b)         commit to urgent action to improve Australian women’s:

(i)           safety and physical security;

(ii)         economic security and retirement incomes;

(iii)        health and reproductive rights; and

(iv)       representation in Australian parliaments; and

(c)         reinstate the Women’s Budget Statement.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 17 August 2020. )

      26    Boxer Combat Reconnaissance Vehicles Project: Resumption of debate ( from  2 March 2020 ) on the motion of Mr Pearce —That this House:

(1)         notes that new Defence projects such as the Boxer Combat Reconnaissance Vehicles built under the $5 billion LAND 400 Phase 2 Mounted Combat Reconnaissance Capability program support the development of defence industry and small business in electorates across Australia;

(2)         supports job creation in construction and sustainment;

(3)         recognises this project presents an exciting opportunity for Australian industry to play a vital role in delivering leading-edge capability and technology to Australia’s army; and

(4)         acknowledges the Government’s significant $200 billion investment in Australia’s defence capability.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 17 August 2020. )

      27    Jewish Australian Internet Radio: Resumption of debate ( from  2 March 2020 ) on the motion of Mr T. R. Wilson —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         the Jewish Australian Internet Radio (J-AIR) is an outstanding broadcasting service that brings together Jewish culture, news, analysis, music, comedy, personalities and performers for audiences in Melbourne and through the internet;

(b)         since 2014, the volunteers at J-AIR have worked tirelessly to give Jewish people a voice and provide awareness of the ongoing safety and security challenges faced by Melbourne’s Jewish community;

(c)         as demonstrated by the 2019 Executive Council of Australian Jewry report, the character of anti-Semitism has worsened in Australia and services like J-AIR play a crucial security role;

(d)         J-AIR has begun working closely with the Community Security Group (CSG) to combat the rise of anti-Semitism and ensure the safety and security of the Jewish community in Victoria; and

(e)         the absence of a community broadcasting licence limits the capacity of J-AIR to fulfil these critical functions; and

(2)         calls on the Australian Communications and Media Authority to consider the new relationship with the CSG and allocate J-AIR a community broadcasting licence in the Melbourne Radio Licence Area.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 17 August 2020. )

 

 

 

COMMITTEE AND DELEGATION BUSINESS has precedence each Monday in the House of Representatives Chamber from 10.10 am to 12 noon; and in the Federation Chamber from 11 am to 1.30 pm and 4.45 pm to 7.30 pm (standing orders 34, 35 and 192).

PRIVATE MEMBERS’ BUSINESS has precedence from the conclusion of consideration of committee and delegation business each Monday (standing orders 34, 35 and 192).

The SELECTION COMMITTEE is responsible for arranging the timetable and order of committee and delegation business and private Members’ business for each sitting Monday. Any private Members’ business not called on, or consideration of private Members’ business or committee and delegation business which has been interrupted and not re-accorded priority on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays, shall be removed from the Notice Paper (standing order 42).