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NOTICES

Notices of motion withdrawn:

The Chair of the Standing Committee on Regulations and Ordinances

(Senator Colston), pursuant to notice of intention given on 31 August

1995, withdrew Business of the Senate notices of motion nos 2, 3, 4, 6,

8 and 9 standing in his name for 2 sitting days after today for the

disallowanceof the following instruments:

Applied Laws (Implementation) (Amendment) Ordinance 1995, Territory of

Christmas Island Ordinance No. 1 of 1995 made under the Christmas

Island Act 1958.

Applied Laws (Implementation) (Amendment) Ordinance 1995, Territory of

Cocos (Keeling) Islands Ordinance No. 1 of 1995 made under the Cocos

(Keeling) Islands Act 1955.

Determination No. 2 of 1995, made under section 356 of the Student and

Youth Assistance Act 1973.

Instrument No. 126 of 1995, made under subsection 196B(2) of the

Veterans' Entitlements Act 1986.

Civil Aviation Orders, Part 105 AD/B747/147, made under the Civil

Aviation Act 1988.

Determination No. T7 of 1995, made under section 15 of the Higher

Education Funding Act 1988.

The Chair of the Standing Committee on Regulations and Ordinances

(Senator Colston), pursuant to notice of intention given on 31 August

1995, withdrew Business of the Senate notices of motion nos 3, 6, and 7

standing in his name for 4 sitting days after today for the disallowance

of the following instruments:

Civil Aviation Orders, Part 105 AD/B747/148, made under the Civil

Aviation Act 1988.

Sales Tax Assessment Regulations (Amendment), as contained in

Statutory Rules 1995 No. 86 and made under the Sales Tax Assessment

Act 1992.

Sales Tax Procedure (Old Law) Regulations (Amendment), as contained in

Statutory Rules 1995 No. 87 and made under the Sales Tax Procedure Act

1934.

Notices of motion:

Senator Bell: To move on the next day of sitting--That the Senate--

(a) notes that the Body Shop shops from around Australia have

published, collected and delivered half a million postcards with

the following message in English with a French translation:

Dear M. Le President,

I wish to protest most strongly at your decision to resume

nuclear testing in the South Pacific.

I urge you to reconsider; and

(b) congratulates the staff and customers of the Body Shop shops for

their efforts in representing to the President of the Republic

of France the concerns of such a large number of Australian

citizens.

Document: Senator Bell, by leave, tabled the following document:

Nuclear testing--South Pacific--Postcard to M. Jacques Chirac,

President of France, distributed by the Body Shop and Greenpeace.

Senator Baume: To move on the next day of sitting--That the Senate--

(a) notes that the Minister for Immigration and Ethnic Affairs

(Senator Bolkus) has claimed, from the depths of his literary

knowledge, that the "Demidenko affair' had damaged the

reputation of the judges, described by him as "old fogies', who

awarded her the Miles Franklin literary award, particularly

Professor Dame Leonie Kramer, and that they should be

embarrassed because they represent an attitude that is not the

dominant one in Australian society;

(b) supports the principle that questions of literary merit in

Australia are not determined on the basis of Government policy

or political correctness or, even more dangerously, a so-called

"dominant attitude' as determined by the Minister; and

(c) calls on the Government either to support the Minister by

appointing him, as a self-appointed expert on literary merit, to

control all literary awards to ensure political correctness in

all such awards as Director of Incompetent Literary Legislation,

DILL for short, or else to dissociate itself from the Minister's

offensive anti-intellectual and authoritarian remarks.

Senator Jones, at the request of Senator Christopher Evans: To move on

the next day of sitting--That the time for the presentation of the

reports of the Select Committee on Superannuation on the adequacy of

current retirement incomes policy arrangements, particularly for women,

and on the operation of the Superannuation Complaints Tribunal be

extended to the last sitting day in 1995.

Senator Short: To move on the next day of sitting--That the Senate--

(a) expresses its concern that the June 1995 quarter national

accounts have shown a marked slowdown in the Australian economy,

to only 3.7 per cent annual growth;

(b) notes:

(i) that this has occurred during a period when

unemployment was still an average 8.4 per cent, with

755 000 out of work, a record $180 billion of foreign

debt, a current account deficit running at more than 6

per cent of gross domestic product and headline

inflation at 4.5 per cent and rising,

(ii) the Prime Minister (Mr Keating) said of the economic

growth rate that it could not have been any better,

(iii) that the Prime Minister appears to have a very short

memory, given that in March 1992 he said the economy

should be able to grow at 4 per cent a year at least,

and that anyone who could not achieve this ought to

give the game away,

(iv) that the Government's green paper on employment in

December 1993 concluded that for Australia to reduce

its unemployment rate to 5 per cent by the year 2000,

the economy would need to grow at an average annual

rate of between 4.5 and 5 per cent,

(v) that the Government's Working Nation statement in May

1994 said that Australia should be able to again

achieve an average annual rate of growth of around 4.5

per cent, and

(vi) that in March 1995 the Prime Minister argued that

growth of 4 to 4.5 per cent was necessary to keep

unemployment coming down;

(c) condemns the Prime Minister and his Government for failing to

match their rhetoric with performance; and

(d) urges the Prime Minister for once to heed his own words, and

give it away.

Senator Spindler: To move on the next day of sitting--That the Senate--

(a) notes:

(i) the likelihood that France will persist with its

program of nuclear testing in the South Pacific despite

the well-documented and world-wide opposition to these

tests,

(ii) reports that one of the reasons France puts forward for

choosing Mururoa Atoll for these tests is that, at

worst, 200 000 (largely indigenous) people would be at

risk, compared with millions of French people if the

tests were held in France,

(iii) the connections between the location of the nuclear

test and the lack of independence of the Tahitian

people, who are being kept politically and economically

dependent on France to ensure that they cannot prevent

these tests, and

(iv) the parallel between the location of the French tests

and that of the Chinese nuclear tests carried out in an

area inhabited mainly by ethnic minorities in China;

and

(b) requests that the Australian Government:

(i) step up its action against the French nuclear tests,

including the provision of economic development

assistance to the people of Tahiti to improve the

prospects of economic self-reliance and ultimately

political self-determination, and

(ii) also initiate strong protests against China's nuclear

tests which pose just as reprehensible a threat to the

Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty, to the security of the

region and to indigenous communities.

Senator Margetts: To move on the next day of sitting--That the Senate,

in recognition of the total failure of the military junta of Burma to

recognise the right of law, or the democratic processes of the nation,

and in recognition that this military junta has suspended the democratic

Government, and refuses to recognise the results of the election it

organised in 1990, calls on the Government to--

(a) impose trade sanctions on Burma;

(b) promote and support more general international sanctions against

Burma;

(c) oppose any Burmese participation in international trade

organisations, including the Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation

forum;

(d) refuse to purchase any product of a company that invests in,

operates in, or provides goods or services to Burma;

(e) investigate options to further restrict or penalise any

Australian company investing in, operating in, or providing

goods or services to Burma; and

(f) investigate options to dissuade Australians from visits to Burma

for the purpose of tourism.

Senator Coulter: To move on the next day of sitting--That the Senate--

(a) notes:

(i) the statement by the French President (M. Chirac) that

Australia was hypocritical and should not sell uranium

to France if it opposes the French nuclear tests as

Australia's uranium goes into French nuclear weapons,

(ii) that, in 1989, the Australian Democrats showed that

Australian uranium had been swapped with highly

enriched uranium destined for the nuclear weapons

program through the simple measure of label swapping,

(iii) that Australia took no action under the Nuclear

Non-Proliferation Treaty following this disclosure, and

(iv) that President Chirac is not ignorant and was telling

the truth when he said that Australian uranium had been

used in French bombs; and

(b) calls on the Government and the Opposition to look at the

objective evidence and to ban further exports of uranium to

France.

Senator Ian Macdonald: To move on the next day of sitting--That the

Senate--

(a) notes reports in the Australian Financial Review on 18 September

1995:

(i) that the Federal Government's native title processes

are in tatters, creating immense frustration and

uncertainty amongst mining, agricultural and Aboriginal

groups, and

(ii) that recent research by the South Australian Department

of Mines and Energy estimates that mineral exploration

activity has slumped by 20 per cent in 1995 because of

uncertainties over Mabo;

(b) notes that frustration and uncertainty resulting from the

unworkable native title legislation and processes are most

prominent in regional, rural and remote areas of Australia, and

are impeding the progressive economic and social development of

these areas; and

(c) calls on the Federal Government to take immediate action to

minimise adverse effects on Aborigines and on regional Australia

from inefficiencies, complexities and inadequacies in the native

title legislation and processes.

Senator Chamarette: To move on the next day of sitting--That the

Senate--

(a) communicates its dismay that the State Law and Order Restoration

Council (SLORC), on the seventh anniversary of the absolute

takeover of Burma in 1988:

(i) has not relinquished power,

(ii) has not restored government to the people,

(iii) has yet to recognise the election of 1990,

(iv) continues to hold many people prisoner, including

former ministers of Government and representatives

elected in the 1990 election,

(v) continues its abuses of ethnic and religious

minorities,

(vi) continues to forcibly dispossess people from their

homes and land, and

(vii) continues to use forced labour under barbaric

conditions;

(b) calls on SLORC to immediately release all political prisoners,

recognise the democratic election of 1990 and work honestly to

restore democracy at the earliest possible date; and

(c) expresses support for the All-Burma Student Democratic

Organisation which demonstrated outside Parliament House on 18

September 1995, and all other Burmese refugees who mourned the

demise of democracy in Burma.

The Chair of the Standing Committee of Privileges (Senator Teague): To

move on the next day of sitting--That the Senate authorise the release

of the following original documents from its custody to that of the

Solicitor for the Northern Territory:

Original documents, formerly in the custody of the Royal Darwin

Hospital and the Solicitor for the Northern Territory, provided by the

Solicitor for the Northern Territory to the Committee of Privileges in

response to its requests during hearings in Darwin on 28 and 29

October 1994, in connection with the reference by the Senate on 18

November 1993 on which the Committee of Privileges reported on 30 June

1995, the findings of which were endorsed by the Senate on 24 August

1995.

Senator Teague, by leave, made a statement relating to the notice of

motion.

Senator Coulter: To move on the next day of sitting--That the Senate--

(a) notes that:

(i) scientific evidence of damage to the earth's ozone

layer emerged in 1972-74,

(ii) this evidence clearly linked the use of

chlorine-containing compounds, especially CFCs, to this

ozone damage,

(iii) industry, especially those industries making and using

CFCs, rejected the scientific evidence and resisted the

application of controls until the evidence became

overwhelming,

(iv) governments, including the Australian Government, sided

with industry against the scientific evidence,

(v) as a consequence, the world will suffer ozone depletion

for much longer than would have been the case if

governments had taken the advice of science much

earlier, and

(vi) this pattern of rejection of well-founded scientific

advice by both industry and government is being

followed with respect to the increase in carbon dioxide

levels and the consequent effects of greenhouse

warming; and

(b) can confidently predict that the damaging greenhouse effects

will be felt for far longer than would have been the case if

governments, including the Australian Federal Government, were

to take strong action immediately to reduce the emission of

greenhouse gases from Australia.

Senator Chamarette: To move on the next day of sitting--That the

Senate--

(a) notes:

(i) the current discrimination against overseas-trained

doctors, recently highlighted by a Human Rights and

Equal Opportunity Commission ruling that the quota

system for these doctors violates the Racial

Discrimination Act, and

(ii) that, under a proposal passed by the Health Minister's

conference in April 1995, 150 of the 200 person quota

would be filled from New Zealand, leaving 50 places for

the 400 to 600 Australian doctors who have been trained

overseas and are eligible to sit the final examination

for registration; and

(b) calls on the Federal Government, in conjunction with the States

and Territories, to eliminate the quota system and

discriminatory immigration policies and put in place a

non-discriminatory process for the registration of all doctors

in Australia.