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NOTICES

Notices of motion withdrawn:

Senator Lees, pursuant to notice of intention given on 28 June 1995,

withdrew Business of the Senate notice of motion no. 4 standing in her

name for this day, for the disallowance of the Nursing Homes Financial

Arrangements Principles (Amendment No. 2 of 1995), made on 24 May 1995

under subsection 40AA(7) of the National Health Act 1953.

Senator Panizza, at the request of Senator Patterson and pursuant to

notice of intention given on 28 June 1995, withdrew Business of the

Senate notice of motion no. 5 standing in the name of Senator Patterson

for this day, for the disallowance of the Nursing Homes Financial

Arrangements Principles (Amendment No. 1 of 1995) and the Nursing Homes

Financial Arrangements Principles (Amendment No. 2 of 1995), each made

on 24 May 1995 under subsection 40AA(7) of the National Health Act 1953.

Notices of motion:

Senator Campbell: To move on the next day of sitting--That the Senate--

(a) congratulates the Australian under-21 netball team for its

exciting victory over the New Zealand team in the first test in

Canberra on 28 June 1995;

(b) wishes the Australian team good luck for the tests to be held in

Melbourne and Ballarat; and

(c) notes the support of the Australian Sports Commission programs

for netball.

Senator Reid: To move on the next day of sitting--That the Senate--

(a) notes that the United Nations 4th Conference on Women is to be

held in Beijing in September 1995;

(b) supports the right of all women, including Tibetan women, to

take part in the Non-Government Organisation (NGO) conference to

be held at the same time;

(c) is concerned:

(i) at the reports that the NGO forum is to be held at a

considerable distance from the World Conference at a

site that cannot accommodate the approximately 20 000

participants expected at the forum,

(ii) at reports that telecommunication, hotel,

interpretation and transport facilities are inadequate

for a conference of this kind and scale, and

(iii) at reports of strict customs procedures and controls

with regard to the importation of written and

audiovisual materials by participants of both

conferences; and

(d) calls on the Minister for Foreign Affairs (Senator Gareth Evans)

to continue:

(i) to make representations to the Chinese Government and

to the conference secretariat to allow women from Tibet

who are accredited to NGOs to attend the conference,

and

(ii) to urge the Chinese Government to ensure that adequate

arrangements are put in place to enable the NGO

conference to proceed with adequate facilities and

democratic procedures.

Senator Spindler: To move 3 sitting days after today--That the following

matters be referred to the Economics References Committee for inquiry

and report on or before 30 October 1995--

(1) The extent to which "outworking' or other subcontracting methods

are used in the Australian garment industry.

(2) The extent to which garment industry practices or contract

provisions related to delivery times, quality standards,

piecework rates and related matters, impose working conditions

on outworkers and their families which do not meet standards of

fairness and equity which the community expects to prevail in

the labour market, with particular reference to:

(a) the adequacy of piecework rates of pay and, in

particular, whether these rates adequately cover:

(i) minimum award rates of pay, and

(ii) holiday and other allowances;

(b) the delivery times required for particular orders;

(c) the effect on the work-safety and the well-being

generally of outworkers and their families;

(d) the proportion of labour costs contained in the firms'

finished articles at wholesale and retail level,

compared with on-site manufacturing costs; and

(e) the extent to which the current system promotes the

employment of children under 15, the conditions under

which they are employed, and the effect on their school

attendance and general well-being.

Senator Margetts: To move on the next day of sitting--That the following

matters be referred to the Legal and Constitutional References Committee

for inquiry and report on or before 28 October 1995:

(a) whether the highest standard of conduct was maintained by the

Department of Defence in its dealings with Trisal Engineering

Pty Ltd; and

(b) whether the Commonwealth acted with the highest standard of

conduct during its defence in Ryker (Faulkner) v the

Commonwealth and Flint (9527/1982) and in particular:

(i) the reason for the delays imposed by the Commonwealth

which meant that 13 years elapsed before the case came

to trial,

(ii) the reasons for the severe limitations which were

imposed on the management of Mrs Faulkner's case,

(iii) whether attempts were made to influence evidence in the

trial, and

(iv) whether other actions or circumstances conspired to

pervert the course of justice.

Senator Reid: To move on the next day of sitting--That the Senate--

(a) notes:

(i) that the United Nations (UN) Secretariat is alleged to

have prohibited any reference to His Holiness the Dalai

Lama in a book to be published to mark the 50th

anniversary of the UN, and

(ii) the statement alleged to have been censored from the

book was a statement made by the Dalai Lama in support

of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights at the

1993 World Conference on Human Rights in Vienna,

namely, "It is in the inherent nature of human beings

to yearn for freedom, equality and dignity and they

have an equal right to achieve that ... Brute force, no

matter how strongly applied, can never subdue the basic

desire for freedom and dignity'; and

(b) calls on the Minister for Foreign Affairs (Senator Gareth

Evans), if it is the case that such censoring has occurred, to

use his influence to urge the UN not to mar the 50th anniversary

of the UN by such censorship.

Senator Tierney: To move on the next day of sitting--That the Senate--

(a) reminds all Australians that they will pay more for almost every

item in every store from 1 July 1995 as the Keating Government's

across-the-board sales tax increases take effect;

(b) condemns the Australian Labor Party (ALP) Government for its

1993 Budget decision to raise sales taxes automatically and by

stealth on 1 July each year;

(c) notes that from 1 July 1995 most consumable items including many

items of food will cost more, with Labor's sales tax rising from

11 per cent to 12 per cent;

(d) registers its disgust at the hypocrisy of the ALP Government

which promised in 1993 not to increase indirect tax when the

Keating Government's receipts from wholesale sales taxes have

increased by more than 50 per cent since 1993;

(e) condemns the ALP Government for increasing sales tax on

necessities without making special compensation payments to

pensioners and low-income earners who are forced to absorb these

Labor taxes; and

(f) calls on the ALP Government to admit that food prices paid by

shoppers will also increase because of other tax increases that

take effect from 1 July 1995, including the 3 per cent rise in

company tax and higher business charges imposed by Labor.

Senator Forshaw: To move on the next day of sitting--That the Senate--

(a) notes that:

(i) the National Institute of Dramatic Art (NIDA) has an

outstanding record in developing the creative talents

of young Australians in the theatre, film and

television, and

(ii) NIDA, through its National Touring Program, offers many

people throughout Australia the opportunity to

undertake short courses in artistic pursuits; and

(b) congratulates NIDA on its successful open day on 24 June 1995

which enabled the public to share in its activities and

recognise its outstanding contribution to the development of

Australia as a creative nation.

Senator Chamarette: To move on the next day of sitting--That the

Senate--

(a) notes that:

(i) the Internet is an increasingly important resource in

the current information technology era which

facilitates access to a vast array of information and

provides a means of virtually instant communication

across nations and continents, and

(ii) to effectively represent their constituents, Members of

Parliament should be able to utilise the Internet as a

vehicle for constituents to obtain information about

parliamentary activities and to convey their views and

concerns to parliamentarians; and

(b) resolves that:

(i) the parliamentary departments provide, on request from

Senators and Members, access to the Internet,

introductory training and support facilities in

Parliament House suites from 3 October 1995, and

(ii) the Department of Administrative Services be asked to

set a time frame for the provision of Internet access

in electorate offices or the ability to connect

electorate offices to commercial Internet servers.

Senator Spindler: To move on the next day of sitting--That the Senate

notes--

(a) the release on 30 June 1995 of the book Piecing it together:

Hearing the Stories of AIDEX 1991;

(b) that this book arose out of the hearings held under the auspices

of the New South Wales Ecumenical Council and was prepared by

Friends of the Hearings; and

(c) that the book will be released on 30 June 1995 at 10 a.m. in the

reception room at the Australian Capital Territory

LegislativeAssembly in Canberra.

Senator Campbell: To move on the next day of sitting--That the Senate--

(a) notes the announcement by New Zealand Post that it will reduce

the cost of postage for a standard letter for the first time in

the history of postal services in the world;

(b) commends:

(i) the postal service in New Zealand for passing on the

benefits of competition to consumers, and

(ii) Australian State and Federal Government initiatives to

increase competition for the private delivery of public

services; and

(c) calls on the Federal Government to increase competition in the

delivery of public services and ensure that all Federal

Government-owned business enterprises receive no hidden

subsidies, that all subsidies are transparent and that they are

in all respects competitively neutral in relation to private

sector competitors.

Senator Baume: To move on the next day of sitting--That the Senate--

(a) notes that:

(i) 1 July 1995 is Keating Sales Tax Day, or "KST' Day,

(ii) on 1 July 1995, the KST (the Government's hidden

version of a goods and services tax) rises to its

highest level ever in Australia's history,

(iii) in the two and a quarter years since the Prime Minister

(Mr Keating) won the 1993 election by promising not to

bring in any consumption taxes, because they are

"unfair', he has increased Labor's own consumption tax,

the KST, by a huge $5 000 million, or more than 50 per

cent,

(iv) at the last election, Australians were paying $9 000

million a year in the hidden KST that most consumers do

not even realise they are paying, but from 1 July 1995,

they are being "ripped-off' by $14 000 million a year,

even after the Coalition blocked the new KST on

building materials of $200 million,

(v) when Mr Keating first became Treasurer during 1982-83,

sales tax totalled only one quarter of this, at $3 500

million,

(vi) from 1 July 1995, the KST will equal about $825 a year

for every man, woman and child in Australia, so that Mr

Keating's secret KST will be taking the equivalent of

an average $65 a week from a four-person family,

compared with only $16 a week when he became Treasurer,

and

(vii) this makes Mr Keating's the highest sales taxing

Government ever, lifting the KST as a percentage of

gross domestic product by almost 50 per cent to a

record 2.9 per cent; and

(b) calls on the Keating Government to apologise to the Australian

people for its deception in pretending to oppose a consumption

tax that is now by far the fasting growing of all its taxes.

Senator Baume: To move on the next day of sitting--That the Senate--

(a) notes that:

(i) on Keating Sales Tax Day, or "KST' Day, 1 July 1995,

the Keating Sales Tax, the Government's version of a

consumption tax, will rise by a further 1 per cent on

the following products: foods like biscuits, snack

foods, ice cream, cordials, confectionary, juices, beer

and other alcohol; appliances like refrigerators,

washing machines, televisions, videos, radios and

compact discs; tableware like crockery, glasses and

cutlery; furnishings like curtains, furniture and floor

coverings; bathroom items like soaps and detergents,

toothpaste, toilet paper, cosmetics and hygiene

products; equipment like some building materials, hand

tools, paper products, pens, pencils and ropes;

personal items like wallets, watches, jewellery,

cameras, sporting goods, suitcases and musical

instruments; transport items like cars, tyres,

batteries, boats, caravans and cycles, and a whole

range of miscellaneous items extending from canvas

goods to processed pet food, and

(ii) these higher consumption taxes will "rip-off' the

equivalent of $65 per week from a four-person family;

and

(b) calls on the Keating Government to admit that it won the 1993

election by falsely opposing consumption tax, but then

increasing its own consumption tax, the KST, by 50 per cent to

its highest-ever level on record.

Senator Baume: To move on the next day of sitting--That the Senate--

(a) notes that:

(i) an expert study of the Keating Sales Tax, or "KST',

shows that it costs small businesses an extra 25 per

cent of the sales tax they have to pay just to comply

with it,

(ii) this is because the KST is very complicated and, after

1 July 1995, will rise by a further 1 per cent so that

on some items it will be 12 per cent, on others 17 per

cent, 22 per cent, 26 per cent, 32 per cent or even 45

per cent, and

(iii) small business people have to work out which is the

right rate and if they get it wrong they get fined by

the Australian Taxation Office; and

(b) condemns the Keating Government for its excessive reliance on

this unfair, discriminatory consumption tax which adversely

affects small business.