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NOTICES

Notices of motion withdrawn:

The Chair of the Standing Committee on Regulations and Ordinances

(Senator Colston), pursuant to notice of intention given on 19 June

1995, withdrew Business of the Senate notices of motion nos 1 and 2

standing in his name for 5 sitting days after today for the disallowance

of the following instruments:

Northern Prawn Fishery Management Plan 1995 NPF01, made under section

17 of the Fisheries Management Act 1991.

Southern Bluefin Tuna Fishery Management Plan 1995 SBT01, made under

section 17 of the Fisheries Management Act 1991.

Notices of motion:

The Leader of the Australian Democrats (Senator Kernot): To move on the

next day of sitting--That the Senate calls on the Government to ban the

mining and export of all uranium from Australia to set an example to

other countries and to demonstrate that Australia is serious about

peace, nuclear disarmament and the protection of the environment.

Senator Knowles: To move on the next day of sitting--That the Senate

urges the Minister for Foreign Affairs (Mr Gareth Evans) to order a

review of the current passport system with a view to checking all

passport applications, thereby closing loopholes which presently allow

false identities to be assumed for the purpose of criminals fraudulently

obtaining new Australian passports.

Senator Margetts: To move on the next day of sitting--That the Senate--

(a) notes that:

(i) the United States (US) is now discussing the

possibility of resuming underground nuclear testing in

the near future, and

(ii) the US is also proposing that the Comprehensive Test

Ban Treaty (CTBT), which is due to be finalised early

in 1996, contains specific provisions to permit nuclear

weapons States to conduct ongoing tests of their

nuclear weapons arsenals; and

(b) calls on the Australian Government to:

(i) abandon its support of the nuclear weapons States,

which was so evident at the recent Nuclear

Non-Proliferation Review and Extension Conference, and

(ii) take a leading role in promoting the urgent

finalisation of a CTBT which does not contain any

provisions permitting ongoing testing by nuclear

weapons States.

The Chair of the Foreign Affairs, Defence and Trade References Committee

(Senator Woods): To move on the next day of sitting--That the time for

the presentation of the report of the Foreign Affairs, Defence and Trade

References Committee on Australia's relations with the People's Republic

of China and the report on matters relating to the crash of the Nomad

aircraft A18-401 and the death of RAAF Flight Lieutenant Glen Donovan be

extended to 28 September 1995.

Senator Denman: To move on the next day of sitting--That the Senate--

(a) notes:

(i) the recent statement by the Premier of Tasmania (Mr

Groom) on the republic issue, and

(ii) Mr Groom's recognition that the change to a republic is

inevitable for Australia; and

(b) congratulates Mr Groom on taking a stance similar to that

announced by the Prime Minister (Mr Keating).

Senator Brownhill: To move on the next day of sitting--That the Senate--

(a) condemns the New South Wales and the Federal Labor Governments

for their divisive and inflammatory actions in relation to their

treatment of the forest industry;

(b) notes:

(i) the critical impact these decisions will have on small

towns and communities throughout New South Wales

including Coolah, for which the creation of the Coolah

Tops National Park will effectivelymean the demise of

the only manufacturing industry in drought-affected

Coolah, and on a forestry company that provides jobs

for 26 people and their families and one with a million

dollar investment in its mill and logging plant, and

(ii) that a similar situation is developing in the

south-east of New South Wales, with towns and villages

closing, families stressed and distressed and

unemployment growing as a result of the policies of

successive State and Federal Labor Governments; and

(c) calls on the Federal and New South Wales Labor Governments to

realise the importance of a viable and sustainable timber

industry to the economic welfare of Australia and Australians.

Senator Lees: To move on the next day of sitting--That the Senate--

(a) notes that:

(i) funding for residents living at Kew Cottages in

Melbourne has been repeatedly cut by the Victorian

Government and is now, per person, less than half the

funding provided for 24-hour care for intellectually

disabled people who live in the community, and

(ii) one result of such inadequate funding is that essential

maintenance and upgrading of residences cannot occur

and so those who live at Kew Cottages continue to

endure overcrowding and lack of privacy; and

(b) calls on the Victorian Government to immediately provide funding

to ensure that:

(i) the overcrowding that occurs in most of the units at

Kew is reduced as soon as possible, and

(ii) private toilets are provided, so that three people at

most share each of these facilities.

Senator Crane: To move on the next day of sitting--That the Senate--

(a) notes that:

(i) in the Australian of 19 June 1995 it was reported that

more than 10 000 unfair dismissal applications have

flooded the federal industrial relations system, most

of which would have been previously handled through

State jurisdictions,

(ii) this is further evidence that the Government has

developed an unjust, overpowerful Industrial Relations

Reform Act, able to easily override State systems, and

(iii) more than $10 million of taxpayers' money has been

allocated in the 1995-96 Budget to pay additional

commissioners of the Australian Industrial Relations

Commission to deal with the extra workload, such as the

unfair dismissal applications; and

(b) condemns the Government for developing an unjust Industrial

Relations Reform Act which has caused this overload and resulted

in a $10 million tax take from Australian taxpayers.

Senator Margetts: To move on the next day of sitting--That the Senate--

(a) notes media reports on 20 June 1995 of the major concerns

expressed about the Government's superannuation policy by a

coalition of community groups comprising the Australian

Consumers Association, Australian Council of Social Services,

Australian Federation of Consumer Organisations, Australian

Pensioners and Superannuants Federation, Australian Youth Policy

and Action Coalition, Council on the Ageing, Older Women's

Network and the Women's Electoral Lobby; and

(b) calls on the Government to acknowledge the importance of this

criticism by such a broadly-based coalition of community groups

and to immediately review both its existing superannuation

strategies and the specific proposals outlined in the 1995-96

Budget in order to improve equity, choice and access for all

sectors of Australian society.

Senator Watson: To move on the next day of sitting--That the Senate--

(a) notes that:

(i) under the new accelerated tax payments regime, an

estimated 20 to 30 per cent of medium-sized companies

have not been notified by the Australian Taxation

Office (ATO) that they are required to have paid tax on

1 June,

(ii) under existing law it is not the ATO's legal

responsibility to keep such taxpayers informed by the

sending of notices, and

(iii) many of these companies are sitting around waiting for

a notice from the ATO to tell them if they are indeed

affected by the new regime; and

(b) calls on the ATO to better communicate with such corporate

taxpayers their obligation in a new Government initiative which

will add considerably to tax compliance costs for medium-sized

Australian companies.

The Leader of the Australian Democrats (Senator Kernot): To move on the

next day of sitting--That the Senate--

(a) condemns the French and Chinese Governments for previous and

intended underground nuclear testing;

(b) urges the Australian Government to send a scientific expedition

to be part of the Greenpeace armada to monitor the French

nuclear testing at Mururoa Atoll; and

(c) calls on the Government to ban the mining and export of all

uranium from Australia to set an example to other countries and

to demonstrate that Australia is serious about peace, nuclear

disarmament and the protection of the environment.

Senator Panizza: To move on the next day of sitting--That the Senate--

(a) notes:

(i) the concern of the majority of Western Australian wheat

growers regarding the direction that the Wheat Industry

Fund is taking and the use to which it is being put,

(ii) that Western Australian wheat growers, while having

contributed almost half of the Wheat Industry Fund, to

date feel that they are powerless regarding its

investment policy and the type and geographical

location of such investments, and

(iii) that the Wheat Industry Fund legislation is now 5 years

old and, in normal circumstances in past wheat industry

acts, would have been due for renewal; and

(b) calls on the Minister for Primary Industries and Energy (Senator

Bob Collins) and the Government to make themselves aware of the

discontent among Western Australian wheat growers and to heed

their concerns for further consideration of the future of, and

direction of, this Wheat Industry Fund.

Senator Knowles: To move on the next day of sitting--That the Senate

notes that--

(a) according to data provided by the Australian Bureau of

Statistics, the number of new home loans has fallen 34.3 per

cent since April 1994, while lending for the construction of new

homes has fallen 42.9 per cent over the same period;

(b) this is due to a lack of voters' confidence in the Government's

economic policies, particularly their caution about

fluctuatinginterest rates and other increases in general

taxation which have been delivered by the Federal Labor

Government; and

(c) the Government's bid to add a 12 per cent wholesale sales tax on

certain common building products will force a further decline in

building activity by putting new houses or renovations out of

the financial reach of many Australian families.

Senator Crane: To move on the next day of sitting--That the Senate--

(a) notes that:

(i) a new discussion paper published by the Australian

Chamber of Commerce and Industry states that the

Government's unfair dismissal law has made business

less willing to hire, and that "the trend to the high

proportion of part-time and casual employment has been

encouraged by the unfair dismissal legislation, leaving

full-time employment lower than it otherwise would have

been', and

(ii) the paper also states that labour force statistics

showed that, while employment had risen past its

previous peak, full-time employment was still below the

peak level reached in 1990;

(b) condemns the Government for creating an anti-employer Act which

makes it virtually impossible for an employer to legitimately

terminate the services of staff, which in turn creates a

reluctance among employers to hire permanent workers; and

(c) calls on the Government to make immediate amendments to the

unfair dismissal laws to ensure more flexible workplaces,

necessary for Australia to compete in the 21st century.

Senator Baume: To move on the next day of sitting--That the Senate--

(a) notes that:

(i) the $30 billion, or record 33.3 per cent, rise in the

Keating Government's tax collections since it won the

1993 election on the false claim that it would not

increase taxes and that tax cuts were L-A-W law, means

that the Keating Government is now Australia's

highest-ever taxing government,

(ii) the Keating Government's 1995-96 Budget is lifting

taxes as a proportion of gross domestic product (GDP)

to levels far higher than even the Whitlam Government's

last budget 20 years ago, and

(iii) total tax revenue is to reach 24.2 per cent of GDP in

the 1995-96 Budget and 24.6 per cent in 1996, a massive

rise from the Whitlam Government's peak of 21.7 per

cent, that income tax is up from the Whitlam

Government's 15.7 per cent of GDP to 17.6 per cent and

that sales tax, the Keating Government's secret

consumption tax, has soared from only 1.8 per cent of

GDP to 2.9 per cent; and

(b) expresses its concern that, in terms of its record tax rip-off,

the Keating Government is even worse than the Whitlam

Government.

The Minister for Defence (Senator Ray): To move on the next day of

sitting--That the following bill be introduced: A Bill for an Act to

amend the Patents Act 1990. Patents Amendment Bill 1995.

The Minister for Defence (Senator Ray): To move on the next day of

sitting--That the following bill be introduced: A Bill for an Act to

amend the Industry Research and Development Act 1986, and for related

purposes. Industry Research and Development Amendment Bill 1995.

The Minister for Defence (Senator Ray): To move on the next day of

sitting--That on Tuesday, 27 June 1995:

(a) the hours of meeting shall be 12.30 p.m. to 7.20 p.m.; and

(b) the routine of business from 12.30 p.m. to 2 p.m. shall be

Government Business only, and from 2 p.m. be as for a Tuesday.

Senator Baume: To move on the next day of sitting--That the Senate--

(a) notes that:

(i) since the Keating Government won the 1993 election on

the dishonest claim that it was opposed to a

consumption tax, consumption tax by way of sales tax

has risen by a record $5 000 million to its

highest-ever level of $14 000 million, representing a

record 2.9 per cent of gross domestic product (GDP),

(ii) this compares with only 1.8 per cent of GDP under the

Whitlam Government and is almost 50 per cent higher

than under Mr Howard's last budget as Treasurer in

1982, and

(iii) the total increase of $30 billion or 33.3 per cent in

the Keating Government's tax collections since the 1993

election is far higher than the $25 billion total gross

cost of the goods and services tax proposed at the 1993

election, before taking offsetting tax cuts into

account, which the Keating Government dishonestly

opposed in the 1993 election campaign; and

(b) condemns the Keating Government for its huge and deliberate

increases in sales tax, the consumption tax that repeated

studies have shown hits hardest on the poorer sections of the

Australian community.