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NOTICES

The Chair of the Rural and Regional Affairs and Transport References

Committee (Senator Brownhill): To move on the next day of sitting--That

the time for the presentation of reports of the Rural and Regional

Affairs and Transport References Committee be extended as follows:

(a) the report on the impact of assets tests on farming families'

access to social security payments and Austudy, to 24 August

1995;

(b) the report on a review of Landcare policies and programs in

Australia, to the last sitting day in 1995; and

(c) the report on value-adding in agricultural production, to the

last sitting day in 1995.

Senator Panizza: To move on the next day of sitting--That the Senate--

(a) condemns the Keating 1995-96 Budget for its increase in taxes

upon the export sector by further imposition of diesel fuel

levy;

(b) notes that the burden of the increased taxation falls most

heavily on rural production and the mining sector; and

(c) calls on the Government to remove this further, unfair,

selective taxing of Australia's major export earners.

Senator Ian Macdonald: To move on the next day of sitting--That the

Senate--

(a) notes that:

(i) the increase in the tax on "light' fuel oil announced

in the 1995-96 Budget will increase the price of fuel

for the ferries operating to Magnetic Island in north

Queensland by approximately 50 per cent,

(ii) this additional cost could result in a 5 per cent

increase in the price of tickets to Magnetic Island,

and

(iii) the tax hike is an unfair slug on the 2 600 residents

of Magnetic Island, as well as tourism businesses on

the island, placing them at an even greater

disadvantage to mainland communities;

(b) condemns the Federal Government for its lack of research and

consultation in imposing this tax increase, which adds a massive

burden on maritime industries which are unable to access the

fuel tax rebate scheme; and

(c) calls on the Federal Government to explain why passenger ferries

and cruise tour operators are required to pay a fuel tax, which

is aimed at raising funds for roads, unlike the commercial

fishing industry which is rightly exempt.

Senator Chamarette: To move on the next day of sitting--That the

Senate--

(a) congratulates the Tasmanian Gay and Lesbian Rights Group on

receiving the 1995 Felipa de Souza human rights award, announced

in San Francisco on 5 June 1995;

(b) notes that:

(i) this annual award honours individuals or organisations

who have, despite risking personal safety, economic

hardship or personal freedom, fought for the human

rights and freedom of sexual minorities in their

countries, and

(ii) this is the first time a group outside the developing

world has received the award;

(c) expresses its deep concern that States such as Tasmania and

Western Australia continue to lower Australia's international

human rights standing to that of a third world dictatorship or

military regime by denying basic human rights to sexual

minorities; and

(d) calls on the Federal Government to support moves by the

Australian Democrats to introduce Commonwealth

anti-discrimination legislation on the grounds of sexuality to

eliminate anomalies in the States.

Senator Ian Macdonald: To move on the next day of sitting--That the

Senate--

(a) congratulates the Leader of the Liberal Party (Mr Howard) on a

visionary speech delivered on the night of 6 June 1995; and

(b) urges the Prime Minister (Mr Keating) to have a similar type of

vision for our nation.

Senator Sandy Macdonald: To move on the next day of sitting--That the

Senate--

(a) notes:

(i) with concern, the abduction of an Australian citizen,

Mr James Peng, from Macau in October 1993, and his

removal against his wishes to the People's Republic of

China, and

(ii) that Mr Peng has remained in detention since that time,

and that he was without access to his family until July

1994, and to his lawyer until November 1994;

(b) expresses deep concern at the prolonged detention of Mr Peng

owing to a lack of evidence sufficient to convict him;

(c) notes that the repeated return of Mr Peng's case to the

Procurate for Supplementary Investigation raises serious doubts

that the charges against Mr Peng can be substantiated; and

(d) calls on the Chinese Government to allow Mr Peng to go free

unless the evidence is now sufficient to convict him.

Senator Ian Macdonald: To move on the next day of sitting--That the

Senate--

(a) notes, with concern, media reports that the French President (M.

Chirac) is considering allowing nuclear testing in the Pacific;

(b) urges President Chirac to maintain the ban on testing in the

Pacific; and

(c) calls on the Australian Government to embark upon intensive

diplomatic negotiations to have the French maintain their

current position.

Senator Baume: To move on the next day of sitting--That the Senate--

(a) notes that:

(i) the latest annual return of Labor Centenary House Pty

Ltd, a subsidiary of the New South Wales Labor Party,

for the 12 months to December 1993, revealed the

company had a deficiency of shareholders' funds of $2.2

million, with current liabilities of $3.8 million and

total assets of only $1.6 million,

(ii) these details were only filed with the Australian

Securities Commission (ASC) in April 1995, along with

similar details for 1991 and 1992, which were up to 3

years late, in breach of ASC requirements, and only in

response to the ASC undertaking deregistration action

against the company, and

(iii) the reason given for this delay by the secretary of the

New South Wales Labor Party, Mr John Della Bosca, was

that the directors, Mr Terry Sheahan and Mr Della Bosca

himself, would not give a commitment to sign the

accounts because "ultimate control of this company

rests with voluntary officials', listed as Mr R Davies,

Mr J B McLean and Mr A T Gietzelt;

(b) expresses its concern that the New South Wales branch of the

Australian Labor Party should be able to have its subsidiary

company avoid the requirements of the Corporations Law for so

many years on the extraordinary ground that directors refused to

rely on the information provided by voluntary officials;

(c) notes that:

(i) the latest annual return reveals that no annual general

meeting was held either for 1992 or 1993, a further

breach of the Corporations Law, and

(ii) although an auditor has been appointed, the latest

annual return was not audited and there is no

indication whether or not the supplementary key

financial data ultimately filed 2 months ago was

audited; and

(d) calls on the Australian Labor Party, at all levels, from the

very top down, to cease its persistent breaches of the

Corporations Law.