Note: Where available, the PDF/Word icon below is provided to view the complete and fully formatted document
 Download PDFDownload PDF 

Previous Fragment    Next Fragment

NOTICES

Notices of motion:

Senator Reid: To move on the next day of sitting--That the Senate--

(a) notes the dilemma faced by individuals and their carers when one

spouse is admitted to a nursing home and there is insufficient

income to pay the nursing home expenses;

(b) deplores the fact that this can result in couples being advised

to legally separate so the resident, then officially with no

other means of support, is eligible for a pension;

(c) acknowledges the trauma and distress such a course of action

involves; and

(d) urges the Government in reviewing social security issues to make

appropriate amendments to legislation so as not to so

dramatically disadvantage married couples and require them to

separate or divorce to survive financially.

The Chair of the Economics References Committee (Senator Ferguson): To

move on the next day of sitting--That the time for the presentation of

the report of the Economics References Committee on the tax treatment of

small business be extended to 29 June 1995.

The Minister for Defence (Senator Ray): To move on the next day of

sitting--That the following bill be introduced: A Bill for an Act to

amend legislation relating to Communications and Tourism, and for

related purposes. Communications and Tourism Legislation Amendment Bill

1995.

The Minister for Defence (Senator Ray): To move on the next day of

sitting--That the following bill be introduced: A Bill for an Act to

amend legislation relating to Customs and Excise and to Bounties, and

for related purposes. Customs, Excise and Bounty Legislation Amendment

Bill 1995.

The Minister for Defence (Senator Ray): To move on the next day of

sitting--That the following bill be introduced: A Bill for an Act to

amend the Employment, Education and Training Act 1988, and for related

purposes. Employment, Education and Training Amendment Bill 1995.

The Minister for Defence (Senator Ray): To move on the next day of

sitting--That the following bill be introduced: A Bill for an Act to

make consequential amendments because of the enactment of amendments of

the Family Law Act 1975. Family Law Reform (Consequential Amendments)

Bill 1995.

The Minister for Defence (Senator Ray): To move on the next day of

sitting--That the following bill be introduced: A Bill for an Act to

amend various Acts relating to law and justice, and for related

purposes. Law and Justice Legislation Amendment Bill (No. 2) 1995.

The Minister for Defence (Senator Ray): To move on the next day of

sitting--That the following bill be introduced: A Bill for an Act about

privileges and immunities of certain overseas missions, and for related

purposes. Overseas Missions (Privileges and Immunities) Bill 1995.

The Minister for Defence (Senator Ray): To move on the next day of

sitting--That the following bill be introduced: A Bill for an Act to

make consequential amendments relating to the Overseas Missions

(Privileges and Immunities) Act 1995. Overseas Missions (Privileges and

Immunities) (Consequential Amendments) Bill 1995.

The Minister for Defence (Senator Ray): To move on the next day of

sitting--That the following bill be introduced: A Bill for an Act to

amend various Acts relating to matters dealt with within the portfolio

of the Prime Minister, and for related purposes. Prime Minister and

Cabinet (Miscellaneous Provisions) Bill 1995.

The Minister for Defence (Senator Ray): To move on the next day of

sitting--That the following bill be introduced: A Bill for an Act

relating to trade marks. Trade Marks Bill 1995.

The Minister for Defence (Senator Ray): To move on the next day of

sitting--That the following bill be introduced: A Bill for an Act to

amend various Acts relating to transport. Transport Legislation

Amendment Bill (No. 2) 1995.

The Minister for Defence (Senator Ray): To move on the next day of

sitting--That the following bill be introduced: A Bill for an Act to

amend the Wildlife Protection (Regulation of Exports and Imports) Act

1982, and for related purposes. Wildlife Protection (Regulation of

Exports and Imports) Amendment Bill 1995.

The Minister for Defence (Senator Ray): To move on the next day of

sitting--That the following bill be introduced: A Bill for an Act to

amend the Trade Practices Act 1974 and the Prices Surveillance Act 1983,

and for related purposes. Competition Policy Reform Bill 1995.

The Leader of the Opposition in the Senate (Senator Hill): To move on

the next day of sitting--That the Senate censures the Minister for

Family Services (Senator Crowley) for her:

(a) insensitivity in releasing to journalists personal details of a

post mortem of an under-aged girl without first obtaining the

consent of the girl's parents;

(b) failure to apologise to the parents of the girl for the offence

caused to them;

(c) misleading the Senate in question time by seeking to deny that

she was responsible for the release of such details; and

(d) failure to meet the reasonable standards of good practice

expected of a Minister of the Crown.

Senator Coulter: To move on the next day of sitting--That the Senate--

(a) notes:

(i) the planned expenditure of $11 million under the better

cities program for the clean-up of Patawalonga in South

Australia,

(ii) that the present proposals under this program include

the digging of a channel through the sandhills at

Westbeach to empty the polluted waters of Sturt Creek

straight into the ocean thus shifting the problem from

Patawalonga to the marine environment, and

(iii) the strong opposition from the residents of the area to

this unsustainable and ecologically disastrous

proposal; and

(b) calls on the Minister for Housing and Regional Development (Mr

Howe) to ensure that federal money is not spent on any work on

this proposed channel until a total catchment plan is developed

for the whole of Sturt Creek and that the expenditure of this

better cities money is clearly oriented towards implementing

this long-term and necessary plan.

Senator Chamarette: To move on the next day of sitting--That the

Senate--

(a) notes:

(i) the consideration by Federal Cabinet on the night of 28

March 1995 of a range of measures to reduce greenhouse

gas emissions and meet Australia's obligations under

the Framework Convention on Climate Change,

(ii) that developing countries produce approximately 25 per

cent of greenhouse gases compared with the

approximately 75 per cent produced by Organisation for

Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) countries,

and

(iii) there is legal obligation in the Framework Convention

on Climate Change for OECD countries to take the lead

in reducing greenhouse gas emissions;

(b) condemns the Federal Government:

(i) for pushing for developing countries to take a

disproportionate share of the responsibility for

reducing greenhouse gas emissions and in doing so

risking a stalemate in negotiations at the ministerial

meeting in Berlin in the week beginning 26 March 1995,

and

(ii) for its poor performance in meeting its own obligations

under the convention; and

(c) calls on the Federal Government:

(i) to meet its obligations under the Framework Convention

on Climate Change and provide leadership in this vital

area by agreeing to the protocol proposed by the

Alliance of Small Island States and make a commitment

to reduce greenhouse gases by 20 per cent by the year

2000, and

(ii) to implement a comprehensive package of measures to

substantially reduce Australia's greenhouse emissions,

addressing in particular such issues as energy

efficiency, least-cost planning, investment in public

transport and the minimisation of vegetation clearance.

Senator Bell: To move on the next day of sitting--That the Senate--

(a) notes that:

(i) on 28 March 1995, the President of the Australian Local

Government Association, Mayor David Plumridge, will

address the International Municipal Leaders' Summit on

Climate Change in Berlin,

(ii) Mayor Plumridge has said that he will demonstrate on

the international stage the very real contribution

Australian councils were making to minimising the

impact of the Australian community on climate change,

and

(iii) Mayor Plumridge has also said that the Australian Local

Government Association's weakness is that it has not

yet been able to get full recognition of local

governments' contributionfrom Commonwealth and State

Governments through bodies such as the Australia and

New Zealand Environment and Conservation Council; and

(b) calls on the Commonwealth Government to encompass the actions of

councils within the framework of a comprehensive national

environment strategy, which should include matters for which the

main, but not the sole, responsibility rests with local

government, and that such matters should include land use and

transport planning, waste management, building control and

natural resource management.

Senator Coulter: To move on the next day of sitting--That the following

bill be introduced: A Bill for an Act to alter the Constitution to

ensure that when making laws the Parliament takes into account the

effect of such laws on certain aspects of the natural environment.

Constitution Alteration (Ecology, Diversity and Sustainability) Bill

1995.

Senator Spindler: To move on the next day of sitting--That the Senate--

(a) commends the success of the job placement and employment

training (JPET) program, run by the Department of Housing and

Regional Development, for its work in addressing the special

employment needs of young homeless people through 42 independent

JPET centres throughout the country;

(b) notes that much of the success of the program can be attributed

to the facts that, in targeting the special problems of the

young homeless, case-workers adopt a flexible, non-invasive

approach and have considerable autonomy, that participation in

the scheme is voluntary, and that, though there are no formal

targets, the scheme has been successful in substantive terms and

close to cost-neutral, saving the Government nearly as much in

welfare payments as it costs to run;

(c) urges the Government to confirm immediately the continuation and

expansion of this successful pilot program, to alleviate the

uncertainty currently being experienced by JPET centres;

(d) notes, with concern, rumours that the JPET program is to be

shifted to the Department of Employment, Education and Training

(DEET), since DEET's invasive, compulsory, formalistic and

formula-based approaches to case management would be likely to

destroy those very characteristics of the program which have

been the basis for its success; and

(e) calls on the Government to deny immediately the rumours of a

program shift to DEET or, at a minimum, to guarantee absolutely

that the nature of the JPET program will not be altered even if

the program is switched between portfolios.

Senator Abetz: To move on the next day of sitting--That the Senate--

(a) notes:

(i) that the Tasmanian Labor leader (Mr Field), has

distanced himself from the Federal Keating Government's

devastating loss in the Canberra by-election on 25

March 1995,

(ii) Mr Field's comments that the Federal Labor Government's

mismanagement of the export woodchipping issue had

shown it was complacent and arrogant,

(iii) that the Tasmanian Labor members for Lyons (Mr Adams),

Denison (Mr Kerr), Franklin (Mr Quick) and Bass (Mrs

Smith), have failed to represent their constituents by

fence-sitting on the Tasmanian forestry issue, and

(iv) that in the Federal and Tasmanian elections, due within

the next 12 months, voters will be able to record their

dissent; and

(b) calls on Tasmanian Labor Members and Senators and the Tasmanian

branch of the Australian Labor Party (ALP) to outline to the

voters in Tasmanian Labor-held electorates precisely where they

stand in relation to Tasmanian forests and employment prospects

of timber workers; and

(c) supports the view of the Tasmanian branch of the ALP that

Federal Labor is complacent and arrogant.

Senator Bell: To move on the next day of sitting--That the Senate--

(a) notes that:

(i) the Adelaide Advertiser of 15 March 1995 reported that

a South Australian high school has employed a debt

collection agency to remind parents of their debts to

the school,

(ii) the same school has also used the small claims court,

and

(iii) the South Australian Minister for Education (Mr Lucas)

has said, in a written answer to a question from Ms

Trish White, that the legal position on school fees has

become "somewhat confused'; and

(b) calls on the Commonwealth Government to ensure that all

Australian children have equal access to free, compulsory

education.

Senator Abetz: To move on the next day of sitting--That the Senate--

(a) notes the call by the Greens for the Federal Government to use

the external affairs power of the Constitution:

(i) to stop timber activities in forests, and

(ii) to stop road construction through Tasmania's Arthur

Pieman region to halt the link road;

(b) notes that, in an answer to a question without notice on 27

February 1995, the Minister for the Environment, Sport and

Territories (Senator Faulkner) stated that:

... the Commonwealth has not had and does not have a role in the

approval of that road. This is a matter for which the Tasmanian

government has to take responsibility. It is its responsibility;

(c) notes that the Minister further stated that:

The Commonwealth's powers to act in relation to this particular

matter are limited. The 1992 intergovernmental agreement on the

environment sets out agreed consultative processes to be

followed in relation to the identification and nomination of

areas for listing as world heritage areas. This Tarkine area has

not been nominated by the government for inclusion on the world

heritage list. Any nomination of additional areas in Tasmania

would in fact be in the context of the agreement that was struck

on 28 November 1988 about this issue;

(d) notes that the construction of the road will enable

environmentalists and tourists alike better access to the Arthur

Pieman area; and

(e) calls on the Federal Government to reject the radical and

unrepresentative agenda of the Greens.

Senator Forshaw: To move on the next day of sitting--That the Senate--

(a) congratulates Australian designers Ms Lizzy Gardiner and Mr Tim

Chappel for winning the costume design Oscar for The Adventures

of Priscilla, Queen of the Desert;

(b) notes that this film follows a long line of awards which have

been won by the Australian Film Industry in recent years; and

(c) congratulates all involved with the Australian Film Industry for

their continuing commitment to excellence.

Senator Chamarette: To move on the next day of sitting--That the

Senate--

(a) heeds the words of the resolution passed at the closing session

of the women and the environment conference held in Melbourne on

the weekend of 25 and 26 March 1995 which, in part, "urges the

conference to oppose Migration Legislation Amendment Bill (No.

4) [1995] which seeks to ban asylum claims based on persecution

or fear of persecution under a country's fertility control

policies' and "urges the conference to register its protest with

the United Nations against the exclusion of Tibetan women's

groups from the Fourth United Nations World Conference on Women

in Beijing in September 1995'; and

(b) calls on the Government:

(i) to immediately withdraw the Migration Legislation

Amendment Bill (No. 4) 1995 in recognition of the

growing alarm in the community about such inhumane

legislation being put forward for debate in Parliament,

and

(ii) to make official representations to the Chinese

Government to allow Tibetan women to attend the Fourth

United Nations World Conference on Women.

Senator Chamarette: To move on the next day of sitting--That the Senate

censures the Member for Kalgoorlie (Mr Campbell) for using parliamentary

privilege to escape State law in order to disclose the name of a minor.

Senator Ian Macdonald: To move on the next day of sitting--That the

Senate--

(a) notes that:

(i) four senior Queensland Government port officials

visited Cooktown on 27 March 1995 to discuss with the

community the possible dredging of the Cooktown Port

and raise concerns about the port's ability, once

dredged, to generate revenue to cover dredging costs,

(ii) while dredging the Cooktown Port will cost

approximately $500 000, it is estimated that Cooktown

will lose a potential $1.4 million in tourism

associated revenue in 1995 if the port is not dredged,

(iii) two cruise companies will be unable to continue

visiting Cooktown from later in 1995 because they are

acquiring large vessels which will be unable to enter

the port, and

(iv) several tourism companies want to operate to the Great

Barrier Reef from Cooktown but cannot because of

inadequate harbour access; and

(b) calls on the Federal Government to support the dredging of the

port under the Regional Tourism Development Program or other

Government programs.

Senator Crane: To move on the next day of sitting--That the Senate--

(a) notes that:

(i) a report by the economics editor of the Australian, Mr

Wood, on 27 March 1995 claimed that the Government's

industrial relations "revolution' cannot survive its

contradictions,

(ii) in the article, Mr Wood stated that "the Keating

Government's Industrial Relations Act is the most

compelling single piece of evidence that Labor has been

in power too long', and

(iii) Mr Wood also said that, "instead of labour market

reform, we have a piece of legislation that represents

a direct pay-off to the ACTU and the unions for their

support of Labor in the election campaign'; and

(b) calls on the Government to repeal the Industrial Relations

Reform Act, which is flawed and unbalanced, as revealed

regularly in the national media.

Senator Ian Macdonald: To move on the next day of sitting--That the

Senate notes that--

(a) the House of Representatives Standing Committee on Banking,

Finance and Public Administration report on its inquiry into the

impact of Australia's taxation regime on the tourism industry,

tabled in Parliament on 27 March 1995, recommended that the

diesel fuel rebate scheme be reviewed to clarify its objectives

and to investigate alternatives that ensure equity and minimise

distortions in its application, and further recommended that

access to the diesel fuel rebate scheme be extended where the

fuel is used in electricity generators which provide an

essential service to areas not linked to the national

electricity grid; and

(b) the Federal Government's 33 per cent diesel fuel excise is

curtailing tourism development in regional and remote Australia

because of its unfair impact on operators who use diesel fuel

for their transport and power generation requirements and are

unable to have access to the diesel fuel rebate scheme.

Senator Crane: To move on the next day of sitting--That the Senate--

(a) notes:

(i) the so-called Industrial Relations Reform Act,

introduced by the Minister for Industrial Relations (Mr

Brereton) and designed as a true "pay-back' to his

trade union mates, has failed,

(ii) that the ultimate result of the Act is to disadvantage

those hundreds of thousands of people desperately

trying to get jobs,

(iii) that it is well recognised that the so-called "unfair

dismissal' provisions are not only allowing frivolous

claims by employees, but have resulted in a logjam of

unfair dismissal claims of more than 5 000 in a year,

or a staggering 100 per week,

(iv) that the "unfair dismissal' provisions are actually a

disincentive to employers to employ people, and

(v) that, on 27 March 1995, Mr Ian Spicer, the Executive

Director of the Australian Chamber of Commerce and

Industry, stated that, "many employers have been forced

to settle claims which should have been simply thrown

out'; and

(b) calls on the Minister for Industrial Relations to scrap this

biased and grossly unfair Industrial Relations Reform Act and to

introduce legislation which provides a truly flexible and

"user-friendly'Act which includes fair provisions for dismissals

and which will promote employee and employer harmony, and will

actually provide an incentive for employers to employ those

people desperately seeking genuine jobs to get off Mr Keating's

unemployment merry-go-round.

Notices of motion withdrawn:

Senator Foreman, at the request of the Chair of the Standing Committee

on Regulations and Ordinances (Senator Colston), withdrew Business of

the Senate notices of motion nos 1 and 2 standing in the name of Senator

Colston for this day for the disallowance of the following instruments:

Export Inspection and Meat Charges Collection Regulations (Amendment),

as contained in Statutory Rules 1994 No. 369 and made under the Export

Inspection and Meat Charges Collection Act 1985.

Military Superannuation and Benefits Trust Deed (Amendment) (No. 2 of

1994), made under section 5 of the Military and Superannuation

Benefits Act 1991.

Senator Coulter, at the request of Senator Lees, withdrew Business of

the Senate notice of motion no. 1 standing in the name of Senator Lees

for 30 March 1995, relating to the reference of a matter to the

Community Affairs References Committee.

Ruling of Acting Deputy President: The Acting Deputy President (Senator

McKiernan) drew attention to standing order 76, relating to the giving

of notices of motion, and indicated that notices given today by Senators

Parer, Herron, Minchin and Ian Macdonald were not in conformity with the

standing orders and would not appear on the Notice Paper.