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5           Notices

Senator Rice: To move on the next day of sitting—That the Industry Research and Development (Boosting Australia’s Diesel Storage Program) Instrument 2021, made under the Industry Research and Development Act 1986 , be disallowed [F2021L00610].

Senator Rice: To move on the next day of sitting—That the following bill be introduced: A Bill for an Act relating to targeted sanctions for human rights violations, and for related purposes. Human Rights (Targeted Sanctions) Bill 2021 . ( general business notice of motion no. 1185 )

Senator Rice: To move on the next day of sitting—That the Industry Research and Development (Temporary Refinery Production Payment Program) Instrument 2021, made under the Industry Research and Development Act 1986 , be disallowed [F2021L00202].

Senator Rice: To move on the next day of sitting—

(1)               That the Senate:

(a)                  notes that on 8 December 2020 the Joint Standing Committee on Foreign Affairs, Defence and Trade tabled its report titled Criminality, corruption and impunity: Should Australia join the Global Magnitsky movement? , and recommended that the ‘Australian Government enact standalone targeted sanctions legislation to address human rights violations and corruption, similar to the United States’ Magnitsky Act 2012’; and

(b)                  calls on the Australian Government to respond to that report’s recommendations as soon as possible, and introduce an Australian Magnitsky Act.

(2)              That there be laid on the table by the Minister for Foreign Affairs, by no later than 2 pm on 11 August 2021, a government response to the report of the Joint Standing Committee on Foreign Affairs, Defence and Trade. ( general business notice of motion no. 1186 )

The Leader of the Australian Greens in the Senate (Senator Waters): To move on the next day of sitting—That the Ministerial Suitability Commission of Inquiry Bill 2021 be referred to the Finance and Public Administration Legislation Committee for inquiry and report by 1 September 2021.

The Leader of the Australian Greens in the Senate (Senator Waters): To move on the next day of sitting—That the Senate—

(a)              notes that:

(i)                    19 women have been killed by violence in Australia in 2021, as reported by the Counting Dead Women project,

(ii)                  there is no real-time national government toll of women killed by violence,

(iii)                more than 370,000 women are subjected to violence each year,

(iv)                1 in 3 women experience physical violence,

(v)                  on average, one woman is murdered every week by her current or former partner,

(vi)                women are three times more likely than men to experience intimate partner violence and 2.5 times more likely to be hospitalised from domestic violence,

(vii)              young women, women with disabilities, and First Nations women are more likely to experience violence,

(viii)            coercive control and persistent emotional abuse is abuse in its own right, and a strong risk indicator for physical violence, and

(ix)                demand for domestic and family violence services continues to increase; and

(b)              calls on the Government to:

(i)                    recognise violence against women as a national security crisis, and

(ii)                  ensure the next national plan for elimination of violence against women and children:

(A)                 includes adequate funding for frontline family and domestic violence services,

(B)                 addresses gender equality in curriculum from early childhood education, and

(C)                 supports a national approach to combating coercive control.  ( general business notice of motion no. 1187 )

Senators Waters, Faruqi and Siewert: To move on the next day of sitting—That the Senate—

(a)              notes that:

(i)                    despite decriminalisation of abortion in Queensland and New South Wales, safe abortion care services remain inaccessible or unaffordable in many areas,

(ii)                  many women in remote and regional communities are required to travel significant distances, often at considerable expense, to receive appropriate reproductive healthcare,

(iii)                Marie Stopes has announced that abortion clinics in Southport, Townsville, Rockhampton and Newcastle will close at the end of July 2021, and

(iv)                loss of these services will hurt women in regional areas, particularly women who already face significant healthcare barriers, such as young women, First Nations women and women from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds;

(b)              further notes that the National Women’s Health Strategy includes:

(i)                    an explicit priority of increasing access to sexual and reproductive health care, and

(ii)                  a goal of delivering equitable access to pregnancy termination services; and

(c)              calls on federal and state governments to:

(i)                    ensure reliable and affordable access to abortion care, permanent and long-acting contraception options, and unbiased counselling across Australia by funding public hospitals and health services to provide essential reproductive healthcare, and

(ii)                  support the long-term availability of telehealth services for reproductive healthcare. ( general business notice of motion no. 1188 )

The Leader of the Australian Greens in the Senate (Senator Waters): To move on the next day of sitting—That the Senate—

(a)              notes that:

(i)                    the most recent Australia Talks survey results show 88% of Australians support a national integrity commission,

(ii)                  the Coalition Government promised in 2018 to introduce a national integrity commission,

(iii)                initial public consultation on the Government’s proposed Commonwealth Integrity Commission model ended over two years ago,

(iv)                public consultation on the Government’s draft Commonwealth Integrity Commission Bill ended on February 2021,

(v)                  the majority of submissions to both consultations raised serious concerns regarding the Government’s proposed model,

(vi)                despite various statements since before the last election that a bill was ‘imminent’ and ‘in progress’, the Government has yet to introduce legislation to establish an integrity commission, and

(vii)              with the Government’s 2021-22 budget papers noting that there will be no staff employed by the Commonwealth Integrity Commission in 2021-22, it is clear that Australia will not see a national integrity commission before the next election; and

(b)              calls on the Government to:

(i)                    urgently introduce a bill to establish a strong, independent national integrity commission, and

(ii)                  allocate adequate funding for the rapid establishment and operation of the commission. ( general business notice of motion no. 1189 )

The Leader of the Australian Greens in the Senate (Senator Waters): To move on the next day of sitting—That the Senate—

(a)              notes that:

(i)                    the total amount of money disclosed as donated to political parties tripled between the 2016 election and the 2019 election,

(ii)                  the Centre for Public Integrity estimates that $1 billion in political donations since 1999 has not been disclosed, and

(iii)                many political donations to federal parties and candidates are not required to be publicly disclosed for more than 12 months after an election; and

(b)              supports:

(i)                    lowering the disclosure threshold for donations to political parties,

(ii)                  requiring more timely disclosure of donations to political parties, and

(iii)                imposing low caps on the amount that donors can donate to political parties. ( general business notice of motion no. 1190 )

The Leader of the Australian Greens in the Senate (Senator Waters): To move on the next day of sitting—That the Senate—

(a)              notes that:

(i)                    total funding in the Women’s Budget Statement was only 4% of new funding in the Government’s 2021-22 Budget,

(ii)                  funding commitments to the women’s safety sector are still less than one quarter of the $1 billion per year the sector says is needed to meet demand,

(iii)                the Government’s 2021-22 Budget did not fund:

(A)                 social and affordable housing to address the housing crisis that has seen women over 45 become the fastest growing cohort of homeless people,

(B)                 a national rollout of expert, evidence-based relationships education,

(C)                 superannuation contributions for paid parental leave, and

(iv)                the welcome removal of the $450 per month threshold for employer superannuation contributions will not commence until July 2022; and

(b)              calls on the Government to:

(i)                    reintroduce the Women’s Budget Impact Statement, to comprehensively address the gendered impacts of future budgets,

(ii)                  increase funding to frontline domestic, family and sexual violence and crisis housing services,

(iii)                urgently fund initiatives to increase social and affordable housing stocks across Australia,

(iv)                fund a national rollout of Our Watch’s respectful relationships education program,

(v)                  pay superannuation on the government paid parental leave scheme, and

(vi)                expedite the removal of the $450 threshold.  ( general business notice of motion no. 1191 )