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Tuesday, 1 December 2015
Page: 9415

Presentation

Senator Scullion to move:

That the following bill be introduced: A Bill for an Act to amend the law relating to social security, and for related purposes. Social Security Legislation Amendment (Community Development Program) Bill 2015 .

Senator Rhiannon to move:

That the Senate—

(a) notes that, in Australia:

(i) Marie Stopes International, a not -for -profit healthcare organisation, is improving access to sexual and reproductive health services for women in Australia,

(ii) a new telehealth model provides women in regional and rural areas with a new way of accessing these important services, and

(iii) the organisation has registered a world first early medical termination of pregnancy product, giving women the opportunity of choosing a medical termination for up to 63 days ' gestation (9 weeks);

(b) further notes that, internationally:

(i) more than 225 million women want effective contraception, but are unable to access it, with over half of this unmet need occurring for women in the Asia Pacific,

(ii) every day 800 women die from pregnancy and childbirth, and that this number would fall by two -thirds if every woman who wanted contraception could access it,

(iii) over 18 million people worldwide were using contraception provided by Marie Stopes International last year—preventing over 5 million unintended pregnancies and nearly 4 million unsafe abortions, and

(iv) Marie Stopes International has pledged to provide services to 12 million new users of contraception as part of the global Family Planning 2020 initiative; and

(c) calls on the Government to meet the commitment made by Australia at the 2012 Family Planning Summit, for an annual contribution of $53 million to family planning by 2016.

Senators Lines and Peris to move:

That the Senate notes that:

(a) support to ' Close the Gap ' on health has been a bipartisan commitment;

(b) the World Health Organization has declared incidents of ear disease in communities in Western Australia and the Northern Territory to be a ' massive health problem ' , with the number of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children in remote community suffering with middle ear infections to be as high as 93 per cent;

(c) the relationship between hearing loss and early interaction with the justice system has been recognised by Indigenous health experts;

(d) the Western Australian Minister for Health , Mr Hames, has, during the week beginning 29 November 2015, cancelled the Government funding of the Telethon Speech and Hearing ' s Ear Health program, an Aboriginal children ' s ear clinic based in Perth, despite its rating of ' outstanding ' in an independent review; and

(e) to achieve progress toward closing the gap across Australia, governments at all levels must recognise the importance of adequate funding for ear health services for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children.

Senator McKim to move:

That the government business order of the day relating to the consideration of the Tax and Superannuation Laws Amendment (2015 Measures No. 3) Bill 2015 be discharged from the Notice Paper .

Senator Leyonhjelm to move:

That the following bill be introduced: A Bill for an Act to amend certain Acts relating to the territories, and for other purposes. Restoring Territory Rights (Assisted Suicide Legislation) Bill 2015 .

Senator Brandis to move:

That the following bill be introduced: A Bill for an Act to amend the law relating to the administration of courts, and for other purposes. Courts Administration Legislation Amendment Bill 2015 .

Senator Wang to move:

That the Senate—

(a) notes that about one in ten teaching graduates failed to meet benchmark literacy and numeracy standards in an exam trialled by the Federal Government to ensure universities are providing teaching graduates of the highest possible standard; and

(b) calls on the Government, through its focus on research and innovation, to:

(i) keep its sights on the quality of our teachers, who are incubating the next generation of Australian researchers and innovators, and

(ii) ensure universities are accountable for all graduates meeting benchmark literacy and numeracy standards.

Senator Conroy to move:

That the following matter be referred to the Foreign Affairs, Defence and Trade References Committee for inquiry and report by 30 April 2016:

Operations of Defence Housing Australia, with particular reference to:

(a) senior management arrangements and board composition;

(b) whether the requirements of the Defence Housing Australia Act 1987 have been met;

(c) how the review announced by the Minister for Finance on 11 May 2015 will affect the accounting, information technology and business reporting systems;

(d) what role land sales will play in future business planning, and what implications there are for current residents if existing housing stock is sold; and

(e) any other related matter.

Senator Siewert to move:

That the Senate—

(a) notes:

(i) the report from the Change the Record Coalition, Blueprint for change: Changing the record on the disproportionate imprisonment rates, and rates of violence experienced by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people , and

(ii) that the Change the Record Coalition is a significant group of leading Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander, human rights, legal and community organisations;

(b) acknowledges that:

(i) in the past 10 years we have seen an 88 per cent increase in the number of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in prison,

(ii) Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are 13 times more likely to be in prison than non -Indigenous Australians, and

(iii) Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women are 34 times more likely to be hospitalised as a result of family violence than non -Indigenous women; and

(c) calls for

(i) Commonwealth, state and territory governments to work together to close the gap in imprisonment rates of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, and cut disproportionate rates of violence experienced by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, particularly women and children, and

(ii) urgent and coordinated national action to close the gap in imprisonment rates of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and cut disproportionate rates of violence experienced by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, particularly women and children.

Senators Wang and Whish-Wilson to move:

That the Senate—

(a) notes that:

(i) in 1979 Australia adopted an anti -whaling policy, permanently ending whaling in Australian waters,

(ii) in 1986, the International Whaling Commission moratorium on commercial whaling came into place,

(iii) in March 2014, Australia won its case against Japan in the International Court of Justice in regards to whaling in Antarctic waters,

(iv) in November 2014, Japan lodged a new whaling plan with the International Whaling Commission to slaughter 3 333 minke whales in Antarctic water,

(v) in April 2015, the Scientific Committee rejected the need for lethal whale sampling in order for Japan to achieve its scientific objectives,

(vi) on 19 November 2015 the Federal Court of Australia fined the Japanese whaling company Kyodo $1 million for hunting whales within an Australian whale sanctuary, and

(vii) in the week beginning 29 November 2015, the Japanese Government gave notice that the whaling fleet will be leaving port to carry out their commercial whaling; and

(b) calls on the Government and the Prime Minister (Mr Turnbull) to:

(i) uphold their election commitment and send a customs patrol vessel to monitor any Japanese whaling activity, and collect evidence for future legal actions,

(ii) raise the issue, and express the disappointment of the Australian people, directly with the Japanese Prime Minister, Shinz o Abe, during discussions on bilateral relations, and

(iii) consider the option put forward by the Second Sydney Panel of Independent Experts to pursue United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea dispute resolution mechanisms to hold Japan accountable for their continued commercial whaling.

Senator Lazarus to move:

That the Senate—

(a) recognises the important work of the Australian Federal Police, the Queensland Police Service, Australian Border Force and other government agencies in protecting Australia ' s northern coastline, borders and communities;

(b) acknowledges the growing need to increase Australia ' s policing capacity in, and monitoring of, our northern waters in view of:

(i) the strategic importance of the region,

(ii) its proximity to the Papua New Guinea coastline,

(iii) the large area to cover and growing number of incidents, for example, authorities monitor an estimated 250 000 boat trips per year and conducted 68 search and rescue operations in 2014, and

(iv) the need for nearby communities to feel safe;

(c) notes the Queensland State Government and the Queensland Police Union ' s calls for the Federal Government to help fund the build of a multi -jurisdictional government facility, Australia ' s northernmost police station, on Sabai Island, located in the Torres Strait of Queensland, to service the northern region; and

(d) calls on the Federal Government to consider contributing to the funding of the facility to increase Australia ' s police presence and border protection and management activities in the northern region.

Senators Bullock and Back to move:

(1) That the Senate notes that:

(a) in today ' s culture, children ' s use of smart phones, tablets and computers has increased markedly;

(b) online pornography is easily accessed, and a growing number of children are viewing it at an early age;

(c) recent studies have shown that exposure to pornography has measurable negative effects on brain development and behavioural outcomes;

(d) online pornography is increasingly violent in its content, particularly against women, and exposure correlates with children ' s acceptance of violent attitudes and beliefs;

(e) violence against women is often linked back to early and repeated exposure to pornography;

(f) violence towards, and abuse of, children is often linked to early and repeated exposure to pornography;

(g) children increasingly access the Internet outside their home environment; and

(h) previous inquiries in Australia have not adequately addressed the question of children ' s (those under 18 years-of-age) exposure to online pornography and the harm caused because of that access.

(2) That the following matter be referred to the Environment and Communications Legislation Committee for inquiry and report by the first sitting day in December 2016:

Harm being done to Australian children through access to pornography on the Internet, with particular reference to:

(a) trends of online consumption of pornography by children and their impact on the development of healthy and respectful relationships;

(b) current methods taken towards harm minimisation in other jurisdictions, and the effectiveness of those methods;

(c) the identification of any measures with the potential for implementation in Australia; and

(d) any other related matters.

Senator Siewert to move:

(1) That the following matter be referred to the Community Affairs References Committee for inquiry and report by 30 July 2016:

The indefinite detention of people with cognitive and psychiatric impairment in Australia, with particular reference to:

(a) the prevalence of imprisonment and indefinite detention of individuals with cognitive and psychiatric impairment within Australia;

(b) the experiences of individuals with cognitive and psychiatric impairment who are imprisoned or detained indefinitely;

(c) the differing needs of individuals with various types of cognitive and psychiatric impairments such as foetal alcohol syndrome, intellectual disability or acquired brain injury and mental health disorders;

(d) the impact of relevant Commonwealth, state and territory legislative and regulatory frameworks, including legislation enabling the detention of individuals who have been declared mentally -impaired or unfit to plead;

(e) compliance with Australia ' s human rights obligations;

(f) the capacity of various Commonwealth, state and territory systems, including assessment and early intervention, appropriate accommodation, treatment evaluation, training and personnel and specialist support and programs;

(g) the interface between disability services, support systems, the courts and corrections systems, in relation to the management of cognitive and psychiatric impairment;

(h) access to justice for people with cognitive and psychiatric impairment, including the availability of assistance and advocacy support for defendants;

(i) the role and nature, accessibility and efficacy of programs that divert people with cognitive and psychiatric impairment from the criminal justice system;

(j) the availability of pathways out of the criminal justice system for individuals with cognitive and psychiatric impairment;

(k) accessibility and efficacy of treatment for people who are a risk of harm to others;

(l) the use and regulation of restrictive practices and their impact on individuals with cognitive and psychiatric impairment;

(m) the impact of the introduction and application of the National Disability Insurance Scheme, including the ability of individuals with cognitive and psychiatric impairment to receive support under the National Disability Insurance Scheme while in detention; and

(n) the prevalence and impact of indefinite detention of individuals with cognitive and psychiatric impairment from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds, including the use of culturally appropriate responses.

(2) That for the purposes of this inquiry:

(a) indefinite detention includes all forms of secure accommodation of a person without a specific date of release; and

(b) this includes, but is not limited to, detention orders by a court, tribunal or under a disability or mental health act and detention orders that may be time limited but capable of extension by a court, tribunal or under a disability or mental health act prior to the end of the order.