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Thursday, 1 June 1989
Page: 3176


Senator WALTERS —I give notice that, on the next day of sitting, I shall move:

That the Senate-

(a) notes that the Federated Iron Workers Association has joined the Timber Workers Union in calling for their unions to disaffiliate from the ALP if the Parliamentary wing does not back down from the agreement with the Green Independents;

(b) further notes that:

(i) the Secretary of the Federated Iron- workers Association (Mr Harper) has said that the Liberal Party represented the views of the State's workers more so than the Labor Party,

(ii) Mr Shane Murphy, Secretary of the Timber Workers Union, said the ALP had become a reactionary party and that the accord showed a blatant disregard for the union movement and also said `We had long term projects and policies for all . . . Instead--

Senator Robert Ray-Mr President, I take a point of order. I raised the same point of order regarding Senator Walters yesterday. Firstly, she is putting argumentation into the text and, secondly, it appears to me that Senator Walters may be supporting a trade union. I draw your attention to that section of the Constitution that states that those who are insane cannot serve in this chamber.


The PRESIDENT —Order! There is no point of order.

Senator Lewis-Mr President, quite clearly the allegations in that last sentence should be withdrawn.


The PRESIDENT —I ask Senator Ray to withdraw that.

Senator Robert Ray-I withdraw.


The PRESIDENT —A notice of motion should not give detailed information. I said yesterday that we will have to refer this to the Procedure Committee. I ask Senator Walters to continue.


Senator WALTERS —I shall repeat that paragraph of the notice of motion:

(ii) Mr Shane Murphy, Secretary of the Timber Workers Union, said the ALP had become a reactionary party and that the accord showed a blatant disregard for the union movement and also said `We had long term projects and policies for . . . Instead they look like a bunch of hicks running around willy nilly.',

(iii) Mr Murphy also said, after talks with Mr Lennon, Secretary of the Trades and Labour Council, that fears about the effect of the accord had not been allayed and his members would continue with their plans for mass meetings to discuss the matter, and--


The PRESIDENT —Order! Senator Walters, under no circumstances can that be seen to be a notice of motion. You are making a speech. You are quoting somebody. A notice of motion must be in specific terms.


Senator WALTERS —I said that the Senate should note that these statements were made, Mr President. The final point in my notice of motion is as follows:

(iv) the sentiments about the Labor Green coalition agreement, as expressed by the Timber Workers Union and the Federated Ironworkers Association, are also shared by other unions including the Pulp and Paper Workers Federation and the Federated Clerks Union.


The PRESIDENT —Order! I will look at that notice of motion and I will alter it on the Notice Paper if I think that is necessary.

Senator Aulich-Mr President, can I seek a ruling from you? When you examine that notice of motion can you look at the quotation that is referred to by Senator Walters? I believe that part of the quotation may be a misinterpretation and a misrepresentation of what was said by Mr Murphy. I believe it is incumbent upon us in this chamber to ensure that such quotations do not damage the reputation of individuals outside this chamber under the cover of parliamentary privilege-a technique that Senator Walters is quite prone to use on many occasions. I seek your indulgence, Mr President, to ask that you examine that notice of motion.


The PRESIDENT —Order! I think there is a very good case to be made for no quotations to be allowed in notices of motion. As I said earlier, I will seek a meeting of the Procedure Committee to deal with notices of motion that give excessive information.