Note: Where available, the PDF/Word icon below is provided to view the complete and fully formatted document
 Download Current HansardDownload Current Hansard   

Previous Fragment    Next Fragment
Tuesday, 5 November 1985
Page: 1601

(Question No. 513)


Senator Jones asked the Minister for Aviation upon notice, on 10 September 1985:

(1) What makes and models of commercial aircraft are operated to and from Australian airports by the following airline companies (a) Trans Australian Airlines (TAA) (b) Ansett (c) Qantas.

(2) How many of each model are operated by each of the three airline companies.

(3) What is the age of each aircraft operated by the three airlines.

(4) What is the life expectancy of each of the models operated by the three airlines.

(5) Are maintenance checks increased as each aircraft grows older; if so, are these checks enforced and by whom; and are such checks carried out by employees of the individual airlines, or by independent personnel employed by a Government Department.


Senator Gietzelt —The Minister for Aviation has provided the following answer to the honourable senator's question:

(1) (2) and (3) The three major Australian airlines operate a total of 111 commercial airline type aircraft. Listed by make and model they are:

MAKES &MARKS OF AIRCRAFT-TAA, ANSETT, QANTAS

Company

Made by

Type

Model

No. on

register

oldest

manuf.

date

most

recent

manuf.

date

TAA

Airbus

A300

B4-203

4

1981

1982

Boeing

727

276

12

1972

1980

Douglas

DC-9

31

9

1967

1971

Fokker

F27

600

3

1970

1971

ANSETT

Boeing

727

277

13

1974

1981

Boeing

737

277

12

1981

1982

Boeing

767

277

5

1983

1984

British

Aerospace

BAe146

200A

2

1985

1985

Fokker

F27

200

5

1959

1968

Fokker

F27

400

5

1966

1970

Fokker

F27

500

6

1975

1977

Fokker

F28

1000

7

1969

1971

Fokker

F28

4000

2

1982

1982

QANTAS

Boeing

747

SP-38

2

1981

1981

Boeing

747

238B

19

1971

1981

Boeing

747

338

3

1984

1985

Boeing

767

238

2

1985

1985

Note: Because there are so many aircraft involved, the year of manufacture for the oldest and newest of each aircraft type has been provided.

(4) The majority of the airline aircraft operated by the Airlines have no fixed retirement life. Those that do are the Fokker F27 and F28 which have a 90 000 flights limit. None of these types on the Australian Register are anywhere near this limit. The design of the structures are such that economic considerations will generally decide the replacement time.

(5) Older airline aircraft are the subject of special audits to ensure the long term airworthiness of aircraft. Supplemental Inspection Programs have been promulgated in Australia for `high-time' B747, B727, F27 and F28 aircraft. A program for the DC9 is currently being developed. New aircraft such as the B767, designed to the current damage tolerance rules, have long term considerations built into the approved maintenance system. Inspections of aircraft are carried out by Airline personnel who have qualified for and been issued with the appropriate licences and certificates by the Department of Aviation. The Department is responsible for the approval of inspection programs and procedures and conducts surveillance checks to ensure compliance with procedures.