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Wednesday, 9 November 2016
Page: 3267


The SPEAKER (09:31): I present report No. 4 of the Selection Committee, relating to the consideration of committee and delegation business and private members' business on Monday, 21 November. The report will be printed in the Hansard fortoday, and the committee's determinations will appear on tomorrow's Notice Paper. Copies of the report have been placed on the table.

The report read as follows—

Report relating to the consideration of committee and delegation business and of private Members' business

1. The committee met in private session on Tuesday, 8 November 2016.

2. The committee determined the order of precedence and times to be allotted for consideration of committee and delegation business and private Members' business on Monday, 21 November 2016, as follows:

Items for House of Representatives Chamber (10.10 am to 12 noon)

PRIVATE MEMBERS' BUSINESS

Notices

1 MR BANDT: To present a Bill for an Act to amend the law in relation to workplace relations, and for related purposes. (Fair Work Amendment (Protecting Christmas) Bill 2016)

(Notice given 8 November 2016.)

Presenter may speak to the second reading for a period not exceeding 10 minutes—pursuant to standing order 41. Debate must be adjourned pursuant to standing order 142.

2 MR BANDT: To present a Bill for an Act to establish Renew Australia, and for related purposes. (Renew Australia Bill 2016)

(Notice given 8 November 2016.)

Presenter may speak to the second reading for a period not exceeding 10 minutes—pursuant to standing order 41. Debate must be adjourned pursuant to standing order 142.

3 MS C. F. KING: To present a Bill for an Act to amend the law in relation to logos used by political parties, and for related purposes. (Commonwealth Electoral Amendment (Protect the Eureka Flag) Bill 2016)

(Notice given 8 November 2016.)

Presenter may speak to the second reading for a period not exceeding 10 minutes—pursuant to standing order 41. Debate must be adjourned pursuant to standing order 142.

4 MR ALBANESE: To present a Bill for an Act to establish the High Speed Rail Planning Authority, and for related purposes. (High Speed Rail Planning Authority Bill 2016)

(Notice given 20 October 2016.)

Presenter may speak to the second reading for a period not exceeding 10 minutes—pursuant to standing order 41. Debate must be adjourned pursuant to standing order 142.

5 MS HENDERSON: To move:

That this House:

(1) notes that:

(a) UNICEF celebrates its 70th anniversary on 11 December 2016; and

(b) it is mandated by the United Nations General Assembly to advocate for the protection of children's rights, to help meet their basic needs and expand opportunities to reach their full potential;

(2) acknowledges the work of UNICEF which now operates in over 190 countries and territories and provides a range of important services including child protection, education and child survival needs (such as nutrition and sanitation);

(3) notes that the Government provides $21 million a year in core funding to UNICEF's regular resources as set out in the Strategic Partnership Framework 2016-2020 signed by the Minister for Foreign Affairs on 27 April 2016;

(4) acknowledges the Minister for Foreign Affairs' October 2016 announcement of $1.5 million in funding for UNICEF following Hurricane Matthew in Haiti; and

(5) congratulates UNICEF and its staff around the world for all the good work they do and wishes them well into the future.

(Notice given 8 November 2016.)

Time allotted—40 minutes.

Speech time limits—

Ms Henderson—5 minutes.

Other Members—5 minutes. each.

[Minimum number of proposed Members speaking = 8 x 5 mins]

The Committee determined that consideration of this should continue on a future day.

Orders of the day

1   Marriage Legislation Amendment Bill 2016 [No. 2] (Mr Bandt): Second reading—Resumption of debate (from12September2016).

Time allotted—20 minutes.

Speech time limits—

Other Members—5 minutes. each.

[Minimum number of proposed Members speaking = 4 x 5 mins]

The Committee determined that consideration of this should continue on a future day.

Notices—continued

6 MS VAMVAKINOU: To move:

That this House:

(1) acknowledges that:

(a) 500 to 700 Palestinian children are arrested, detained and prosecuted in the Israeli military court system each year;

(b) Human Rights Watch reported in April that arrests of Palestinian children by Israeli forces had doubled in the preceding six months;

(c) Defence for Children International research, based on 429 affidavits from Palestinian children, indicates that 97 per cent of children had no parent or legal counsel available during interrogation and 75 per cent endured some form of physical violence following arrest;

(d) the United States State Department's 2014 human rights report on Israel states that military courts have more than a 99 per cent conviction rate for Palestinian defendants;

(e) UNICEF has reported that ill-treatment in the Israeli military detention system remains widespread, systematic, and institutionalised throughout the process; and

(f) Australia raised concerns with Israel about the treatment of Palestinian minors in 2011 and 2014, however there has been little improvement concerning the treatment of Palestinian children by Israeli forces; and

(2) calls on the Australian Government to raise concerns with the Israeli Government about the treatment of Palestinian children.

(Notice given 18 October 2016.)

Time allotted—remaining private Members' business time prior to 12 noon.

Speech time limits—

Ms Vamvakinou—5 minutes.

Other Members—5 minutes. each.

[Minimum number of proposed Members speaking = 2 x 5 mins]

The Committee determined that consideration of this should continue on a future day.

Items for Federation Chamber (11 am to 1.30 pm)

PRIVATE MEMBERS' BUSINESS

Notices

1 MR PERRETT: To move:

That this House:

(1) recognises that:

(a) prior to the passage of the Parliamentary Privileges Act 1987 the Houses of the Australian Parliament had the power to expel a Senator or Member of the House of Representatives;

(b) the expulsion of a Member of this House is the most drastic of sanctions;

(c) on 11 November 1920, the then Member for Kalgoorlie, Mr Hugh Mahon, was expelled from this House; and

(d) Mr Mahon is the only Member to have ever been expelled from this House;

(2) acknowledges that Mr Mahon was expelled:

(a) by a motion brought on hastily and with limited time for debate;

(b) by a vote of the House on party lines; and

(c) without the due process and procedural fairness that such an important issue deserves; and

(3) recognises that:

(a) it was unjust on the limited evidence for the institution to which Mr Mahon had been democratically elected to reverse the decision of his constituents; and

(b) the expulsion of Mr Mahon was a misuse of the power then invested in the House.

(Notice given 10 October 2016.)

Time allotted—20 minutes.

Speech time limits—

Mr Perrett—5 minutes.

Other Members—5 minutes. each.

[Minimum number of proposed Members speaking = 4 x 5 mins]

The Committee determined that consideration of this should continue on a future day.

2 MR ZIMMERMAN: To move:

That this House:

(1) acknowledges that the Government won the election and has been getting on with the job of governing; and

(2) congratulates the Government for the following achievements:

(a) securing Australia's 25 consecutive year of economic growth;

(b) protecting our borders and making our nation more secure with over 800 days having passed without a successful people smuggling venture;

(c) delivering:

(i) a personal tax cut to 500,000 middle income Australians;

(ii) a fairer and more flexible superannuation system; and

(iii) $11 billion of budget repair;

(d) establishing a process which makes bank Chief Executive Officers answerable to the public through appearances before Parliament;

(e) legislating to protect volunteer firefighters from union takeovers;

(f) reintroducing bills to restore the rule of law on the nation's construction sites;

(g) securing the naval shipbuilding industry and jobs for the future;

(h) strengthening trade and defence ties with Singapore, creating thousands of new jobs;

(i) strengthening the United States alliance in defence, counter-terrorism and cyber security;

(j) reintroducing legislation to crack down on illegal firearms trafficking;

(k) increasing protection for women and children against domestic violence;

(l) growing our industries with record commodity prices and a $2.5 billion water infrastructure rollout to support farmers and the resource sector;

(m) fixing the problems in Vocational Education and Training and cracking down on dodgy providers;

(n) increasing digital literacy and improved school resourcing;

(o) supporting more Indigenous Australians through skills, jobs and language;

(p) signing new City Deals to improve housing and expand public transport;

(q) accelerating the broadband build and connecting rural Australia;

(r) securing an agreement with the states and territories on energy security and reforms for affordable, reliable power;

(s) protecting Medicare, improving primary health care, making over 2,000 medicines cheaper and simplifying private health care;

(t) saving lives through a National Cancer Screening Register;

(u) supporting the South Australian steel sector and jobs by providing a $49.2 million loan to Arrium;

(v) addressing long term welfare dependence;

(w) delivering better:

(i) tax arrangements for working holiday makers and backpackers; and

(ii) child care for 1 million Australians and lifting immunisation rates;

(x) showing a commitment to new resettlement programs for genuine refugees as a result of strong border policies; and

(y) boosting Australia's place in the workforce with access to new markets and stronger ties including with East Asia, Europe, and the United Kingdom.

(Notice given 8 November 2016.)

Time allotted—40 minutes.

Speech time limits—

Mr Zimmerman—5 minutes.

Other Members—5 minutes. each.

[Minimum number of proposed Members speaking = 8 x 5 mins]

The Committee determined that consideration of this should continue on a future day.

3 DR FREELANDER: To move:

That this House:

(1) notes:

(a) that the unemployment rate in Australia has barely fallen from immediate post Global Financial Crisis levels;

(b) Treasury projections that the unemployment in Australia is unlikely to improve in the next three years under current policy settings; and

(c) significant labour market indicators such as rate of under-employment and levels of long term and youth unemployment, are continuing concerns within the community and amongst economic commentators, as is the comparative decline in the availability of full time jobs;

(2) further notes that:

(a) rates on unemployment in many OECD counties have fallen significantly since 2012 while Australia's unemployment rate has remained stagnant; and

(b) Reserve Bank of Australia observations about the likely limited effect on economic activity of further interest rate cuts;

(3) recognises:

(a) the negative impact on the federal budget in continuing high levels of unemployment;

(b) the cost to individuals, the community and the economy in people not being able to find work; and

(c) the Government's failure to grow full-time employment opportunities; and

(4) urges the Government to give higher priority to addressing labour market stagnation and take whatever steps it can through fiscal policy and selective initiatives to address this ongoing blight on Australian society.

(Notice given 8 November 2016.)

Time allotted—30 minutes.

Speech time limits—

Dr Freelander—5 minutes.

Other Members—5 minutes. each.

[Minimum number of proposed Members speaking = 6 x 5 mins]

The Committee determined that consideration of this should continue on a future day.

4 MR RAMSEY: To move:

That this House:

(1) acknowledges that reducing social harm caused by welfare-fuelled alcohol, drug and gambling abuse is a key priority nationally and for local communities;

(2) recognises that the Government is currently trialling the cashless debit card in two communities—Ceduna in South Australia, and the East Kimberley in Western Australia—in partnership with local community leaders in those communities; and

(3) acknowledges the:

(a) hard work, dedication and commitment of community leaders in Ceduna and the East Kimberley in co-designing the trials with Government, and their leadership in its implementation and delivery in their communities; and

(b) positive initial results of the cashless debit card model in the two trial communities, including the strong positive feedback from the community on the ground.

(Notice given 8 November 2016.)

Time allotted—30 minutes.

Speech time limits—

Mr Ramsey—5 minutes.

Other Members—5 minutes. each.

[Minimum number of proposed Members speaking = 6 x 5 mins]

The Committee determined that consideration of this should continue on a future day.

5 MS L. M. CHESTERS: To move:

That this House:

(1) notes:

(a) the Fair Work Ombudsman's (FWO's) report Inquiry into the wages and conditions of people working under the 417 Working Holiday Visa Program (October 2016) found that more than one third of 417 visa holders claimed that they were paid less than the minimum wage;

(b) the inquiry found that the 417 visa program created an environment where unreasonable and unlawful requirements are being imposed on visa holders by unscrupulous businesses;

(c) the FWO, Ms Natalie James, said in a statement that the inquiry confirms that overseas workers seeking regional work to satisfy the 88 day requirement and obtain a second-year 417 visa are particularly vulnerable to exploitation;

(2) acknowledges:

(a) that in 2015-16, 76 per cent of litigations filed by the FWO involved visa holder workers;

(b) that the inquiry found instances of employers engaging in sophisticated labour supply chains involving sham contracting, where workers were in fact employees, to exploit vulnerable 417 visa holders to gain a competitive or commercial advantage through the reduction of labour costs; and

(c) findings from the inquiry found that the 417 visa program has been used to source an unpaid workforce, thus facilitating an unfair commercial advantage to these employers, distorting the market place and placing pressure on the domestic employment market;

(3) expresses its disappointment in the Government for announcing yet another taskforce, the Migrant Workers Taskforce, to look at the issue of worker exploitation, while there is still no legislation that has been presented to the Parliament that will change the law to protect exploited workers; and

(4) calls on the Government to join the Opposition in preventing workers from being exploited by supporting its legislation before the Parliament, the Fair Work Amendment (Protecting Australian Workers) Bill 2016.

(Notice given 18 October 2016.)

Time allotted—remaining private Members' business time prior to 1.30 pm

Speech time limits—

Ms L. M. Chesters—5 minutes.

Other Members—5 minutes. each.

[Minimum number of proposed Members speaking = 6 x 5 mins]

The Committee determined that consideration of this should continue on a future day.

Items for Federation Chamber (4.45 pm to 7.30 pm)

PRIVATE MEMBERS' BUSINESS

Orders of the day

MS VAMVAKINOU: Debate to be resumed on the motion of Ms Vamvakinou—

That this House:

(1) acknowledges that:

(a) 500 to 700 Palestinian children are arrested, detained and prosecuted in the Israeli military court system each year;

(b) Human Rights Watch reported in April that arrests of Palestinian children by Israeli forces had doubled in the preceding six months;

(c) Defence for Children International research, based on 429 affidavits from Palestinian children, indicates that 97 per cent of children had no parent or legal counsel available during interrogation and 75 per cent endured some form of physical violence following arrest;

(d) the United States State Department's 2014 human rights report on Israel states that military courts have more than a 99 per cent conviction rate for Palestinian defendants;

(e) UNICEF has reported that ill-treatment in the Israeli military detention system remains widespread, systematic, and institutionalised throughout the process; and

(f) Australia raised concerns with Israel about the treatment of Palestinian minors in 2011 and 2014, however there has been little improvement concerning the treatment of Palestinian children by Israeli forces; and

(2) calls on the Australian Government to raise concerns with the Israeli Government about the treatment of Palestinian children.

(Notice given 18 October 2016.

Time allotted—20 minutes.

Speech time limits—

Other Members—5 minutes. each.

[Minimum number of proposed Members speaking = 4 x 5 mins]

The Committee determined that consideration of this should continue on a future day.

Notices—continued

6 MR HASTIE: To move:

That this House:

(1) notes that as the terrorist group, the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant comes under increasing pressure in Iraq and Syria, coming with the risk that more foreign fighters will seek to leave, with some trying to return to their home countries, including Australia;

(2) acknowledges that the Government:

(a) has given greater support, funding and legislative powers to law enforcement and security agencies; and

(b) continues to work in close partnership with international partners to counter the terrorism risk; and

(3) notes that the national security challenges facing Australia continue to evolve.

(Notice given 8 November 2016.)

Time allotted—30 minutes.

Speech time limits—

Mr Hastie—5 minutes.

Other Members—5 minutes. each.

[Minimum number of proposed Members speaking = 6 x 5 mins]

The Committee determined that consideration of this should continue on a future day.

7 MR GILES: To move:

That this House:

(1) notes with deep concern that:

(a) income inequality in Australia is growing such that currently the top 20 per cent of households receive half of Australia's income while the bottom 20 per cent receive just four per cent; and

(b) in 2013 the top 1 per cent of Australian earners received 9 per cent of Australia's income, and the top 0.1 per cent received 2.5 per cent, in both cases representing the highest proportion since the 1950s, and a proportion which continues to increase;

(2) notes rapidly increasing executive and, in particular, Chief Executive Officer (CEO) remuneration, for example between 1971 and 2008, real CEO pay grew by nearly five times, while the real average weekly earnings grew just over one and a half times despite:

(a) research showing that executive pay increases are not closely related to company performance;

(b) the belief that large disparities between executive pay and average earnings might actually demotivate a company's employees and adversely affect priorities, as reported in the 2009 Productivity Commission inquiry into executive remuneration in Australia; and

(c) the belief that poor remuneration arrangements can promote inappropriate, risky short term decision making, carrying wider economic ramifications including a negative impact on productivity growth;

(3) notes the positive effect of past legislative efforts on ensuring corporate executive remuneration is transparent, particularly the 'two strikes' legislation which came into effect in 2011, acknowledging that mandatory disclosure of CEO pay ratios, as required in the United Kingdom and more recently in the United States, would:

(a) provide:

(i) important information to shareholders voting on executive remuneration; and

(ii) a more accurate measure of an important aspect of income inequality in Australia; and

(b) improve the health of our democracy by making important information more accessible to the public; and

(4) calls on the Government to consider following the lead of the United States in its Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act in mandating that public companies disclose the ratio of a CEO's annual total remuneration to the average annual total of all company employees.

(Notice given 8November 2016.)

Time allotted—30 minutes.

Speech time limits—

Mr Giles—5 minutes.

Other Members—5 minutes. each.

[Minimum number of proposed Members speaking = 6 x 5 mins]

The Committee determined that consideration of this should continue on a future day.

8 MR LITTLEPROUD: To move:

That this House:

(1) notes that:

(a) on 8 November at Government House the Governor-General awarded ten soldiers with military awards for actions at the Battle of Long Tan;

(b) these soldiers received these awards 50 years after the Battle of Long Tan:

(i) which was the most costly single battle fought by Australian soldiers in the Vietnam War, involving 105 Australians and three New Zealanders from D Company 6RAR and more than 2,000 enemy troops; and

(ii) where a total of 17 Australians were killed in action and 25 were wounded, one of whom later died from his wounds; and

(2) acknowledges:

(a) the ten soldiers who received an award, some posthumously, including Lieutenant Adrian Roberts, Sergeant Frank Alcorta, Lance Corporal Barry Magnussen (deceased), Second Lieutenant Gordon Sharp (deceased), Privates Neil Bextrum, Ron Brett (deceased), Ian Campbell, William Roche, Geoffrey Peters and Noel Grimes;

(b) the service and sacrifice of all those who served their country in Vietnam; and

(c) all of Australia's service men and women who display courage, bravery and mateship above and beyond the call of duty.

(Notice given 8 November 2016.)

Time allotted—35 minutes.

Speech time limits—

Mr Littleproud—10 minutes.

Other Members—5 minutes. each.

[Minimum number of proposed Members speaking = 1 x 10 mins + 5 x 5 mins]

The Committee determined that consideration of this should continue on a future day.

9 MR WATTS: To move:

That this House:

(1) acknowledges that White Ribbon:

(a) is a male led campaign to end male violence against women;

(b) is now active in over 60 countries around the world; and

(c) has ambassadors around Australia who are working to engage men and encourage them to take a leadership role in ending violence against women;

(2) notes that:

(a) in 2016 in Australia, each week approximately one woman is murdered by a partner or former partner;

(b) one in four Australian women has experienced physical or sexual violence by an intimate partner;

(c) men's violence against women is a symptom of gender inequality in our society; and

(d) social policy initiatives and law reform addressing gender inequality are central to reducing attitudes that support violence against women;

(3) recognises that:

(a) 25 November is White Ribbon Day; and

(b) the white ribbon is the symbol of the International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women; and

(4) supports White Ribbon and other organisations to eliminate violence against women.

(Notice given 8 November 2016.)

Time allotted—remaining private Members' business time prior to 7.30 pm

Speech time limits—

Mr Watts—5 minutes.

Other Members—5 minutes. each.

[Minimum number of proposed Members speaking = 10 x 5 mins]

The Committee determined that consideration of this should continue on a future day.