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46 th Parliament

Senate Notice Paper

No. 25 : Wednesday, 13 November 2019

The Senate meets at 9.30 am

Business for today . 1

Business of the Senate—Notices of motion » . 1

Government business—Orders of the day . 3

General business—Notices of « motion » . 5

Business for future consideration . 19

Other information . 31

Bills currently before committees . 31

Bills discharged or negatived . 32

Questions on notice . 32

Orders of the Senate . 32

Contingent notices of « motion » . 36

Appointments to statutory authorities . 39

Temporary chairs of committees . 39

 

 

 



 



Guide to the Notice Paper

Notifications prefixed by an * appear for the first time.

Further information can be found at www.aph.gov.au/Senate/business



Business for today

Business of the Senate—Notices of « motion »

Notice given 1 August 2019

1           Chair of the Standing Committee on Regulations and Ordinances ( Senator Fierravanti-Wells ): To move—That the Immigration (Guardianship of Children) Regulations 2018, made under the Immigration (Guardianship of Children) Act 1946 , be disallowed [F2018L01708].

Last day for resolving **

** Indicates sitting days remaining, including today, within which the « motion » must be disposed of or the regulation will be deemed to have been disallowed.

Notice of intention to withdraw at the giving of notices on 13 November 2019

( Notice given 12 November 2019 )

2          Senator Rice : To move—That the Gene Technology Amendment (2019 Measures No. 1) Regulations 2019, made under the Gene Technology Act 2000 , be disallowed [F2019L00573].

Last day for resolving **

** Indicates sitting days remaining, including today, within which the « motion » must be disposed of or the regulation will be deemed to have been disallowed.

Notice given 9 September 2019

3          Senators Siewert and McKim: To move—That the Quality of Care Amendment (Minimising the Use of Restraints) Principles 2019, made under the Aged Care Act 1997 , be disallowed [F2019L00511].

Two sitting days remain, including today, to resolve the « motion » or the instrument will be deemed to have been disallowed.

Notice given 17 October 2019

4         Senators Farrell, Sheldon and O’Neill: To move—That the following matter be referred to the Economics References Committee for inquiry and report by the last sitting day in June 2020:

The causes, extent and effects of unlawful non-payment or underpayment of employees’ remuneration by employers and measures that can be taken to address the issue, with particular reference to:

(a)              the forms of and reasons for wage theft and whether it is regarded by some businesses as ‘a cost of doing business’;

(b)              the cost of wage and superannuation theft to the national economy;

(c)              the best means of identifying and uncovering wage and superannuation theft, including ensuring that those exposing wage/superannuation theft are adequately protected from adverse treatment;

(d)             the taxation treatment of people whose stolen wages are later repaid to them;

(e)              whether extension of liability and supply chain measures should be introduced to drive improved compliance with wage and superannuation-related laws;

(f)               the most effective means of recovering unpaid entitlements and deterring wage and superannuation theft, including changes to the existing legal framework that would assist with recovery and deterrence;

(g)              whether Federal Government procurement practices can be modified to ensure that public contracts are only awarded to those businesses that do not engage in wage and superannuation theft; and

(h)             any related matters.

Notice of « motion » altered on 11 November 2019 pursuant to standing order 77.

Notice given 11 November 2019

5         Chair of the Environment and Communications References Committee ( Senator Hanson-Young ): To move—That the following matter be referred to the Environment and Communications References Committee for inquiry and report by 30 March 2020:

The deal struck between the Federal Government and the South Australian Government for 100GL of Murray-Darling River water to be cut from South Australia’s allocation, and the Commonwealth to fund the increased use of the State’s desalination plant to instead provide the same amount of water to the State, with particular reference to:

(a)              the consequences for the river system of taking 100GL plus conveyance water from downstream flows;

(b)              the mechanisms for ensuring that the water that South Australia is forgoing is actually delivered as intended, such as to small farmers to grow fodder;

(c)              the checks and transparency measures to ensure the program is not rorted or exploited;

(d)             whether the 100GL could have been delivered to New South Wales and Victorian farmers by a means other than reducing South Australia’s allocation, and whether that would have been more cost-effective;

(e)              the South Australian-commissioned desalination feasibility report;

(f)               whether $88.4 million to help offset costs of running the South Australian desalination plant is the most efficient and cost-effective measure to help farmers feed their stock;

(g)              legal provisions that allow Commonwealth and state governments to buy and sell water outside the provisions of the Water Act 2007 ; and

(h)             any other related matters.

Notice of « motion » altered on 12 November 2019 pursuant to standing order 77.



 

Government business—Orders of the day

1          National Disability Insurance Scheme Amendment (Streamlined Governance) Bill 2019 —( Senate bill )

Adjourned debate on the « motion » of the Assistant Minister for Forestry and Fisheries ( Senator Duniam )—That this bill be now read a second time.

And on the amendment moved by Senator Brown —At the end of the « motion » , add “but the Senate calls on the Government to:

(a)              remove the average staffing level cap for the National Disability Insurance Agency set out in Part 2 of Budget Paper No. 4 (2019-20) ; and

(b)              directly employ the number of people required to administer the National Disability Insurance Scheme and the National Disability Insurance Scheme Act 2013 ” ( Senator Siewert , in continuation, 17 October 2019 ).

2         Protection of the Sea (Prevention of Pollution from Ships) Amendment (Air Pollution) Bill 2019 —( Minister for Families and Social Services, Senator Ruston )

Second reading—Adjourned debate ( 17 October 2019 ).

3         Aged Care Legislation Amendment (New Commissioner Functions) Bill 2019 —( Senate bill ) —( Assistant Minister for Forestry and Fisheries, Senator Duniam )

Second reading—Adjourned debate ( 16 October 2019 ).

4         Treasury Laws Amendment (2018 Measures No. 2) Bill 2019 —( Minister for Families and Social Services, Senator Ruston )

Second reading—Adjourned debate ( 17 October 2019 ).

5         Counter-Terrorism Legislation Amendment (2019 Measures No. 1) Bill 2019 —( Assistant Minister for Forestry and Fisheries, Senator Duniam )

Second reading—Adjourned debate ( 1 August 2019 ).

6         Crimes Legislation Amendment (Sexual Crimes Against Children and Community Protection Measures) Bill 2019 —( Minister for Families and Social Services, Senator Ruston )

Second reading—Adjourned debate ( 17 October 2019 ).

7         Social Services Legislation Amendment (Drug Testing Trial) Bill 2019 —( Minister for Families and Social Services, Senator Ruston )

Second reading—Adjourned debate ( 17 October 2019 ).

8         National Health Amendment (Safety Net Thresholds) Bill 2019 —( Minister for Families and Social Services, Senator Ruston )

Second reading—Adjourned debate ( 17 October 2019 ).

9         Education Legislation Amendment (2019 Measures No. 1) Bill 2019 —( Assistant Minister for Forestry and Fisheries, Senator Duniam )

Second reading—Adjourned debate ( 11 November 2019 ).

10        Defence Service Homes Amendment Bill 2019 —( Senate bill ) —( Assistant Minister for Forestry and Fisheries, Senator Duniam )

Second reading—Adjourned debate ( 19 September 2019 ).

11        Treasury Laws Amendment (International Tax Agreements) Bill 2019 —( Assistant Minister for Forestry and Fisheries, Senator Duniam )

Second reading—Adjourned debate ( 11 November 2019 ).

12        Medical and Midwife Indemnity Legislation Amendment Bill 2019 —( Minister for Families and Social Services, Senator Ruston )

Second reading—Adjourned debate ( 17 October 2019 ).

13        Fair Work (Registered Organisations) Amendment (Ensuring Integrity) Bill 2019 —( Minister for Families and Social Services, Senator Ruston )

Second reading—Adjourned debate ( 31 July 2019 ).

14        Fair Work Laws Amendment (Proper Use of Worker Benefits) Bill 2019 —( Minister for Resources and Northern Australia, Senator Canavan )

Second reading—Adjourned debate ( 11 September 2019 ).

15        Military Rehabilitation and Compensation Amendment (Single Treatment Pathway) Bill 2019 —( Assistant Minister for Finance, Charities and Electoral Matters, Senator Seselja )

Second reading—Adjourned debate ( 16 September 2019 ).

16        New Skilled Regional Visas (Consequential Amendments) Bill 2019 —( Minister for Families and Social Services, Senator Ruston )

Second reading—Adjourned debate ( 17 October 2019 ).

17        Customs Amendment (Growing Australian Export Opportunities Across the Asia-Pacific) Bill 2019

Customs Tariff Amendment (Growing Australian Export Opportunities Across the Asia-Pacific) Bill 2019 ( Assistant Minister for Forestry and Fisheries, Senator Duniam )

Second reading—Adjourned debate ( 11 November 2019 ).

18        Migration Amendment (Repairing Medical Transfers) Bill 2019 —( Assistant Minister for Finance, Charities and Electoral Matters, Senator Seselja )

Second reading—Adjourned debate ( 29 July 2019 ).

19        Migration Amendment (Strengthening the Character Test) Bill 2019 —( Minister for Trade, Tourism and Investment, Senator Birmingham )

Second reading—Adjourned debate ( 19 September 2019 ).

20       Migration Amendment (Streamlining Visa Processing) Bill 2019 —( Minister for Resources and Northern Australia, Senator Canavan )

Second reading—Adjourned debate ( 11 September 2019 ).

General business—Notices of « motion »

A complete list of all general business notices of « motion » and orders of the day remaining on the Notice Paper is published at: www.aph.gov.au/Senate/business

Notice given 31 July 2019

84       Chair of the Standing Committee on Regulations and Ordinances ( Senator Fierravanti-Wells ): To move—That, in accordance with the recommendations of the Standing Committee on Regulations and Ordinances in its report, Parliamentary scrutiny of delegated legislation—

(1)   The standing orders be amended, with effect from 4 December 2019, as follows:

             (a)   omit standing order 23, substitute:

23 Scrutiny of Delegated Legislation

                          (1)    A Standing Committee for the Scrutiny of Delegated Legislation shall be appointed at the commencement of each Parliament.

                          (2)    All instruments made under the authority of Acts of the Parliament, which are subject to disallowance, disapproval or affirmative resolution by the Senate and which are of a legislative character, shall stand referred to the committee for consideration and, if necessary, report.

                          (3)    The committee shall scrutinise each instrument as to whether:

                                     (a)    it is in accordance with its enabling Act and otherwise complies with all legislative requirements;

                                     (b)    it appears to be supported by a constitutional head of legislative power and is otherwise constitutionally valid;

                                      (c)    it makes rights, liberties, obligations or interests unduly dependent on insufficiently defined administrative powers;

                                     (d)    those likely to be affected by the instrument were adequately consulted in relation to it;

                                      (e)    its drafting is defective or unclear;

                                      (f)    it, and any document it incorporates, may be freely accessed and used;

                                      (g)    the accompanying explanatory material provides sufficient information to gain a clear understanding of the instrument;

                                     (h)    it trespasses unduly on personal rights and liberties;

                                       (i)    it unduly excludes, limits or fails to provide for independent review of decisions affecting rights, liberties, obligations or interests;

                                      (j)    it contains matters more appropriate for parliamentary enactment; and

                                     (k)    it complies with any other ground relating to the technical scrutiny of delegated legislation that the committee considers appropriate.

                          (4)    The committee shall also scrutinise each instrument to determine whether the attention of the Senate should be drawn to the instrument on the ground that it raises significant issues, or otherwise gives rise to issues that are likely to be of interest to the Senate.

                          (5)    The committee may, for the purpose of reporting on its terms of reference, consider any proposed or draft legislative instrument, including an exposure draft of such an instrument.

                          (6)    (a) The committee shall consist of 6 senators, 3 being members of the government party nominated by the Leader of the Government in the Senate, and 3 being senators who are not members of the government party, nominated by the Leader of the Opposition in the Senate or by any minority groups or independent senators.

                                   (b) The nominations of the opposition or any minority groups or independent senators shall be determined by agreement between the opposition and the minority groups or independent senators, and, in the absence of agreement duly notified to the President, the question of the representation on the committee shall be determined by the Senate.

                          (7)    The committee may appoint sub-committees consisting of 3 or more of its members, and refer to any such sub-committee any matters which the committee is empowered to consider.

                          (8)    The committee shall elect as chair a member appointed to the committee on the nomination of the Leader of the Government in the Senate.

                          (9)    The committee shall elect as deputy chair a member appointed to the committee on the nomination of the Leader of the Opposition in the Senate, and the member so elected shall act as chair of the committee when there is no chair or the chair is not present at a meeting of the committee.

                        (10)    Where votes on a question before the committee  are equally divided, the chair, or the deputy chair when acting as chair, shall have a casting vote.

                        (11)    The committee and any sub-committee shall have power to send for persons and documents, to move from place to place, and to meet and transact  business in  public or private session and notwithstanding any prorogation of the Parliament or dissolution of the House of Representatives.

                        (12)    The committee may inquire into and report on any matter related to the technical scrutiny of delegated legislation.

                        (13)    The committee may appoint with the approval of the President a legal adviser to the committee.

                        (14)    The committee shall be empowered to print from day to day any of its documents and evidence. A daily Hansard shall be published of public proceedings of the committee.

                        (15)    The committee may report from time to time its proceedings and evidence and any recommendations, and shall make regular reports of the progress of the proceedings of the committee.

             (b)   omit standing order 25(2)(a), substitute:

                          (a)    The legislation committees shall inquire into and report upon:

                                       (i)    estimates of expenditure in accordance with standing order 26,

                                      (ii)    bills or draft bills referred to them by the Senate,

                                     (iii)    legislative instruments made in the portfolios allocated to them,

                                    (iv)    annual reports in accordance with paragraph (20), and

                                     (v)    the performance of departments and agencies allocated to them.

(2)   The initial members of the Standing Committee for the Scrutiny of Delegated Legislation shall be the members of the Standing Committee on Regulations and Ordinances appointed at the commencement of this Parliament.

(3)   The Standing Committee for the Scrutiny of Delegated Legislation have the power to consider and use the records of the Standing Committee on Regulations and Ordinances.

Notice given 11 November 2019

215      Senator Watt : To move—That there be laid on the table by the Minister representing the Minister for Industry, Science and Technology, by no later than 3.30 pm on 14 November 2019, the following documents referred to in Auditor-General’s report no. 12 2019-20, Award of Funding Under the Regional Jobs and Investment Packages (RJIP):

(a)              the Memorandum of Understanding signed in July 2017, under which the Business Grants Hub was engaged to administer aspects of the program;

(b)              documents that show how the cost of $8.078 million was determined;

(c)               all other documents relating to the Business Grants Hub being selected to administer the RJIP, including emails/briefs between the Minister, the Minister's office, the Department of Industry, Innovation and Science (the Department) and the Business Grants Hub, as well as all correspondence between the Department and the Department of Infrastructure, Transport, Cities and Regional Development; and

(d)              the request for quote and the final agreed contract between the Department and the contractor who undertook the assessment process at a cost of $3.15 million.

Notice of « motion » altered on 12 November 2019 pursuant to standing order 77.

216     Senator Watt : To move—That there be laid on the table by the Minister representing the Minister for Infrastructure, Transport and Regional Development, by no later than 3.30 pm on 14 November 2019, the following documents referred to in Auditor-General’s report no. 12 2019-20, Award of Funding Under the Regional Jobs and Investment Packages (RJIP):

(a)              all written briefings provided to Ministerial Panels to inform the award of grant funding in each of the 10 regions;

(b)              all written responses from Ministerial Panels to the Department of Infrastructure, Transport, Cities and Regional Development (the Department) following consideration of advice provided in relating to paragraph (a) above, including:

(i)                all records of requests by Panels to award funding to applications that had not been recommended by the Department, and all reasons for Panels awarding funding to applications that had not been recommended by the Department,

(ii)              all records of requests by Panels to not award funding to applications that had been recommended by the Department, and all records of reasons for Panels not awarding funding to applications that had been recommended by the Department,

(iii)            any documents identifying projects identified as ineligible, including any that received funding under the RJIP,

(iv)            any documents identifying late applications, including any projects that received funding under the RJIP, and

(v)              any documents identifying projects where there was a request for a co-funding exemption, including all records related to the decisions on whether to grant an exemption;

(c)               a copy of the assurance review contracted by the Department of Infrastructure, Transport, Cities and Regional Development; and

(d)              all documents provided to Ministers/Ministerial Panels containing the scoring/assessment of all grant applications under the RJIP, and all responses by Ministers/Ministerial Panels to this advice.

Notice of « motion » altered on 12 November 2019 pursuant to standing order 77.

218     Senator Rice : To move—That the Senate—

(a)              notes:

(i)                the Victorian Government’s announcement last week that they intend to end native forest logging in Victoria by 2030,

(ii)              that clear-fell logging of public native forests continues in Western Australia, New South Wales, Victoria and Tasmania, and continues to receive significant public subsidy, and

(iii)            that plantation-sourced wood and fibre makes up 88% of Australia’s timber output; and

(b)              calls on the Federal Government to:

(i)                take national leadership to halt destructive logging and protect native forests for their values as complex ecosystems, including wildlife habitat, water supply, carbon storage and regional tourism, and

(ii)              establish a national aim of phasing out native forest logging, and for plantations and farm forestry to provide 100% Australian-grown wood and fibre.

219     Senator Rice : To move—That there be laid on the table by the Minister representing the Assistant Treasurer, by 28 November 2019:

(a)              a copy of the unused census test form, including new questions on gender and sexuality;

(b)              any analysis undertaken by the Australian Bureau of Statistics as to whether these questions contribute to an understanding of the health needs, outcomes and wellbeing of the LGBTIQ+ community; and

(c)               any communications between Ministers or their offices and the Australian Bureau of Statistics in relation to these questions.

220     Senator Keneally : To move—That there be laid on the table by the Minister representing  the Minister for Home Affairs, by no later than 11.45 am on 14 November 2019, a copy of the full report prepared by the Independent Health Advice Panel for the third quarter of 2019, and the Minister’s summary and response, in accordance with Section 199E of the Migration Act 1958 .

Notice of « motion » altered on 12 November 2019 pursuant to standing order 77.

221      Senators Green and Farrell: To move—That the Senate—

(a)              recognises that, 40 years after the Matildas first took to the field to play in the World Women’s Invitational Tournament in 1978, Football Federation Australia and Professional Footballers Australia (PFA) have delivered a new four-year collective bargaining agreement, which will see the Matildas and Socceroos receive an equal share of revenue, closing the pay gap between Australia’s national football teams;

(b)              notes that:

(i)                this agreement has been reached after the extensive collective bargaining efforts of female footballers through the PFA, and

(ii)              this is an important step in closing the gender pay gap in professional sport;

(c)               notes the current gender pay gap for Australian women is 14% - a statistic which has only decreased by 5% over the past two decades; and

(d)              calls on the Federal Government to do more to ensure Australian women are not worse off in any workplace.

222      Senator Patrick : To move—That the following bill be introduced: A Bill for an Act to amend the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 , and for related purposes. Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Amendment (Tax Transparency in Procurement and Grants) Bill 2019 .

223     Senator « Steele » - « John » : To move—That the Senate—

(a)              notes that:

(i)                there are an estimated 100 living survivors from the thalidomide disaster in Australia who are experiencing rapid deterioration of their health and quality of life,

(ii)              the Community Affairs References Committee conducted an inquiry into the support for Australia’s thalidomide survivors and a report, presented on 22 March 2019, found the current supports available to thalidomide survivors are inadequate - the committee made 11 recommendations, including that the Government should issue a formal apology, as well as provide compensation to enable survivors to live with their disability, and the findings received unanimous support from the committee,

(iii)            the Federal Government has not yet responded to the report, and has not indicated a clear timeline for its response to survivors, and

(iv)            survivors have clearly articulated the need for urgency in enacting all recommendations of the report, especially those which call for the provision of compensation to all survivors; and

(b)              calls on the Federal Government to:

(i)                urgently respond to the committee report and provide a clear timeline for that response to survivors, and

(ii)              enact all recommendations of the committee report without delay.

224     Senator Hanson-Young : To move—That the Senate notes that:

(a)              Norwegian company Equinor has an application before the National Offshore Petroleum Safety Environmental Management Authority (NOPSEMA) to drill for oil in the Great Australian Bight;

(b)              NOPSEMA has rejected Equinor’s environment plan stating that Equinor must provide it with further information about matters relating to consultation, source control, oil spill risk, and matters protected under Part 3 of the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 ;

(c)               modelling commissioned by The Australia Institute shows Equinor will pay the Norwegian Government more than it will pay in Australian Government taxes, and up to 27 times more than it will pay to the South Australian Government;

(d)              if Equinor’s application is ultimately approved by NOPSEMA, a foreign-owned company will therefore take the vast majority of financial gains while exploiting and putting at risk our precious marine and coastal environment, and tens of thousands of tourism and fishing industry jobs; and

(e)              the ecological and environmental significance of the Great Australian Bight is, in fact, priceless.



 

225     Senators Faruqi and Waters: To move—That the Senate—

(a)              notes that:

(i)                states of emergency have been declared in New South Wales and Queensland due to catastrophic bushfire risk,

(ii)              lives have been lost, more than 150 homes have been destroyed, and almost 1,000,000 hectares of land in New South Wales have been razed since the start of this year’s unprecedented bushfire season,

(iii)            in New South Wales, the Greater Sydney and Hunter areas are set to experience catastrophic fire conditions for the first time on record,

(iv)            in Queensland, a state of emergency has been declared in 42 local government areas across the south east and central Queensland, with at least 11,000 hectares and more than a dozen homes lost,

(v)              the climate crisis is making bushfires like these more frequent and more intense, and making fire seasons longer and more dangerous each year, and

(vi)            burning coal, oil and gas is dangerously heating our planet, and Australia is the third largest exporter of carbon pollution in the world;

(b)              expresses its whole-hearted support for communities across New South Wales and Queensland devastated by these raging bushfires;

(c)               thanks the courageous firefighters and emergency services for their service to communities in need; and

(d)              calls on the Federal Government to:

(i)                act decisively to build resilience in communities, and

(ii)              declare a climate emergency.

227     Senator Faruqi : To move—That the Senate—

(a)              notes that on 17 October 2019, 7.30 revealed that:

(i)                horses bred for racing, and subject to interstate trade, are being sent to knackeries and abattoirs to be slaughtered,

(ii)              the horse racing industry produced more than 14,000 foals in the last financial year,

(iii)            footage of horses matched to the national industry’s official record of thoroughbreds - the Australian Stud Book­ - showed around 300 racehorses, representing almost $5 million in prize money, were detected at Meramist Abattoir in Queensland in just 22 days alone,

(iv)            horses like Tahitian Black, who won $400,000 in prize money, were trialled and raced dozens of times for people to wager on for sport, and have been discarded at knackeries and used for pet food, and

(v)              thoroughbred race horses as young as two years old, fillies and colts, and the brood mares that produced them, are ending up at slaughter houses and knackeries; and

(b)              calls on the Federal Government to request His Excellency the Governor­-General of the Commonwealth of Australia to issue Letters Patent to establish a royal commission to inquire into cruelty to race horses.

228     Senator Siewert : To move—That the Senate—

(a)              notes that:

(i)                in December 2018, the Department of Social Services (the Department) figures recorded that 199,907 Newstart recipients had a ‘partial capacity to work’ meaning they are disabled or have an illness that prevents them from working 30 hours per week,

(ii)              when the Department released figures to June 2019, it was revealed that the Department had been under-reporting the number of people with a ‘partial capacity to work’ and there were in fact 284,900 on Newstart with ‘partial capacity to work’ in December 2018,

(iii)            figures to June 2019, show there are now 289,489, of a total of 686,000 people on Newstart, who are categorised as having a ‘partial capacity to work’ meaning 42% of Newstart recipients now have an illness or disability,

(iv)            only 14.5% of people with a ‘partial capacity to work’ are reporting earnings,

(v)              the inquiry into the jobactive program, undertaken by the Education and Employment References Committee, found that the employment services framework is not fit for purpose, and

(vi)            the jobactive system is making people sick and depressed and exacerbating existing conditions;

(b)              expresses its deep concern that:

(i)                42% of Newstart recipients who are sick and disabled people are struggling to pay bills often forced to choose between a meal or medicine, while looking for work, and

(ii)              jobactive and disability employment services (DES) are not adequately supporting sick and disabled people; and

(c)               calls on the Federal Government to make it a priority to help alleviate poverty by immediately increasing Newstart.

229     Senator Griff : To move—That the Senate—

(a)              notes that:

(i)                the Stop the Debt Trap Alliance has today released its report entitled, The Debt Trap , and

(ii)              the report contains new data showing the scale of financial harm that payday lending is causing in Australia;

(b)              recognises that:

(i)                payday loans trap people in a cycle of debt and leave them in a significantly worse position than they were in prior to taking out the loan,

(ii)              payday lenders target people who are economically disadvantaged and excluded from accessing mainstream finance,

(iii)            over a five-year period, around 15% of payday loan borrowers fall into a debt spiral,

(iv)            the number of women using payday loans has risen from 177,000 in 2016 to 287,000 in 2019 - this represents a rise to 23.13% of all borrowers,

(v)              digital platforms have contributed to a rapid growth in payday lending, with payday loans that originate online expected to hit 85.8% by the end of 2019, and

(vi)            in the 2015 report of the Australian Securities and Investments Commission entitled, The cost of consumer leases for household goods , it found in one case a dryer cost a Centrelink recipient the equivalent of an interest rate of 884%;

(c)               further notes that:

(i)                in 2015, the Federal Government initiated a review into Small Amount Credit Contracts and accepted the vast majority of recommendations made in the final report of the review delivered in 2016, and

(ii)              in October 2017, the Federal Government released exposure draft legislation on Small Amount Credit Contract and Consumer Lease Reforms but since then has taken no action to introduce or attempt to pass the bill; and

(d)              calls on the Federal Government to urgently introduce and pass legislation to provide critical protections and stop the harm caused by payday loans and consumer leases.

230     Senators Birmingham, Fawcett, Ruston, Bernardi, Antic, Gallacher, Hanson-Young, Wong, Patrick, Marielle Smith, Farrell and Griff: To move—That the Senate—

(a)              notes that today, 12 November 2019, marks the 100th anniversary of the commencement of the first ever flight from England to Australia;

(b)              records its enduring respect for the feat achieved by the four-person crew, comprising pilot Ross Smith, navigator Keith Smith and mechanic Wally Shiers, all from South Australia, and mechanic Jim Bennett from Victoria;

(c)               recalls that they:

(i)                competed alongside five other Australian crews who responded to the invitation by then Prime Minister Billy Hughes to race from London to Darwin in a British built plane in pursuit of prize money of £10,000, provided they completed the journey within 30 days,

(ii)              departed Hounslow, England, on 12 November 1919, stopping at Lyons, Pisa, Venturina, Rome, Taranto, Canea, Cairo, Damascus, Ramadi, Basra, Bundar Abbas, Karachi, Delhi, Muttra, Allahabad, Calcutta, Akyab, Rangoon, Bangkok, Singora, Singapore, Batavia, Surabaya, Bima and Atamboea before landing in Darwin 27 days and 20 hours later at 3.50 pm on 10 December 1919, with an actual flying time of 135 hours,

(iii)            overcame great adversity to become the only crew to reach Darwin within the 30 days, with two crews perishing in accidents, two others abandoning the race due to crashes and the other crew taking 206 days to reach Darwin,

(iv)            flew a Vickers Vimy, registration number G-EAOU, made largely of wood and fabric, with an open cockpit that variously exposed them to snow, sleet, hail and extreme heat, which is one of only two such aircraft still in existence, housed at Adelaide Airport, and is scheduled to be relocated into a modern, purpose built facility within the airport terminal by 2021, and

(v)              were widely praised around the world for this accomplishment, with the New York Times editorialising that Captain Ross Smith “must be hailed as the foremost living aviator”; and

(d)              extends its thanks to those who have helped to coordinate celebrations to mark the centenary of this epic flight and, in doing so, to raise awareness of the courage, ingenuity and perseverance of these skilled aviators.

Notice given 12 November 2019

*231    Senators Sterle and Gallacher: To move—That the Senate—

(a)              notes:

(i)                the Government’s failure to provide a response to the reports of the Rural and Regional Affairs and Transport References Committee (the Committee) on aspects of road safety in Australia,

(ii)              that, in 2018, both the Rural and Regional Affairs and Transport Legislation and References Committees sent two letters to the Minister, drawing attention to the Committee’s reports into aspects of road safety in Australia,

(iii)            that the Committee received correspondence in reply from the Minister, advising that the Department of Infrastructure, Transport, Cities and Regional Development was ‘consulting with other portfolios to finalise the Australian Government response to the Rural and Regional Affairs and Transport References Committee inquiry into aspects of road safety in Australia’,

(iv)            that it has now been a further nine months since the Minister’s advice to the Committee that a government response to its road safety reports was being finalised, and a government response has still not been presented to the Senate, and

(v)              significant concern about this lack of response, given the importance of improving road safety in Australia and preventing unnecessary deaths on our roads;

(b)              calls on the Federal Government to:

(i)                respond to the Committee’s recommendations in reports presented in 2016 and 2017, so that the recently established Joint Select Committee on Road Safety can properly consider the best ways to reduce road accident rates and deaths on Australian roads, and

(ii)              take immediate action to implement the recommendations of the Committee’s road safety inquiry; and

(c)               requires the Minister representing the Minister for Infrastructure, Transport and Regional Development to table, by no later than 3.30 pm on 14 November 2019, the government’s response to the Committee’s reports.

*232   Senator Sheldon : To move—That the Senate—

(a)              recognises there is a crisis in Australia in the exploitation of migrant workers;

(b)              notes the findings in a report, dated November 2017, Wage theft in Australia: Findings of the National Temporary Migrant Work Survey , authored by Migrant Worker Justice Initiative, UNSW and UTS, that include:

(i)                two-thirds of migrant workers reporting that their employer, at one point or another, failed to provide a payslip - with 44% reporting they had never received a payslip for their work,

(ii)              28% of workers in the hospitality industry experiencing their employer confiscating their passport,

(iii)            30% of survey participants earning $12 per hour or less - this is approximately half the minimum wage for a casual employee in many of the jobs in which temporary migrants work, and

(iv)            46% of participants earning $15 per hour or less;

(c)               notes an October 2018 report, by the Migrant Worker Justice Initiative which found that fewer than one in 10 (9%) of migrant workers took action to recover unpaid wages, even though most know they were being underpaid;

(d)              commends UnionsNSW and the Immigration Advice and Rights Centre for their Visa Assist program which provides free legal advice and assistance to migrant union members; and

(e)              notes that, despite accepting all the recommendations contained in the report of the Migrant Workers’ Taskforce, released on 7 March 2019, the Federal Government has failed to act on recommendations 3 to 9, 11 to 13 and 18 to 22.

*233   Senator Griff : To move—That the Senate—

(a)              congratulates all finalists and recipients of the 2020 South Australian of the Year awards;

(b)              further congratulates eye surgeon and blindness prevention pioneer, Dr James Muecke, AM, for being honoured as South Australian of the Year for 2020;

(c)               recognises that Dr Muecke, AM, has dedicated his working life to fighting blindness prevention and ophthalmic research;

(d)              notes that in 2000, Dr Muecke, AM, co-founded Vision Myanmar at the South Australian Institute of Ophthalmology, a $1 million program that has developed and operated eye health and blindness initiatives in the Southeast Asian nation;

(e)              further notes that Dr Muecke, AM, is the founder and chairman of Sight for All, a social impact organisation which aims to create a world where everyone can see;

(f)                acknowledges that Sight for All creates low-cost programs to fight blindness through research, education and infrastructure, and is closely involved in projects operating in Ethiopia, nine Asian countries, and in mainstream and Aboriginal communities across Australia;

(g)              notes that, according to the Institute of Health and Welfare, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people over the age of 40 years, have 6 times the rate of blindness of other Australians, and 94% of vision loss in Indigenous Australians is preventable or treatable; and

(h)              calls on the Federal Government to correct the marked under-resourcing of specialist eye services provided to remote and disadvantaged communities, when compared with the national average.

*234   Senator « Steele » - « John » : To move—That the Senate—

(a)              notes that, in October 2019, the Conservation Council of Western Australia released its ‘Clean State’ report, which found that:

(i)                LNG production in Western Australia (WA) is the fastest-growing pollution source in Australia, and has been the primary driver of recent national emissions growth,

(ii)              the rapid expansion in LNG production in WA, in combination with inadequate carbon pollution controls, has had a dramatic impact on the State’s total emissions - while all other States’ emissions are falling, WA’s have risen by 23% since 2005,

(iii)            Chevron and Woodside are responsible for most of this pollution and there are no effective controls on their operations,

(iv)            over the next 12 years, the total cumulative emissions from WA’s five current LNG facilities (384Mt) will cancel out the entire amount of abatement expected to be delivered under the Emissions Reduction Fund (ERF) (375Mt), at a total cost of $4.55 billion the ERF is effectively an Australian taxpayer-funded offset program for Chevron and Woodside’s operations to 2031,

(v)              offsetting LNG pollution in WA would create 4000 jobs, and

(vi)            there is no such thing as clean gas; and

(b)              calls on the Federal Government to:

(i)                acknowledge the ‘clean gas myth’, and

(ii)              commit to moving away from extracting and exporting LNG.

*235   Chair of the Select Committee on the effectiveness of the Australian Government’s Northern Australia agenda ( Senator Watt ): To move—That paragraph (5) of the resolution of the Senate of 4 July 2019, appointing the Select Committee on the effectiveness of the Australian Government’s Northern Australia agenda, be amended to provide: That 3 members of the committee constitute a quorum of the committee, provided that in a deliberative meeting the quorum shall include one Government member and one Opposition member.

*236   Leader of Pauline Hanson’s One Nation ( Senator Hanson ): To move—

(1)               That the Senate notes that:

(a)              on 15 March 2019, the Federal Government announced that it would progress a mandatory code of conduct for the dairy industry;

(b)              the current exposure draft of the Competition and Consumer (Industry Codes—Dairy) Regulations 2019 differs from an earlier exposure draft, in that it provides that milk processors will be able to retrospectively reduce the minimum price paid to producers under a milk supply agreement in circumstances that are ‘beyond reasonable control of the processor’; and

(c)              the Minister for Agriculture, Senator McKenzie, stated during a media interview on 12 November 2019 on ABC Radio National, that ‘our legal drafters have interpreted the feedback we got through consultation and have actually reflected that in the words we have today’.

(2)              That there be laid on the table by the Minister for Agriculture, by 5 pm on 25 November 2019:

(a)              the drafting instructions provided to legal drafters to make changes to the previous exposure draft of the Competition and Consumer (Industry Codes—Dairy) Regulations 2019; and

(b)              all correspondence between milk processors and the Minister for Agriculture, and milk processors and the Department of Agriculture during the period 1 March and 12 November 2019.

*237   Senators O’Neill, Farrell, Polley, Ciccone and Marielle Smith: To move—That the Senate—

(a)              recognises that:

(i)                85% of retail and fast food workers had experienced abuse from customers at work,

(ii)              for retail and fast food workers, this abuse can severely impact their physical and psychological health and it cannot continue,

(iii)            the Christmas holidays period is the busiest time for retail workers, and

(iv)            every worker has the right to be able to do their job in a safe environment; and

(b)              acknowledges the work of the Shop, Distributive and Allied Employees’ Association in representing its members in retail and fast food, and advocating for industry changes to ensure that customers cannot continue this behaviour and build better protections for retail and fast food workers.

*238   Senator Faruqi : To move—That the Senate—

(a)              notes, with deep concern, recent comments from the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights, Mr Rupert Colville that:

(i)                an undeclared curfew is still in place in large parts of the Kashmir Valley, and that this curfew prevents the free movement of people, hampers their ability to exercise their right to peaceful assembly and restricts their rights to health, education and freedom of religion and belief,

(ii)              there have been allegations of excessive use of force against protestors, and unconfirmed reports of civilian deaths and injuries,

(iii)            all internet services remain blocked in the Kashmir Valley, and

(iv)            hundreds of political and civil society leaders have been detained;

(b)              notes that Kashmiris have a right to self-determination and to live their lives free of violence, militarisation, curfews and limits to freedom of speech; and

(c)               urges the Australian Government to use all diplomatic means available to call on the Indian Government to reverse its decision to remove the autonomy of Kashmir, to release political prisoners, to lift the curfew and allow freedom of movement, communication, speech and assembly to the people of Kashmir, and to respect Kashmiris’ right to self-determination.

*239   Senator Waters : To move—That the Senate—

(a)              notes that:

(i)                in May 2019, the Victorian Essential Services Commission agreed to update its Energy Retail Code (the Code) to improve protections for customers affected by family violence, with effect from 1 January 2020,

(ii)              changes to the Code implement a recommendation of the Royal Commission into Family Violence, and were developed in consultation with energy and community sector participants, and

(iii)            the revised Code will provide practical support and protection to those experiencing domestic and family violence by requiring energy providers to:

(A)             adopt policies to assist customers affected by family violence, including through consideration for hardship programs,

(B)             provide customers experiencing family violence with flexible assistance in managing their personal and financial security,

(C)             develop policies to ensure the « privacy » of contact details are protected in a situation where a customer is escaping a family violence situation, and

(D)            provide comprehensive and ongoing training to all responsible staff regarding family violence;

(b)              commends the Victorian Government and the Essential Services Commission for adopting these measures; and

(c)               calls on the Minister for Energy and Emissions Reduction to discuss the development of a national framework of Family Violence Support Provisions for Energy Retailers with Energy Ministers at the upcoming COAG Energy Council Meeting.

*240   Senators Duniam, Askew, Abetz, Chandler and Colbeck: To move—That the Senate—

(a)              notes:

(i)                the devastating impact of bushfires currently burning across Australia,

(ii)              the tragic loss of life, loss of and damage to property, and the impact on the livelihoods and communities of many Australians, and

(iii)            the extraordinary resilience of these communities and emergency service personnel in responding to these tragic and challenging circumstances;

(b)              acknowledges the immense risk being taken by our firefighting personnel, both paid and voluntary; and

(c)               particularly acknowledges the Tasmanian firefighting personnel from the Tasmanian Fire Service, Parks and Wildlife Services and Sustainable Timbers Tasmania assisting in New South Wales, which is a great representation of the Australian spirit of helping out when needed.

*241     Senator Siewert : To move—That the following bill be introduced: A Bill for an Act to amend the Governor-General Act 1974 , and for related purposes. Governor-General Amendment (Cessation of Allowances in the Public Interest) Bill 2019 .

*242   Senator Rice : To move—That the Senate—

(a)              notes that:

(i)                this week is Transgender Awareness Week, and

(ii)              Transgender Awareness Week is an opportunity to learn about gender diversity, work to remove all forms of discrimination against transgender and gender diverse people, and commit to being better allies; and

(b)              calls on all parliamentarians to:

(i)                commit to learning more about the lives and experiences of transgender and gender diverse people,

(ii)              elevate the voices of transgender and gender diverse people, especially during Transgender Awareness Week, and

(iii)            support the provision of essential health, social, cultural, and community services for trans and gender diverse people and their families, delivered with the meaningful input and involvement of these communities.

*243   Senator Hanson-Young : To move—That the Senate—

(a)              notes that:

(i)                since 2013, more than $300 million has been cut from the Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC) by the Coalition Government,

(ii)              the ABC has confirmed it will not buy the non-commercial rights to next year’s Olympic Games in Tokyo, meaning there will be no live broadcast for the first time since 1952, and

(iii)            the ABC has cited ‘budget pressures’ as being behind the decision; and

(b)              calls on the Federal Government to restore every dollar cut from the ABC’s budget since 2013.

*244   Leader of Pauline Hanson’s One Nation ( Senator Hanson ): To move—That the Senate—

(a)              notes:

(i)                the statement made by the Queensland Premier, Ms Annastacia Palaszczuk, reported in the Brisbane Times on 30 October 2019, indicating she would be open to discussing the development of a ‘smaller version of the Bradfield scheme’ with Prime Minister Scott Morrison, and

(ii)              that, on 1 November 2019, the Courier Mail reported that LNP Leader, Ms Deb Frecklington, has committed to an updated version of the Bradfield Scheme in the form of a ‘multibillion-dollar water scheme that could drought-proof parched western Queensland’; and

(b)              calls on the Federal Government to take the necessary steps to ensure the construction of a Bradfield-type scheme can begin, in Queensland, as swiftly as possible.

*245   Senator Siewert : To move—That the Senate—

(a)              notes that:

(i)                the 2019 Anglicare Rental Affordability Snapshot found that there were no affordable properties in any capital city for a single person on Newstart or Youth Allowance,

(ii)              the low level of appropriate and affordable properties available to rent for households on the Newstart Allowance and Youth Allowance, strongly indicates the likelihood that many of those households will be living in housing stress or housing that is not appropriate,

(iii)            the lack of affordable housing means that people on Newstart and Youth Allowance are spending a disproportionately high percentage of their income support on housing, resulting in them not being able to afford other essentials like food, energy and health, and

(iv)            poverty is a well-established social determinant of health, including psychological health, and persistent poverty plays a demonstrable role in increasing levels of psychological distress; and

(b)              calls on the Federal Government to immediately increase Newstart and Youth Allowance to allow people in our community to have dignity of choice and to help address housing stress.

Business for future consideration

On the next day of sitting (14 November 2019)
General Business—Notice of « motion »

Notice given 11 November 2019

226     Senator Waters : To move—That the Senate—

(a)              notes that:

(i)                the overall national toll for women killed by violence, since the start of 2019, now stands at 47, as reported by Counting Dead Women Australia from Destroy The Joint,

(ii)              there is no national government reporting program to record the ongoing toll of women killed by violence in real-time,

(iii)            on average, one woman is murdered every week by her current or former partner,

(iv)            according to the Australian Bureau of Statistics Personal Safety Survey 2016:

(A)             more than 370,000 Australian women are subjected to violence from men each year,

(B)             1 in 3 Australian women has experienced physical violence,

(C)             1 in 5 Australian women has experienced sexual violence,

(D)            1 in 6 Australian women has experienced physical or sexual violence by a current or former partner,

(E)             1 in 4 Australian women has experienced emotional abuse by a current or former partner,

(F)             Australian women are nearly three times more likely than men to experience violence from an intimate partner, and

(G)            Australian women are 2.5 times more likely to be hospitalised for assault injuries arising from family and domestic violence than men, with hospitalisation rates rising by 23% since 2014-15,

(v)              in 2017, young women aged between 15-34 accounted for more than half of reported sexual assaults,

(vi)            there is growing evidence that women with disabilities are more likely to experience violence,

(vii)          Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women report experiencing violence at 3.1 times the rate of non-Indigenous women,

(viii)        in 2016-17, Indigenous women were 32 times as likely to be hospitalised due to family violence as non-Indigenous women,

(ix)            the Fourth Action Plan of the National Plan to Reduce Violence against Women and their Children 2010-2022 , states that the overall prevalence of violence against women will only start to decrease in the very long term as gender roles change, and

(x)              the Fourth Action Plan recognises that demand for domestic and family violence services has increased, and will continue to increase; and

(b)              calls on the Federal Government to:

(i)                recognise domestic violence against women as a national security crisis,

(ii)              adequately fund frontline domestic, family and sexual violence and crisis housing services to ensure that all women seeking safety can access these services when and where they need them,

(iii)            legislate for 10 days paid domestic and family violence leave so that women do not have to choose between paying the bills and seeking safety,

(iv)            ensure that all government-funded counselling services for domestic and family violence are delivered by expert family violence service providers, in accordance with the National Outcome Standards for Perpetrator Interventions,

(v)              implement all 25 recommendations contained in the report of the Finance and Public Administration References Committee on domestic violence in Australia, tabled on 20 August 2015, and

(vi)            maintain and publish an official real-time national toll of women killed by violence in Australia.

On 20 November 2019
Business of the Senate—Order of the day

1          Legal and Constitutional Affairs Legislation Committee

Report to be presented on the provisions of the Customs Amendment (Product Specific Rule Modernisation) Bill 2019 . ( Referred pursuant to Selection of Bills Committee report. )

Government Business—Order of the day

1          Customs Amendment (Product Specific Rule Modernisation) Bill 2019 —( Assistant Minister for Forestry and Fisheries, Senator Duniam )

Second reading—Adjourned debate ( 11 November 2019 ).

On 22 November 2019
Business of the Senate—Order of the day

1          Education and Employment Legislation Committee

Report to be presented on the provisions of the Education Legislation Amendment (Tuition Protection and Other Measures) Bill 2019 , the VET Student Loans (VSL Tuition Protection Levy) Bill 2019 and the Higher Education Support (HELP Tuition Protection Levy) Bill 2019. ( Referred pursuant to Selection of Bills Committee report. )

Government Business—Order of the day

1          Education Legislation Amendment (Tuition Protection and Other Measures) Bill 2019

VET Student Loans (VSL Tuition Protection Levy) Bill 2019

Higher Education Support (HELP Tuition Protection Levy) Bill 2019 ( Assistant Minister for Forestry and Fisheries, Senator Duniam )

Second reading—Adjourned debate ( 11 November 2019 ).

On 25 November 2019
General Business—Notice of « motion »

Notice given 30 July 2019

72       Senator Kitching : To move—

(1)               That a select committee, to be known as the Select Committee on Integrity, be established to inquire into and report on the integrity of government administration, with particular reference to:

(a)              the adequacy and performance of existing integrity measures including, but not limited to:

(i)                the Statement of Ministerial Standards, and

(ii)              the Lobbyist Code and Register of Lobbyists;

(b)              the funding, functions and performance of Commonwealth integrity agencies;

(c)              the adequacy of government responses to Senate committee reports;

(d)             the adequacy of government responses to Senate orders for the production of documents;

(e)              the operation of the Commonwealth Procurement Framework;

(f)               the administration of the Freedom of Information Act 1982 legislation;

(g)              any proposals to strengthen the integrity of government administration; and

(h)             any related matters.

(2)              That the committee present its final report on or before the third sitting day of 2021.

(3)              That the committee consist of 8 senators, as follows:

(a)              2 nominated by the Leader of the Government in the Senate;

(b)              2 nominated by the Leader of the Opposition in the Senate;

(c)              1 nominated by the Leader of the Australian Greens; and

(d)             3 nominated by minor party and independent senators.

(4)              That:

(a)              participating members may be appointed to the committee on the nomination of the Leader of the Government in the Senate, the Leader of the Opposition in the Senate or any minority party or independent senator; and

(b)              participating members may participate in hearings of evidence and deliberations of the committee, and have all the rights of members of the committee, but may not vote on any questions before the committee.

(5)              That 4 members of the committee constitute a quorum of the committee.

(6)              That the committee may proceed to the dispatch of business notwithstanding that not all members have been duly nominated and appointed and notwithstanding any vacancy.

(7)              That the committee elect as chair one of the members nominated by the Leader of the Opposition in the Senate and as deputy chair one of the members nominated by the Leader of the Australian Greens or by minor party and independent senators.

(8)              That the deputy chair shall act chair when the chair is absent from a meeting of the committee or the position of chair is temporarily vacant.

(9)              That, in the event of an equality of voting, the chair, or the deputy chair when acting as chair, have a casting vote.

(10)           That the committee have power to appoint subcommittees consisting of 3 or more of its members, and to refer to any such subcommittee any of the matters which the committee is empowered to consider.

(11)            That the committee and any subcommittee have power to send for and examine persons and documents, to move from place to place, to sit in public or in private, notwithstanding any prorogation of the Parliament or dissolution of the House of Representatives, and have leave to report from time to time its proceedings and the evidence taken and such interim recommendations as it may deem fit.

(12)           That the committee be provided with all necessary staff, facilities and resources and be empowered to appoint persons with specialist knowledge for the purposes of the committee with the approval of the President.

(13)           That the committee be empowered to print from day to day such papers and evidence as may be ordered by it, and a daily Hansard be published of such proceedings as take place in public.

Three sitting days after today (26 November 2019)
Business of the Senate—Notices of « motion »

Notice given 11 September 2019

1           Chair of the Standing Committee on Regulations and Ordinances ( Senator Fierravanti-Wells ): To move—That the Air Services Regulations 2019, made under the Air Services Act 1995 , be disallowed [F2019L00371].

Four sitting days remain, including today, to resolve the « motion » or the instrument will be deemed to have been disallowed.

2          Chair of the Standing Committee on Regulations and Ordinances ( Senator Fierravanti-Wells ): To move—That the Road Vehicle Standards Rules 2018, made under the Road Vehicle Standards Act 2018 , be disallowed [F2019L00198].

Four sitting days remain, including today, to resolve the « motion » or the instrument will be deemed to have been disallowed.

On 26 November 2019
Business of the Senate—Notice of « motion »

Notice given 2 July 2019

1          Senator Rice : To move—That the following matter be referred to the Legal and Constitutional Affairs References Committee for inquiry and report by 3 December 2019:

The continuing discrimination against lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, gender diverse, intersex and queer people and their families in Australia, its prevalence and its impacts, including:

(a)              existing discrimination within federal, state and territory law and policy;

(b)              experience of discrimination in Australian life, including but not limited to educational settings, workplaces, aged care, healthcare, sporting clubs and organisations, religious organisations, the provision of government services, including where contracted out, and in the provision of goods, services, housing and accommodation;

(c)              where discrimination is sanctioned by federal, state and territory legislation and where it is occurring in breach or potential breach of legislation;

(d)             how this discrimination affects the human rights, legal rights, access to justice, health, wellbeing and educational and economic outcomes of LGBTIQ+ people in Australia;

(e)              the additional and compounding impacts of discrimination on LGBTIQ+ people and their families who are Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander, of different or minority race, ethnicity or religion, or on the grounds of their migrant status, age, ability and socio-economic background or circumstances, who have intersectional LGBTIQ+ identities, or who have a range of these personal characteristics;

(f)               how the experience of discrimination on LGBTIQ+ people and their families differs for young people;

(g)              how the experience of discrimination on LGBTIQ+ people and their families differs based on whether they live in urban, regional, rural or remote areas;

(h)             the specific discrimination, stigmatisation and human rights violations, including harmful practices in medical settings, experienced by people born with variations of sex characteristics, including infants, children and adolescents, and also encompassing prenatal interventions due to variations of sex characteristics;

(i)                the broad range of sexual orientation and gender identity change efforts and associated formal and informal activities, particularly by religious organisations, and the impacts of these on lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, gender diverse and queer people;

(j)                the reforms and initiatives required to remedy prejudice, stigma and discrimination against LGBTIQ+ people and their families, including legislative and policy reforms, funding for training and education programs, funding for community and government initiatives, development of funded government strategies, better liaison between government, relevant NGOs and the LGBTIQ+ community, and the development of national standards for best-practice legislative, policy and program initiatives; and

(k)              any other related matters.

Five sitting days after today (28 November 2019)
Business of the Senate—Notices of « motion »

Notice given 16 September 2019

1           Chair of the Standing Committee on Regulations and Ordinances ( Senator Fierravanti-Wells ): To move—That the Quality of Care Amendment (Minimising the Use of Restraints) Principles 2019, made under the Aged Care Act 1997 , be disallowed [F2019L00511].

Six sitting days remain, including today, to resolve the « motion » or the instrument will be deemed to have been disallowed.



 

2          Senator McKim, on behalf of the Parliamentary Joint Committee on Human Rights: To move—That the Quality of Care Amendment (Minimising the Use of Restraints) Principles 2019, made under the Aged Care Act 1997 , be disallowed [F2019L00511].

Six sitting days remain, including today, to resolve the « motion » or the instrument will be deemed to have been disallowed.

On 28 November 2019
Business of the Senate—Orders of the day

1          Privileges—Standing Committee

Report to be presented on the development of a foreign influence transparency scheme.

2         Rural and Regional Affairs and Transport Legislation Committee

Report to be presented on the provisions of the Agricultural and Veterinary Chemicals Legislation Amendment (Australian Pesticides and Veterinary Medicines Authority Board and Other Improvements) Bill 2019 . ( Referred pursuant to Selection of Bills Committee report. )

On 3 December 2019
General Business—Notice of « motion »

Notice given 11 November 2019

217      Senator Brown : To move—That the Senate notes:

(a)              that 3 December 2019 is the International Day of People with Disability;

(b)              that the theme for 2019 is ‘Empowering persons with disabilities and ensuring inclusiveness and equality’;

(c)               that 3 December is recognised each year as the day for the celebration of the achievements of people living with disability;

(d)              that it is also the day when we promote awareness of the challenges faced by people with disability, and the role that communities and society can play in accelerating the eradication of barriers to social inclusion, equality, participation and citizenship;

(e)              that approximately 1 billion people worldwide, and 3.96 million people in Australia, live with disability - this represents 15% of the global population and 20% of the population of Australia; and

(f)                the remarkable contributions people with disability make to Australia, and congratulates all of the organisations and communities throughout Australia that are celebrating this important day.

On 4 December 2019
Business of the Senate—Orders of the day

1          Jobs for the Future in Regional Areas—Select Committee

Report to be presented.



 

2         Community Affairs Legislation Committee

Report to be presented on the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare Amendment (Assisted Reproductive Treatment Statistics) Bill 2019 . ( Referred pursuant to Selection of Bills Committee report. )

On 5 December 2019
Business of the Senate—Orders of the day

1          Environment and Communications Legislation Committee

Report to be presented on the Competition and Consumer Amendment (Prevention of Exploitation of Indigenous Cultural Expressions) Bill 2019. ( Referred pursuant to Selection of Bills Committee report. )

2         Rural and Regional Affairs and Transport References Committee

Report to be presented on the feasibility of a National Horse Traceability Register for all horses.

3         Economics References Committee

Report to be presented on regional inequality in Australia.

On 7 February 2020
Business of the Senate—Order of the day

1          Economics Legislation Committee

Report to be presented on the provisions of the Currency (Restrictions on the Use of Cash) Bill 2019 . ( Referred pursuant to Selection of Bills Committee report. )

Government Business—Order of the day

1          Currency (Restrictions on the Use of Cash) Bill 2019 —( Assistant Minister for Forestry and Fisheries, Senator Duniam )

Second reading—Adjourned debate ( 11 November 2019 ).

On the last sitting day in February 2020
Business of the Senate—Order of the day

1          Legal and Constitutional Affairs References Committee

Report to be presented on the impact of changes to service delivery models on the administration and running of Government programs.

On 27 February 2020
Business of the Senate—Order of the day

1          Foreign Affairs, Defence and Trade References Committee

Report to be presented on Australia’s declarations made under certain international laws.

On 28 February 2020
Business of the Senate—Order of the day

1          Legal and Constitutional Affairs Legislation Committee

Report to be presented on the provisions of the Native Title Legislation Amendment Bill 2019 . ( Referred pursuant to Selection of Bills Committee report. )

On 1 March 2020
Business of the Senate—Order of the day

1          Corporations and Financial Services—Joint Statutory Committee

Report to be presented on the regulation of auditing in Australia.

On the first sitting day in March 2020
Business of the Senate—Order of the day

1          Economics References Committee

Report to be presented on Australia’s oil and gas reserves.

On the first sitting Wednesday in March 2020
Business of the Senate—Order of the day

1          Community Affairs References Committee

Report to be presented on Centrelink’s compliance program.

On the third sitting day in March 2020
Business of the Senate—Order of the day

1          Rural and Regional Affairs and Transport References Committee

Report to be presented on Australia’s dairy industry.

On 16 March 2020
Business of the Senate—Orders of the day

1          Environment and Communications References Committee

Report to be presented on the disclosure and reporting of sensitive and classified information.

2         Environment and Communications References Committee

Report to be presented on the impact of feral deer, pigs and goats in Australia.

On 27 March 2020
Business of the Senate—Order of the day

1          Community Affairs References Committee

Report to be presented on the adequacy of Newstart and related payments and alternative mechanisms to determine the level of income support payments in Australia.

On or before 30 March 2020
Business of the Senate—Order of the day

1          Road Safety—Joint Select Committee

Interim report to be presented.

On 31 March 2020
Business of the Senate—Order of the day

1          Environment and Communications Legislation Committee

Report to be presented on the Coal-Fired Power Funding Prohibition Bill 2017 . ( Referred pursuant to Selection of Bills Committee report. )

April 2020
Business of the Senate—Order of the day

1          Rural and Regional Affairs and Transport References Committee

Report to be presented on the road transport industry.

On the last sitting day of the 2020 Autumn sittings
Business of the Senate—Order of the day

1          Environment and Communications References Committee

Report to be presented on Australia’s faunal extinction crisis.

On the Thursday of the first sitting week in May 2020
Business of the Senate—Order of the day

1          Environment and Communications Legislation Committee

Report to be presented on the Product Stewardship Amendment (Packaging and Plastics) Bill 2019 . ( Referred pursuant to Selection of Bills Committee report. )

On the last sitting day in May 2020
Business of the Senate—Orders of the day

1          Legal and Constitutional Affairs References Committee

Report to be presented on nationhood, national identity and democracy.

2         Environment and Communications References Committee

Report to be presented on the impact of seismic testing on fisheries and the marine environment.

On the first sitting day in June 2020
Business of the Senate—Order of the day

1          Community Affairs References Committee

Report to be presented on Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder.

On the Wednesday of the first sitting week in June 2020
Business of the Senate—Order of the day

1          Rural and Regional Affairs and Transport References Committee

Report to be presented on policy, regulatory, taxation, administrative and funding priorities for Australian shipping.

On the last sitting day in June 2020
Business of the Senate—Order of the day

1          Economics References Committee

Report to be presented on Australia’s sovereign naval shipbuilding capability.

On or before 31 July 2020
Business of the Senate—Order of the day

1          Road Safety—Joint Select Committee

Final report to be presented.

On 30 September 2020
Business of the Senate—Order of the day

1          Rural and Regional Affairs and Transport References Committee

Report to be presented on the management of the Inland Rail project.

On 1 October 2020
Business of the Senate—Order of the day

1          Rural and Regional Affairs and Transport References Committee

Report to be presented on water quality outcomes in the Great Barrier Reef.

On 7 October 2020
Business of the Senate—Order of the day

1          Australia’s Family Law System—Joint Select Committee

Report to be presented.

On or before the first sitting day in October 2020
Business of the Senate—Order of the day

1          Financial Technology and Regulatory Technology—Select Committee

Report to be presented.

On 1 November 2020
Business of the Senate—Orders of the day

1          Multi-Jurisdictional Management and Execution of the Murray Darling Basin Plan—Select Committee

Report to be presented.

2         Select Committee on the Multi-Jurisdictional Management and Execution of the Murray Darling Basin Plan

Report to be presented on the Constitution Alteration (Water Resources) 2019 . ( Referred pursuant to Selection of Bills Committee report. )

On or before the final sitting day of 2020
Business of the Senate—Order of the day

1          Effectiveness of the Australian Government’s Northern Australia agenda—Select Committee

Report to be presented.

On the last sitting day in May 2022
Business of the Senate—Order of the day

1          Implementation of the National Redress Scheme—Joint Select Committee

Report to be presented.

Within 6 months of the Joint Standing Committee on Electoral Matters receiving the reference
Business of the Senate—Order of the day

1          Electoral Matters—Joint Standing Committee

Report to be presented on a review of the operation of the amendments, dealing with foreign donations and related matters, made by the Electoral Legislation Amendment (Electoral Funding and Disclosure Reform) Act 2018 , to commence on the second anniversary for the Royal Assent of the Electoral Legislation Amendment (Electoral Funding and Disclosure Reform) Act 2018 .

( Bill received royal assent on 29 November 2018. )

Date unspecified
Business of the Senate—Order of the day

1          Community Affairs References Committee

Report to be presented on a possible cancer cluster on the Bellarine Peninsula.



 

Other information

Bills currently before committees

 

Agricultural and Veterinary Chemicals Legislation Amendment (Australian Pesticides and Veterinary Medicines Authority Board and Other Improvements) Bill 2019 [provisions] ‡

Referred to Rural and Regional Affairs and Transport Legislation Committee (referred 19 September 2019; reporting date: 28 November 2019)

Australian Institute of Health and Welfare Amendment (Assisted Reproductive Treatment Statistics) Bill 2019 ‡

Referred to Community Affairs Legislation Committee (referred 25 July 2019; reporting date: 4 December 2019)

Coal-Fired Power Funding Prohibition Bill 2017 ‡

Referred to Environment and Communications Legislation Committee (referred 4 July 2019; reporting date: 31 March 2020)

Competition and Consumer Amendment (Prevention of Exploitation of Indigenous Cultural Expressions) Bill 2019 ‡

Referred to Environment and Communications Legislation Committee (referred 4 July 2019; reporting date: 5 December 2019)

Constitution Alteration (Water Resources) 2019 ‡

Referred to Select Committee on the Multi-Jurisdictional Management and Execution of the Murray Darling Basin Plan (referred 12 September 2019; reporting date: 1 November 2020)

Currency (Restrictions on the Use of Cash) Bill 2019 [provisions] ‡

Referred to Economics Legislation Committee (referred 19 September 2019; reporting date: 7 February 2020)

Customs Amendment (Product Specific Rule Modernisation) Bill 2019 [provisions] ‡

Referred to Legal and Constitutional Affairs Legislation Committee (referred 19 September 2019; reporting date: 20 November 2019)

Education Legislation Amendment (Tuition Protection and Other Measures) Bill 2019 [provisions], the VET Student Loans (VSL Tuition Protection Levy) Bill 2019 [provisions] and the Higher Education Support (HELP Tuition Protection Levy) Bill 2019 [provisions] ‡

Referred to the Education and Employment Legislation Committee (referred 17 October 2019; reporting date: 22 November 2019)

Native Title Legislation Amendment Bill 2019 [provisions] ‡

Referred to Legal and Constitutional Affairs Legislation Committee (referred 17 October 2019; reporting date: 28 February 2020)

Product Stewardship Amendment (Packaging and Plastics) Bill 2019 ‡

Referred to Environment and Communications Legislation Committee (referred 12 September 2019; reporting date: the Thursday of the first sitting week in May 2020)

‡ Reference adopted by the Senate following a recommendation of the Selection of Bills Committee.

Bills discharged or negatived

Private senators’ bills

Plebiscite (Future Migration Level) Bill 2018

Second reading negatived, 29 July 2019.

Protecting Australian Dairy Bill 2019

Second reading negatived, 11 November 2019.

 

Questions on notice

Questions remaining unanswered

Nos 651, 675, 902 to 941.

Question nos, as shown, from 651 to 675 remain unanswered for 30 or more days (see standing order 74(5)).

The full text of Question on Notice and their answers are available online at Questions on Notice .

 

Orders of the Senate

Allocation of departments/agencies

That departments and agencies be allocated to legislative and general purpose standing committees as follows:

Community Affairs

Health

Social Services, including Services Australia

Economics

Industry, Innovation and Science

Treasury

Education and Employment

Education

Employment, Skills, Small and Family Business, including Industrial Relations

Environment and Communications

Communications and the Arts

Environment and Energy

Finance and Public Administration

Finance

Parliament

Prime Minister and Cabinet

Foreign Affairs, Defence and Trade

Defence, including Veterans’ Affairs

Foreign Affairs and Trade

Legal and Constitutional Affairs

Attorney-General, excluding Industrial Relations

Home Affairs

Rural and Regional Affairs and Transport

Agriculture

Infrastructure, Transport, Cities and Regional Development.

( Agreed to 4 July 2019 )

Consideration of disallowance motions

(1)               That on Tuesday, 12 November 2019—

(a)              the notice of « motion » proposing the disallowance of the ASIC Corporations (Banking Code of Practice - Revocation of 2018 Approval) Instrument 2019/662 and the ASIC Corporations (Approval of Banking Code of Practice) Instrument 2019/663, standing in the name of Senator Roberts, be called on for debate by no later than 6 pm; and

(b)              if consideration of the « motion » listed in paragraph (a) is not concluded at 6.30 pm, or at the expiration of 30 minutes after the moving of the « motion » , whichever is the earlier, the questions on the unresolved « motion » shall then be put.

(2)              That on Wednesday, 13 November 2019—

(a)              the notice of « motion » proposing the disallowance of the Gene Technology Amendment (2019 Measures No. 1) Regulations 2019, standing in the name of Senator Rice, be called on for debate at 3.30 pm;

(b)              if consideration of the « motion » listed in paragraph (a) is not concluded at 4 pm, the questions on the unresolved « motion » shall then be put;

(c)              immediately after consideration of the « motion » listed in paragraph (a) has concluded, the notice of « motion » proposing the disallowance of the Immigration (Guardianship of Children) Regulations 2018, standing in the name of the Chair of the Standing Committee on Regulations and Ordinances (Senator Fierravanti-Wells), be called on for debate; and

(d)             if consideration of the « motion » listed in paragraph (c) is not concluded at 4.30 pm, the questions on the unresolved « motion » shall then be put.



 

(3)              That—

(a)              if the notice of « motion » proposing the disallowance of the Quality of Care Amendment (Minimising the Use of Restraints) Principles 2019, standing in the name of Senators Siewert and McKim for 12 November 2019, has not been resolved by 14 November 2019, that notice of « motion » be called on by no later than 3.30 pm on 14 November 2019; and

(b)              if consideration of the « motion » listed in paragraph (a) is not concluded by 4 pm, the questions on the unresolved « motion » shall then be put.

 ( Agreed to 12 November 2019 )

Environment and Communications References Committee—Determination of committee chair—Standing order 25(9)

That, pursuant to standing order 25(9), the Senate determines:

(a)              that the chair of the Environment and Communications References Committee shall be elected by that committee from members nominated by minor parties or independent senators; and

(b)              that this order remain in effect until the President is duly notified of an agreement that meets the terms of standing order 25(9)(c).

( Agreed to 2 November 2011; varied 13 September 2016 )

Estimates hearings—2018-19 additional estimates; 2019-20 supplementary Budget estimates

(1)               That the 2019-20 supplementary Budget estimates hearings be scheduled as follows:

Monday, 21 October and Tuesday, 22 October 2019 (supplementary hearings—Group A)

Wednesday, 23 October and Thursday, 24 October 2019 (supplementary hearings—Group B).

(2)              That cross portfolio estimates hearings on Indigenous matters and on Murray-Darling Basin Plan matters be scheduled for Friday, 25 October 2019, but not restricted to that day.

(3)              That the committees consider the proposed expenditure in accordance with the allocation of departments and agencies to committees agreed to by the Senate.

(4)             That committees meet in the following groups:

Group A:

Environment and Communications

Finance and Public Administration

Legal and Constitutional Affairs

Rural and Regional Affairs and Transport



 

Group B:

Community Affairs

Economics

Education and Employment

Foreign Affairs, Defence and Trade.

( Agreed to 4 July 2019 )

Estimates questions (unanswered)—2019-20 Budget estimates

That—

(a)              answers to outstanding questions taken on notice in relation to the 2018-19 additional estimates and the 2019-20 Budget estimates, and which remained unanswered at the beginning of the 46th Parliament, be provided to legislation committees by 31 July 2019; and

(b)              for the purposes of standing order 74(5), the day set for answering each of the unanswered questions is 31 July 2019.

( Agreed to 29 July 2019 )

Formal business and suspensions of standing orders—Standing order 66—Amendment

That, in accordance with the recommendation in the Procedure Committee’s first report of 2019, standing order 66 be amended as follows:

After paragraph (3), insert:

(4)              The question on any « motion » to suspend standing orders moved in the following circumstances shall be put immediately without any amendment or debate:

(a)              any « motion » to suspend standing orders to provide for the consideration of a « motion » for which formality has been denied; and

(b)              any other « motion » to suspend standing orders moved during consideration of formal business under standing order 66.

( Agreed to 4 July 2019 )

Indigenous Australians—
Closing the Gap statement—Resolution

That each year, on the day on which the Prime Minister presents the annual report on progress in meeting the ‘Closing the Gap’ targets, the sitting of the Senate be suspended 10 minutes prior to the time set for the presentation of the report in the House of Representatives, until the ringing of the bells, to enable senators to attend.

Languages—Amendment to standing order 35 and resolution

At the end of standing order 35, add :

(3)              If evidence is heard by a committee in an Indigenous Australian language the transcript of that evidence shall record both:

(a)              the evidence as submitted in the Indigenous Australian language; and

(b)              an English translation of the evidence.

Resolution :

The Senate resolves that, where a committee has heard evidence in an Indigenous Australian language, the transcription by Hansard staff of the evidence as submitted, and its translation into English, should be assisted by the person who gave evidence or a person from their community.

( Agreed to 17 October 2019 upon adoption of the recommendation in the Procedure Committee’s second report of 2019 )

Meeting of Senate—2019

That the days of meeting of the Senate for the remainder of 2019 be as follows:

Winter sittings:

Monday, 22 July to Thursday, 25 July

Monday, 29 July to Thursday, 1 August

Spring sittings:

Monday, 9 September to Thursday, 12 September

Monday, 16 September to Thursday, 19 September

Monday, 14 October to Thursday, 17 October

Monday, 11 November to Thursday, 14 November

Monday, 25 November to Thursday, 28 November

Monday, 2 December to Thursday, 5 December.

( Agreed to 4 July 2019 )

Contingent notices of « motion »

Conduct of business

1          Leader of the Government in the Senate (Senator Cormann): To move (contingent on the Senate on any day concluding its consideration of any item of business and prior to the Senate proceeding to the consideration of another item of business)—That so much of the standing orders be suspended as would prevent a minister moving a « motion » to provide for the consideration of any matter.

2         Leader of the Opposition in the Senate (Senator Wong)

Leader of the Australian Greens (Senator Di Natale)

Leader of Pauline Hanson’s One Nation (Senator Hanson)

Senator Bernardi

Senator Patrick

To move (contingent on the Senate on any day concluding its consideration of any item of business and prior to the Senate proceeding to the consideration of another item of business)—That so much of the standing orders be suspended as would prevent the senator moving a « motion » relating to the conduct of the business of the Senate or to provide for the consideration of any matter.

Formal business

3         Leader of the Government in the Senate (Senator Cormann)

Leader of the Opposition in the Senate (Senator Wong)

Leader of the Australian Greens (Senator Di Natale)

Leader of Pauline Hanson’s One Nation (Senator Hanson)

Senator Bernardi

Senator Patrick

To move (contingent on any senator objecting to a « motion » being taken as formal)—That so much of the standing orders be suspended as would prevent the « motion » being moved immediately and determined without amendment or debate.

4         Leader of the Government in the Senate (Senator Cormann)

Leader of the Opposition in the Senate (Senator Wong)

Leader of the Australian Greens (Senator Di Natale)

Leader of Pauline Hanson’s One Nation (Senator Hanson)

Senator Bernardi

Senator Patrick

To move (contingent on any senator being refused leave to move an amendment to a « motion » discovered during formal business)—That so much of the standing orders be suspended as would prevent that senator moving the amendment to the « motion » .

Limitation of time

5         Leader of the Government in the Senate (Senator Cormann): To move (contingent on the chair declaring that the time allotted for the consideration of a bill, or any stage of a bill, has expired)—That so much of standing order 142 be suspended as would prevent further consideration of the bill, or the stage of the bill, without limitation of time or for a specified period.

Leader of the Opposition in the Senate (Senator Wong)

Leader of the Australian Greens (Senator Di Natale)

Leader of Pauline Hanson’s One Nation (Senator Hanson)

Senator Bernardi

Senator Patrick

6         To move (contingent on a minister moving a « motion » that a bill be considered an urgent bill)—That so much of standing order 142 be suspended as would prevent debate taking place on the « motion » .

7         To move (contingent on a minister moving a « motion » to specify time to be allotted to the consideration of a bill, or any stage of a bill)—That so much of standing order 142 be suspended as would prevent the « motion » being debated without limitation of time and each senator speaking for the time allotted by standing orders.

8         To move (contingent on the chair declaring that the time allotted for the consideration of a bill, or any stage of a bill, has expired)—That so much of standing order 142 be suspended as would prevent further consideration of the bill, or the stage of the bill, without limitation of time or for a specified period.

Matters of urgency

9         Leader of the Government in the Senate (Senator Cormann): To move (contingent on the moving of a « motion » to debate a matter of urgency under standing order 75)—That so much of the standing orders be suspended as would prevent a minister moving an amendment to the « motion » .

10        Leader of the Opposition in the Senate (Senator Wong)

Leader of the Australian Greens (Senator Di Natale)

Leader of Pauline Hanson’s One Nation (Senator Hanson)

Senator Bernardi

Senator Patrick

To move (contingent on the moving of a « motion » to debate a matter of urgency under standing order 75)—That so much of the standing orders be suspended as would prevent a senator moving an amendment to the « motion » .

Order of business

11        Leader of the Opposition in the Senate (Senator Wong)

Leader of the Australian Greens (Senator Di Natale)

Leader of Pauline Hanson’s One Nation (Senator Hanson)

Senator Bernardi

Senator Patrick

To move (contingent on the Senate on any day concluding its consideration of any item of business and prior to the Senate proceeding to the consideration of another item of business)—That so much of the standing orders be suspended as would prevent the senator moving a « motion » relating to the order of business on the Notice Paper .

Questions without notice

12         Leader of the Opposition in the Senate (Senator Wong)

Leader of the Australian Greens (Senator Di Natale)

Leader of Pauline Hanson’s One Nation (Senator Hanson)

Senator Bernardi

Senator Patrick

To move (contingent on a minister at question time on any day asking that further questions be placed on notice)—That so much of the standing orders be suspended as would prevent the senator moving a « motion that, at question time on any day, questions may be put to ministers until 30 questions, including supplementary questions, have been asked and answered.

Statements

13        Leader of the Government in the Senate (Senator Cormann)

Leader of the Opposition in the Senate (Senator Wong)

Leader of the Australian Greens (Senator Di Natale)

Leader of Pauline Hanson’s One Nation (Senator Hanson)

Senator Bernardi

Senator Patrick

To move (contingent on any senator being refused leave to make a statement to the Senate)—That so much of the standing orders be suspended as would prevent that senator making that statement.

Tabling of documents

14         Leader of the Opposition in the Senate (Senator Wong)

Leader of the Australian Greens (Senator Di Natale)

Leader of Pauline Hanson’s One Nation (Senator Hanson)

Senator Bernardi

Senator Patrick

To move (contingent on any senator being refused leave to table a document in the Senate)—That so much of the standing orders be suspended as would prevent the senator moving that the document be tabled.

Appointments to statutory authorities

National Archives of Australia Advisory Council

Senator Carr ( appointed 1 August 2019, for a period of 3 years ).

Council of the National Library of Australia

Senator Bilyk ( appointed 1 August 2019, for a period of 3 years ).

Parliamentary Retiring Allowances Trust

Senators Abetz and Carr (appointed 1 August 2019 ).

Temporary chairs of committees

Senators Askew, Bernardi, Bilyk, Brockman, Brown, Faruqi, Fawcett, Fierravanti-Wells, Gallacher, Griff, Kitching, Sterle and Stoker

 

 

Richard Pye

Clerk of the Senate



 

 

Ministerial representation

 

 

 

Ministers

Representing

 

Senator the Honourable Mathias Cormann

Minister for Finance

   Vice-President of the Executive Council

   Leader of the Government in the Senate

 

 

Prime Minister

Minister for the Public Service

Minister Assisting the Prime Minister for the Public Service and Cabinet

Minister for Population, Cities and Urban Infrastructure

Treasurer

Assistant Treasurer

Minister for Housing

 

 

Senator the Honourable Bridget McKenzie

Minister for Agriculture

 

Minister for Water Resources, Drought, Rural Finance, Natural Disaster and Emergency Management

 

 

 

 

Senator the Honourable Simon Birmingham

Minister for Trade, Tourism and Investment

   Deputy Leader of the Government in the Senate

 

 

Assistant Trade and Investment Minister

Minister for Education

Minister for Energy and Emissions Reduction

Minister for the Environment

 

 

Senator the Honourable Marise Payne

Minister for Foreign Affairs

Minister for Women

 

 

Minister for International Development and the Pacific

Attorney-General

Minister for Industrial Relations

 

 

 

 

Senator the Honourable Richard Colbeck

Minister for Aged Care and Senior Australians

Minister for Youth and Sport

 

 

 

 

 

 

Senator the Honourable Michaelia Cash

Minister for Employment, Skills, Small and Family Business

 

Minister for Health

Minister for Home Affairs

Minister for Immigration, Citizenship, Migrant Services and Multicultural Affairs

 

Senator the Honourable Matt Canavan

Minister for Resources and Northern Australia

 

Deputy Prime Minister

Minister for Infrastructure, Transport and Regional Development

Minister for Regional Services, Decentralisation and Local Government

Minister for Industry, Science and Technology

 

 

 

 

Senator the Honourable Linda Reynolds, CSC

Minister for Defence

 

Minister for Communications, Cyber Safety and the Arts

Assistant Defence Minister

Minister for Veterans and Defence Personnel

Minister for Defence Industry

 

 

 

 

Senator the Honourable Anne Ruston

Minister for Families and Social Services

   Manager of Government Business in the Senate

 

 

Minister for Indigenous Australians

Minister for the National Disability Insurance Scheme

Minister for Government Services

 

 

Assistant Ministers - designated as Parliamentary Secretaries under the Ministers of State Act 1952

 

Senator the Honourable Jane Hume

Assistant Minister for Superannuation, Financial Services and Financial Technology

 

 

Senator the Honourable Zed Seselja

Assistant Minister for Finance, Charities and Electoral Matters

 

 

Senator the Honourable Jonathon Duniam

Assistant Minister for Forestry and Fisheries

Assistant Minister for Regional Tourism

 

 

 



 

Senate sittings and estimates hearings for 2019

 

July

 

 

August

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October

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December

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Key

" Date of Senate ⅔ Cut-Off

S—Senate sitting week only

—Supplementary Budget estimates

*—Cross portfolio estimates hearings on Indigenous matters, and Murray-Darling Basin Plan matters