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Wednesday, 1 December 1965


Mr DALY (Grayndler) .- The honorable member for Mallee (Mr. Turnbull) was out of order, but the real question which was raised by the honorable member for Lalor (Mr. Pollard), and to which the honorable member for Mallee was endeavouring to reply, was that of competition in the shipment of Australian exports. The honorable member should know that the greatest sufferers from lack of competition in this field are the people who produce primary products - the very people whom he is supposed to represent.


Mr Turnbull - Mr. Chairman, I raise a point of order-


The CHAIRMAN - Order! The honorable member for Grayndler is now developing an argument-


Mr Turnbull - Mr. Chairman-


The CHAIRMAN - Order! I am calling the honorable member for Grayndler to order. He is now developing the very argument in respect of which the honorable member for Mallee was ruled out of order.


Mr DALY - Naturally, Mr. Chairman, I will not proceed against your ruling. I recognise the wisdom of the judgments that you give. It is nice to know that you are impartial. As the Deputy Leader of the Opposition (Mr. Whitlam) points out to me, the honorable member for Lalor was dealling with the restriction of the application of the Australian Industries Preservation Act and the position of overseas shipping companies under that Act. The point about the overseas shipping combines and the Conference lines is that as a result of agreements into which they have entered there is no competition whatever between them. As I mentioned a few minutes ago in my first speech on this clause, under the agreement that I produced the shippers are tied hand and foot. They are told the ships on which their goods shall go and the companies which will carry their goods. There is no opportunity for any company to go outside the agreements or to enter into competition in respect of the carriage of Australian exports.

That is why the Treasurer (Mr. Harold Holt) was moved to advocate the establishment of an Australian owned overseas shipping line. The Deputy Prime Minister and the Leader of the Australian Country Party (Mr. McEwen) indicated in this Parliament that he had to step in and stop the overseas shipping companies from raising their freight rates, because they were exploiting Australian primary producers. Only yesterday in the House the Deputy Prime Minister's answer to a quetsion showed that he believes that we would overcome much of the trouble-


Mr Turnbull - Mr. Chairman, I raise a point of order. I notice that the honorable member for Grayndler has had his two minutes. I was ruled out of order after speaking on this subject for two minutes. Will you treat him in the same way?


The CHAIRMAN - On the point of order raised by the honorable member for Mallee, I suggest that the honorable member for Grayndler is getting a little wide of the subject matter before the Committee. I suggest that he confine his remarks to the restriction of the application of the Australian Industries Preservation Act, instead of making a general statement on overseas shipping.


Mr DALY - I cannot go all the way with you on that judgment, Mr. Chairman; but I will wind up my remarks. I point out to the honorable member for Mallee that he does not know his own party's policy; that he does not know that supporters of his own party have been exploited; and that he does not know that the leader of his own party has condemned the Conference lines. This Bill does not do anything to relieve the situation--







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