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Monday, 20 March 2017
Page: 1311


Senator ROBERTS (Queensland) (10:36): by leave—I move amendments (1) and (2) on sheet 8063 together standing in my name:

(1) Schedule 1, page 3 (after line 11), after item 2, insert:

2A At the end of section 41

Add:

(6) Screening of individuals is to be conducted in accordance with the advice of the Australian Federal Police or the Australian Security Intelligence Organisation, in general prioritising individuals profiled as members of high threat groups.

(2) Schedule 1, page 4 (after line 3), after item 7, insert:

Aviation Transport Security Regulations 2005

7A Subregulation 3.16D(4)

Omit "random".

As set out in the circulated amendments, on behalf of Pauline Hanson's One Nation, our proposed changes to the Transport Security Legislation Amendment Bill 2016 will refocus security screening from its current deference to political correctness to the single goal of minimising risk to air travellers by responding to identified threats. Specifically, our amendments to the bill before the Senate seek, firstly, to delete the word 'random' from regulation 3.16D(4) of the Aviation Transport Security Regulations 2005; and, secondly, to add a subsection (6) to section 41 in part 4 of division 2 of the Aviation Transport Security Act 2004 to state:

Screening of individuals is to be conducted in accordance with the advice of the Australian Federal Police or the Australian Security Intelligence Organisation, in general prioritising individuals profiled as members of high threat groups.

Currently, airport screening is to be conducted not in accordance with the threat advice of the Australian Federal Police and ASIO but on a non-discriminatory, random basis. This ridiculous situation subordinates screening of the highest risk individuals to the political correct goal of being nondiscriminatory. In other words, this places politically correct ahead of the safety and security of Australian families. This left-wing control madness must end. These proposed amendments will remove the requirement in the Aviation Transport Security Regulations 2005 for security screening to be conducted randomly and then amend the Aviation Transport Security Act 2004 to require that screening of individuals be conducted whilst prioritising individuals profiled as members of high-threat groups in accordance with the advice of the AFP and ASIO.

One Nation implores other senators to put the safety of our loved ones first and support our efforts to align our security procedures with those of the Israelis and the Americans, for whom airport security is a non-negotiable priority. In that spirit I commend One Nation's amendments to the chamber.