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PRIVATE MEMBERS’ BUSINESS

Notice given for Tuesday, 19 February 2019

      *1    Ms Sharkie : To move—That the Civil Aviation (Community Service Flights—Conditions on Flight Crew Licences) Instrument 2019, made under regulation 11.068 of the Civil Aviation Safety Regulations 1998 on 12 February 2019 and presented to the House on 14 February 2019, be disallowed.

              ( Notice given 18 February 2019. Instrument will be taken to have been disallowed unless disposed of within 15 sittings days, including today. )

Notices —continued

       1    Mr Bandt : To move—That this House has no confidence in the Minister for Home Affairs.

              ( Notice given 10 September 2018. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays including 15 April 2019. )

       2    Mr Keogh : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         Labor committed to a legislated Fair Share Fund for Western Australia back in August 2017 to bring Western Australia up to 70 cents equivalent in GST distribution;

(b)         after delaying the release of the Productivity Commission Horizontal Fiscal Equalisation report for months, the Australian Government only announced a package to assist Western Australia on GST distribution in July 2018; and

(c)         the Australian Government has failed to:

(i)           provide the states and territories or this parliament with any detail about how its GST ‘plan’ will be funded; and

(ii)         guarantee it will not cut other state funding like schools, hospitals or infrastructure to fund their plan;

(2)         acknowledges:

(a)         the importance of legislating a GST floor to ensure certainty for the people of Western Australia and indeed the entire nation of a fair go on GST distribution; and

(b)         that the Opposition has committed to legislate, should it win Government, a 70 cent floor for Western Australia’s GST share in its first 100 days from 2019-20, and 75 cents from 2024-25 as a permanent fixture of the Horizontal Fiscal Equalisation system;

(3)         condemns the so called ‘New Generation’ Australian Government for:

(a)         running a misinformation campaign through misleading advertisements from Government members regarding Labor’s position on GST;

(b)         refusing to deliver details of its plan for GST to the states and territories; and

(c)         failing to guarantee that no state or territory will be worse off under any such plan; and

(4)         calls on the Australian Government to work co-operatively with federal Labor and the states and territories to solidify the GST plan for Western Australia and across our nation to ensure a fair share for Western Australia and for all on GST.

              ( Notice given 11 September 2018. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays including 15 April 2019. )

       3    Ms Sharkie : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         Australians are increasingly required to go online to access government and community services;

(b)         as measured by the Australian Digital Inclusion Index, there is a growing ‘digital divide’ between Australians who have the means and capacity to access online services and those who do not;

(c)         low income, elderly, Indigenous, rural and disabled Australians, but especially elderly women, are over-represented on the far side of the digital divide;

(d)         households are spending a growing proportion of their income on internet services (from l per cent in 2014 to 1.19 per cent in 2017) raising affordability concerns for the poorest segments of the Australian community; and

(e)         the withdrawal of face-to-face Centrelink and Medicare services is having a particularly detrimental impact upon Australians on the far side of the digital divide; and

(2)         calls on the Australian Government to:

(a)         recognise the importance of access for all Australians to essential government services;

(b)         use digitisation of essential government services to enhance rather than to replace face-to-face services; and

(c)         undertake a review into the effect of the digital divide upon the delivery of Centrelink and Medicare services.

              ( Notice given 11 September 2018. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays including 15 April 2019. )

       4    Mr Bandt : To move—That this House:

(1)         expresses concern at the continuing and alarming practice of so-called conversion and reparative therapies on LGBTIQ+ people;

(2)         notes the call for the criminalisation of such practices, including by the United Nations Human Rights Commissioner and most recently in Australia by Amnesty International and a number of religious and community leaders, including Victorian Young Australian of the Year recipients Mr Jason Ball and Ms Georgie Stone; and

(3)         calls on the Government to legislate for the criminalisation of such practices.

              ( Notice given 11 September 2018. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays including 15 April 2019. )

       5    Dr Aly : To move—That this House: 

(1)         notes that:

(a)         the National Ice Action Strategy currently relies on 2011 Census population data to allocate funds to treatment services across the country; and

(b)         recommendation 11 of the Joint Committee on Law Enforcement’s inquiry into crystal methamphetamine (ice) Final Report (March 2018) recommends that the Department of Health considers using 2016 Census and National Wastewater Drug Monitoring Program data to determine the allocation of National Ice Action Strategy funding for 2019-20;

(2)         recognises the Australian Criminal Intelligence Commission’s National Wastewater Drug Monitoring Program Report 4 (March 2018) shows Western Australia’s ice usage figures far exceed the national average;

(3)         condemns the Australian Government for its failure to:

(a)         provide sufficient funding for treatment services in Western Australia; and

(b)         enact Recommendation 11 of the inquiry into crystal methamphetamine (ice) Final Report; and

(4)         calls on the Government to enact Recommendation 11 to allocate funding for 2019-20.

              ( Notice given 13 September 2018. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 15 April 2019. )

       6    Mr Keogh : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         the fear of insurance implications has been shown to deter the uptake of potentially lifesaving clinical genetic testing and research participation;

(b)         the Parliamentary Joint Committee on Corporations and Financial Services unanimous report Life Insurance Industry (27 March 2018), revealed that genetic data is not presently sufficiently accurate or reliable, particularly in relation to the increasingly popular direct to consumer genetic testing, for a duty to disclose to be appropriate;

(c)         the Committee was unanimously of the view that a ban on the use of predictive genetic test results in life insurance underwriting be implemented, at least in the medium term, in a form similar to the United Kingdom Moratorium; and

(d)         there are concerns that the current self-regulation model applied to use of genetic data by the life insurance industry is conflicted and a co-regulatory approach would strike an appropriate balance between safeguarding against the improper use of genetic information by the life insurance industry while still allowing it to operate efficiently; 

(2)         acknowledges that:

(a)         the Government was due to respond to the unanimous Report three months after it was presented; and

(b)         nearly six months after the Committee report was presented, the Government is yet to respond; and

(3)         calls on the Government to respond to the Report, particularly in respect of its recommendations concerning the use of genetic information by life insurers.

              ( Notice given 18 September 2018. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 15 April 2019. )

       7    Mr Watts : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         tragically, so called ‘gay conversion therapy’ remains an issue in Australia;

(b)         ‘gay conversion therapy’ is a practice that:

(i)           is outdated, discredited and dangerous; and

(ii)         has been condemned by experts as a form of torture;

(c)         it is impossible to measure the harm inflicted on the LGBTI community through the practice of ‘gay conversion therapy’ as it operates outside the regulated medical system;

(d)         the Australian Medical Association unequivocally condemns ‘gay conversion therapy’ because it recognises that that the practice is not only harmful to individuals, but to broader society;

(e)         the practice of ‘gay conversion therapy’ presents a serious threat to the health and human rights of anyone who suffers through it;

(f)          for the above reasons, the vast majority of Australians are against this harmful and inhumane practice; and

(2)         calls on the Government to:

(a)         recognise the harm that the practice of ‘gay conversion therapy’ has on not only LGBTI Australians, but also on the wider Australian community; and

(b)         reflect the views of the majority of Australians by condemning the abhorrent practice of so-called ‘gay conversion therapy’.

              ( Notice given 18 September 2018. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 15 April 2019. )

       8    Ms McGowan : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         under the pension assets test, which was introduced in 1985, the value of the residential family home is exempt when assessing the assets to be tested;

(b)         when the family home is located on a large block of land, such as a farm or rural residential block, land around the home up to the amount of two hectares is also exempt;

(c)         in 2006 the Government introduced changes to allow for the exemption of all the land on the same title document as the family home where:

(i)           the claimant is of age pension age and claiming Age Pension, Carer Payment or Service Pension;

(ii)         they have a long term attachment to the land of at least 20 years; and

(iii)        they can show that land with commercial potential is being used to generate an income;

(d)         the requirement for a 20 year attachment to the land, requires the person to have been living on the land for 20 years, a definition which excludes a significant number of rural pensioners;

(e)         at the time, the stated intent of the 2006 measure was to assist people owning land in rural residential areas, those with bush blocks with little commercial potential, retired farmers with small holdings and retired farmers who still live on their farm while it is being worked by someone else;

(f)          the definition of attachment to land as ‘living on the land’, excludes many pensioners that may own rural property but have not lived there continuously, even when they have owned the land for decades—in many cases pensioners decide to move to their rural property as part of their retirement and this is often the case in rural residential areas, or those with bush blocks;

(g)         some pensioners have the potential to make an income themselves, while others have lease arrangements in place or have the younger generation working their properties;

(h)         other properties will have very limited capacity to generate income and any income derived from the land by the owners is subject to the asset test; and

(i)           the Parliamentary Budget Office has completed a costing on the cost of reducing the 20 year requirement to 10 years—reducing the Extended Land Use Test to 10 years would cost $120 million over the forward estimates; and

(2)         calls on the Government to:

(a)         bring fairness to the treatment of rural land under the social security and veterans’ affairs pension assets test; and

(b)         change the rules relating to the provisions for the Extended Land Use Test under the social security and veterans’ affairs pension assets test to reduce the continuous attachment to land requirement to 10 years.

              ( Notice given 19 September 2018. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 15 April 2019. )

       9    Ms McGowan : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         10 to 16 September was the inaugural nation-wide Social Sciences Week;

(b)         Social Sciences Week showcased the breadth and depth of issues being addressed through the social sciences, inspiring the next generation of students and social scientists;

(c)         social scientists work on systematic development of logic and evidence to understand human behaviour in its social setting, including the nature of economic, political, and community activity and institutions;

(d)         the high quality research of the social sciences in support of public policy is crucial;

(e)         social scientists work for the public and in the national interest, providing information based on rigorous research that guides development of sensible and effective public policy;

(f)          the social sciences fine tune existing systems and help to design innovative future public policies;

(g)         in addition to assisting government and its institutions, the social sciences also strive to inform business, community groups, and the wider public;

(h)         according to the 2016 Census of Population and Housing, 195,892 individuals were working in the social sciences (89,912 in management and commerce, 105,980 in society and culture) in the education and training industry;

(i)           social science student enrolments constitute well over half of both domestic and international higher education enrolments, with education earnings now at $30 billion as of 2017, and $20.7 billion of this being from higher education, meaning that university-based social sciences generate over $10 billion in revenue for Australia;

(j)          a 2012 study found that humanities, arts and social sciences produced 34 per cent of university research, and accounted for 44 per cent of the fields of research judged worthy of research funding, but got just 16 per cent of Australian Research Council (ARC) funding;

(k)         in 2018 the ARC funding round provided 21 per cent of its funds for the social sciences; and

(l)           social sciences deserve more research funds and Commonwealth research funding for NHMRC, CSIRO, DSTO, the Bureau of Meteorology and similar bodies should require collaborative inclusion of the social sciences, recognising their capacity for public policy development; and

(2)         calls on the Government to:

(a)         honour the contribution of the social sciences by providing adequate funding for those disciplines to contribute to the health, wellbeing and prosperity of Australians and the continued success of our national innovation system;

(b)         complement the Chief Scientist with a Chief of Research, that is inclusive of all research disciplines; and

(c)         appoint a social scientist to the Commonwealth Science Council.

              ( Notice given 19 September 2018. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 15 April 2019. )

    10    Ms Husar : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes that this month is Frocktober, an Ovarian Cancer Research Foundation initiative in its twelfth year, that encourages people to become more aware of the symptoms and effects of ovarian cancer;

(2)         recognises that one Australian woman dies every eight hours from ovarian cancer, one of the most lethal gynaecological cancers, and it has no warning symptoms and no early detection test;

(3)         supports the need for action and greater awareness of ovarian cancer, its symptoms and devastating effects; and

(4)         understands that:

(a)         there is a need for greater focus on education and funding for additional research to help Australian scientists find early detection markers and more effective treatments for ovarian cancer; and

(b)         when ovarian cancer is diagnosed at an early stage, the outlook is positive—as many as 90 per cent of women diagnosed early are cured, however 75 per cent of women are diagnosed at the advanced stage when it is very difficult to treat.

              ( Notice given 15 October 2018. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays including 15 April 2019. )

    11    Ms Rishworth : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes:

(a)         11 November is Remembrance Day;

(b)         on the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month Australians observe one minute’s silence in memory of those who died or suffered in all wars and armed conflicts;

(c)         2018 also marks the centenary of the Armistice which ended the First World War; and

(d)         on Remembrance Day we pay our respects and honour the memory of all those who have served in our country’s defence forces;

(2)         encourages all Australians to attend a commemoration ceremony in their local community, and to pause for a minute of silence to remember those who have served in our defence force and made the ultimate sacrifice; and

(3)         acknowledges:

(a)         the service and sacrifice of all who served;

(b)         those who were wounded or came home bearing the hidden scars of war;

(c)         those who made the ultimate sacrifice in service to our country; and

(d)         family members whose lives were shaped by their loved ones’ service.

              ( Notice given 16 October 2018. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays including 15 April 2019. )

    12    Mr Bandt : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         the Australian Renewable Energy Agency (ARENA) has unlocked $3.5 billion of public and private investment in the nation’s renewable energy sector since 2012;

(b)         ARENA currently has only $401 million left in its budget to spend on the next generation of clean technologies, like the renewable energy export industry; and

(c)         there is cross-parliamentary support for ARENA’s work, but the Government has made no commitment to continue funding ARENA; and

(2)         calls on the Government to:

(a)         immediately provide at least an additional $300 million of funding to ARENA to ensure its long term future is secure so that it can continue growing the Australian renewable energy industry; and

(b)         ensure that the Climate Change Authority is not disbanded and continues to operate in the 46th Parliament and beyond.

              ( Notice given 23 October 2018. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 15 April 2019. )

    13    Dr Freelander : To move—That the House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         the assisted reproductive technology of in vitro fertilisation (IVF) is a valid pathway towards reproduction for many Australian families;

(b)         as a procedure, IVF enables couples to overcome a range of different fertility issues to conceive a child;

(c)         in addition to being a means to overcome fertility issues, IVF can also be employed in certain cases to overcome genetic problems;

(d)         as the Australian population ages, the demand for IVF techniques will rise as fertility declines with age; and

(e)         Australia is leading the world in terms of IVF technology;

(2)         recognises that:

(a)         IVF can be a costly exercise to undertake, with a single cycle of treatment costing in excess of $9,000;

(b)         the costs associated with undertaking IVF can far exceed this figure, with many couples made to undertake a number of cycles before successfully conceiving a child, and having to pay for additional services such as the freezing and storage of embryos; and

(c)         while bulk billing and Medicare rebates are available for certain fertility treatment services, large out-of-pocket expenses are still associated with these procedures; and

(3)         calls on the Government to:

(a)         introduce measures to make IVF technologies more affordable; and

(b)         commit to increasing the accessibility of IVF treatments.

              ( Notice given 25 October 2018. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 15 April 2019. )

    14    Mr Bandt : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes that on Friday 30 November 2018, students from the movement School Strike 4 Climate Action will hold a national school strike calling for emergency action on climate change;

(2)         commends the students for their strike action; and

(3)         calls on the Government to listen to the students and take immediate action to prohibit coal mining in the Galilee Basin.

              ( Notice given 27 November 2018. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 15 April 2019. )

    15    Ms Sharkie : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         craft distillers:

(i)           make an increasingly important contribution to the Australian economy; and

(ii)         are a significant tourism attraction and have a significant multiplier effect on the wider economy, particularly in rural and regional areas;

(b)         the excise regime faced by craft distillers is excessively complex, burdensome, and is a major obstacle for smaller operators;

(c)         the timing of excise payments can have a negative effect upon cashflow for start-up craft distillers; and

(d)         the levying of excise payments on tastings and samples is limiting opportunities for tourism, export, and growth; and

(2)         calls on the Government to:

(a)         take steps to reduce the tax complexity and barriers to growth faced by craft distillers;

(b)         assess the effect that the timing of excise payments has on cash flow for smaller businesses and the resultant influence this has on growth;

(c)         target the excise refund scheme more effectively towards craft distillers; and

(d)         consider the removal of excise payments on samples and tastings.

              ( Notice given 27 November 2018. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 15 April 2019. )

    16    Ms M. M. H. King : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         the Government:

(i)           established a panel to review the Small Amount Credit Contract (SACC) laws on 7 August 2015, which provided its final report to the Government on 3 March 2016; and

(ii)         released its response to the SACC review on 28 November 2016, in which it agreed with the vast majority of the recommendations in part or in full;

(b)         the then Minister for Revenue and Financial Services, the current Minister for Industrial Relations, Jobs and Women, said at the time that ‘the implementation of these recommendations will ensure that vulnerable consumers are afforded appropriate levels of consumer protection while continuing to access SACCs and leases’;

(c)         the Minister claimed in an interview on Lateline on 28 February 2017 that Treasury was drafting legislation to implement the review’s recommendations;

(d)         a consultation draft of SACC legislation was published by Treasury on 23 October 2017 but was only open for comment for two weeks; and

(e)         it has since been 1,209 days since the commencement of the SACC review, and 729 days since the publication of the final report;

(2)         acknowledges that consumer credit contracts and consumer leases have been shown to cause unnecessary hardship to vulnerable consumers, and that the Parliament should act to protect vulnerable consumers;

(3)         recognises that the delay in introducing legislation for consideration by the Parliament, to implement the SACC review recommendations, results in unnecessary continuation of hardship to vulnerable consumers and their families; and

(4)         calls on the Government to introduce legislation, for consideration by the Parliament, to implement the SACC review recommendations as a matter of urgency.

              ( Notice given 29 November 2018. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 15 April 2019. )

    17    Mr Champion : To move—That this House:

(1)         acknowledges and thanks all RAAF personnel involved in operations of the AP-3C Orion aircraft;

(2)         notes that the AP-3C Orion has served the ADF with distinction in:

(a)         Operation Resolute in conducting maritime border patrols;

(b)         Operation Slipper and Operation Catalyst from 2003 to 2012 in the Middle East;

(c)         the Black Saturday bushfires in Victoria in 2009;

(d)         the search for Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 in 2014;

(e)         Operation Gateway in conducting freedom of navigation exercises over the South China Sea in 2015;

(f)          operations over Mindanao in the Philippines in 2017; and

(g)         air sea rescue operations;

(3)         recognises the contribution of the AP-3C Orion, crews and logistical support personnel in advancing and protecting Australia’s strategic interests; and

(4)         congratulates the AP-3C Orion crews and logistical support personnel for their service on the retirement of the AP-3C Orion from operational duty.

              ( Notice given 3 December 2018. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 15 April 2019. )

    18    Ms Ryan : To move—That this House:

(1)         acknowledges that:

(a)         approximately 350,000 four year olds across Australia begun their first steps of early learning this year as they begun preschool and kindergarten; and

(b)         there was no funding the in the 2018-19 MYEFO for four year old preschool/kindergarten after this school year;

(2)         notes that:

(a)         the Government has left parents and providers in limbo with their refusal to provide funding certainty;

(b)         without funding, 350,000 Australian kids could miss out on kindergarten, including more than 98,000 in the state of Victoria alone;

(c)         the electoral division of of Lalor has the highest number of four year olds, with 5,348 children who access kindergarten; and

(d)         those families with three year olds who are planning to send their children to kindergarten or preschool next year will stand to lose under this Government more than $1,200 in funding per child; and

(3)         calls on the Government to properly fund four year old preschool/kindergarten and follow Labor’s commitment to provide ongoing funding to four year olds and extend this to three year olds.

              ( Notice given 12 February 2019. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 15 April 2019. )

    19    Ms Vamvakinou : To move—That this House:

(1)         acknowledges that:

(a)         14 February 2019 is Her Heart Day, a national day to raise awareness of women’s heart health in Australia;

(b)         despite its perception as a men’s health issue, heart disease is one of the biggest killers of women in Australia;

(c)         in 2017, the ABS listed heart disease as killing more women than all cancers combined, a rate of more than one woman per hour;

(d)         the Australian Institute for Health and Wellbeing states that the risk factors associated with heart disease are largely avoidable, and the majority of deaths related to heart disease are preventable;

(e)         according to Heart Research Australia, 90 per cent of Australians have at least one risk factor, which include: family history, age, smoking, high cholesterol, high blood pressure, diabetes, inactive lifestyle, obesity, unhealthy diet, and depression;

(f)          there is a misperception of the risk of heart disease for women held by women themselves and also among health professionals like General Practitioners and triage nurses; and

(g)         this misperception can mean women that receive fewer tests, are under diagnosed, and are less likely to be referred for cardiac rehabilitation; and

(2)         recognises the contribution of Her Heart—Australia’s only not-for-profit organisation dedicated to women’s heart health—which aims to raise the national awareness of women’s risk of heart disease and cut the number of women dying of heart disease in half by 2025; and

(3)         calls on the Government to:

(a)         support the continuing work of Her Heart; and

(b)         make women’s heart health a national priority.

              ( Notice given 12 February 2019. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 15 April 2019. )

    20    Mr Christensen : To move—That this House acknowledges both the extreme stress experienced as well as the incredible resilience demonstrated by people in North Queensland who have been devastated by what has been dubbed the ‘Monster Monsoon’, an event which has delivered a year’s worth of rainfall in nine days, and places on record:

(1)         that its deep gratitude is extended to Australian Defence Force personnel, all emergency services personnel including the Queensland Police, Queensland Fire and Rescue, State Emergency Services, council workers at both Townsville City Council and Burdekin Shire Council, and all other personnel involved in the massive rescue and recovery operation extending over many days in these communities;

(2)         the outpouring of community spirit, with neighbour helping neighbour and numerous community organisations and not for profits contributing greatly to the relief effort by providing support which goes far beyond monetary terms in uplifting those who suffered great losses;

(3)         that all flood affected victims have access to assistance measures—via various federal as well as joint federal and state payments—which have been adjusted in order to enable all who have suffered adverse effects to access this assistance; and

(4)         that while acknowledging the rapid response of the insurance sector in responding to this disaster, insurers should place the highest priority on:

(a)         ensuring assessors are fully qualified and experienced in North Queensland requirements;

(b)         ensuring that scopes of work are undertaken properly in the first instance and do not drag on for months and months;

(c)         believing what customers are saying unless there is clear evidence against this; and

(d)         being fair and reasonable in payout figures.

              ( Notice given 12 February 2019. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 15 April 2019. )

    21    Mr Bandt : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         the latest Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change report makes clear that the world must rapidly decarbonise to avoid the worsening impacts of global warming;

(b)         Australia is one of the countries most vulnerable to climate change—Australians are already experiencing the worsening impacts of global warming around us such as:

(i)           deadly heat waves;

(ii)         unprecedented and catastrophic bushfires;

(iii)        prolonged and severe droughts and dust storms; and

(iv)       unseasonal rainfall and flash flooding; and

(c)         the Prime Minister acknowledged last week that climate change was ‘a factor’ in the frequency of extreme weather events that Australia has experienced, such as the recent floods in Queensland and fires in Tasmania, observing also that most Australians recognise this;

(2)         condemns the Government’s years of inaction, dysfunction and proactive wrecking of climate policy in Australia; and

(3)         calls on the Prime Minister to urgently commit to measures that will reduce Australia’s contribution to global greenhouse gas emissions.

              ( Notice given 12 February 2019. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 15 April 2019. )

Orders of the day

         1    Social Security Commission Bill 2018 ( Ms McGowan ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  20 August 2018 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on 15 April 2019. On 19 September 2018, the Selection Committee made a determination that this Bill be referred to the Standing Committee on Social Policy and Legal Affairs. )

         2    Family Law Amendment (Review of Government Support for Single Parents) Bill 2018 ( Mr Wilkie ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  20 August 2018 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on 15 April 2019. )

         3    AIME mentoring program: Resumption of debate ( from  20 August 2018 ) on the motion of Dr Chalmers —That this House:

(1)         acknowledges the power of mentoring and its impact in fighting inequality;

(2)         recognises the outstanding work of the AIME mentoring program;

(3)         notes that:

(a)         15,000 Indigenous high schoolers and 5,000 university students have been through the AIME program since it began in 2005;

(b)         the program aims to mobilise a generation of university students to volunteer and mentor disadvantaged high school students; and

(c)         the program is helping to close the education gap between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians; and

(4)         calls on the Government to explore how AIME’s successful model can be strengthened to help address Indigenous inequality and assist other marginalised Australians. 

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on 15 April 2019. )

         4    Thai cave rescue: Resumption of debate ( from  20 August 2018 ) on the motion of Mrs Marino —That this House:

(1)         notes with great relief that the young boys trapped in the caves in Thailand have all been rescued;

(2)         congratulates the:

(a)         Thai authorities on managing a successful rescue mission; and

(b)         international effort to support the Thai authorities and bring the boys out;

(3)         especially recognises the Australian support to the rescue mission;

(4)         recognises Dr Richard Harris and Dr Craig Challen for their heroic actions during the rescue and their awarding of the Medal of the Order of Australia and the Star of Courage;

(5)         further recognises the awarding of the Medal of the Order of Australia and the Bravery Medal to Troy Either, Robert James, Kelly Boers, Benjamin Cox, Matthew Fitzgerald, Justin Bateman and Chris Markcrow for their brave actions during the rescue;

(6)         notes with sadness the tragic death of the Royal Thai Navy SEAL veteran during the rescue mission; and

(7)         warmly congratulates all involved in the rescue mission and gives thanks for their courage and heroism.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on 15 April 2019. )

         5    R U OK? Conversation Convoy: Resumption of debate ( from  17 September 2018 ) on the motion of Ms Collins —That this House notes that:

(1)         the R U OK? Conversation Convoy began on 30 July 2018 to raise awareness that a conversation could change a life, and the Convoy will:

(a)         travel across 14,000 kilometres and 25 communities to show Australians that every day is the day to ask: Are you Ok?; and

(b)         conclude in Sydney on 13 September 2018 which is also R U OK? Day, an important day which was first established in 2009 to raise awareness around suicide prevention and mental ill health;

(2)         the statistics around suicide and mental ill health are heartbreaking and confronting:

(a)         in 2016, 2,866 Australians lost their lives to suicide;

(b)         research reveals that around 65,000 Australians attempt suicide every year and hundreds of thousands of people are impacted by each suicide death; and

(c)         one in five Australians experience mental ill health in any year;

(3)         all levels of government and the community are urged to work together to reduce the impact of suicide and mental ill health in our society; and

(4)         work must continue towards reducing stigma and raising community awareness around suicide prevention and mental ill health.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 15 April 2019. )

         6    Uyghurs and human rights: Resumption of debate ( from  17 September 2018 ) on the motion of Mr Zappia —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         an estimated 25 million Uyghur people live in Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region;

(b)         many Uyghur people have fled their homeland and sought refuge in other countries including Australia;

(c)         in recent years there have been increasing reports of violations of human rights of Uyghurs by Chinese Government authorities including arrest, interrogation, detention and incarceration in what are referred to as re-education camps; and

(d)         many Uyghurs now living in Australia have lost contact with family members and relatives in their homeland and they hold grave concerns for their safety; and

(2)         calls on the Government to:

(a)         raise concerns about allegations of human rights abuse against Uyghurs with the Chinese Government through whatever opportunities are available;

(b)         assist in whatever way is possible Australian Uyghur residents to make contact with family members and relatives in their homelands; and

(c)         expeditiously process permanent resident visa applications for Uyghur people in Australia on temporary protection visas.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 15 April 2019. )

         7    High Speed Rail Planning Authority Bill 2018 ( Mr Albanese ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  15 October 2018 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays including 15 April 2019. )

         8    A Fair Go for Australians in Trade Bill 2018 ( Mr Clare ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  15 October 2018 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays including 15 April 2019. )

         9    Royal Commission into the Aged Care Sector: Resumption of debate ( from  15 October 2018 ) on the motion of Mr Ted O’Brien —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         the Government is asking the Governor-General to establish a Royal Commission into the Aged Care Sector;

(b)         this Royal Commission will primarily look at the quality of care provided in residential and home aged care to senior Australians, but also include young Australians with disabilities living in residential aged care settings, as well as the challenges associated with the provision of aged care in remote, rural and regional Australia;

(c)         evidence to date shows that the problems are not restricted to any one part of the aged care sector, whether it is for profit or not for profit, large or small facilities, or regional or major metropolitan; and

(d)         the Royal Commission will look at the sector as a whole, without bias or prejudice, and make findings on the evidence;

(2)         commends the Government for taking action to ensure that older Australians have access to care that supports their dignity and recognises the contribution that they have made to society; and

(3)         calls on the Government to continue to provide record level funding to the aged care sector.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays including 15 April 2019. )

      10    Inspector-General of Animal Welfare and Live Animal Exports Bill 2018 ( Mr Fitzgibbon ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  15 October 2018 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays including 15 April 2019. )

      11    Defence (Honour General Sir John Monash) Amendment Bill 2018 ( Ms McGowan ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  22 October 2018 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 15 April 2019. )

      12    Migration Amendment (Kids Off Nauru) Bill 2018 ( Mr Wilkie ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  22 October 2018 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 15 April 2019. )

      13    National Greenhouse and Energy Reporting Amendment (Timely Publication of Emissions) Bill 2018 ( Ms Sharkie ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  22 October 2018 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 15 April 2019. )

      14    National Consumer Credit Protection Amendment (Small Amount Credit Contract and Consumer Lease Reforms) Bill 2018 ( Ms McGowan ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  22 October 2018 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 15 April 2019. )

      15    Equal Pay Standard Bill 2018 ( Mr Wilkie ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  26 November 2018 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 15 April 2019. )

      16    National Integrity Commission Bill 2018 ( Ms McGowan ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  26 November 2018 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 15 April 2019. )

      17    International Human Rights and Corruption (Magnitsky Sanctions) Bill 2018 ( Mr Danby ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  3 December 2018 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 15 April 2019. )

      18    Live Sheep Long Haul Export Prohibition Bill 2018 (No. 2) ( Ms Sharkie ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  3 December 2018 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 15 April 2019. )

      19    Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Amendment (Heritage Listing for the Bight) Bill 2018 ( Ms Sharkie ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  3 December 2018 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 15 April 2019. )

      20    Sex Discrimination Amendment (Removing Discrimination Against Students) Bill 2018 [No. 2] ( Mr Shorten ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  3 December 2018 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 15 April 2019. )

      21    National Integrity (Parliamentary Standards) Bill 2018 ( Ms McGowan ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  3 December 2018 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 15 April 2019. )

      22    Coal-Fired Power Funding Prohibition Bill 2018 ( Mr Bandt ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  3 December 2018 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 15 April 2019. )

      23    Live Animal Export Prohibition (Ending Cruelty) Bill 2018 ( Mr Wilkie ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  3 December 2018 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 15 April 2019. )

      24    Migration Amendment (Urgent Medical Treatment) Bill 2018 ( Dr Phelps ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  3 December 2018 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 15 April 2019. )

      25    Queensland electricity prices: Resumption of debate ( from  3 December 2018 ) on the motion of Mr Ted O’Brien —That this House:

(1)         recognises that:

(a)         many Queensland families are struggling with cost of living pressures and many small businesses are being crippled by the cost doing business;

(b)         the primary responsibility for lowering power prices for Queensland families and small businesses lies with the Queensland Government; and

(c)         the Queensland Government is ripping off everyday Queenslanders through a sophisticated scam that funnels billions of dollars into government coffers;

(2)         calls on the Queensland Government to:

(a)         immediately pass on recent reductions in wholesale prices to customers in full;

(b)         end the network ‘gold plating’, write down regulated assets and accept a lower return so that Queenslanders can be charged less;

(c)         provide adequate subsidies to Queensland families and businesses in recognition of the interest they have been paying on unnecessary debt carried by state-owned electricity businesses;

(d)         increase competition in the Queensland electricity market by splitting the two state owned generators into three viable businesses with ‘fair dinkum’ electricity generation; and

(e)         be honest with Queenslanders by informing them of the real cost of increasing the supply of unreliable electricity to meet Labor’s 50 per cent Renewable Energy Target; and

(3)         acknowledges that if the Queensland Government was prepared to take serious action, electricity prices could be lowered immediately for millions of hard working Queensland families and hundreds of thousands of small businesses.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 15 April 2019. )

      26    Suspension of standing and sessional orders—Royal Commission to inquire into violence, abuse and neglect of people with a disability: Resumption of debate ( from  14 February 2019 —Mr Morrison, in continuation ) on the motion of Mr Shorten —That so much of the standing orders be suspended as would prevent the Member for Maribyrnong from moving the following motion forthwith—That the House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         Australians with a disability and their loved ones have been crying out for a Royal Commission to inquire into violence, abuse and neglect of people with a disability;

(b)         only a Royal Commission has the powers to compel evidence, conduct public hearings and provide a safe place for witnesses to shine a light on the shameful abuse and neglect being suffered by Australians with a disability;

(c)         today in the Senate at approximately 12.15 pm, the Government voted against a Royal Commission to inquire into violence, abuse and neglect of people with a disability;

(d)         the Government is right now desperately running down the clock so that there is not enough time for the House to vote on the Senate’s message; and

(e)         the Government is doing all it can to avoid a second loss on the floor of Parliament in just one week; and

(2)         therefore, calls on this Prime Minister to allow enough time in the House so that the Australian people can know where he and his Government stands on this important issue.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 15 April 2019. Time remaining—3 minutes. )

    *27    National Consumer Credit Protection Amendment (Small Amount Credit Contract and Consumer Lease Reforms) Bill 2019 ( Ms M. M. H. King ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  18 February 2019 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays including 15 April 2019. )

    *28    Refugee Protection Bill 2019 ( Mr Wilkie ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  18 February 2019 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays including 15 April 2019. )

    *29    Galilee Basin (Coal Prohibition) Bill 2019 ( Mr Bandt ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  18 February 2019 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays including 15 April 2019. )

    *30    Coal Prohibition (Quit Coal) Bill 2019 ( Mr Bandt ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  18 February 2019 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays including 15 April 2019. )

    *31    Banking Amendment (Rural Finance Reform) Bill 2019 ( Ms Sharkie ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  18 February 2019 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays including 15 April 2019. )

    *32    Office for Regional Australia Bill 2019 ( Ms McGowan ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  18 February 2019 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays including 15 April 2019. )

    *33    Reserve Bank Amendment (Australian Reconstruction and Development Board) Bill 2019 ( Mr Katter ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  18 February 2019 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays including 15 April 2019. )

    *34    Export Control Amendment (Banning Cotton Exports to Ensure Water Security) Bill 2019 [No. 2] ( Ms Sharkie ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  18 February 2019 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays including 15 April 2019. )

    *35    Townsville floods: Resumption of debate ( from  18 February 2019 ) on the motion of Ms O’Toole —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         Townsville has experienced the worst floods in recorded history;

(b)         Townsville received a year’s rainfall in nine days, with 1,134 millimetres recorded up to 9 am on Monday 4 February 2019, reaching over 1.65 metres;

(c)         the Ross River Dam reached a record breaking 244 per cent capacity; and

(d)         more than 22,000 homes and 110 roads in Townsville were affected by this extreme weather event;

(2)         acknowledges the:

(a)         professional and skilled work undertaken by the Townsville Local Disaster Management Group;

(b)         dedicated and collaborative work undertaken by the Australian Defence Force (ADF), Emergency Services and State Emergency Services (SES) in rescuing stranded residents in dangerous circumstances;

(c)         commitment and hard work of the ADF in the massive recovery clean-up process; and

(d)         amazing work of the SES, Ergon Energy, Townsville City Council workers, businesses and the thousands of community volunteers for their efforts to assist the many people whose homes were inundated; and

(3)         calls on the Government to end the confusion related to the disaster recovery payment and assist the thousands of distressed Townsville residents during this difficult time.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays including 15 April 2019. )

 

 

 

COMMITTEE AND DELEGATION BUSINESS has precedence each Monday in the House of Representatives Chamber from 10.10 am to 12 noon; and in the Federation Chamber from 11 am to 1.30 pm and 4.45 pm to 7.30 pm (standing orders 34, 35 and 192).

PRIVATE MEMBERS’ BUSINESS has precedence from the conclusion of consideration of committee and delegation business each Monday (standing orders 34, 35 and 192).

The SELECTION COMMITTEE is responsible for arranging the timetable and order of committee and delegation business and private Members’ business for each sitting Monday. Any private Members’ business not called on, or consideration of private Members’ business or committee and delegation business which has been interrupted and not re-accorded priority on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays, shall be removed from the Notice Paper (standing order 42).