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10    Notices

Senators Patrick and Griff : To move on the next day of sitting—That the Senate—

                 (a)       notes that:

                                       (i)       the Department of Health funds the Rural Doctors Workforce Agency (RDWA) to deliver Rural Health Workforce Support Activity in South Australia,

                                     (ii)       the RDWA completes an annual Health Workforce Needs Assessment in consultation with a Health Workforce Stakeholder Group in South Australia,

                                    (iii)       the town of Kimba has been without a resident doctor for more than one year, and

                                   (iv)       the lack of a resident doctor in rural, regional and remote areas is a common problem across South Australia; and

                 (b)       orders that there be laid on the table by the Minister representing the Minister for Health, by no later than 4.30 pm on 25 July 2019, the most recent annual RDWA Health Workforce Needs Assessment. ( general business notice of motion no. 43 )

The Leader of Pauline Hanson’s One Nation ( Senator Hanson ): To move on the next day of sitting—

(1)         That so much of the standing orders be suspended as would prevent this resolution having effect.

(2)         That the following bills be restored to the Notice Paper and consideration of each of the bills resume at the stage reached in the 45th Parliament:

Human Services Amendment (Photographic Identification and Fraud Prevention) Bill 2019

Plebiscite (Future Migration Level) Bill 2018. ( general business notice of motion no. 44 )

Senators Keneally, Ayres, McAllister, O’Neill, Sheldon, Bragg, Davey, Faruqi, Fierravanti-Wells, Hughes, Payne, Sinodinos and Seselja: To move on the next day of sitting—That the Senate congratulates—

                 (a)       the New South Wales (NSW) Blues for winning the 2019 State of Origin series;

                 (b)       NSW coach, Mr Brad Fittler, for being the second Blues coach to win back-to-back series;

                 (c)       NSW captain, Mr Boyd Cordner, for leading the Blues to back-to­-back series victories for the first time since 2005;

                 (d)       NSW fullback, Mr James Tedesco, for winning the Wally Lewis Medal for Player of Origin series;

                 (e)       NSW halfback, Mr Mitchell Pearce and winger, Mr Blake Ferguson, for setting up the passage of play for Mr Tedesco’s match winning try; and

                  (f)       all Blues’ players, coaches and support staff. ( general business notice of motion no. 45 )

Senator Waters : To move on the next day of sitting—That the Senate—

                 (a)       notes that:

                                       (i)       on 17 July 2019, the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority released a Position Statement on Climate Change, which stated: ‘climate change is the greatest threat to the Great Barrier Reef. Only the strongest and fastest possible actions to decrease global greenhouse gas emissions will reduce the risks and limit the impacts of climate change on the Reef’… ‘If we are to secure a future for the Great Barrier Reef and coral reef ecosystems globally, there is an urgent and critical need to accelerate actions to reduce global greenhouse gas emissions. This must happen in parallel to taking actions to build the Reef’s resilience’,

                                     (ii)       in an address to the British Parliament on 9 July 2019, Sir David Attenborough criticised Australia for not taking the risks of climate change seriously, and imperilling the Great Barrier Reef,

                                    (iii)       at its meeting in 2015, the UNESCO World Heritage Committee gave the Australian Government five years to address the state of the Great Barrier Reef before it re-considered whether to include it on the World Heritage In Danger list—the Australian Government is due to submit a report addressing the protection of the Reef’s Outstanding Universal Value to avert an In Danger listing by 1 December 2019,

                                   (iv)       scientific reports confirm that approximately half of the shallow water coral of the Great Barrier Reef has been lost since 2016 due to successive coral bleaching incidents,

                                     (v)       the Association of Marine Park Tourism Operators has signed a Reef Climate Declaration that acknowledges climate change as “the single biggest threat to the Great Barrier Reef” and states that “Australia must join the rest of the world to rapidly phase out coal and other fossil fuels and transition to renewable energy”,

                                   (vi)       the Great Barrier Reef supports approximately 64,000 jobs and generates $6.4 billion for the Australian economy annually,

                                  (vii)       the science and the economics are clear that these jobs are at risk if strong action is not taken immediately to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and limit global temperature rises to 1.5°C, and

                                (viii)       fossil fuel companies have donated nearly $5 million to the Liberals, The Nationals and Labor parties over the past four years; and

                 (b)       calls on the Federal Government to:

                                       (i)       affirm the advice of the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority that climate change is the greatest threat to the Great Barrier Reef,

                                     (ii)       direct Mr Warren Entsch, Special Envoy for the Great Barrier Reef, to prioritise actions that reduce greenhouse gas emissions,

                                    (iii)       implement a climate policy that accelerates actions to limit global warming to 1.5°C to protect the Great Barrier Reef,

                                   (iv)       take all action necessary to properly protect the Great Barrier Reef and avoid the UNESCO World Heritage Committee needing to place the Great Barrier Reef on the World Heritage In Danger list,

                                     (v)       revoke all federal approvals for the Adani Carmichael mine and not approve any new coal in Australia,

                                   (vi)       develop a clear plan to move towards 100% clean energy, including a plan for a just transition for Australia’s regional workforces affected by climate change so that regional economies can thrive and workers are protected, and

                                  (vii)       ban corporate donations to political parties from the fossil fuel industry, an industry which financially benefits from this Government’s lack of action on climate change. ( general business notice of motion no. 46 )

Senator Waters : To move on the next day of sitting—

(1)         That the Senate notes that—

(a)         the Statement of Ministerial Standards clearly provides that Ministers must act with honesty and integrity in all their activities, in particular, Ministers must:

                                                     (i)       make arrangements to avoid conflicts arising from their private interests, also having regard to interests held by family members (paragraphs 2.9 and 2.17), and

                                                    (ii)       not use public office for private purposes (paragraph 2.2),

(b)         on 19 June 2019, the Guardian reported that, while a company part-owned by the Minister for Energy and Emissions Reduction, Mr Angus Taylor MP, and his brother was under investigation by the Department of the Environment and Energy for alleged unlawful clearing of a critically-endangered grassland species, the Minister met with departmental staff; the Guardian further reported, on 27 June 2019, that an investigator from the office responsible for investigating the clearing allegations was present at a meeting;

(c)         on 20 June 2019, the Guardian reported that former Minister for the Environment and Energy, Mr Josh Frydenberg MP, was approached by Mr Taylor in relation to the listing of the grassland species; according to the report, Mr Frydenberg subsequently sought advice about his powers to amend the critically-endangered listing; and

(d)         these meetings raise serious questions about whether such conduct complies with the Ministerial Standards — the statement provided by Senator Cormann to the Senate on 23 July 2019, failed to satisfactorily address these questions.

(2)         That the following matter be referred to the Finance and Public Administration References Committee for inquiry and report by 10 September 2019:

(a)         compliance by the Minister for Energy and Emissions Reduction, Mr Taylor, and the Treasurer, Mr Frydenberg, with the Prime Minister’s Statement of Ministerial Standards;

(b)         enforcement of the Ministerial Standards including, but not limited to:

                                                     (i)       actions taken in response to allegations of improper conduct or other non­-compliance with the Ministerial Standards,

                                                    (ii)       investigation of allegations of improper conduct or other non-compliance with the Ministerial Standards by the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet,

                                                  (iii)       investigation of allegations of misconduct or other non-compliance with the Ministerial Standards by an independent authority,

                                                  (iv)       penalties for non-compliance with the Ministerial Standards, and

                                                   (v)       any policies developed to guide implementation of the Ministerial Standards;

(c)         appointment of a Parliamentary Integrity Commissioner tasked with enforcing compliance with the Ministerial Standards; and

(d)         any related matters.

(3)         That the Senate requests that the Finance and Public Administration References Committee, as far as practicable, conduct this inquiry in conjunction with the committee’s inquiry into compliance by former Ministers of State with Ministerial Standards, referred on 22 July 2019.

Senator Siewert : To move on the next day of sitting—That the Senate—

                 (a)       notes:

                                       (i)       that the rate of Newstart for single people without children is $555.70 per fortnight,

                                     (ii)       that the Federal Government has taken action to address deeming rates acknowledging that part-pensioners were struggling,

                                    (iii)       that the Salvation Army’s 2018 Economic and Social Impact Survey found that after paying for accommodation, Newstart recipients were left with $17 a day,

                                   (iv)       the findings of an analysis by the Australian National University’s Professor Peter Whiteford, that Newstart is the second lowest unemployment payment in the OECD if we look at the replacement rate, and

                                     (v)       that the Anglicare Rental Affordability Snapshot 2019 found there were zero affordable rentals for a single person on Newstart or Youth Allowance in any major Australian city; and

                 (b)       urges the Federal Government to immediately increase the single rate of Newstart and Youth Allowance by $75 a week. ( general business notice of motion no. 47 )

Senator Hanson-Young :To move on the next day of sitting—That the Senate—

                 (a)       notes that recent reports that the proposed nuclear waste dump site in South Australia will be expanded, covering at least 160 hectares, an increase of 60%, are deeply troubling given the lack of consultation; and

                 (b)       calls on the Minister representing the Minister for Industry, Science and Technology, Senator Canavan, to provide a full explanation of the current plans for the nuclear waste dump site, and to clarify exactly how large it will be and what level of waste it will hold. ( general business notice of motion no. 48 )

Senator Faruqi : To move on the next day of sitting—That the Senate—

                 (a)       notes that:

                                       (i)       the Australian Government has committed to the public release of summary reports from independent observers on live export ships,

                                     (ii)       following the release of the first report in November 2018, the then Minister for Agriculture and Water Resources, Mr Littleproud MP, stated that “full transparency is the only way to build public trust in any industry” and that “the Australian public must have trust in the integrity and regulation of the live export trade. Reports from Independent Observers are a huge part of building this trust”, and

                                    (iii)       to date, less than half of the Independent Observer summary reports from 2018 have been finalised and publicly released, and no 2019 reports have been released; and

                 (b)       calls on the Federal Government to:

                                       (i)       commit to transparency in the live exports industry,

                                     (ii)       release the outstanding Independent Observer summary reports, and

                                    (iii)       commit to release future Independent Observer summary reports in a timely manner. ( general business notice of motion no. 49 )

The Leader of the Australian Greens ( Senator Di Natale ):To move on the next day of sitting—That the Senate—

                 (a)       notes with serious concern the credible reports from China of arbitrary detention, as well as widespread surveillance and restrictions, particularly targeting Uighurs and other minorities in Xinjiang;

                 (b)       further notes the heartbreaking stories screened on Four Corners on 15 July 2019 of Australian citizens and permanent residents and their families, who have been subjected to arbitrary detention, mass surveillance and restrictions to their freedom of movement in Xinjiang;

                 (c)       welcomes:

                                       (i)       the Australian Government’s decision to co-sign a letter to the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights, co-signed by 21 other countries, which urged China to end its mass arbitrary detentions and related violations, and called on China to allow United Nations and independent international observers to access the region, and

                                     (ii)       the fact that the Australian Government has formally requested that the Chinese authorities allow the family of Australian man Mr Sadam Abudusalamu to travel to Australia;

                 (d)       reiterates:

                                       (i)       the Australian Government’s call for the family of Mr Sadam Abudusalamu to be permitted to travel to Australia, and

                                     (ii)       the call for China to end its human rights violations in Xinjiang, including the incarceration of Uighurs and other Muslim minorities; and

                 (e)       calls for the Australian Government to advocate for the release of Australians who are arbitrarily detained in Xinjiang. ( general business notice of motion no. 50 )

The Chair of the Community Affairs References Committee ( Senator Siewert ): To move on the next day of sitting—That the following matter be referred to the Community Affairs References Committee for inquiry and report by 12 November 2019:

The adequacy of Australia’s income support payments and alternative mechanisms to determine the level of income support payments in Australia, with specific reference to:

                 (a)       consideration of what constitutes an acceptable standard of living in Australia;

                 (b)       the labour market, unemployment and under-employment in Australia;

                 (c)       the changing nature of work in Australia;

                 (d)       the appropriateness of current arrangements for supporting those experiencing insecure employment, inconsistent employment and precarious hours in the workforce;

                 (e)       the current approach to setting income support payments in Australia;

                  (f)       the impact of the current approach to setting income support payments on the aged, families, single parents, people with disability, jobseekers, students, First Nations peoples, people from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds, people living in regional and remote areas, and any others affected by the process;

                 (g)       the adequacy of income support payments in Australia and whether they allow people to maintain an acceptable standard of living in line with community expectations and support job search activities (where relevant);

                 (h)       the impact on local and domestic economies of inadequate income support payments and any potential increases to income support payments;

                   (i)       the relationship between income support payment levels, minimum wages and wage stagnation in Australia and other comparable economies;

                  (j)       other countries’ approaches to setting income support payments, minimum wages and awards;

                 (k)       other bodies that set payments, minimum wages and awards in Australia;

                   (l)       the role of independent and expert decision-making in setting payments; and

               (m)       any other related matters.