Note: Where available, the PDF/Word icon below is provided to view the complete and fully formatted document
 Download Current HansardDownload Current Hansard    View Or Save XMLView/Save XML

Previous Fragment    Next Fragment
Tuesday, 30 July 2019
Page: 1131

Presentation

Senator McCarthy to move on the next day of sitting:

That the Senate—

(a) notes that 23 August 2019 marks 53 years since the Gurindji people, led by Mr Lingiari, walked off Wave Hill station in the Northern Territory to protest their work and living conditions;

(b) recognises that the actions of the Gurindji, which began as a fight for wage justice, led to the recognition of Indigenous land rights;

(c) acknowledges 23 August 2019 as a day of significance in modern Australian history; and

(d) extends best wishes for the Freedom Festival that will be held at Kalkaringi from 23-25 August 2019, to celebrate and remember the remarkable achievements of the Gurindji and their supporters.

Senator McKenzie to move on the next day of sitting:

That the following bill be introduced: A Bill for an Act to provide for the appointment of an Inspector-General of Live Animal Exports, and for related purposes. Inspector-General of Live Animal Exports Bill 2019.

Senator Sheldon to move on the next day of sitting:

That the Senate—

(a) notes that:

   (i) there is a worsening crisis in New South Wales (NSW) public hospitals, with regard to the safety of patients and staff; last year alone there were 465 assaults in NSW hospitals, and

   (ii) on 1 August 2019, 22,000 health workers will take industrial action as part of their campaign to improve safety and staffing conditions in NSW public hospitals; and

(b) supports the Health Service Union in its endeavours for greater protection for patients and staff at NSW public hospitals;

(c) calls on the NSW Government to work with health workers to deliver these requests.

Senator Faruqi to move on the next day of sitting:

That the Senate—

(a) notes that:

   (i) seventy-six percent of school enrolment growth in the 5 years to 2018 was in public schools,

   (ii) across Australia, public schools have the greatest need for infrastructure such as classrooms, libraries, science labs or sporting facilities,

   (iii) the Federal Government has established a $1.9 billion Capital Grants Program, that is reserved for private schools,

   (iv) the only access public schools have to federal infrastructure funding is the Local Schools Community Fund, which consists of a one-off allocation of $200,000 to each electorate, which will be shared with private schools and will fall well short of the needs of public schools, and

   (v) public school students deserve world-class facilities; and

(b) calls on the Federal Government to establish a capital works fund dedicated to public schools of at least $300 million per year.

Senator Faruqi to move on the next day of sitting:

That there be laid on the table by the Minister for Foreign Affairs, by no later than 9.30 am on 1 August 2019, all draft and final versions, produced since July 2018, of the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade's climate change action strategy for the foreign aid program.

Senator Di Natale to move on the next day of sitting:

(1) That a select committee, to be known as the Select Committee into Jobs for the Future in Regional Areas, be established to inquire and report on the following matters:

   (a) new industries and employment opportunities that can be created in and around thermal coal mining communities and regions:

      (i) as automated mining and transport technologies replace jobs over coming years, and

      (ii) as domestic production and exports decline to keep global warming to levels safe for human life at or below 1.5 degrees;

   (b) the number of existing jobs in regional areas in clean energy technology and ecological services and their future significance;

   (c) lessons learned from structural adjustments in the automotive, manufacturing and forestry industries and energy privatisation and their impact on labour markets and local economies;

   (d) the importance of long-term planning to support the diversification of supply chain industries and local economies;

   (e) measures to guide the transition into new industries and employment, including:

      (i) community infrastructure to attract investment and job creation,

      (ii) the need for a public authority to manage the transition,

      (iii) meaningful community consultation to guide the transition, and

      (iv) the role of vocational education providers, including TAFE, in enabling reskilling and retraining;

   (f) the use of renewable resources in Northern Australia to build a clean energy export industry to export into Asia; and

   (g) any related matters.

(2) That the committee present its final report on or before 4 December 2019.

(3) That the committee consist of 5 senators as follows:

   (a) 2 nominated by the Leader of the Government in the Senate;

   (b) 2 nominated by the Leader of the Opposition in the Senate; and

   (c) 1 nominated the Leader of the Australian Greens.

(4) That:

   (a) participating members may be appointed to the committee on the nomination of the Leader of the Government in the Senate, the Leader of the Opposition in the Senate or any minority party or independent senator; and

   (b) participating members may participate in hearings of evidence and deliberations of the committee, and have all the rights of members of the committee, but may not vote on any questions before the committee.

(5) If a member of the committee is unable to attend a meeting of the committee, that member may in writing to the chair of the committee appoint a participating member to act as a substitute member of the committee at that meeting, and if the member is incapacitated or unavailable, a letter to the chair of a committee appointing a participating member to act as a substitute member of the committee may be signed on behalf of the member by the leader or whip of the party or group on whose nomination the member was appointed to the committee.

(6) That the committee may proceed to the dispatch of business notwithstanding that not all members have been duly nominated and appointed and notwithstanding any vacancy.

(7) That the committee elect as chair the member nominated by the Leader of the Australian Greens and as deputy chair a member nominated by the Leader of the Opposition in the Senate.

(8) That the deputy chair shall act as chair when the chair is absent from a meeting of the committee or the position of chair is temporarily vacant.

(9) That the chair, or the deputy chair when acting as chair, may appoint another member of the committee to act as chair during the temporary absence of both the chair and deputy chair at a meeting of the committee.

(10) That 3 members of the committee constitute a quorum of the committee.

(11) That, in the event of an equally divided vote, the chair, or the deputy chair when acting as chair, have a casting vote.

(12) That the committee have power to appoint subcommittees consisting of 3 or more of its members, and to refer to any such subcommittee any of the matters which the committee is empowered to examine.

(13) That the committee and any subcommittee have power to send for and examine persons and documents, to move from place to place, to sit in public or in private, notwithstanding any prorogation of the Parliament or dissolution of the House of Representatives, and have leave to report from time to time its proceedings, the evidence taken and such interim recommendations as it may deem fit.

(14) That the committee be provided with all necessary staff, facilities and resources and be empowered to appoint persons with specialist knowledge for the purposes of the committee with the approval of the President.

(15) That the committee be empowered to print from day to day such documents and evidence as may be ordered by it, and a daily Hansard be published of such proceedings as take place in public.

Senator Waters to move on the next day of sitting:

That the Senate—

(a) notes that:

   (i) the ability to secure finance and insurance is a crucial step in the development of large-scale resources projects, providing protection for developers, government and the community,

   (ii) Suncorp last week announced that it would no longer invest in, finance or insure new thermal coal mines and power plants, and will not underwrite any existing thermal coal projects after 2025,

   (iii) QBE Insurance announced in March that, from 1 July 2019, it would no longer directly invest in or insure new thermal coal projects and would stop underwriting existing operations from 2030,

   (iv) all Australian-based insurance companies have now effectively committed to removing coal from their investment portfolios, and

   (v) many major multi-national re-insurance providers, including Allianz, AXA, Swiss Re, Munich Re and Zurich, have also restricted investment in, and underwriting of, thermal coal projects; and

(b) calls on the Federal Government to:

   (i) pay attention to the financial signals and recognise that thermal coal projects are increasingly unviable, and

   (ii) commit to action to progress a rapid and just transition to clean and renewable energy sources for a low-carbon economy.

Senator Hanson-Young to move on the next day of sitting:

That the Senate—

(a) notes that:

   (i) the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission has released the final report in its Digital Platforms Inquiry, and

   (ii) it has emphasised the importance of the public broadcasters and recommended stable and adequate funding "in recognition of their role in addressing the risk of under-provision of public interest journalism that generates broad benefits to society"; and

(b) calls on the Federal Government to:

   (i) move from triennial to quinennial funding cycles for the public broadcasters,

   (ii) fully restore the cuts to funding since 2014, and

   (iii) guarantee a minimum level of funding across the quinennial cycles.

Senator Hanson to move on the next day of sitting:

That the Senate—

(a) acknowledges that:

   (i) the family is the basis of society and, in most cases, the best place to raise children,

   (ii) policies that encourage the formation of stable families should be supported,

   (iii) the freedom to choose whether a parent can stay at home or pursue work is vital to the formation of stable families, and

   (iv) families would benefit if married couples were given the choice to file their income tax returns separately, or to file a joint tax return, a practice known as income splitting;

(b) calls on the Senate to debate the benefits of giving married couples the option to prepare and file joint income returns; and

(c) calls on the Federal Government to cost a change to the income tax system which would permit joint filing of tax returns by married couples.

Senators Patrick and Lambie to move on the next day of sitting:

That the following matter be referred to the Legal and Constitutional Affairs References Committee for inquiry and report by 28 February 2020:

(a) accusations of Crown Casino's links to organised crime, money laundering, improper activity by consular officials, tampering with poker machines, and domestic violence and drug trafficking on Crown property, including:

   (i) the allegations raised in the House of Representatives on 18 October 2017 by the Member for Clark (the then-Member for Denison), Mr Andrew Wilkie, concerning Crown Casino,

   (ii) Mr Wilkie's referral to the Independent Broad-based Anti-Corruption Commission on 24 July 2019 of the Victorian Commission for Gambling and Liquor Regulation and Victoria Police, and

   (iii) reports by Nine newspapers and 60 Minutes in July 2019 concerning alleged criminal activity and misconduct involving Crown Casino;

(b) the actions taken or omissions made by state and federal agencies in responding to these allegations, and in particular the actions of the Victorian Commission for Gambling and Liquor Regulation and the Victoria Police;

(c) the relationship between Crown Casino and governments, including the role of former members of state and federal parliaments; and

(d) any related matters.

Senator Seselja to move on the next day of sitting:

That, in accordance with the provisions of the Public Works Committee Act 1969, the following proposed work be referred to the Parliamentary Standing Committee on Public Works for consideration and report as soon as reasonably possible:

      Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation's Sydney Consolidation Project

Senator Seselja to move on the next day of sitting:

That, in accordance with the provisions of the Public Works Committee Act 1969, the following proposed work be referred to the Parliamentary Standing Committee on Public Works for consideration and report as soon as reasonably possible:

      Australian Taxation Office proposed fit-out of leased premises in Moonee Ponds, Victoria

Senator Seselja to move on the next day of sitting:

That, in accordance with the provisions of the Public Works Committee Act 1969, the following proposed work be referred to the Parliamentary Standing Committee on Public Works for consideration and report as soon as reasonably possible:

      National Museum of Australia Proposed Gallery Development Stage 1: Life in Australia

Senator Seselja to move on the next day of sitting:

That, in accordance with the provisions of the Public Works Committee Act 1969, the following proposed work be referred to the Parliamentary Standing Committee on Public Works for consideration and report as soon as reasonably possible:

      Department of Defence, Point Wilson Waterside Infrastructure Remediation Project, Point Wilson, Victoria

Senator McKim to move on the next day of sitting:

That the following matter be referred to the Legal and Constitutional Affairs References Committee for inquiry and report by the third sitting day of October 2019:

      Allegations regarding visa applications and other immigration matters, with particular reference to the following:

(a) allegations that current members of Parliament, including ministers, pressured senior officers in the Department of Home Affairs to make it easier for certain people, including high-roller clients of Crown Resorts, to pass customs;

(b) allegations that visa applications for certain people were fast-tracked by the Department of Home Affairs or the former Department of Immigration and Border Protection;

(c) any agreements between the Department of Home Affairs and Crown Resorts to fast-track visas for wealthy clients of Crown Resorts;

(d) the operation and effectiveness of Commonwealth legislation, administrative arrangements and law enforcement strategies in identifying, detecting, and disrupting any activity that weakens the functions and integrity of the Department of Home Affairs;

(e) Crown Resorts' alleged links to organised crime, money laundering, improper activity by consular officials, tampering with poker machines, and domestic violence and drug trafficking on Crown Resorts' property;

(f) the relationship between Crown Resorts and governments, including the role of former members of state and federal parliaments and the influence of political donations;

(g) the need for any legislative or administrative reform; and

(h) any related matters.

Senator Kitching to move on the next day of sitting:

(1) That a select committee, to be known as the Select Committee on Integrity, be established to inquire into and report on the integrity of government administration, with particular reference to:

   (a) the adequacy and performance of existing integrity measures including, but not limited to:

      (i) the Statement of Ministerial Standards, and

      (ii) the Lobbyist Code and Register of Lobbyists;

   (b) the funding, functions and performance of Commonwealth integrity agencies;

   (c) the adequacy of government responses to Senate committee reports;

   (d) the adequacy of government responses to Senate orders for the production of documents;

   (e) the operation of the Commonwealth Procurement Framework;

   (f) the administration of the Freedom of Information Act 1982 legislation;

   (g) any proposals to strengthen the integrity of government administration; and

   (h) any related matters.

(2) That the committee present its final report on or before the third sitting day of 2021.

(3) That the committee consist of 8 senators, as follows:

   (a) 2 nominated by the Leader of the Government in the Senate;

   (b) 2 nominated by the Leader of the Opposition in the Senate;

   (c) 1 nominated by the Leader of the Australian Greens; and

   (d) 3 nominated by minor party and independent senators.

(4) That:

   (a) participating members may be appointed to the committee on the nomination of the Leader of the Government in the Senate, the Leader of the Opposition in the Senate or any minority party or independent senator; and

   (b) participating members may participate in hearings of evidence and deliberations of the committee, and have all the rights of members of the committee, but may not vote on any questions before the committee.

(5) That 4 members of the committee constitute a quorum of the committee.

(6) That the committee may proceed to the dispatch of business notwithstanding that not all members have been duly nominated and appointed and notwithstanding any vacancy.

(7) That the committee elect as chair one of the members nominated by the Leader of the Opposition in the Senate and as deputy chair one of the members nominated by the Leader of the Australian Greens or by minor party and independent senators.

(8) That the deputy chair shall act chair when the chair is absent from a meeting of the committee or the position of chair is temporarily vacant.

(9) That, in the event of an equality of voting, the chair, or the deputy chair when acting as chair, have a casting vote.

(10) That the committee have power to appoint subcommittees consisting of 3 or more of its members, and to refer to any such subcommittee any of the matters which the committee is empowered to consider.

(11) That the committee and any subcommittee have power to send for and examine persons and documents, to move from place to place, to sit in public or in private, notwithstanding any prorogation of the Parliament or dissolution of the House of Representatives, and have leave to report from time to time its proceedings and the evidence taken and such interim recommendations as it may deem fit.

(12) That the committee be provided with all necessary staff, facilities and resources and be empowered to appoint persons with specialist knowledge for the purposes of the committee with the approval of the President.

(13) That the committee be empowered to print from day to day such papers and evidence as may be ordered by it, and a daily Hansard be published of such proceedings as take place in public.

Senator Waters to move on the next day of sitting:

(1) That so much of the standing orders be suspended as would prevent this resolution having effect.

(2) That the Landholders' Right to Refuse (Gas and Coal) Bill 2015 be restored to the Notice Paper and consideration of the bill resume at the stage reached in the 45th Parliament.

Senator Siewert to move on the next day of sitting:

That the Senate—

(a) notes that:

   (i) the majority of ParentsNext participants are women,

   (ii) the Australian Human Rights Commission has stated that ParentsNext is not compatible with human rights, and

   (iii) despite recommendations in the report of the Community Affairs References Committee inquiry into ParentsNext (the Senate inquiry), some participants are still being misled into believing that privacy waivers are compulsory, and pressured into signing them or risk loss of their income;

(b) recognises that the overwhelming evidence presented to the Senate inquiry into the program recommended that ParentsNext not continue in its current form; and

(c) calls on the Federal Government to urgently sanction providers who are pressuring program participants into signing privacy waivers, and implement the recommendations of the Senate inquiry.

Senator Siewert to move on the next day of sitting:

That the following matter be referred to the Community Affairs References Committee for inquiry and report by 4 December 2019:

      Centrelink's compliance program, with specific reference to:

(a) the ongoing impact of the Federal Government's automated debt collection processes upon current and past income support recipients;

(b) data-matching techniques used by Centrelink, including limitations and uncertainties of data-matching techniques and error-handling processes;

(c) the handling of under-payment errors, including the number of payments identified and made through data-matching following an under-payment error;

(d) the use of real-time wages data and other techniques to prevent overpayment;

(e) the capacity and adequacy of Centrelink and the Department of Human Services to deliver the program, including the use of contract staff and the impact of staff performance targets on the program;

(f) the error rates in the issuing of initial letters and debt notices, the causes of these errors and what steps are routinely taken when errors are identified;

(g) the procedures that have been put in place to prevent future errors;

(h) the number of initial letters and debt notices sent out and the number of debts that have been recovered;

(i) the review process and appeals process for debt notices, including the number of reviews and appeals undertaken;

(j) the use and legality of the debt collection processes used by Centrelink and the Department of Human Services;

(k) the use of debt collectors in the compliance program; and

(l) the cost of the compliance program to date, including the projected and actual amount raised from the program.