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Australian War Memorial—Report for 2014-15


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AUSTRALIAN WAR MEMORIAL ANNUAL REPORT 2014-2015 AUSTRALIAN WAR MEMORIAL ANNUAL REPORT 2014-2015

Annual report for the year ended 30 June 2015, together with the financial statements and the report of the Auditor-General

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Images produced courtesy of the Australian War Memorial, Canberra

Cover and title page images

Reverse and obverse: One of the first community monuments to be completed after the Great War, Gilbert Doble’s Winged victory is prominently placed in the legacies section of the redeveloped First World War Galleries. ART96224

Copyright © Australian War Memorial

ISSN 1441 4198

This work is copyright. Apart from any use as permitted under the Copyright Act 1968, no part may be reproduced, copied, scanned, stored in a retrieval system, recorded, or transmitted in any form or by any means without the prior written permission of the publisher.

Australian War Memorial GPO Box 345 Canberra, ACT 2601 Australia

www.awm.gov.au

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Private G.J. Giles’s tunic, encrusted with mud from the Somme, has long been an iconic object, and is currently on display in the First World War Galleries. RELAWM04500

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His Royal Highness Prince Henry of Wales is welcomed by Rear Admiral Ken Doolan AO RAN (Retd), Chairman of the Council of the Australian War Memorial. Also present are His Excellency General the Honourable Sir Peter Cosgrove AK MC (Retd), Governor-General of the Commonwealth of Australia, and Dr Brendan Nelson, Director of the Australian War Memorial.

Governor-General Peter Cosgrove and the Honourable Chris Finlayson QC MP, Attorney-General of New Zealand, watch the veterans’ march the Anzac Day National Ceremony.

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INTRODUCTION TO THE REPORT

The Annual Report of the Australian War Memorial for the year ended 30 June 2015 was produced in the format for an annual report for a corporate Commonwealth entity under the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013. The report has been constructed to reflect the Memorial’s Outcome and Outputs structure and to address government reporting requirements.

Part One Corporate Governance includes the Chair’s Report and details of the Council and its operations and performance.

Part Two Corporate Operations includes the Director’s highlights and overview of the Memorial’s performance during 2014-15.

Part Three Corporate Summary provides information on the structure and reporting framework of the Memorial.

Part Four Performance Report details performance information against the Memorial’s Outcome and against external and internal Outputs.

Part Five Accountability provides detailed information about the Memorial as required for reporting.

Part Six Financial Statements includes the Report by the Auditor-General and Financial Statements.

Appendices Appendices provide additional information about the Memorial, including staff profiles, collection acquisitions and disposals, and major sponsors.

Contact Officer

The contact officer for enquiries about this report is:

The Executive Officer Corporate Services Australian War Memorial GPO Box 345 Canberra ACT 2601

Phone: (02) 6243 4290 Fax: (02) 6243 4330 Email: executive@awm.gov.au

A copy of this report may be found on the Memorial’s website at www.awm.gov.au

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The Honourable Tony Abbott MP, former Prime Minister of Australia, Senator the Honourable Michael Ronaldson, former Minister for Veterans’ Affairs, and Rear Admiral Ken Doolan AO RAN (Retd), Chairman of the Council of the Australian War Memorial, with schoolchildren in front of the Roll of Honour.

The Honourable Bill Shorten MP, Leader of the Opposition, lays a wreath in the Hall of Memory on Remembrance Day 2014.

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INTRODUCTION TO THE REPORT vii

Highlights xii

GOVERNANCE 1

Governance Structure 3

Council of the Memorial 4

Council Performance 4

CORPORATE OPERATIONS 5

CORPORATE SUMMARY 9

Purpose 9

Mission 9

Vision 9

Values 9

Planning and Reporting Framework 10

Organisation Chart and Senior Staff 10

Branch Descriptions 11

National Collection 11

Public Programs 11

Corporate Services 11

PERFORMANCE REPORT 13

OUTCOME AND OUTPUTS STRUCTURE 13

External programs 13

Internal programs 13

Overall performance against the Outcome 14

Commemoration performance indicator 14

Accessibility performance indicator 14

Knowledge and understanding of performance indicator 15

OUTPUT 1.1 Commemorative Ceremonies 16

Overview 16

Other commemorative activities 18

OUTPUT 1.2 The National Memorial and Grounds 19

Overview 19

Other related activities 21

OUTPUT 1.3 The National Collection 22

Overview 22

Other collection activities 24

OUTPUT 1.4 Exhibitions 26

Overview 26

Other exhibition activities 28

OUTPUT 1.5 Interpretive Services 29

Overview 29

Other interpretive activities 33

OUTPUT 1.6 Promotions and Community Services 35

Overview 35

Other promotion and community services activities 37

OUTPUT 1.7 Research, Information, and Dissemination 38

Overview 38

Other research activities 44

CONTENTS

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OUTPUT 1.8 Visitor Services 46

Overview 46

Other visitor services activities 48

INTERNAL OUTPUTS 49

OUTPUT 1.9 Corporate Governance 49

OUTPUT 1.10 Executive Strategic Management 49

Executive leadership 49

Strategic management 50

Risk management and business continuity planning 51

Evaluation and visitor research 51

OUTPUT 1.11 Resource Management 53

Buildings and Services 53

Finance 55

Information Technology 55

People Management 56

OUTPUT 1.12 Revenue Generation 57

Memorial Shop 57

e-Business 57

OUTPUT 1.13 Team Management 58

ACCOUNTABILITY 59

Legislation, Functions, and Powers 59

Enabling legislation 59

Functions of the Memorial 59

Powers of the Memorial 60

Responsible Minister 60

Powers of the Minister 60

Internal and External Audits 61

Fraud Control 61

Effects of Ministerial Directions 61

Government policy order under section 22 of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 61

Indemnities and Insurance Premiums 61

Legal Actions 61

Ombudsman 61

Social Justice and Equity 61

Advertising and market research expenditure 62

Freedom of Information Act 1982 62

Freedom of Information Act 1982, statistics 2014-15 64

Environmental Protection and Biodiversity Conservation (EPBC) Act 1999, Section 516A Statement 64

Energy consumption and environmental management 64

Heritage management 65

Work Health and Safety 65

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REPORT BY AUDITOR-GENERAL AND FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 67

APPENDICES 109

APPENDIX 1 109

Council membership 109

Council Committee membership 110

Finance, Audit, and Compliance Committee 110

Remuneration Committee 111

Council Membership Committee 111

APPENDIX 2 112

Council profiles 112

APPENDIX 3 116

Senior Staff profiles 116

APPENDIX 4 119

Selected VIP visits, events, and ceremonies 119

APPENDIX 5 124

Key acquisitions and disposals 124

APPENDIX 6 126

Travelling exhibitions 126

APPENDIX 7 130

Selected staff publications, lectures, and talks 130

APPENDIX 8 148

Staffing overview as at 30 June 2015 148

APPENDIX 9 149

Major sponsors 149

Glossary 151

Compliance Index 152

Index 153

THE YEAR IN PHOTOGRAPHS …

More than 128,000 people poured into the Memorial grounds and onto Anzac Parade for the 2015 Anzac Day Dawn Service.

A special start to the Dawn Service, with Able Seaman Boatswains Mate Alan Patterson of the Gunggandgji people breaking the night’s silence with his didgeridoo.

The newly redeveloped First World War Galleries. His Royal Highness The Duke of Kent places a poppy on the Roll of Honour after the 2015 Anzac Day National Ceremony.

Pre-federation and First World War guns on open display.

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The rain failed to dampen the smiles of those waiting to meet His Royal Highness Prince Henry of Wales during his visit to the Memorial.

Heritage-listed dioramas in the First World War Galleries.

The launch of Poppy’s Café in honour of Trooper David “Poppy” Pearce.

The History Channel films a behind-the-scenes documentary in the Memorial’s storage facility at Mitchell.

Australia’s first Indigenous official war artist, Tony Albert, with his NORFORCE exhibition.

Lieutenant Colonel Harry Smith SG MC (Retd) presents his medals to the Australian War Memorial.

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HIGHLIGHTS The year in figures …

Visitors:

• More than 1.142 Million visitors came to the Memorial and its storage facility in Mitchell, Canberra

• More than 337,000 visitors made their first visit to the Memorial

Record attendances at ceremonies:

• 144,000 at the Last Post Ceremonies

• 128,700 at the Anzac Day Dawn Service

• 31,500 at the Anzac Day National Ceremony

• 3,900 at the Remembrance Day National Ceremony

• More than 14,000 visitors attended small-scale Memorial ceremonies and VIP tours

• More than 274,000 visitors attended Memorial public programs and special events

• More than 1.282 million visitors attended Memorial exhibitions and travelling exhibitions

• At least 12 free highlight tours were conducted by voluntary guides each day

• Media coverage was broadcast to an audience of more than 60 million during the Anzac Day period

Collection:

• More than 91,000 items were acquired for the National Collection

• More than 421,000 National Collection items can be accessed via online public databases

Education:

• 92 Memorial Boxes were loaned to 564 schools across the country and used by more than 67,500 students

• More than 139,000 school students visited the Memorial

• More than 117,000 students participated in facilitated programs

• More than 5,100 students participated in school wreathlaying ceremonies

• Professional development sessions were provided to 263 school teachers and librarians

Research and online access:

• More than 7.376 million visits were madeto the website, a 47 per cent increase from last year

• Almost 63,000 followed us on Facebook

• More than 3.2 million total views were recorded of Memorial photographs on Flickr

• More than 35,296 visitors to the Reading Room accessed more than 18,300 collection items

• More than 34,629 research enquiries were answered

• More than 20 million page views accessed online research facilities

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GOVERNANCE

The Centenary of the First World War has bought with it opportunities and challenges, not least of which was meeting the commemorative expectations of a nation. We recognised the national assumption that the Australian War Memorial would play a leading role in honouring the memory of those who served and sacrificed. Despite focusing this year on the men and women who were involved in the First World War, we ensured that the Memorial continued to pay tribute to those who have served in the 100 years since. Council was convinced it was the Memorial’s duty to help facilitate the collective commemoration of a nation through the story of the men and women who put themselves in harm’s way to protect our precious freedoms, whether that story be told via a visit to the Memorial and its world-class museum in Canberra, by attending one of the Memorial’s many ceremonies, or through the growing presence of the Memorial in the broader community through exhibitions, publications, and digital media. It is a duty that has not been taken lightly, and one that has been an honour for the Council to oversee.

One of the most significant undertakings of the centenary period has been the completion of the Memorial’s refurbished First World War Galleries. This was one of the largest projects ever undertaken by this institution and was completed to general approbation due in large measure to the hard work, enthusiasm, and dedication of all the paid and volunteer staff. Every section, every team, and perhaps every staff member made some sort of contribution to this development. On behalf of Council I thank those staff members for the spectacular yet sensitive galleries they have created.

The First World War Galleries’ timeline follows the story of the Australian commitment to this conflict, from 1914 through war’s end and beyond. We have endeavoured to weave the story of the military actions with the impact on and contribution of the broader community. Our goal here was not to produce a comprehensive history of the war from the perspective of all nations involved but a historical window through which to view aspects of the conflict from an Australian perspective. To show the reality of war, its horror, and its brutality, and to give

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Josephine the kangaroo, made by nurses interned as prisoners of the Japanese in 1942. RELAWM30212

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the coming generations an understanding of how the story of this “war to end all wars” unfolded, we take visitors beyond the shores of Gallipoli through all campaigns involving Australians, particularly the devastation of the Western Front. As Council member Mr Les Carlyon AC said in his superb address at the official opening of the galleries, their most important attribute is that they make people think.

Another significant task the government asked the Australian War Memorial to undertake was to plan a Centenary of Anzac travelling exhibition. The Spirit of Anzac Centenary Experience is the flagship community event for Centenary of Anzac commemorations. It will reach out to regional Australia and help individuals to connect with the Anzac story. It will allow communities to explore and understand their connections to those Australians who served in war and on operational service. Equally importantly, the travelling exhibition will allow those living in rural and regional areas to see a collection of artefacts and an interpretation of the First World War they may not otherwise have the opportunity to see in this manner. This project is sponsored by the Australian government, including the three arms of the Australian Defence Force, and is supported by the Commonwealth Bank and Telstra.

Throughout the 2014-15 financial year the Memorial has hosted many distinguished visitors and significant commemorative ceremonies, prime among which were Remembrance Day 2014 and Anzac Day 2015. The Remembrance Day 2014 National Ceremony marked the 96th anniversary of the Armistice which ended the First World War and was attended by 3,900 people, with more than one-quarter of attendees being schoolchildren. This was a marked increase, with the numbers representing almost four times those of the previous year. The Honourable John Howard OM AC delivered the Commemorative Address to an audience comprising many high-level dignitaries and diplomats. As has now become tradition, 102 students from Australia’s states and territories laid individual poppies to represent the more than 102,000 Australian servicemen and servicewomen who have died defending our nation.

The Dawn Service at the Australian War Memorial on 25 April 2015 attracted a record crowd, with at least 128,700 people turning out to mark the centenary of the Gallipoli landings. People poured onto the site and took up positions on the parade ground, in the gardens (where special large screens were set up), and even filling up the top end of Anzac Parade. The ceremony was opened with readings from Captain Tim Brown, Flight Sergeant Hayden Inwood, and Corporal Daniel Keighran VC. Speaking to the heart of the Memorial’s mission, these readings included excerpts from the letters and diaries of men and women who served in various conflicts, and reflected on the experiences of those who stood on the shores of Gallipoli in 1915.

At 5.30 am the proceedings officially commenced with the sounds of a didgeridoo played by a member of the Gunggandgji people, Able Seaman Boatswains Mate Alan

Patterson of the Royal Australian Navy. This was a moving and unforgettable start to this most momentous of events.

Anzac Day commemorative activities continued throughout the day with the traditional National Ceremony and veterans’ march onto the Memorial’s Parade Ground. The march was preceded by a beautifully restored 18-pounder gun from the First World War, complete with a horse team and limber provided by the Royal Australian Artillery Historical Company. As usual we paid tribute to the many hundreds of veterans from past and recent wars and operations who chose to march.

The financial year 2014-15 has been one of achievement despite increasing financial challenges. The Council envisages these challenges will continue and increase during the year ahead. Like all government agencies the Memorial has had to respond to the imposition of efficiency dividends. The consequence is that we have had to plan for further reductions in staffing at a time when there is an increased demand on staff resources to deliver programs and services associated with the Centenary of the First World War.

Notwithstanding these concerns, the Australian War Memorial remains in a strong financial position. The operating loss reported since 2009-10 relates to annual government funding for the development of the National Collection and drawdowns from the reserve established to meet anticipated costs of the First World War centenary programs. The reported result emphasises that the Memorial’s well-established financial and budget management practices are sound.

Partnerships and collaboration are essential parts of the success of the Memorial. We are delighted to be working with several generous companies and benefactors. On

Former Minister for Veterans’ Affairs Senator the Honourable Michael Ronaldson launches the Spirit of Anzac Centenary Experience.

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behalf of Council I sincerely thank BHP Billiton Sustainable Communities for their assistance in funding the delivery of the refurbished First World War Galleries. I also convey the thanks of Council, the Director, and staff to Lockheed Martin, Boeing Australia, BAE Systems, Qantas, Kingold, the De Lambert Largesse Foundation, the RSL and Services Clubs NSW, RSL Queensland, RSL Victoria, Thales, Wesfarmers, the Seven Network, and the Gandevia Foundation. The support of these donors and others allows the Memorial to continue to deliver leading-edge museum technology, quality content, and public programs for our visitors, and to enhance the standing of what is an iconic place of commemoration for all Australians and one of the world’s great museums. This support further helps the Memorial engage with the community at all levels and shows the considerable generosity of the Australian business community to its mission.

There have been several changes to the membership of the Council of the Australian War Memorial during the year 2014-15. I offer my sincere thanks to Mr Peter FitzSimons AM, Dr Allan Hawke AC, and Major General Paul Stevens AO (Retd), whose terms on the Council came to an end this year. Each contributed significantly to the governance of the Memorial.

I also thank the Australian government for supporting Council’s request for funding to undertake the research and writing of a new official history that covers Australian military and peacekeeping operations in East Timor, Iraq, and Afghanistan. These new official history volumes are to be produced over the next six years and will allow the Memorial to play its part in carrying on the legacy of Charles Bean, the official war correspondent of the First World War and author of several of the corresponding official histories.

The Council continues to be highly impressed with the dedication, initiative, and industry of the Director, the Honourable Dr Brendan Nelson, and the Memorial’s experienced, expert, and hardworking paid and volunteer staff. On behalf of Council I thank each of them for all they have done and continue to do to ensure that the Australian War Memorial remains the iconic heart of national remembrance.

Rear Admiral Ken Doolan AO RAN (Retd)

Chair

Governance Structure The Australian War Memorial was established as a statutory authority under, and draws its authority from, the Australian War Memorial Act 1980 (the Act). The Act allows for the appointment of a Council and a Director as Chief Executive Officer of the Memorial.

The performance of the Memorial and the accountability of its Council and management are subject to the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013, which imposes key reporting, financial, and pecuniary obligations on the Memorial and its Council members. Many of these are modelled on provisions which apply under corporations law, particularly those for directors.

The Memorial is subject to other acts that bear on its operation, and is accountable to the government through the Minister for Veterans’ Affairs. It has a strong link to the Department of Finance for budgetary processes, appropriations, grants, and financial management processes, and it follows the Principles and Better Practice Guides

Rear Admiral Ken Doolan AO RAN (Retd) and Dr Brendan Nelson present the Honourable John Howard OM AC with a copy of Anzac treasures: the Gallipoli collection of the Australian War Memorial on Remembrance Day 2014.

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produced and regularly updated by the Australian National Audit Office (ANAO). The Memorial adheres to Australian accounting standards in the preparation of its financial reports and follows best practice in its financial management.

Council of the Memorial The Council of the Australian War Memorial is established by section 9 of the Australian War Memorial Act 1980.

The Council is responsible for the conduct and control of the affairs of the Memorial, and the policy of the Memorial with respect to any matters is determined by the Council. In particular, the Council:

• establishes the strategic direction and vision of the Memorial

• approves the goals and key objectives of the Memorial

• approves the annual budget and monitors expenditure and financial reporting, including for major projects

• ensures agreed corporate objectives are met

• adopts a strategic plan, which includes a business plan with objectives and key reporting measures

• ensures the Memorial has adequate financial resources to meet known and planned future commitments

• ensures that systems, processes, and internal controls are in place for effective management and monitoring of the principal risks to which the Memorial is exposed

• ensures that satisfactory procedures are in place for auditing the Memorial’s financial affairs and that the scope of internal and external audit is adequate

• ensures decisions made are consistent with the ethos of the Memorial

• ensures that the Memorial communicates effectively with the public and key stakeholders

• monitors and evaluates the performance of the Director.

Council performance Council reviews its performance at least once a year in terms of the achievement of targets associated with the outputs specified in the Business Plan. A report on Council activities is included under Output 1.9.

New Council members are expected to undertake orientation training before attending a Council meeting, and all are provided with a manual that outlines the functioning of the Council in terms of applicable acts and members’ responsibilities.

Details of Council membership, Council Committee membership, and terms of reference for committees are in Appendix 1.

Profiles of Council members can be found in Appendix 2.

Members of the Council of the Australian War Memorial:

BACK ROW: Lieutenant General Angus Campbell DSC AM, Chief of Army; Major General Greg Melick AO RFD FANZCN SC; Brigadier Alison Creagh CSC; Mr Kerry Stokes AC; Mr Les Carlyon AC; Rear Admiral Michael van Balen AO RAN, representing the Chief of Navy; Air Vice-Marshal Leo Davies AO CSC, representing the Chief of Air Force.

FRONT ROW: The Honourable Graham Edwards AM; Ms Gabrielle Trainor; Rear Admiral Ken Doolan AO RAN (Retd), Chairman; Mrs Josephine Stone AM; the Honourable Dr Brendan Nelson, Director of the Australian War Memorial.

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CORPORATE OPERATIONS

In the pre-dawn darkness on the 100th anniversary of the Gallipoli landings, 128,700 Australians paused in silence at the Australian War Memorial. With awkward humility and abiding reverence infused with overwhelming pride, we gathered as free and confident heirs to a legacy born of idealism, forged in self-sacrifice and passed now to our generation. We had travelled from the length and breadth of the continent in renewed commitment to one another and our nation to pay silent tribute to those who have given so much for us.

When Able Seaman Boatswains Mate Alan Patterson of the Gunggandgji people broke the eerie silence from the parapet of the Memorial playing the didgeridoo to commence the Dawn Service, it was clear this was the beginning of a very special event and day of activities. In delivering to the nation the Dawn Service, the National Ceremony, and the Last Post Ceremony, the Memorial’s key staff had spent a year planning and delivering for Australia. In every sense of the word they exceeded any reasonable expectation. They did the memory of these men and women proud.

The past year has seen the culmination of many years of planning and hard work to deliver what may be one of the nation’s most significant anniversaries. Although we have marked the centenary of the commencement of the Gallipoli campaign, the anniversaries of the pivotal events of the Western Front, the mobile war of Sinai and Palestine, and the eventual Armistice all lie ahead. These events, perhaps like no others, shaped and defined us. They certainly changed us.

Charles Bean, at the time of conceiving the Memorial during the bloody fighting at Pozières in July 1916, wrote:

Many a man lying out there at Pozières or in the low scrub at Gallipoli … has thought in his last moments: “Well - well - it’s over; but in Australia they will be proud of this.”

We are. We are very proud.

The redeveloped First World War Galleries officially opened in February to reflect that pride - the Memorial’s gift to the nation for the centenary. They are simply stunning - delivered on time and on budget.

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This British Quick Fire 4.5-inch howitzer Mk II is on display in the Western Front section of the Memorial’s redeveloped First World War Galleries. REL46223.

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A steady flow of visitors can be seen at the Memorial each day, with scarcely a moment when crowds of people are not taking in the dioramas, exploring the digital labels, marvelling at the battlefield relics, or looking into the eyes of one of the many photographic portraits situated throughout the gallery spaces. Visitor numbers are up 24 per cent compared to the previous financial year. They leave the First World War Galleries proud of what our young nation achieved, but informed by a sober understanding of the cost.

This year the Memorial delivered the world-class conference Gallipoli 1915: a century on, in partnership with the Australian National University. Eminent domestic and international historians gathered to cast light on the many perspectives of the campaign. Significantly, a series of sessions was also devoted to Indigenous servicemen and servicewomen from all nations, and others highlighted some of the extraordinary music and art that the campaign inspired. The conference was attended by more than 400 registered delegates and was a credit to the Memorial’s history team.

One subtle but stunning project for the year past has been the building’s enhanced external lighting. The Memorial at night, particularly the Hall of Memory, the Roll of Honour, and the stained-glass windows, are now bathed in light. This gives a new ambience to the Memorial in the evening and includes the illumination of the building as a whole. The aim is not only to highlight the form and aesthetics of the building but also to evoke the spiritual ambience central to Charles Bean’s vision. The central, most prominent stained-glass window, now illuminated from the inside, is that of the Australian nurse with the simple value “Devotion” at its base. During the summer evenings the Commemorative Area was opened to the public, when these illuminations were even more appreciated.

Every night, from dusk to dawn, each of the more than 60,000 names from the First World War Roll of Honour is projected onto the Memorial immediately beneath the Hall of Memory dome. Each name will appear for 30 seconds on up to 30 occasions over the four years of the centenary period. Families have gathered and paused throughout the night and predawn darkness to see a particular name light up.

The Memorial continues to broaden its reach with the Commemorative Crosses project. Schoolchildren from around the nation who visit the Memorial inscribe individual crosses with their personal tributes. The crosses are then delivered to Australian ambassadors and high commissioners in 39 countries, to be placed on Australian war graves and memorials. More than 43,000 crosses have been inscribed by students and 16,000 have been placed on Australian graves here and overseas.

The personal stories told in the galleries and exhibitions at the Memorial are at the heart of a strong emotional connection with our visitors. No more apparent is this than in the Afghanistan: the Australian story exhibition. Intense emotions are revealed in this space by veterans, families, and visitors.

This exhibition is only a starting point for the Memorial to tell the story of recent conflicts, and we continue to work with the Australian Defence Force (ADF) and other agencies to expand our collection in the area. Chiefly, with members of the ADF through the Collection Coordination Group (CCG) and Defence Materials Organisation (DMO), the Memorial is working to ensure that the items identified by curators in Afghanistan are returned to the Memorial. Additionally, the Memorial and CCG are working to procure large technology items and other equipment that will help illustrate the story of the Middle East Area of Operations. More than 27,000 ADF personnel, Australian Federal Police, aid workers, and diplomats have served in Afghanistan over the more than a decade of our involvement. The welcome home parade held in March was a moving tribute to them and their families, but their story needs to be told - and told now.

Beyond exhibitions, the government delivered $12.8 million for the official history of Iraq, Afghanistan, and East Timor. This will be done under the auspices of the Australian War Memorial and the chosen official historian.

Since the inception of the Official War Records Unit in 1917 and the subsequent appointment of Will Dyson as official war artist in May of the same year, the story of the Australian experience of war has been told not just through collecting objects of significance but through commissioning interpretive work. This year the Memorial has continued this tradition by commissioning a commemorative Print Portfolio featuring the work of contemporary Australian and New Zealand artists. This project is a major artistic engagement highlighting the ongoing significance of the First World War in contemporary Australia and New Zealand, while commemorating, to a high artistic standard, the service and sacrifice of individuals, families, and communities during the conflict. The collection is particularly interesting as it will capture the similarities and the differences in the contemporary interpretation of the Anzac story between Australians and New Zealanders.

The Memorial’s collection continues to reach further into the Australian community. This year collection items previously available only to visitors to the Memorial are now available for viewing online. Particular effort has been put into the digitisation of the extensive collection of film and oral histories. Interviews from Gallipoli veterans recorded in the 1980s and 1990s have been of particular interest and have proved to be popular additions to the Memorial’s website. Memorial staff have curated the film collection into show reels and placed them on the Memorial’s YouTube channel. This work, currently undertaken in many areas of the collection, including personal records, photos, film, official records, and diaries, is extremely important. The vast majority of the Memorial’s collection cannot be displayed in the confines of the Memorial’s limited gallery space, so this becomes the only medium by which it can be displayed. This is, after all, Australia’s collection, and the Memorial continues to endeavour to make as much of it available to Australia as possible.

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Students remain one of the Memorial’s key audiences. This year has seen record numbers flock to the Memorial to be part of the centenary commemorations. The Memorial continues to produce high-quality education programs as a strong part of the Australian National Curriculum to ensure that young people continue to engage, connect, and think critically about our history. These programs link strongly to classroom learning, focusing on the individual experience of war in the context of the broader conflicts. Their growing popularity has seen a record amount of students - close to 140,000 - visit the Memorial this year.

Through the generous support of a corporate sponsor the Memorial has been able to build the Kingold Education and Media Centre. This green screen studio is equipped with the full facility for broadcasting and recording. It will allow the Memorial to connect with a broader audience, including schools, professional groups, and the general public. It provides another avenue to expose and interpret the collection, allowing the collection and the stories of the men and women behind it to reach a wider, deeper audience. This is important work and will increasingly shape our future activities. The collection can be accessed where limited space and object condition and fragility may otherwise preclude it. The Memorial has even commenced the scanning of objects so that they can be viewed digitally in 3D.

The virtual tour of the Memorial, built by Google and accessible through the Memorial’s website or the Google Institute, perfectly complements the Kingold facility.

The Memorial’s former travelling exhibition program changed during the financial year due to budgetary restraints. This left the Memorial with the challenge of continuing to reach out to regional and remote communities. Through the generous

support of Wesfarmers, Remember me: the lost diggers of Vignacourt travelled to Western Australia. Similarly, Thales Australia supported the Ben Quilty: after Afghanistan exhibition in the garrison cities of Darwin and Townsville.

The Memorial has also implemented a new exhibition model with the A camera on Gallipoli. This exhibition features a selection of the remarkable images taken by Sir Charles Ryan in Egypt and on Gallipoli in 1914 and 1915. Some of the most graphic and important photographic images from the campaign are displayed. Venues may choose a digital display or a self-printed exhibition which can be mounted without charge, requiring them only to print and display at their cost. This has proved extremely popular, with 131 venues (including 23 international venues) requesting a copy of the exhibition since February 2015.

With the generous support of the Queensland Museum the Memorial signed a Memorandum of Understanding to enable “Mephisto”, the A7V German First World War tank, to be displayed at the Memorial in Anzac Hall. This is the first time that this unique war relic has been displayed outside of Queensland.

The Last Post Ceremony conducted every evening at the Memorial is now an institution in its own right. In just over two years it has become one of the Memorial’s most meaningful and poignant offerings. Immense commitment by the Memorial’s staff has been invested in this simple nightly ceremony. Our historians have now researched and written more than 1,000 stories of the men and women who have given their lives for us and our freedoms.

A nation reveals itself in subtle but powerful ways. We honour most the idealism and heroism of the everyday Australian. The most prominent image chosen for the Hall of Memory is a nurse. Names are added to the bronze Roll of Honour without rank or military honours. Similarly, in the nightly ritual of the Last Post Ceremony, schoolchildren and everyday Australians lay their wreaths and floral tributes alongside governors-general, heads of state, and visiting VIPs. We are equal in death and its commemoration.

The café restaurant in the Memorial’s grounds was redeveloped to give it “soul”. Former Prime Minister Tony Abbott opened Poppy’s Café, named in honour of Trooper David “Poppy” Pearce, who was killed in Afghanistan in 2007. His widow, Nicole, and their two daughters were deeply moved by the tribute, which includes the name of the café, etched in his honour on the wooden sign made by the sappers for the Tarin Kowt recreation centre in Afghanistan. It greets all who enter the welcoming ambience of the café.

Foxtel produced and screened for the History Channel a five-part behind-the-scenes documentary on the Memorial and its activities. After 16 months examining the letters, diaries, artefacts, relics, and development of the First World War Galleries, the documentary narrator, Scottish archaeologist and historian Neil Oliver, stood in the twilight of the

Vietnam veteran and Long Tan commander Lieutenant Colonel Harry Smith SG MC (Retd) presents his medals to Memorial Director Dr Brendan Nelson.

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Commemorative Area on the steps to the Hall of Memory, and said in part:

What is most inspiring is that in their last moments these men devoted their last moments not to themselves, but to their friends. And that’s love. The love might not survive them, but it’s the last thing they would lose … so as well as all the death, loss, and horror it is friendship and love that will be remembered here, and for all time.

Sound financial management practices are in place and we will continue to manage our operations within the Memorial’s available funding. This has meant a modest reduction in staffing for 2014-15 as well as a necessary reduction in some activities. Considerable effort is being invested in seeking non-government sources of support for the Memorial. Consistent with this, the redeveloped Memorial Shop has already repaid the investment with a significant increase in sales.

In that context I also thank those companies and individuals who have partnered with the Memorial and who have contributed to its work as the soul of the nation. We are very grateful to our generous supporters and partners, including BHP Billiton Sustainable Communities, Mr Kerry Stokes AC, Seven Group Holdings, the Seven Network, Boeing Australia, Qantas, Lockheed Martin, BAE Systems, Thales Australia, Kingold, RSL Victoria, RSL Queensland and Services Clubs, and the De Lambert Largesse Foundation. I also thank the

federal government, the Department of Veterans’ Affairs, and Senator the Honourable Michael Ronaldson, for their ongoing support.

I thank Memorial Chair Rear Admiral Ken Doolan AO RAN (Retd), and all members of Council for their leadership, oversight, strategic direction, and guidance. The Chair has skilfully guided the Memorial through a time of the utmost importance to our nation.

Of course, all this would not have been possible without the talent, enthusiasm, and commitment of the Memorial’s staff and our many volunteers in their various capacities. I thank them and acknowledge their professional and passionate contributions. In particular, I thank my Assistant Directors Rhonda Adler, Tim Sullivan, and Anne Bennie for their support, expertise, commitment, and leadership. It is their work that has delivered so much and prepared the Memorial so well for its future in service to the nation.

By any standard, this has been a year of achievement for the Australian War Memorial, its staff, and its volunteers. Australians can be immensely proud of each and every one of them. I certainly am.

Dr Brendan Nelson

Director

The Australian War Memorial’s Corporate Management Group at the entrance to the redeveloped First World War Galleries. From left: Mr Tim Sullivan, Assistant Director, Branch Head National Collection; Ms Rhonda Adler, Assistant Director, Branch Head Corporate Services; Ms Anne Bennie, Assistant Director, Branch Head Public Programs; and Dr Brendan Nelson, Director.

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CORPORATE SUMMARY

Purpose The purpose of the Australian War Memorial is to commemorate the sacrifice of those Australians who have died in war or on operational service.

Mission To assist Australians to remember, interpret, and understand the Australian experience of war and its enduring impact on Australian society.

Vision Our vision is for the Memorial to:

• play the leading role in the nation’s commemoration of the Australian experience of war;

• engage with people and communities to achieve our purpose;

• collaborate with a wide range of stakeholders and partners to create mutual long-term value; and

• be a workplace that inspires integrity and excellence.

Values The Memorial is committed to the Australian Public Service values:

Impartial The APS is apolitical and provides the government with advice that is frank, honest, timely, and based on the best available evidence.

Committed to service The APS is professional, objective, innovative, and efficient, and works collaboratively to achieve the best results for the Australian community and the government.

Accountable The APS is open and accountable to the Australian community under the law and within the framework of ministerial responsibility.

Respectful The APS respects all people, including their rights and their heritage.

Ethical The APS demonstrates leadership, is trustworthy, and acts with integrity in all that it does.

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A battle-damaged storage bin from a Bushmaster Protected Mobility Vehicle, showcased in the exhibition Afghanistan: the Australian story. REL47027.001

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AUSTRALIAN WAR MEMORIAL ANNUAL REPORT 2014-2015

Planning and Reporting Framework The Memorial is a statutory authority within the Veterans’ Affairs portfolio, and is responsible for functions in accordance with the requirements of the Australian War Memorial Act 1980, the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013, and other applicable acts. The Memorial’s strategic direction and policies are set by its Council, which typically meets four times per year.

Management and implementation of strategies and policies are the responsibility of the Director, who is a Statutory Appointee under the Australian War Memorial Act 1980.

The strategic direction for the Memorial over 2014-15 has been provided by the Memorial’s Corporate Plan. The plan includes, among other things, the outcomes to be achieved by the Memorial, as well as its vision, corporate priorities, and values. The Corporate Plan, approved and regularly reviewed by Council, provides the framework for drafting the annual Business Plan and its related budget. This identifies the outputs that relate to the priorities: all Memorial activities are linked directly to these outputs with associated performance targets. Performance information related to these outputs is contained later in this report.

National Collection Branch Tim Sullivan

Council Chair

Rear Admiral Ken Doolan AO RAN (Retd)

Director

Dr Brendan Nelson

Corporate Services Branch Rhonda Adler

Spirit of Anzac Centenary Experience Brian Dawson

Buildings and Services David Fitzgerald

Finance

Leanne Patterson

Information Technology Daryl Winterbottom

People Management Frances Henderson

Retail and Online Sales Mark Campbell

As at 30 June 2015

Public Programs Branch Anne Bennie

Military Heraldry and Technology Nick Fletcher

Art

Ryan Johnston

Executive Support and Evaluation

Collection Services Brian Dawson

Photographs, Film and Sound Hans Reppin

Research Centre Robyn van Dyk

Communications and Marketing Allan Yates

Commemoration and Visitor Engagement Sarah Hitchcock

Exhibitions Katherine McMahon

Military History Ashley Ekins

The Memorial has a number of other plans that focus on particular activities, including collection development, collection documentation, collection conservation, gallery and site development, audit, business risk, business continuity, budget, fraud control, information technology, workplace diversity, and security of physical assets, people, and information.

Further details of applicable legislation, functions, and powers can be found in Part 5.

Organisation Chart and Senior Staff The day-to-day corporate operations are conducted by management in accordance with the policies and strategic direction set by the Council of the Memorial. The management structure of the Memorial comprises three branches based on functional responsibilities, but outputs are achieved by cross-branch activities.

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Project teams for particular tasks are established as required. These draw on staff from sections across the Memorial and are managed and coordinated by the Memorial’s senior executive committee, the Corporate Management Group (CMG), which comprises the Director and three assistant directors. CMG meets weekly and is responsible for overall leadership and management and implementation of strategies and policies, and for the regular review of performance. For all financial matters, the Chief Finance Officer attends CMG and also has direct access to the Director as necessary.

Profiles of senior staff are at Appendix 3.

Branch Descriptions

National Collection The National Collection branch develops, manages, conserves, and researches the National Collection and makes it accessible through an extensive range of programs.

The Memorial’s collection contains a wide range of historical and cultural heritage items representative of Australia’s involvement in war and on operational service. It provides the Memorial with authentic material with which to mount exhibitions and public displays, to educate and inform its visitors, and to meet the information needs of public enquiries, researchers, and academic and official organisations.

Each section of the branch covers a major portion of the collection or provides key support services such as conservation and registration. Collection areas comprise Art; Military Heraldry and Technology; Photographs, Film and Sound; and the Research Centre. Curators in these areas are responsible for researching and developing the collection; for ensuring that it is accessible, well documented, and properly preserved and that its heritage value is understood; and for contributing to the development of exhibitions. A digitisation program contributes to the preservation of the collection and increases access to it via the internet. Collection Services staff are responsible for the conservation, storage, movement, and physical control of collection items, and for the continuing management of the collection management system. The Research Centre also manages the Roll of Honour and the Commemorative Roll.

Public Programs The function of the Public Programs branch is to engage all Australians and visitors in commemoration through ceremonies, exhibitions, education, interpretation, and marketing services.

The branch develops and undertakes activities to enhance commemoration at the Memorial and throughout the Australian community. It does this by conducting major ceremonies to mark anniversaries relating to Australia’s experience of war, in particular Anzac Day and Remembrance Day, and by producing and conducting the daily Last Post Ceremony to remember those individuals who lost their

lives in conflict. Through the Exhibitions program the branch contributes to the remembrance and understanding of the Australian experience of war by developing and maintaining world-class museum exhibitions, incorporating multimedia and interactive displays, relics, photographs, and works of art. The Memorial’s goals are further supported through a program of changing temporary exhibitions in the Special Exhibitions Gallery. The Travelling Exhibitions program, which enabled the stories and objects from the Memorial’s collection to be seen across Australia, has been much diminished this year due to a funding reduction.

The branch conducts research to identify the needs and expectations of major interest groups, and evaluates the extent to which those needs are being met. It conducts a program of public events and a range of visitor services, including those provided by the Memorial’s volunteers and the Battlefield Tours program. The branch develops and implements education programs that are linked with national education curricula, both for delivery on site and as part of its outreach strategy.

The branch is also responsible for seeking, managing, and servicing development and sponsorship opportunities; developing and coordinating marketing initiatives across the Memorial; providing public relations direction and support; supplying authoritative historical research and interpretation; maintaining and developing the Memorial’s website; and researching and writing the official history of Australia’s involvement in peacekeeping, humanitarian, and post-Cold War operations.

The Public Programs Branch has also had the responsibility for coordinating many Memorial activities in relation to the Centenary of the First World War.

Corporate Services The Corporate Services Branch is responsible for the delivery of a range of internal and external governance, compliance, and resource management functions. Implementation of government reforms relevant to the Memorial is also co-ordinated by the branch.

The branch facilitates the management of the Memorial’s resources, including staff, finances, facilities, information technology, and office services. It provides grounds and property management, communications strategies, and security and records management services. It is responsible for corporate planning and issues relating to administrative law, public liability, fraud control, risk management, and ethics. Corporate Services also manages tax administration, financial policy, internal audit, and asset management. The branch is also responsible for management of the Memorial Shop and e-Business.

Executive functions and ministerial and parliamentary liaison are also coordinated in this branch.

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Focus on … In June 2015 the last surviving German tank of the First World War, A7V No. 506 “Mephisto”, arrived at the Australian War Memorial for display. This unique vehicle is being exhibited in Canberra as a joint project between the Memorial and the Queensland Museum, commemorating the centenary of the Great War.

Mephisto was one of 13 A7Vs that participated in the German attack at Villers-Bretonneux on 24 April 1918, but was disabled and abandoned after becoming mired in a shell hole. The tank was subsequently damaged by artillery fire, and after lying in no man’s land for nearly two months it was salvaged on the night of 22-23 July by men of the 26th Battalion AIF

and the British 1st Gun Carrier Company. After inspection and investigation by allied tank experts and scientists, Mephisto was eventually ceded to Australia as a war trophy.

Travelling to Australia on the SS Armagh in April 1919, Mephisto was offloaded in Brisbane in recognition of the home state of the 26th Battalion. The tank has remained at the Queensland Museum ever since, and the exhibition at the Memorial marks the first occasion on which it has been displayed outside Brisbane since its arrival in Australia.

Mephisto will be on display at the Australian War Memorial between July 2015 and early 2017.

The world’s only surviving German First World War tank, “Mephisto”, comes to the Memorial.

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PERFORMANCE REPORT

Outcome and Outputs Structure Australian government agencies are required to measure their performance in terms of Outcomes. These are the results, impacts, or consequences of their actions on the Australian community. The performance of the Australian War Memorial is expressed in terms of a single Outcome:

Australians remember, interpret, and understand the Australian experience of war and its enduring impact on Australian society.

The Outcome will be achieved through the maintenance and development of the national memorial and a national collection of historical material, and through commemorative ceremonies, exhibitions, research, interpretation, and dissemination.

The Memorial delivers 13 programs, of which five are internally generated, to achieve the Outcome:

External programs Output 1.1 Commemorative Ceremonies

Output 1.2 The National Memorial and Grounds

Output 1.3 The National Collection

Output 1.4 Exhibitions

Output 1.5 Interpretive Services

Output 1.6 Promotions and Community Services

Output 1.7 Research, Information, and Dissemination

Output 1.8 Visitor Services

Internal programs Output 1.9 Corporate Governance

Output 1.10 Executive Strategic Management

Output 1.11 Resource Management

Output 1.12 Revenue Generation

Output 1.13 Team Management

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When time stood still: Private Robert Hartley’s watch stopped at 4.43 am as he jumped into the water during the dawn landings on Gallipoli. RELAWM14245

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Overall performance against the Outcome … we are out to make our war museum, our war gallery, our war library, if possible, not merely fine museums for Australia, but the finest that the world contains.

Charles Bean

The Australian War Memorial is considered one of the nation’s foremost sites for wartime commemoration. Never has this been more important than during this financial year, which marked the centenary of the outbreak of the First World War.

Visitors gravitated to the Memorial seeking to commemorate the service and sacrifice of past and present defence personnel; deepen their understanding of military history; and, most importantly, forge a personal connection with the Australian experience of war.

The Memorial’s commitment to fostering a meaningful visitor experience resulted in the delivery of a targeted program of exhibitions, interpretive presentations, and commemorative events throughout the year. The launch of the newly refurbished permanent First World War exhibition, Australia in the Great War, is one such example. An engaging blend of century-old objects and state-of-the-art technology, the new galleries aim to open the story of Anzac up to a new generation of Australians.

In line with the Memorial’s mission, the new First World War Galleries encourage visitors to remember, interpret, and understand our nation’s involvement in the First World War, and its enduring impact on Australian society. Moreover, they represent the Memorial’s most significant contribution to the Australian commemoration of the Centenary of the First World War one which will no doubt ensure that Charles Bean’s vision remains strong.

Commemoration performance indicator Whether people were actively involved in commemoration by attending the national Anzac Day and Remembrance Day ceremonies and other commemorative ceremonies held at the Memorial.

In line with predictions of increased attendance at the Anzac Day Dawn Service and National Ceremony, the response to commemorations on 25 April was extraordinary. Australians from across the country made pilgrimages to the Australian War Memorial to pay their respects to the service and sacrifice of Australian defence personnel, and to take part in this historic centenary event.

Dawn Service attendance exceeded all expectations. Visitors overflowed from the Parade Ground into the Memorial’s grounds and continued onto the darkened Anzac Parade. The official figure for Dawn Service attendance was 128,700, a 248 per cent increase or 91,700 more visitors than the previous year. This figure sets a new benchmark for attendance at a commemorative ceremony held at the Australian War Memorial, and may not be repeated in the near future.

While attendance figures for the Dawn Service were subject to some media scrutiny, the Memorial’s attendance count methodology is based on calculations for population density at the ceremony.

The Anzac Day National Ceremony also attracted record numbers, with 31,500 people in attendance. Although not as large as the Dawn Service, this still represents a 24 per cent increase on the previous year’s attendance.

The Remembrance Day National Ceremony held in 2014 was also very well attended, with 3,900 people participating in the commemorations. This represents a 77 per cent increase or 1,700 more visitors than the previous year, which recorded the lowest attendance on record owing to wet weather.

Attendance at the Last Post Ceremony continues to rise, with an increasing number of visitors choosing to finish their visit to the Memorial by taking part in this moving ceremony. A total of 144,133 visitors attended this daily commemorative ceremony during the year 2014-15, indicating a 27 per cent increase on the previous year. Participation in other dedicated commemorative ceremonies continued to be well attended: 8,032 people at wreathlayings (299 per cent increase on last year); 5,160 at school wreathlayings (three per cent decrease); and 145 at plaque dedication ceremonies (55 per cent decrease).

Accessibility performance indicator Whether a significant number of Australians visited or had access to the Australian War Memorial and its services, including exhibitions, travelling exhibitions, collections, the website, the Research Centre, and research and interpretive programs.

This year the Memorial experienced record attendance and heightened visitor engagement across most commemorative and interpretive outputs.

Total interactions for this year included more than 7.3 million visitors to the website, more than 1.142 million visitors to the Memorial and its storage facility in Mitchell, 139,971 visitors to travelling exhibitions, and assistance with more than 32,469 research enquiries.

The Memorial’s on-site visitation welcomed more than 139,765 student visitors this year. In addition, more than 35,296 people visited the Memorial’s Reading Room and 274,409 visitors participated in interpretive programs and events. These figures do not include visitation to exhibitions by other organisations that display items on loan from the Memorial’s collection.

Overall, 97 per cent of the Memorial’s visitors who responded to the annual General Visitor Survey rated the Memorial as either exceeding or meeting their expectations. First-time visitors to the Memorial accounted for 30 per cent of visitors, and were significantly more likely to be female and/or under the age of 35. Around 28 per cent of domestic travellers said that the Memorial was the main reason for their visit to

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Canberra. Most pertinent, the Centenary of Anzac was cited as one of the major motivations prompting people to visit the Memorial this year (41 per cent).

Knowledge and understanding performance indicator • Whether as a result of their contact with the Memorial, visitors and clients had an increased level of knowledge and

understanding of the Australian experience of war and its enduring impact on our society.

• Everyone benefits from understanding their country’s history, even if they can’t see themselves reflected in it. We learn from history to make our society better going forward.

Delegate comment, Gallipoli 1915: a century on

The Memorial continued to examine visitor perceptions surrounding the “Anzac spirit”, a concept which is intrinsically linked to the Australian identity. As part of the General Visitor Survey visitors were asked to rate how important Australia’s wartime involvement has been in shaping who we are as a nation. Of these, 75 per cent stated that it was “very important” or “extremely important”. A review of data shows this number to have decreased over the last two years.

It is possible that this change reflects something of an attitudinal shift among the public. Some visitors have noted an

overwhelming sense of pride and appreciation for the past and present service and sacrifice of Australian defence personnel, while an increasing proportion of visitors find themselves reflecting on the futility of war and the legacy that remains. However, visitors have also indicated their satisfaction with how the Memorial has represented the story of Australia’s wartime experience:

• The Memorial reminds me of the sadness and futility of war. It makes me tear up at the lives lost …

• The whole experience is very moving and honours our troops who serviced the government’s wishes to contribute to a peaceful world.

• The War Memorial is a moving experience. It excites the senses because there is just so much to see. It must never be used to glorify war, rather to remind us of past mistakes never to be repeated.

Visitor comments, General Visitor Survey 2014-15.

The remainder of this report assesses the Memorial’s achievement against the performance measures and targets established in the Portfolio Budget Statements for each of the Memorial’s eight external and five internal outputs. Much of this data is drawn from the Memorial’s continuing program of evaluation and visitor research.

Visitors view wreaths laid at the Remembrance Stone after the 2014 Remembrance Day ceremony.

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AUSTRALIAN WAR MEMORIAL ANNUAL REPORT 2014-2015

OUTPUT 1.1 Commemorative Ceremonies Major national ceremonies, particularly Anzac Day and Remembrance Day, and other commemorative ceremonies are conducted in an engaging, dignified, and appropriate manner, with assistance provided to organisations conducting commemorative ceremonies.

Overview Attendance, interest, and participation in the Memorial’s commemorative program have never been greater. Many significant anniversaries of events in the nation’s history have been marked in this reporting period.

The Memorial marked the centenary of the commencement of the First World War on Monday 4 August 2014 with a special Last Post Ceremony. This preceded and incorporated the official launch of two of the Memorial’s Centenary of the First World War projects: the Roll of Honour Soundscape and the Roll of Honour Name Projections.

The 2014 Remembrance Day National Ceremony marked the 96th anniversary of the Armistice which ended the First World War and was attended by 3,900 people, with more than one-quarter of attendees made up of students. The Honourable John Howard OM AC delivered the Commemorative Address to an audience comprising many high-level dignitaries, diplomats, and students from each state and territory, representing the youth of Australia.

On Saturday 21 March 2015 Australia marked the conclusion of Operation Slipper with commemorative activities conducted across each state and territory capital city, as well as in Townsville. Australia’s military contribution across Afghanistan and the Middle East commenced in October 2001 with more than 33,000 Australian Defence Force, Australian Public Service, and Australian Federal Police personnel deployed to the Middle East Area of Operations. More than 3,500 attended the march and ceremony at the Australian War Memorial.

Saturday 25 April marked the 100th anniversary of the Gallipoli landings with record attendance at the Dawn Service and the National and Last Post Ceremonies. Images of Australian servicemen and servicewomen were projected onto the front façade of the Memorial from dusk until dawn from 22 to 26 April. Prior to the Dawn Service, Captain Tim Brown, Flight Sergeant Hayden Inwood, and Corporal Dan Keighran VC read excerpts from letters and diaries belonging to Australian servicemen and servicewomen. The first two readings contained passages taken from conflicts spanning a century, while the final reading focused on the Gallipoli experience.

At 5:30 am the silence was broken and the Dawn Service commenced with a didgeridoo performance by Able Seaman Boatswains Mate Alan Patterson, a member of the Gunggandgji people. This was a powerful and moving new element for the Dawn Service. The six large screens brought onto the grounds provided the significantly increased audience with vision of the service, which included a poignant

Commemorative Address by Chief of Army Lieutenant General David Morrison AO. An estimate of a record 128,700 visitors attended the Dawn Service - 91,700 more than the previous year.

The National Ceremony saw an increase in both visitors and the number of veterans participating in the march, with more than 31,500 people in attendance - an increase of 6,000 from 2014. His Royal Highness The Duke of Kent KG GCMG GCVO ADC laid a wreath in his role as President of the Commonwealth War Graves Commission and the Commemorative Address was delivered by the Governor-General of Australia, His Excellency General the Honourable Sir Peter Cosgrove AK MC (Retd), who also reviewed the veterans’ march.

To mark this significant Anzac Day the sounding of the didgeridoo was also included in the National Ceremony, as was the singing of the New Zealand National Anthem “God defend New Zealand”, alongside the Australian National Anthem “Advance Australia fair”.

To conclude the commemorations, the stories of Private John Edward Barclay and Mustafa Kemal Ataturk were read at the Last Post Ceremony by representatives of the Australian and Turkish armies. This moving ceremony was attended by 1,504 visitors together with a number of dignitaries from Australia, New Zealand, and Turkey. Also in attendance were the Governor-General of Australia, His Excellency General the Honourable Sir Peter Cosgrove AK MC (Retd), the Governor-General of New Zealand, His Excellency Lieutenant General the Right Honourable Sir Jerry Mateparae GNZM QSO, and the Turkish Ambassador to Australia, His Excellency Reha Keskintepe.

Dr Brendan Nelson and Ms Gillian Adamson walk along the Roll of Honour with the Honourable John Howard OM AC and Mrs Janette Howard after the 2014 Remembrance Day ceremony.

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Performance information: Commemorative ceremonies

Key performance indicator Attendance at and participation in a commemorative ceremony is an explicit act of remembrance. Therefore the KPI for measuring the effectiveness of this program is the total attendance figure at commemorative ceremonies.

Result Just over 320,000 people attended commemorative ceremonies during 2014-15.

Deliverable 1 Three major ceremonies - the Anzac Day Dawn Service, the Anzac Day National Ceremony, and the Remembrance Day Ceremony.

Result The Memorial attracted record attendance at the three major commemorative ceremonies held during 2014-15.

1. Anzac Day Dawn Service: approximately 128,700 visitors (37,000 last year)

2. Anzac Day National Ceremony: 31,500 visitors (25,500 last year)

3. Remembrance Day Ceremony: 3,900 visitors (2,200 last year)

Deliverable 2 At least ten other commemorative ceremonies.

Result Commemorative ceremony Number Attendees

Major ceremonies 3 164,100

Other ceremonies (incl. special commemorative events and wreathlayings) 26 8,032

Plaque dedications 3 145

Head-of-state visits 7 210

VIP visits (incl. tours and wreathlayings)

97 1,003

School wreathlayings 103 5,160

Last Post Ceremonies 364 144,133

TOTAL 603 322,783

Deliverable 3 At least two ceremonies per week for the school wreathlaying program.

Result The school wreathlaying program continues to be an engaging and meaningful commemorative experience for students visiting the Australian War Memorial. The program enables students to participate in a ceremony in the Tomb of the Unknown Australian Soldier and includes a guest veteran to provide a personal perspective on service and sacrifice. The opportunity to ask questions of the veteran is a valuable learning experience for the students.

Throughout the year 103 ceremonies were attended by 5,160 students, and 25 of these ceremonies were attended by a member of parliament who greeted and spoke to students from their electorates. This was a significant increase on the previous year, during which eight members of parliament were able to attend.

Funding support provided by the Department of Veterans’ Affairs enables this commemorative program to continue to be delivered.

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Deliverable 4 The Last Post Ceremony on a daily basis.

Result The Last Post Ceremony is an integral component of the Memorial’s commemorative program and over the past year has continued to grow in popularity. To date 515 requests have been made by families, veterans associations, visiting VIPs, and Defence personnel. This is an increase of 315 over the past 12 months. Of the 515 requests, 335 have been written to date, the majority of which have been delivered or scheduled, or are in the process of being scheduled.

The success of the Last Post Ceremony is its inclusivity of all Australians and visitors to the Memorial. In particular, families continue to cite closure and healing for (in some cases) generations of grief at losing loved ones in war.

The opportunity for members of the public to lay wreaths at the ceremony is unique among the Memorial’s commemorative events.

The involvement of the Australian Defence Force through the rostering of volunteer readers each evening and the ceremonial support of Australia’s Federation Guard is integral to the continuing success of the Last Post Ceremony.

Other commemorative activities

Additions to the Roll of Honour In a private ceremony held on 10 November the name of a serviceman who lost his life while serving in Afghanistan, Lance Corporal Todd John Chidgey, was added to the Roll of Honour. Family members and Defence personnel were in attendance.

First World War Galleries launch On Sunday 22 February 2015 the Governor-General of the Commonwealth of Australia, His Excellency General the Honourable Sir Peter Cosgrove AK MC (Retd), officially launched the First World War exhibition Australia in the Great War. This was the first time that such a significant activity has been conducted on the front steps of the Memorial and was attended by a crowd of more than 1,000 people, including a number of VIP guests, members of the Australian Defence Force, the Diplomatic Corps, Memorial stakeholders, and the general public.

The launch included addresses by the Governor-General, the former Minister for Veterans’ Affairs Senator the Honourable Michael Ronaldson, and, representing the Prime Minister of New Zealand, the Honourable Maggie Barry ONZM MP, with the keynote address delivered by renowned author Mr Les Carlyon AC. Performances by Lee Kernaghan, the Sydney Children’s Choir, and the Band of the Royal Military College, Duntroon, together with a Guard of Honour from Australia’s Federation Guard made this a unique commemorative occasion to mark this key centenary redevelopment, made possible through the generous support of the Australian government’s Anzac Centenary Program 2014-18, and assisted by BHP Billiton Sustainable Communities.

Poppy’s Café launch On 24 July 2014 the Memorial re-launched its re-designed and re-named café-restaurant, now known as Poppy’s in honour of

Trooper David “Poppy” Pearce, who was killed in Afghanistan in October 2007.

Trooper Pearce, having joined the army later in life, was regarded as a mentor by the young Australian soldiers with whom he served. On his death, his nickname, “Poppy”, was given to the recreation centre in Tarin Kowt. This original Poppy’s became a popular and welcome respite from the hardship of duty at the front.

The format of the launch was three-fold, with the morning event, the official opening, and the plaque unveiling by former Prime Minister the Honourable Tony Abbott MP and Trooper Pearce’s widow, Nicole Pearce.

The café displays and houses the kangaroo and boomerang signs that were affixed to Poppy’s recreational centre in Afghanistan. This was brought directly to the Australian War Memorial late in 2013 by the former Prime Minister. An image of Trooper Pearce is displayed along with his story.

VIP visits The Memorial conducted more than 100 VIP visits in 2014-15, including visits by: His Majesty King Harald V and Her Majesty Queen Sonja of Norway, His Royal Highness Prince Henry of Wales, and His Royal Highness The Duke of Kent. There were also seven visits by a head of state or head of government, including: the Right Honourable David Cameron, Prime Minister of the United Kingdom; the Honourable Narendra Modi, Prime Minister of India; Mr Francois Hollande, President of the French Republic; His Excellency Mr Petro Poroshenko, President of the Ukraine, and Her Excellency Mrs Maryna Poroshenko; and the Governor-General of New Zealand, His Excellency Lieutenant General the Right Honourable Sir Jerry Mateparae GNZM QSO, and Her Excellency Lady Janine Mateparae.

A complete list of VIP visits and ceremonies is provided at Appendix 4.

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OUTPUT 1.2 The National Memorial and Grounds The Memorial building and grounds are conserved and developed as a national memorial to Australians who served and died in war.

Overview In addition to the Roll of Honour and Hall of Memory, the surrounding grounds are maintained as an important commemorative area. The review of the Campbell Site Development Plan (SDP) completed in November 2011 identified future plaque and memorial locations. Three more large technology objects were installed in the grounds, and preparation for installation of the war correspondents memorial continued in the western Sculpture Garden. The five-year cycle for an update of the Campbell SDP has commenced, with the Johnson Pilton Walker review to be completed in 2016.

Enhancements to the Roll of Honour, including re-waxing of panels and the addition of names previously not included, have been implemented. Major sandstone cleaning of the Memorial’s façade and sculptures within the grounds was also completed. The Roll of Honour Name Projections, with the names of those on the First World War Roll of Honour projected directly below the dome, were finalised. The Roll of Honour Soundscape, playing these names within the cloisters, was also installed, while further recordings continue.

Heritage and aesthetic considerations in the Commemorative Area are important, as they enhance the visitor experience, so they are being carefully managed in alignment with the Memorial’s Heritage Management Plan. A project to replace the gargoyles in the Commemorative Area has commenced and has been generously supported by the Department of Environment through a $1 million grant from the Protecting National Historic Sites program.

VIP visits: His Excellency Lieutenant General the Right Honourable Sir Jerry Mateparae GNZM QSO, Governor-General of New Zealand, and Her Excellency Lady Janine Mateparae (above left); and the Right Honourable David Cameron MP, Prime Minister of the United Kingdom (above).

LEFT: The illuminated Commemorative Area at night.

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Performance information: The national memorial and grounds

Key performance indicator Attending the National Memorial is an explicit act of remembrance. Therefore, the KPI is the total attendance figure at the Australian War Memorial in Canberra.

Result A total of 1,142,814 people visited the Australian War Memorial.

Deliverable 1 The Memorial heritage building, Commemorative Area, and surrounding grounds maintained and presented to highest standard.

Result High-quality building, garden, and grounds presentation remains a top priority for the Memorial. A maintenance program was continued to ensure that the grounds and buildings are presented to the highest possible standard. Replacement of trees and other plantings was undertaken as required, as was maintenance of all sculptures and memorials, buildings, and the Pool of Reflection.

A change of landscaping in key areas, as an alternate control program to make the site a less suitable habitat for rabbits, has reduced their site impact. The Westringia beds in the western Sculpture Garden had rabbit proofing installed and the beds replanted with a Hebe species similar to that planted on Anzac Parade. This has contributed to the impeding of their breeding cycles; however, rabbits continue to inhabit the grounds in moderate numbers. Changes to the plantings around the Administration Building could be considered at a later date.

Detailed garden maintenance of the Commemorative Area and the Memorial Courtyard continues to be performed weekly to keep these high-profile formal gardens at their best. The continual refined maintenance regime for the Pool of Reflection in the Commemorative Area, and for the National Service Memorial Fountain in the Memorial Courtyard, has further improved water quality and reduced conservation requirements in these areas.

Deliverable 2 Access to the Memorial and visitor facilities of the highest standards.

Result The implementation of the Campbell Site Development Plan continued. Various minor new site developments for visitor amenities were undertaken this year, including upgrades to the Anzac Hall bathroom vanities, mirrors, and lighting, which have greatly improved quality and function.

Additional to the major external lighting upgrades to the Main Building, new lights were installed to highlight the Western Courtyard stairs, and lights on the front forecourt security camera poles are proposed to further improve safety and security. Two speed humps were installed outside the Administration Building to reduce traffic speed and increase public safety.

There were also three additional pedestrian pathways installed to improve public egress from the western car park to the Sculpture Garden, from Fairbairn Avenue to the Main Building entrance, and from the coach parking behind Anzac Hall to the Centurion Tank.

Deliverable 3 Building works that comply with relevant standards, codes, and regulations.

Result All building works at the Memorial are undertaken in accordance with relevant standards, codes, and regulations.

Deliverable 4 Management and conservation of heritage elements using the Australia ICOMOS Burra Charter.

Result Heritage specialists have continued to provide advice as required for building works in heritage-sensitive areas. This advice was also sought for the installation of banners on the south face of the building.

A maintenance regime for the stonework in the Memorial building was undertaken. This included the removal of algal deposits from the sandstone whereby the affected areas were first sprayed with a biocide to allow for these deposits to be washed off naturally by rain.

Stubborn stains were removed by light-pressure washing. This regime will continue on a regular basis. In several locations granite steps were re-laid to remove trip hazards, and the first flight of the front steps was re-caulked.

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The re-waxing of the Roll of Honour panels commenced, with the Second World War, Post-1945, and Operational Service panels being completed by March 2015. It is anticipated that the First World War panels will be completed in the latter part of the calendar year. In addition to improving the aesthetics of the panels it will also protect them from corrosion.

A regular maintenance regime for the Lone Pine tree (Pinus halepensis) continues to assist with its longevity. A replacement Pinus halepensis, derived from a seed taken from the original Lone Pine, was planted by Their Royal Highnesses The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge on Anzac Day 2014. It is anticipated that this tree will have grown to a suitable size when the original Lone Pine reaches senescence. The new pine remains in a very healthy state, assisted by the fence and bird netting.

Deliverable 5 Timely completion of works to minimise impact on visitors.

Result All minor works at the Memorial, including regular maintenance and cleaning, are scheduled out-of-hours where possible and in consideration of significant public events. Any major works that may be disruptive are scoped and planned to ensure that work on intrusive elements is scheduled at the most appropriate times, that alternative arrangements are made for visitors, and that the public is informed.

Other related activities

Plaque dedication program Two commemorative plaques were installed during the year, with another four plaques awaiting dedication. To date 212 commemorative plaques have been installed in the Memorial’s grounds.

Roll of Honour The Memorial’s bronze Roll of Honour panels were updated for accuracy, with a number of in-situ amendments being made to the panels. The Afghanistan panel was recast to include the name of Lance Corporal T. J. Chidgey.

In addition to the re-waxing, which is still in progress, the panels continue to be updated for accuracy. This year not only in-situ amendments were carried out but orders were also placed for a number of supplementary panels to be recast. These are expected to be received and installed early in the next financial year.

ABOVE: Veterans pay their respects during the National Servicemen’s Association of Australia wreathlaying ceremony.

BELOW: The Roll of Honour panel for Afghanistan and Iraq.

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OUTPUT 1.3 The National Collection A national collection of historical material related to Australia’s military history that is developed, managed, preserved, and interpreted to make it accessible.

Overview The major achievement for all areas of the National Collection branch was in the highly effective ways in which the demands of the Centenary of the First World War have been met in the Memorial’s programs and in supporting commemorative projects and activity across the nation and around the world. All areas of the branch have experienced significant increases in activity with the heightened levels of interest in the story of Australia’s contribution in conflicts and operations around the world for more than a century.

This has been done in an environment in which Australians are still engaged in important operations in our region, and in which our work in contemporary collecting to ensure our capacity to tell the stories of this generation’s commitment can be told.

As part of the First World War Galleries re-development program almost 1,700 objects from the Memorial’s National Collection have been interpreted, conserved, and installed. Three large artillery pieces from the First World War were installed in the grounds of the Memorial. Conservation works continue for loans as well as for on-site activities. The Centenary of the First World War has spawned projects around the country and a corresponding surge in requests for object loans for major projects such as the National Anzac Interpretive Centre in Albany, the redevelopment of the Shrine of Remembrance in Melbourne, and temporary and travelling exhibitions in institutions small and large. Support for the Spirit of Anzac Centenary Experience travelling exhibition incorporates the preparation of 200 objects from the Memorial’s collection. A major project to clear a backlog of collection donations processed more than 800 individual collections, comprising 77,721 items. A project to remediate infestation risk to the Memorial’s textile collection will result in the treatment and re-housing of the collection in refurbished storage.

The Multimedia team project-managed the concept development and construction of the Kingold Education and Media Centre to enable greater outreach with rich content from the collection. New digital storage was developed and a framework drafted for achieving collection separation to mitigate the risk of loss.

Major international loans were managed, with the iconic Longstaff painting Menin Gate at midnight and the Menin Gate Lions being loaned to the Canadian War Museum. In collaboration with the Queensland Museum, National Collection staff negotiated the complex logistics of bringing the only surviving A7V German tank “Mephisto” from Ipswich for display at the Memorial until mid-2017.

An important consultation was undertaken with stakeholders in the long-term conservation of the MV Krait, currently on loan to the Australian National Maritime Museum in Sydney. Planning is well-advanced to ensure the vessel’s integrity afloat until a shore-based facility is developed with an enriched interpretation of the story of Z Special Unit and those who served in the Krait.

Major new acquisitions included nine rare portraits of First World War Australian soldiers by Hilda Rix-Nicholas; Eric Thake’s Self-portrait in a broken shaving mirror (1945); and Arthur Streeton’s Amiens Cathedral (1918). The most extensive commissioning program in many years included:

• a large-scale commemorative tapestry of the First World War, created by Imants Tillers and the Australian Tapestry Workshop and supported by the Geoff and Helen Handbury Foundation

• a large-scale textile print by Rosie Ware exploring the Torres Strait Islander experience of the Second World War

• Michael Zavros’s diptych portrait of Corporal Ben Roberts-Smith VC MG

• digital backdrops to dioramas in the new First World War Galleries by Arlo Mountford and a painted one by Alexander McKenzie

• Alex Seton’s As of today …, incorporating carved marble flags commemorating each Australian killed in the Afghanistan war; and

• painter David Jolly’s record of the centenary Anzac Day service on Gallipoli.

Two major public works of art were also commissioned: a memorial to war correspondents and a sculpture dedicated to Explosive Detection Dogs. The Anzac Centenary Print Portfolio project features the artistic responses of ten leading Australian and New Zealand artists to the shared legacy of the First World War. The portfolio is the product of a partnership with the Megalo Print Studio in Canberra and master-printmaker John Loane. Finally, partnerships have been established with organisations including the 4A Centre for Contemporary

The Menin Gate lions depart the Memorial as they begin their journey to Canada.

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Asian Art in Sydney and Protocinema in Turkey to create works embracing international perspectives on the Australian experience of war.

Through the Collections Coordination Group (CCG) the Memorial maintains a close and effective liaison with the Australian Defence Force (ADF) in identifying material from current operations for the Memorial’s collection. We are in a unique period as a major re-equipping of the ADF’s air, land, and sea capability occurs during current operations around the world, with the result that several aircraft types and heavy and armoured fighting and infantry mobility vehicles are being retired. Plans for providing space to accommodate these objects in consolidated storage at Mitchell are underway.

The Memorial has continued to work on creating better access to its official and private record collections. Digital public access is essential to broadening engagement with users of the Memorial’s collection and knowledge systems. The result of the work in this area has been the creation of permanent ontologies on the website relating to Australian military units, places, and events, and an increase in the capacity to link across collections and data using simple searches not previously available to users. A web ontology and permanent URL for the most comprehensive listing of Australians who served in the First World War is underway in collaboration with the University of New South Wales, Canberra.

LEFT: Corporal Ben Roberts-Smith VC MG discusses his portrait with artist Michael Zavros.

BELOW: Previously a favourite from the Sinai-Palestine gallery, the stuffed camel now features prominently in the redeveloped First World War Galleries.

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Performance information: The National Collection

Key performance indicator The existence of an outstanding National Collection provides the necessary foundation for other programs to be able to occur. The KPIs for the effectiveness of this program are:

KPI 1 The number of new items acquired, in accordance with the Collection Development Plan.

Result Total number of acquisitions: 91,037. (This is a 485 per cent increase on last year’s result. The main contributing factor is the addition by the Collection Donations team of 77,721 items, owing to the donations backlog project.)

KPI 2 The number of items disposed of, in accordance with the Collection Development Plan.

Result Zero.

KPI 3 The number of items for which documentation has been enhanced or corrected.

Result Documentation was enhanced or corrected for 463,517 items (620,981 last year).

KPI 4 At least 80 per cent of the collection in storage that meets conservation standards for environmental conditions.

Result Photographs, Film and Sound: 91.8 per cent (92.9 per cent last year).

Art: 99.98 per cent (99.69 per cent last year). Military, Heraldry and Technology: 86.7 per cent (82.7 per cent last year). Research Centre collections: 99.77 per cent.

KPI 5 Number of collection items that can be accessed via the Memorial’s online public databases.

A total of 421,133 items in the National Collection meet Collection Access System (CAS) requirements for public access via online public databases.

Deliverable 1 The Australian War Memorial will deliver an outstanding National Collection of historical material with provenance that is related to Australia’s military history.

Result The depth and breadth of the National Collection is incomparable. It covers more than a century of conflicts, all arms of the defence forces, and the home front. Its range includes works of art, large technology objects, letters and diaries, uniforms and medals, photographs, film, and sound recordings.

The key focus for the Memorial is to acquire a collection that helps to illustrate experiences in conflict. By collecting from a breadth of sources and mediums the Memorial hopes to be able to highlight the stories of conflicts over the last century. Collecting is not restricted to any one period or conflict, and it is indeed imperative to add new dimensions to conflicts from the past to ensure our ability to tell the stories of recent conflicts for future generations.

A list of key acquisitions and disposals is in Appendix 5.

Other collection activities

Documentation This year documentation enhancement was focused on a number of areas, including works pertaining to the First World War, new acquisitions, and the large number of works loaned to other institutions for centenary-related exhibitions. One of the most significant documentation projects was the recent donation of several hundred works of art by the painter and illustrator William Edwin Pidgeon (1909-1981). This is the largest collection of the artist’s work held by any public institution, and it is now fully documented.

Enhancement of records is an ongoing curatorial activity; however, the Photographs, Film and Sound section dedicated full-time resources to address the large backlog of uncontrolled content. To date some 337 primary collections of Photographs, Film and Sound content now have controlled numbers and locations.

Amending records to provide better public access is an ongoing activity. This year 2,185 biographical roll enquiries and 154 catalogue records related to the papers of Field Marshal Lord William Birdwood were updated. Data enhancement as part of the Anzac connections project continued this year with approximately 262 biographical records being merged

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and 104,000 names checked as part of the First World War nominal roll transcription project. Some of the more distinctive areas of the Memorial’s published collections were also updated, including 14 catalogue records related to the digitisation of silk postcards and sheet music.

Curatorial activities To support the ongoing development of the Memorial’s collection and the First World War Galleries redevelopment the Memorial has initiated more than a dozen major commissions, including, among others: the Centenary Print Portfolio; three new diorama backdrops by Arlo Mountford and Alex McKenzie; Imants Tillers’ commemorative tapestry; Ewen Coates’ public sculpture of an Explosive Detection Dog and handler; a portrait of Corporal Ben Roberts-Smith VC by Michael Zavros; Rosie Ware’s large-scale textile work reflecting on the experience of the Second World War in the Torres Strait Islands; David Jolly’s series of paintings marking the centenary Anzac Day service on Gallipoli; and the war correspondents memorial. Initial planning and scoping has also been undertaken for three new sculptures for the Memorial grounds: a monument to families, a portrait sculpture of Sir John Monash, and a memorial to Indigenous service. During this year a number of major new partnerships with diverse organisations have been forged to enhance collection development capacity, including: Megalo Print Studio, the Australian Tapestry Workshop, 4A Centre for Asian Art, and the Istanbul-based Protocinema.

This year the Spiros Zournazis Memorial Fellowship was also launched, providing for emerging academics to travel to Canberra to research the Memorial’s art collection.

Staff conducted a high-level survey of the entire photographic, film, and sound collection, providing an accurate census of the size and distribution of our physical collection. This work is the major component to the review of preservation storage practices and policies.

Digitisation of historic First World War collections of letters and diaries continues for the Anzac connections project. These collections provided a vast array of stories, quotes, and anecdotes for the Gallipoli centenary of 2015, and were in high demand, illustrating the experience of those who served in their own words. The Memorial’s major undertaking to digitise its entire collection of Naval Reports of Proceedings spanning all wars is halfway through to completion. The collections are progressively released online as they are completed.

The Australian War Memorial blog and Facebook sites were used extensively to promote the collections and the Anzac connections project. The blog has been an invaluable means of contacting relatives of collections soon to be published online. From 1 January 2015 Twitter was used on a daily basis to promote the digitised collections online. #DailyDigger is a centenary initiative providing a daily narrative of the First World War using personal quotes drawn from digitised private letters and diaries of soldiers and nurses. The narrative helps

reveal the thoughts, activities, and responses of all ranks to the experience of active service during this conflict. In October 2014 the Memorial produced a blog seeking assistance from the public to index the First World War Nominal Roll. The project, due for completion in 2015, is a significant undertaking and now includes more than 70 volunteers.

The Memorial’s expert curatorial and conservation staff continue to engage with the public and professional areas. They have contributed heavily to the Memorial’s Public Programs activities and presented to peers through workshops and conferences both in Australia and overseas.

Conservation - preservation activities Conservation work is an ongoing activity at the Memorial. Demands from projects and particular programs often drive the work, but it is also carried out necessarily to make sure the collection is maintained into the future. One of the feature pieces of conservation outside of that done for the First World War Galleries has been the restoration of the Second World War Lockheed Hudson bomber, planned for completion in mid-2016.

This year the Memorial commenced an extensive collection management review of preservation storage practices and policies, especially as these relate to the photographic and film collection. This includes a focus on version separation, environmental standards, and management controls.

The Digital Assets Management System (DAMS) core operating tool was upgraded in 2014-15, including the preservation infrastructure increasing in size from 100TB to 250TB to manage the growing demands for digital preservation storage. This system ingested 116,500 digital assets this year.

Conserving material is carried out on a large scale, and the work undertaken this year includes:

• 67,468 pages from the Research Centre collections scanned for preservation, and a solution identified for the preservation of digital-born Microsoft Office documents

• 43 shelf-metres of records and 7,200 additions and amendments to the collection database

• 1,300 private records additions and amendments

• 243 collections rehoused for improved collection preservation.

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OUTPUT 1.4 Exhibitions Development and maintenance of the Memorial’s permanent and temporary exhibitions and a program of travelling exhibitions.

Overview The major focus for 2014-15 was the completion of the new permanent First World War exhibition, Australia in the Great War. These galleries are the Memorial’s major contribution to the centenary of the First World War.

Delivered on time and within the budget, the galleries cover all major theatres of operations, including: Gallipoli; the Western Front; Sinai Palestine; the war at sea; events at home; and the enduring legacy of war. The exhibition presents the Australian experience of war chronologically from 1914 to 1918 and integrates a wide variety of items from the collection such as dioramas and other works of art; uniforms and medals; artillery, firearms, and large technology objects; photographs and film; and personal items such as letters and diaries. Technology is integrated seamlessly into the display,

with digital touch screens providing interactive information throughout. Three of the Memorial’s rarest large technology objects, too large for the galleries, have been installed on the western side of the Main Building. Feedback from the general public and stakeholders continues to be overwhelmingly positive.

The Memorial’s Orientation Gallery and entry and exit corridors have also been redeveloped over the past 12 months to compliment the new galleries. Ongoing maintenance of existing galleries has continued to a high standard. Two temporary exhibitions, Ben Quilty: after Afghanistan and Alex Seton: as of today …, were displayed in the Special Exhibitions Gallery during this period.

The Memorial’s travelling exhibition program ceased this year, and the Memorial continues to seek non-government support to be able to fund future outreach opportunities for travelling exhibitions and similar activities.

Performance information: Exhibitions

Key performance indicator Attending a memorial exhibition is a deliberate act to find out more about the Australian experience of war. The KPIs for the effectiveness of this program are:

KPI 1 The total attendance figure at the Memorial exhibitions and travelling exhibitions.

Result A total of 1,282,785 people visited Memorial exhibitions and travelling exhibitions.

KPI 2 Qualitative or quantitative evidence about increases in visitors’ understanding.

Result A majority of visitors attained a better understanding of the Australian experience of war and the conditions faced by service personnel as a result of their visit to the following exhibitions:

• 90 per cent - Australia in the Great War (First World War Galleries)

• 86 per cent - Afghanistan: the Australian story

• 91 per cent - Anzac voices

• 83 per cent - Ben Quilty: after Afghanistan and Alex Seton: as of today … (joint exhibition)

Visitors demonstrated increased levels of understanding through a variety of knowledge-building methods such as recognition of key messages, fact recall, and the formation of individual and collective opinions.

One-quarter (25 per cent) of visitors to the First World War Galleries cited hardships, suffering, and the horrors of war as the key messages delivered by the gallery narrative.

More than half (57 per cent) the visitors to Afghanistan: the Australian story could recall at least one thing they learned from the exhibit. Of these, one-quarter remembered facts relating to the humanitarian efforts being undertaken by Australian troops in Afghanistan (e.g. working in the Afghanistan community, providing training, building infrastructure such as schools).

Every visitor to the Anzac voices exhibition was able to describe the conditions faced by soldiers during the First World War. Common descriptors included: “appalling”, “awful”, “challenging”, “difficult”, “extreme”, “harsh”, “horrendous”, and “terrible”.

Learning outcomes for the Ben Quilty: after Afghanistan and Alex Seton: as of today… joint exhibition were much more fluid. Visitors were encouraged to draw their own conclusions about what the Memorial aimed to achieve by presenting the joint exhibition.

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One-quarter (25 per cent) of visitors determined that the exhibition’s primary purpose was to offer a contemporary perspective on the Afghanistan conflict through the delivery of abstract and emotive themes (as opposed to the chronological or operational narrative of the conflict). A further 21 per cent of visitors believed the exhibition was aimed at uncovering the impact of war on soldiers, with a particular focus on sensitive subject matter including post-traumatic stress disorder. Futility of war also rated highly, with 15 per cent of visitors suggesting that this was the main purpose of the exhibition.

KPI 3 Qualitative or quantitative evidence of affective or attitudinal change.

Result Strong emotional responses were evoked in audiences following a visit to Afghanistan: the Australian story. The ongoing nature and harsh realities of the Afghanistan campaign, as well as personal connections to veterans or current service members, may have influenced visitor opinions and attitudes.

Just over one-quarter (27 per cent) of visitors experienced feelings of sadness or anger towards the gallery narrative, while a further ten per cent commented on the futility of the Afghanistan campaign. Visitors reported feeling: “a bit powerless” and “quite sad, sad that it’s still a mess”.

Conversely, 18 per cent of visitors reported feelings of pride and appreciation for the work of the Australian troops in Afghanistan. A further five per cent empathised with the troops and their families. Visitors were: “impressed by our servicemen and women” and “grateful that Australia is free and grateful to those who served and those who didn’t come home”, while holding “respect for the magnitude of their task”.

Nine per cent of visitors expressed mixed emotions, stating they were: “Proud and sad” and “Emotional, angry at the Taliban, proud of the service of the Australians”.

Interestingly, one in ten visitors reported feeling more sympathetic and supportive of Australia’s contribution to the Afghanistan campaign following their visit, citing Australia’s humanitarian efforts as one of the primary reasons for the shift in opinion. Visitors stated: “It is more like a peacekeeping mission than a conflict … the Australian troops are helping more than fighting”, “they are making a difference”, and “knowing more has changed our view”.

Seven per cent of visitors surveyed identified themselves as veterans or current service personnel who had been deployed to Afghanistan. A further 20 per cent identified themselves as friends or family members of veterans or current service personnel.

Deliverable 1 Permanent exhibitions developed and maintained to the highest standard.

Result A strong focus on maintaining the high standard of the Memorial’s 10,000 m2 of exhibition space was continued throughout the year.

The major deliverable was the launch of the new permanent First World War exhibition, Australia in the Great War. The 1,750 m2 exhibition displays more than 2,000 items from the Memorial’s collection, including 1,500 objects and works of art; ten dioramas; 700 photographs; 100 illustrations; and two hours of film footage. A soft opening of the exhibition took place on 1 December 2014, where formal remedial evaluation was conducted. Feedback from the general public and stakeholders was overwhelmingly positive. The exhibition was officially launched on 22 February 2015 by the Governor-General of the Commonwealth of Australia, His Excellency General the Honourable Sir Peter Cosgrove AK MC (Retd). An accompanying audio tour for the exhibition was launched for public trial in late February 2015; and an external display of a 9.2-inch howitzer, a 15-centimetre Kanone 16, and the gun from the stern of HMQS Gayundah was unveiled as part of the official launch on 22 February 2015. All major milestones for this four-year project were delivered to schedule and within the total project budget of $32.37 million (GST excl.). The Memorial wishes to acknowledge the outstanding work of the principal contractors involved in this project, including Cunningham Martyn Design, Johnson Pilton Walker, Built NSW, Root Projects Australia, and WT Partnership.

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Deliverable 2 Travelling exhibitions exhibited at different venues across Australia.

Result The Memorial’s Travelling Exhibitions program was funded by the Department of Veterans’ Affairs’ commemorations program from July 1997 to August 2014, and our deep appreciation is extended for its much-valued support over this time. The Memorial’s travelling exhibitions are highly regarded by state and regional host venues and audiences across Australia.

Access and outreach remained central to the delivery of the Travelling Exhibitions Program, and from its inception in 1997 to its formal closure in 2014, 46 exhibitions toured to 485 venues across every state and territory in Australia, attracting a grand total of 4.16 million visitors.

During the past year, six travelling exhibitions were exhibited at 17 host venues across Australia, reaching a total of 139,971 people. These exhibitions were:

Shaun Gladwell: Afghanistan

Nurses: from Zululand to Afghanistan

Ben Quilty: after Afghanistan

Remember me: the lost diggers of Vignacourt

Reality in flames: modern Australian art and the Second World War

A camera on Gallipoli

Development of the First World War centenary travelling exhibition, A camera on Gallipoli, was completed in 2014-15. This exhibition was initially offered to venues in three formats; however, following the cessation of the Travelling Exhibitions Program this was narrowed to one digital format. During the year 242 organisations expressed an interest in receiving the digital version. To date, 131 of these organisations (54 per cent) have received the digital exhibition, including 23 overseas venues.

A complete list of exhibitions and associated host venues is provided in Appendix 6.

Other exhibition activities

“Mephisto”: the Devil’s chariot In December 2014 development began on a First World War temporary exhibition featuring Germany’s first tank, the A7V Sturmpanzerwagen 506 “Mephsito”. The exhibition will be displayed in Anzac Hall from late July 2015 to March 2017.

Special Exhibitions Gallery The temporary exhibitions program featured three exhibitions in the Special Exhibitions Gallery. Anzac voices (29 November 2013 to 30 November 2014) provided an important First World War presence at the Memorial while the permanent galleries were closed for redevelopment. An estimated 386,000 visitors saw this exhibition while on display, representing just over half of the Memorial’s on-site visitation.

Ben Quilty: after Afghanistan and Alex Seton: as of today … were displayed together from 12 December 2014 to 17 June 2015. During this time an estimated 162,500 visitors saw the joint exhibition. The Memorial’s Special Exhibitions Gallery was the eighth venue for Ben Quilty: after Afghanistan, which had previously travelled to venues in New South Wales, Queensland, South Australia, and Western Australia as part of the Memorial’s Travelling Exhibitions Program. Alex Seton: as of today … featured a series of 41 marble sculptures commemorating all the Australian soldiers who have lost their lives while serving in Afghanistan. The series will continue to be displayed in the Memorial’s permanent galleries.

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OUTPUT 1.5 Interpretive Services Understanding of Australia’s experience of war is enhanced through provision of interactive interpretation, including school and public education programs and public events.

Overview During 2014-15 more than 274,000 people engaged in the Memorial’s interpretive programs and events. These activities highlighted the National Collection, and provided opportunities for audiences to participate in the operations and activities of the Memorial. The existing program of regular gallery and collection talks and behind-the-scenes curator tours has increased and diversified in content, with additional Memorial teams contributing and sharing their expertise with the public. Several external experts also delivered public lectures throughout the year.

One of the Memorial’s new initiatives was the late-night openings of the Commemorative Area. On selected evenings in January visitors were able to view the newly illuminated Hall of Memory, allowing them an additional opportunity to pay respects to the fallen during the Centenary of First World War.

Popular programs like the weekly story time for pre-schoolers, museum theatre performances during school holidays, and the summer film screenings in January continued to attract strong audience numbers. Other new programs introduced included Starrs Productions’ Dusted off, performed by Brett Hunt, and Of words and war: poetry at the Memorial, during which poets from around Australia shared their work in the galleries.

A record number of students, totalling 139,765, visited the Memorial in the reporting period, with 84 per cent undertaking facilitated education programs linked to the Australian curriculum.

The successful Soldiers in Residence program continued in 2014-15, providing the opportunity for current serving Afghanistan soldiers to learn about the back- and front-of-house operations of the Memorial. The soldiers also participated in the delivery of programs to visitors to the Memorial.

Students participating in education programs enjoy hands-on gallery talks and tours, as well as wreathlaying ceremonies, sometimes with Members of Parliament.

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Performance information: Interpretive services

Key performance indicator Attending a Memorial program or event is a deliberate act to find out more about the Australian experience of war. The KPIs for the effectiveness of this program are:

KPI 1 The total attendance figure at Memorial programs (not including commemorative ceremonies).

Result Type Number Attendees

Education programs 2,094 117,524

Public programs (incl. interpretive programs, gallery talks, and tours) 595 21,054

Tours (incl. public “highlight” tours and privately conducted tours) 5,826 61,845

Events 16 4,297

Offsite programs (incl. Memorial Box loans)

564 67,500

Offsite tours (incl. Mitchell precinct tours)

54 652

Offsite events 5 1,537

TOTAL 9,154 274,409

Each day a minimum of 12 free highlight tours of the Memorial were conducted by voluntary guides. Attendance numbers for these are included within “Tours”.

KPI 2 Qualitative or quantitative evidence about increases to participants’ understanding.

Result Key findings from the General Visitor Survey showed that visitor satisfaction levels remained consistently high across all interpretive programs and events run by the Memorial. Museum theatre performances, public talks, and guided gallery tours rated the highest (receiving an average satisfaction rating of 4.65 out of 5).

Participation in education and public programs assists to enlighten and enrich visitor understanding of Australia’s wartime service history. Anecdotal evidence (captured through formal and informal visitor feedback) demonstrates this:

• I would like to thank you for your outstanding curator tour on Monday that focused on the service contributions of Indigenous Australians. Your engaging stories gave me a finer appreciation of the sacrifices made by the first Australians before, during, and after the war. Holding CAPT Reg Saunders’ service medals was a highlight. Thanks for passing on your insights. I could have listened for hours.

Adrian D.

• I just wanted to thank you ever so much for taking the time to tour us through the Memorial recently, talking about the role animals have played during conflict. It was enlightening and emotional. You certainly have a passion for your work which we are very appreciative of.

Dianne G.

• The story program was a highlight for a lot of our littlies. The whole experience was amazing and the knowledge and patience the staff had was beautiful!

Holy Family Early Learning Centre staff

KPI 3 Qualitative or quantitative evidence of affective or attitudinal change.

Result Three per cent of the Memorial’s general visitors cited research as the primary purpose for their visit. Anecdotal evidence (captured as part of the General Visitor Survey) suggests that visitors received an increase in knowledge and an enhanced understanding of the Australian experience of war, whether intended or incidental, simply as a result of their visit to the Memorial.

• I have been here a number of times and each visit I always walk away with something new I have learnt.

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• The AWM is a treasure trove of information. I have used it numerous times across the years for genealogy. Also - I gained more info today on Ypres/Polygon Wood battles.

• Was fantastic and kids learnt a lot about Australia’s history and their great grandparents.

• As it was my first visit I was impressed by the amount of information available and the number of exhibits - I will be back but I will make sure I have longer time available.

• The amount of information provided at each exhibit, the variety of exhibits, the overall ability to get a real sense of “how it was” - very moving and overwhelming in the amount of detail …

Visitor comments, General Visitor Survey 2014-15

Deliverable 1 A range of public programs and events for visitors to the Memorial.

Result In 2014-15 gallery public program activities were delivered to 21,054 visitors. This year has seen a further increase in delivery by many sections across the Memorial. Programs included: Hands-on history, which allows visitors of all ages to handle artefacts and objects while discovering associated personal stories; collection-focused gallery talks; curator-led tours of the special exhibition; behind-the-scenes art, multimedia, and military heraldry and technology tours; school holiday craft workshops; professional museum theatre performances of Radio silence and Last letters during school holidays; guest lectures from notable historians; and summer film screenings, featuring six prisoner-of-war-themed films.

A select list of staff-presented public talks is provided in Appendix 7.

On 28 February the Memorial delivered the Of words and war: poetry at the Memorial day, where 21 poets from around Australia came together to share their commemorative poems with visitors in the Memorial’s galleries. Poet Rupert McCall OAM was commissioned by the Memorial to write a new poem, which he titled One hundred years from now and delivered on-site during the day. Four poets presented Anzac-themed poetry in the Commemorative Area followed by a moving performance by the Bendigo Youth Choir to conclude the day’s events.

The Australian Federation Guard ceremonial program, which incorporates the day-long mounting of a catafalque party around the Tomb of the Unknown Australian Soldier and the posting of sentries outside the Hall of Memory, was conducted twice monthly and incorporated into the daily Last Post Ceremony.

Visitors regard the Memorial’s interpretive programs and events very highly. Appreciation for this aspect of the Memorial follows:

• Thanks very much for organising the poetry day at the War Memorial on Saturday. It was a great idea and I really enjoyed the day.

Peter A.

• I would like to take the opportunity to say how much we have enjoyed all the tours we have taken at the War Memorial. I would rate your talks and tours program very highly.

Jennifer W.

• The Defence students thoroughly enjoyed their day at the Australian War Memorial and they mentioned that the tours were a definite highlight. It is so important to be able to pass on to the younger generations the Australian stories and oral history of the past and for visitors to see and learn something different each time they visit the Memorial.

Diana H.

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Deliverable 2 A series of quality, engaging, curriculum-related school education programs for on-site education groups.

Result Education programs at the Australian War Memorial are key educational activities for Australian schoolchildren, from preschool to Year 12. In total, 139,765 students visited the Memorial during the reporting period, of which 117,524 (84 per cent) participated in a facilitated program. The Memorial’s 12 available education programs link to statements in the Australian curriculum: history, and were designed to assist students to remember, interpret, and understand the Australian experience of war and its enduring impact on Australian society. The centenary Commemorative Crosses project continues to be incorporated into the We will remember them education program.

• Thank you for the rich and rewarding learning time our students had during their visit. Your teachers are excellent and the students gained much from their program and from being in the Memorial. The Last Post Ceremony was one the highlights of the trip for many of our students. We look forward to our visit next year.

Catherine H., Toongabbie Christian School, Victoria

• I would like to say thank you for your excellent programs and helpful staff. Our students learned a lot and were engaged. Also the support during the booking process and the lead-up to the excursion was excellent.

Sharee H., Ngunnawal Primary School, Australian Capital Territory

• The exhibits were absolutely amazing, but they were so complex that without you touring us I wouldn’t have understood them at all. Before coming to the War Memorial I knew how horrendous the war was but my understanding was taken to a whole new level after that day.

Grace, Year 6, Geelong Grammar School, Victoria

Deliverable 3 Memorial Boxes for schools in all Australian states and territories to borrow during the year.

Result The Memorial Box program remains a consistently requested and highly regarded outreach resource. The redevelopment of Box 1: Australia in the First World War was completed in December 2014, with an additional 12 boxes created to meet the demand for hands-on material. A series of online resources and activities were developed to complement the physical content of these boxes.

The 92 themed boxes, administered by state agents, contain a variety of items including case studies of personal stories and hands-on items like uniforms, badges, and objects. In 2014-15, 564 schools and community organisations borrowed a Memorial Box, with approximately 67,500 users. Secondary schools make up around 40 per cent of all borrowers, with primary schools at 47 per cent, and community groups like public libraries, aged care facilities, and after-school-care groups making up the remainder.

Demand for the Memorial Boxes in Far North Queensland led to the establishment of a new Memorial Box agent in Cairns, and the development of two additional First World War boxes, now available for loan.

Ongoing funding by the Department of Veterans’ Affairs enables the program to continue.

A survey of all Memorial Box borrowers indicated high satisfaction, with an average rating of 8.87 out of 10. Feedback is routinely sought from participants in the Memorial Box program:

• Most of our students are from non-English-speaking backgrounds and do not have a direct connection with older Australians. The box helped us to contextualise Anzac for our students.

Resurrection Primary School, Victoria

• The Memorial Box enabled students to engage and interact with hands-on artefacts that they would never see in our local community. They had an outstanding learning experience and we appreciate the Australian War Memorial supplying such quality learning materials for today’s students.

St Mary of the Angels Primary School, New South Wales

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Deliverable 4 An education-specific section of the Memorial’s website.

Result Reorganisation of the Memorial’s education webpages continued in 2014-15 to make them more user-friendly and better able to meet the needs of schools. Additions to the pages include learning resources on the Gallipoli campaign and classroom showcases containing examples of student work. An additional online resource featuring the role and contribution of the Royal Australian Navy was made possible through the donation of Sir James Balderstone.

Audiences continued to engage with Education via social media, with close to 900 users now “liking” the Education at the Australian War Memorial Facebook page. Posts sharing information on commemoration, Indigenous service, and the Gallipoli campaign have reached more than 80,000 people. Compared with last financial year, visitation to the education page is up 126.08 per cent.

• I did not know that rosemary is worn for Anzac, being Canadian. I have been to an Anzac memorial site in Turkey - there were a lot of Australians on this tour - it was very emotional.

Audrey L., Facebook comment

Other interpretive activities

Commemorative Area late-night openings On Fridays from 2 to 30 January, Saturdays from 3 to 31 January, and Sunday 25 January between 7.30 pm and 10 pm the Memorial’s Commemorative Area was opened to the public. This enabled visitors to see the Memorial from a different perspective and provided an additional opportunity for them to pay their respects to the fallen during the Centenary of the First World War.

Volunteer guides undertook tours of the Commemorative Area and provided insights for visitors into some of the stories from the Roll of Honour. By opening the space after-hours, the Memorial was able to provide visitors not only with another opportunity to listen to the recorded voices of Australian schoolchildren reciting the names of the servicemen and servicewomen whose names appear on the First World War Roll of Honour but also with a chance to view the names of those who lost their lives in the First World War as they were projected onto the Memorial’s dome after sunset. More than 1,400 visitors attended these late-night openings.

Students lay poppies on the Remembrance Stone during the 2014 Remembrance Day Ceremony. The 102 poppies laid by students represent the more than 102,000 men and women whose names are listed on the Roll of Honour.

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Commemoration In addition to engagement in learning activities ranging from the Discovery Zone, an experiential learning area, to facilitated education programs, visiting students also increasingly participated in commemorative ceremonies. In 2014, 1,128 students attended the Remembrance Day National Ceremony, with 102 students participating in the poppy-laying component of the program. In 2015, 133 students attended the Anzac Day National Ceremony. Students continue to be active participants in wreathlaying during the daily Last Post Ceremonies.

Simpson Prize In collaboration with the History Teachers’ Association of Australia and the Department of Education and Training, the Education team researched, developed, and hosted online the 2015 Simpson Prize question. This First World War-themed, national essay-writing competition is for secondary students. Links to relevant source material from the Memorial’s collection were provided to assist students with their research and writing. A historian from the Memorial’s Military History section led the group in Turkey for a battlefield tour and Anzac Day ceremonies.

Publications The third publication in the Century of Service series, Ancestry: stories of multicultural Anzacs, was developed by Education and published in collaboration with the Department of Veterans’ Affairs in March 2015. The second book in the series, Audacity: stories of heroic Australians in wartime (published in 2014), was shortlisted as a finalist for information book of the year in the Children’s Book Council of Australia’s Book of the Year Awards in May 2015.

Professional development Education delivered nine professional development sessions throughout the year to 263 school teachers and librarians. The aim of these programs is to equip teachers to better use the Memorial’s collection and historical content in the classroom. A further 120 Education conference delegates attended the Memorial and participated in guided gallery tours delivered by Education staff.

Performances In August 2014 Education hosted a successful three-day performance season of Starrs Productions’ Dusted off, performed in the BAE Systems Theatre by Brett Hunt. Some 950 students attended nine shows, with an additional special performance delivered for 150 Vietnam veterans and families on the anniversary of the battle of Long Tan.

• Dusted off showed me a side of the Vietnam War and of being a Vietnam veteran that I had never known before. It also gave new meaning to the song “I was only nineteen” in many ways. You can know the historical facts; you can see the statistics of a body count; you can know about trials that people had to face; but you learn so much more when you hear a real story.

Sarah K., Year 11, St Francis Xavier College, Australian Capital Territory

Florance Foundation visit The annual Florance Foundation visit of Junior Legatees to the Memorial was hosted in April, this year facilitating 13 students on gallery tours and at the National Ceremony on Anzac Day. Following their visit the students rated their experiences at the Memorial very highly:

• This past week has been the most exciting, amazing, nerve-wracking, and enlightening experience I have ever and will ever experience.

The 2015 Simpson Prize winners and runners up.

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OUTPUT 1.6 Promotions and Community Services Promotion of the Memorial as an outstanding national institution, and assistance given to the community to understand the Memorial’s roles, activities, programs, relevance, and future.

Overview The Memorial continues its integrated marketing campaigns to ensure it disseminates information to its core audience and continues to promote to non-traditional audiences.

The Memorial endeavours to appeal to all ages and the wider Australian community, and to help the Australian public understand the impact of war on our society.

The launch of the Memorial’s First World War centenary brand and program received national media coverage and positioned the Memorial as a leader in commemorative activities for the 2014-18 anniversaries.

A number of marketing activities have been identified as part of this report as those which underpin the key Memorial initiatives.

Performance information: Promotions and community service

Key performance indicator Effective promotion of the Memorial provides the necessary foundation for other programs to function effectively. The KPIs for the effectiveness of this program are:

KPI 1 Number of visits to the Memorial’s website.

Result During the reporting period there were 7,376,838 visits to the Memorial’s website.

KPI 2 Number of people to make their first visit to the Memorial.

Result It is estimated that 336,698 people visited the Memorial for the first time during the financial year. This figure represents almost one-third of total on-site Memorial visitation (1,142,814 visitors).

KPI 3 Number of positive media items, including television, radio, online, and print media.

Result A total of 9,240 media items were recorded during the year, with 99.84 per cent of them positive.

Deliverable 1 An engaging website with accurate information.

Result There was a 48 per cent increase in visitation to the website this year. April, always our busiest month, saw a 108 per cent increase in traffic compared with April 2014. From 22 to 26 April 2015 there were more than 883,000 sessions on the website, up 103 per cent for the same period in 2014.

The trend towards an increasing proportion of users accessing the website from mobile devices continues; there was a 125 per cent increase in the use of mobile devices and a 97 per cent increase in the use of tablets to access the site compared to the figures for 2013-14. The figures for April 2015 show that while there was a 78 per cent increase in the number of visitors using desktop computers compared with April 2014, there was a 158 per cent increase in the use of mobile devices and a 154 per cent increase in the use of tablets. On Anzac Day 47 per cent of traffic to the website came from mobile devices.

A process of continual improvement is in progress on the “single search” feature on the site. The search allows users to search for information about people, places, objects, and events across all digitised material from one place. This year has seen a 62 per cent increase in visitation to collection items, with 3.29 million visitors looking at this material compared to 2.09 million last year. There was a 31 per cent increase in visitation to the biographical information on the site, up to 12.9 million views from 9.87 million last year.

Deliverable 2 High-quality service to media to encourage suitable coverage in all forms of media.

Result The Memorial has consistently provided high-quality service to media both in the day-to-day engagement with media and in the delivery of major anniversaries, events, and visits, resulting in overwhelmingly positive media coverage.

The Memorial continues to build upon its strong existing relationship with media across print, online, television, and radio. It worked proactively to inform media about events and exhibitions at the Memorial, and to create media stories and opportunities around significant anniversaries, visits, and new acquisitions.

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The Memorial liaised closely with the media around significant events and dates to manage on-site activity smoothly, ensuring that media could report on events effectively and without disruption. This maximised the coverage for the Memorial, particularly in live television.

The launch of the Memorial’s centenary branding on 4 August received significant national and international media coverage equating to an audience reach of 41,511,156 and an advertising space rate total of $7,785,030.

Anzac Day

The month of April 2015 saw a total of 4,885 media items over the month, giving a total audience reach of 149,528,936 and a total ASR of $54,897,574.

A total of 2,306 media items were recorded in the week surrounding Anzac Day (21-27 April), giving a total audience reach of 60.1 million and a total ASR of $23.2 million.

On Anzac Day 1,050 items were recorded, with a total audience reach of 26.8 million and a total ASR of $14.8 million.

NOTE: the total number of media items is less than the previous year. However, it should be noted that the number of search terms has been significantly reduced in that time. Where once there were more than 20 search terms, there are now only a few. With this in mind, the media reach is significantly higher than previous years.

The effect and reach of the Memorial’s media and marketing strategy can be demonstrated through the findings of the General Visitor Survey. More than half (52 per cent) of surveyed respondents recalled seeing or hearing something about the Memorial in the months preceding their visit. This demonstrates an eight per cent increase in media exposure when compared with last year. Television was the most effective means of communication (58 per cent), followed by word-of-mouth (44 per cent), newspaper (29 per cent), the Memorial website (15 per cent), tourism brochures (14 per cent), and radio (14 per cent).

Deliverable 3 High-quality marketing and promotional activities as appropriate.

Result The Memorial undertakes national marketing campaigns to support its permanent, temporary, and travelling exhibition program. The year 2014-15 saw the Memorial promote on-site exhibitions Anzac voices, Ben Quilty: after Afghanistan, Alex Seton: as of today …, and NORFORCE - Tony Albert, and travelling exhibitions Remember me: the lost diggers of Vignacourt, A camera on Gallipoli, and Reality in flames: modern Australian art and the Second World War.

The Communications and Marketing (CAM) team supported Memorial activity around Remembrance Day 2014 and Anzac Day 2015, providing advertising and public communication on logistics and organisation. Anzac Day incorporated close liaison with the RSL and Memorial staff in developing a marketing plan to meet the expected demand and attendance.

The Memorial also received the ACT government’s major event funding grant, which was allocated on a dollar-for-dollar basis on advertising and promotions which would attract visitors to Canberra. This recognition was further highlighted with the Memorial being recognised by international travel website TripAdvisor, which named the Memorial as the number one landmark in Australia, Asia, and the South Pacific, and the 17th worldwide.

The Memorial entered into a partnership with the Weekend Australian to produce two First World War commemorative magazines per year from 2015 to 2018. Extending the reach of the Memorial’s target audience also saw national ads in Fairfax and NewsCorp metropolitan newspapers, including the Sydney Morning Herald, driving visitation to the ACT and the Memorial in line with the ACT government’s grant funding. Regional advertising campaigns were also incorporated into CAM’s marketing strategy.

The Memorial was also promoted at specific tourism trade events such as the Australian Tourism Exchange, where the Memorial’s tourism products are promoted to international and national tour operators and wholesalers, and locally within the National Capital Attractions Association

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and VisitCanberra. The Memorial also regularly conducted familiarisations for local, national, and international industry professionals and operators (leisure and business tourism), enhancing our marketing activities, market reach, and brand awareness both nationally and internationally.

Human Brochure, a marketing campaign developed by VisitCanberra, featured the Memorial and was a successful campaign for both it and Canberra as a tourist destination. This was supplemented by the Memorial’s presence at Floriade in September-October 2014.

Additional marketing support activities included familiarisations in conjunction with the Canberra Convention Bureau (national business tourism (convention) markets), the promotion of various public programs and events, including summer film screenings, late-night Commemorative Area openings, and the promotion of battlefield tours and book launches such as Anzac treasures: the Gallipoli collection of the Australian War Memorial.

CAM has been tasked with providing servicing and support activity for Memorial sponsors and has also overseen a selection process for a company specialising in sponsorship and philanthropy business. This is part of an ongoing and overarching strategy for the Memorial which will continue into 2015-16 and beyond.

Other promotion and community services activities

Friends of the Memorial Friends of the Memorial is the Memorial’s membership loyalty program, and offers a range of benefits and member-only events. Memberships are available to individuals, families, and clubs and organisations. The program has continued to expand, with approximately 1,800 active members.

The Friends program ran a number of events in conjunction with Anzac Day and Remembrance Day, along with a special Korean War 65th anniversary tour, a Victory in Europe Day commemoration art tour, and gallery tours. The Travelled these roads coach tour was very popular, with 40 Friends booking out the tour.

The annual Friends Gala Dinner was well attended, with 115 Friends enjoying the evening with Memorial staff.

Social media This year saw an increased use of social media in the Memorial’s integrated marketing and communication strategies, with positive results. April was particularly busy this year, with posts on our Facebook page reaching more than 745,100 people, while 23,000 were actively engaged in the material posted. On Anzac Day more than 136,300 people were reached. The Memorial’s photographs on Flickr received more than 3.24 million views, with upwards of 837,000 views in April 2015 alone.

Two major projects on Twitter in April, as well as our own tweets about events, saw strong public engagement and a significant increase in followers and traffic from Twitter to our website. The @ABCNews 1915 project was well promoted by the ABC as project leader, and ran for the month. The #AnzacDay project saw Twitter widely promote the use of this hashtag with the aim of preserving the tweets - 450,000 made over 25-26 April - for the Memorial’s collection as a record of commemorative activity for the 100th anniversary of the landings at Gallipoli.

Centenary of the First World War The Memorial’s Centenary brand has been widely used in support of many Memorial and community non-commercial initiatives across Australia. This brand adorns much of the Memorial’s brand presence and has placed the Memorial and its centenary program at the forefront for media organisations and their program planning for the next four years.

Behind-the-scenes documentary A five-episode documentary series was filmed in 2014 by the History Channel (Foxtel Networks Australia). During the 12 months of filming internationally renowned historian Neil Oliver took viewers behind the scenes to explore the work of the Memorial in the lead up to the centenary of the First World War. The episodes followed the redevelopment of the First World War Galleries and preparations for Remembrance Day, and examined the rich stories told by the letters, diaries, artefacts, and relics in the National Collection. The series, named The Memorial, aired to Australian audiences on the History Channel on Remembrance Day 2014.

The Memorial’s First World War centenary brand, on the Audi kindly supplied by Rolfe Motors.

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OUTPUT 1.7 Research, Information, and Dissemination The conduct and stimulation of historical research and dissemination of knowledge and understanding of Australia’s military history.

Overview A wide range of research and dissemination activities was undertaken during the year, including publication of military history books and articles, media broadcasts, individual research projects, family history workshops, website provision of digitised official and private records, and the provision of military history information and research assistance by the Military History Section and through the Reading Room and the research enquiry service.

The 2015 centenary of the Gallipoli landings has generated unprecedented interest in the Memorial’s collections and the stories they reveal about the Australians who served. The Memorial has assisted enquiries in record numbers, from people using the collections to trace their family’s military history through to those performing academic research, writing books, or producing documentaries.

Anzac connections is progressively delivering new digitised collections to the website, improved search and discovery on the site, and ways for people to interact with the collection. The project is delivering data in a more useful format and with new social crowd-sourcing tools, including transcription.

First World War collections of letters and diaries are continuing to be digitised and progressively released to the website as part of the project. These collections are being added to the more than two million pages of archival records available on the Memorial’s website.

The Anzac connections platform has created the ability to identify and publish linkages between the Memorial’s collection data online. This provides improved context and ability to access the Memorial’s collections. Using this platform, for example, the Memorial has published an authoritative First World War list of Indigenous service by linking existing data with research generated by the Australian War Memorial and other sources. More than 850 Indigenous Australians have been identified and new research will continue to be published online using this platform.

This year the Memorial and the University of New South Wales, Canberra, entered into a data sharing agreement to create a permanent linkable URL for every Australian who served in the First World War.

A variety of Roll of Honour and Commemorative Roll research projects were undertaken in addition to the administration of the rolls. These tasks included investigations into new cases for inclusion, the majority of which concerned the recently established Operational Service panels and First World War commemorative projects. Policy development research and

work on improving existing data and data structures continued throughout the year.

The names of 17 Australian soldiers were added to the Operational Service panels of the Roll of Honour in November 2014. They died serving in Papua and New Guinea in 1947-75 and in south-east Asia during 1955-75.

With the support of the Anzac Centenary Arts and Culture Fund, Mr Chris Latham was appointed to create a program of musical performances and recordings in Australia and along the Western Front, drawing on the collections of the Australian War Memorial and other collecting institutions. A highlight was the first performance of the program, Flowers of war, which took place at the High Court of Australia in Canberra. As well as raising awareness of the Memorial’s music and instrument collections, the project will reveal some of the extraordinary musical talent engaged and often lost in the First World War.

Field work began in an ARC-funded project to research the experience of people in northern Borneo in the Second World War and their interactions with Australians and the Japanese. This is part of a commitment to continue to engage in new research to better understand the international context of the Australian experience of war, especially in our region. Other activities in this sphere included participation by Memorial staff in the ADF’s involvement in Operation Render Safe in Bougainville, and humanitarian operations in the Philippines.

The Honourable Tony Abbott MP, former Prime Minister of Australia, with author Dr Peter Pedersen at the launch of Anzac treasures: the Gallipoli collection of the Australian War Memorial.

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Performance information: Research, information, and dissemination

Key performance indicator Conducting one’s own research at the Memorial’s Research Centre, viewing digitised website resources, searching through the Memorial’s online databases, making research enquiries, attending lectures and conferences, or reading material produced by the Memorial’s military historians are all deliberate actions to interpret and understand the Australian experience of war and its enduring impact on Australian society. The KPIs for the effectiveness of this program are:

KPI 1 Number of visits to the Research Centre’s Reading Room.

Result Approximately 35,296 people visited the Reading Room in 2014-15. The dramatic increase in visitors experienced in the last two financial years demonstrates an ongoing interest in Australian military history and the Research Centre’s collections associated with the Centenary of the First World War.

KPI 2 Number of collection items retrieved for and accessed by Reading Room clients.

Result A total of 18,374 collection items were requested by Reading Room clients this year. Last year 16,610 items were retrieved and accessed.

KPI 3 Viewing online research facilities.

Result More than 20,200,000 page views of the Memorial’s online research facilities were recorded.

KPI 4 Number of research enquiries answered by Memorial staff.

Result Memorial staff answered 34,629 research enquiries in 2014-15.

KPI 5 Total attendance at Memorial conferences.

Result The international history conference Gallipoli 1915: a century on attracted more than 400 registered delegates.

KPI 6 & 7 Number of lectures and conference papers given by Memorial staff. Number of books and articles written by Memorial staff.

Result During 2014-15 Memorial staff presented 20 conference papers (23 last year); delivered 42 lectures or offsite talks (41 last year); and completed 56 interviews (82 last year).

Memorial staff also wrote or edited seven books (one last year), nine book chapters (five last year) and 27 articles including book reviews (43 last year) during the year.

A select list of staff talks, lectures, and publications is included in Appendix 7.

KPI 8 Sales figures for Wartime magazine and other publications produced by the Memorial.

Result Type Sales

Wartime 22,744

Books* 1,979

Exhibition catalogues 1,232

Souvenir publications 13,115

* Sales of books through e-Sales and the Memorial Shop only. Does not include sales through other book stores.

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Deliverable 1 Support for research about Australian military history, including:

a. the Official history of Australian peacekeeping, humanitarian and post-Cold War operations;

b. the annual Summer Scholars program; and

c. a range of internal research projects.

Result a. the Official history of Australian peacekeeping, humanitarian and post-Cold War operations

The Memorial continues to support the six-volume Official history of Australian peacekeeping, humanitarian and post-Cold War operations through the contribution of one full-time historian. Two volumes of the history have been published to date:

• Volume II: Australia and the “new world order”: from peacekeeping to peace enforcement, 1988-1991, by David Horner (Cambridge University Press, 2011)

• Volume III: The good international citizen: Australian peacekeeping in Asia, Africa, and Europe, 1991-1993, by David Horner and John Connor (Cambridge University Press, 2014)

Of the remainder of the series:

• Volume V: The good neighbour: Australian peace support operations in the Pacific Islands 1980-2006, by Dr Bob Breen, was completed in 2012 and after some delays was cleared by relevant government departments and has been submitted to the publisher.

• Volume VI: In their time of need: Australia’s overseas emergency relief operations 1918-2006, by Memorial historian Dr Steven Bullard, is on track for completion in the second half of 2015 after resolution of issues regarding access to relevant records.

Progress on the remaining two volumes (I and IV) was expedited in March 2015 through funding assistance provided by the Department of Defence. This assistance will allow the release of external authors from academic commitments for up to 12 months and will also provide the resources to enable the remaining manuscripts to be completed in 2016.

b. the annual Summer Scholars program

Scholars are selected through a competitive, merit-based selection process that is open to university students at a late stage of their history degrees, customarily honours graduates. They are assigned individual research projects and are supervised and professionally guided by Memorial historians. Three scholars successfully completed research projects related to the Memorial’s ongoing historical research, collections, exhibitions, and publications:

Shaun Mawdsley (Massey University, New Zealand) on the battle of Lone Pine and the creation of the Memorial’s iconic Lone Pine diorama.

Bryce Abraham (University of Newcastle) on the planning for and recovery of Australian prisoners of war from Europe and Asia by specially organised contact groups in the Second World War.

Julia Smart (Monash University) on the work of Australian war graves units locating and creating the graves of the dead in the immediate aftermath of the First World War.

After editing, all the scholars’ research reports are published on the Memorial’s website. The scholars also delivered presentations on their findings at the conclusion of the program.

c. a range of internal research projects

These included:

• A major investigation into Australia’s involvement in post-Second World War Japanese war crimes trials (funded by an ARC grant in collaboration with the University of Melbourne) to produce a multi-volume law report series covering 310 trials and a separate volume on their historical and legal significance. The volumes in the law report series are in production by the publisher, Martinus Nijhoff, in the Netherlands, for launching at the International Criminal Court in the Hague, while the separate thematic volume will be released in late 2015.

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• The Australian War Memorial is partnering with the Australian National University (ANU) in a major three-year ARC-funded research project into Borneo in the Second World War.

The project, titled Beyond Allied histories: Dayak memories of World War II in Borneo, involves the ANU and the Memorial providing new research into how different groups of people experienced the Second World War in Borneo. The research team combines anthropological expertise from Dr Christine Helliwell of the College of Arts and Social Sciences at ANU with curatorial expertise from Robyn van Dyk, Head of the Research Centre at the Memorial, in a genuinely collaborative project.

As well as a scholarly book and articles the project will generate a major public exhibition at the Memorial that will represent Australian and Dayak responses to the war. The exhibition will make use of the Memorial’s collections to convey the Australian experience, as well as video and sound recordings and items of Dayak material culture to convey indigenous experiences of the war.

Memorial staff disseminated military history in various ways during the year:

• delivered research papers and public talks on aspects of Australian military history at seminars and conferences and in association with Memorial exhibitions and other public programs;

• provided military history advice for a wide range of corporate needs, including in-house training, media requirements, major commemorative functions, and official government programs;

• contributed to the development of Memorial permanent and travelling exhibitions;

• published both scholarly and popular articles on a wide range of Australian military history subjects.

A select list of staff talks, lectures, and publications is included in Appendix 7.

Summer Scholars 2015. Left to right: Shaun Mawdsley, Julia Smart, and Bryce Abraham in front of the boat from HMT Ascot, which landed on Gallipoli on 25 April 1915.

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Deliverable 2 A publishing program including:

a. curatorial monographs

b. military history publications;

c. Wartime; and

d. exhibition and education publications.

Result a. curatorial monographs

Australians at the Great War 1914-1918, by Peter Burness, published by Murdoch Books in March 2015.

Anzac treasures: the Gallipoli collection of the Australian War Memorial, by Peter Pedersen, published by Murdoch Books in September 2014.

b. military history publications Australian soldiers in Asia-Pacific in World War II, by Lachlan Grant, published by NewSouth Publishing in October 2014.

Beyond surrender: Australian prisoners of war in the twentieth century, edited by Joan Beaumont, Lachlan Grant, and Aaron Pegram, published by Melbourne University Press in June 2015.

The Changi book, edited by Lachlan Grant, published by NewSouth Publishing in June 2015.

Kokoda: beyond the legend, edited by Karl James, in production with Cambridge University Press for publication in mid-2016.

Double Diamonds: Australian commandos in the Pacific War, by Karl James, being completed for publication by NewSouth Publishing in 2016.

Australia’s war crimes trials 1945-51, edited by Tim McCormack and Narrelle Morris, in production for publication in late 2015.

Charles Bean’s diaries from the Western Front, being completed by Peter Burness under Lambert Fellowship funding for publication in 2016.

Korea: in from the cold, edited by Michael Kelly, compiling and editing for publication in 2016.

c. Wartime magazine Production of the Memorial’s popular military history magazine, Wartime, continued during 2014-15. Four issues (numbers 67-70) were published with a balance of high-quality, popular, and engaging articles. A high proportion of articles in Wartime were once again written by Memorial historians and other staff. The magazine continued its popular “themed” focus, featuring collections of articles on: the centenary of the outbreak of the First World War (issue 67, winter 2014); the Great War (issue 68, spring 2014); the Memorial’s new First World War Galleries (issue 69, summer 2015); and the centenary of the Gallipoli campaign (issue 70, autumn 2015).

d. exhibition and education publications Ancestry: stories of multicultural Anzacs, developed by Education and published in collaboration with the Department of Veterans’ Affairs in March 2015.

Reality in flames: modern Australian art and the Second World War, by Warwick Heywood, Australian War Memorial exhibition publication.

Ben Quilty: after Afghanistan (second edition), by Laura Webster, Australian War Memorial exhibition publication.

Alex Seton: as of today …, by Warwick Heywood, Australian War Memorial exhibition publication (received a Highly Commended at the Museums Australia Multimedia and Publication Design Awards).

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Deliverable 3 Access to collection items and military history information, including:

a. Reading Room facilities;

b. an authoritative research enquiry service;

c. an annual conference;

d. online research facilities; and

e. a shop that provides quality military history books and exhibition publications.

Result a. Reading Room facilities

The Memorial’s Research Centre continued to attract large numbers of visitors throughout the year. Approximately 35,296 people visited the Reading Room, with 18,374 requests made for collection items. Reference officers delivered a face-to-face reference service, which is delivered to remote clients via email, telephone, and mail. Many researchers are also accessing the digitised collections from the Reading Room. The availability of digitised records such as war diaries, Reports of Proceedings, and private records through Anzac connections has helped alleviate pressure on the retrieval of original First World War manuscripts in heavy demand over this centenary period.

b. an authoritative research enquiry service Research Centre staff answered 26,662 enquiries made online or by telephone, fax, or through the mail. This is approximately 5,600 more enquiries than last year, and a continuation of the growth in public interest and research experienced in 2013-14. Telephone and online enquiries (via ReQuest and email) vastly outnumber mail enquiries. Research Centre clients are satisfied with the quality of service: some 2,426 emails and letters of appreciation were received in 2014-15, compared with 1,821 in 2013-14.

Military History Section staff also answered more than 4,190 research enquiries during 2014-15. The enquiries include those made online, by telephone, and via mail from the public and the media, and through the Minister’s and Prime Minister’s offices and other government agencies. In addition, historians answered a substantial number of mail and email enquiries sent to the editors of Wartime.

c. an annual conference This year’s international annual history conference, Gallipoli 1915: a century on, marked the centenary of the Gallipoli campaign. This major conference was jointly convened by the Memorial and the Australian National University (ANU) in Canberra over 18-20 March 2015, and marked the culmination of a continuing partnership between the two institutions. The Memorial planned and co-organised the conference and allocated sponsorship funding to assist in delivering the event. The ANU assisted with provision of the venue, Llewellyn Hall, travel expenses and accommodation at University House for several speakers, as well as funding an evening reception. The Turkish Ambassador, His Excellency Reha Keskintepe, also kindly hosted and funded the welcome reception for the conference at the Turkish Embassy in Canberra.

The conference was opened by the Honourable Kevin Andrews MP, former Minister for Defence, representing the Prime Minister. It attracted a record audience of more than 400 registered delegates, including eminent historians, specialists from other disciplines, authors, film-makers, researchers, students, and interested members of the general public. A total of 42 speakers representing most of the nations involved in the Gallipoli operation, including leading authorities from Australia, New Zealand, Turkey, Britain, India, Canada, France, and Ireland, delivered a range of international perspectives on many aspects of the campaign. They covered the strategic conception and conduct of the campaign on land and sea, the military experience of soldiers from many nations, and the memory, legacies, and heritage of Gallipoli.

Professor Sir Hew Strachan, Chichele Professor of the History of War at the University of Oxford, delivered the conference keynote address. Other eminent speakers included Professor Jay Winter of Yale University, Professor John Horne of Trinity College Dublin, Professor Robin Prior of Flinders University, and Professor Joan Beaumont of the ANU. Renowned author Mr Les Carlyon AC delivered the conference dinner talk and the former Minister for Veterans’ Affairs, Senator the Honourable Michael Ronaldson, also addressed the conference on the significance of the Centenary of the First World War.

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An extensive audience survey subsequently confirmed overwhelmingly positive responses from participants for what most found to be a stimulating, engaging, educational, and memorable experience. In the main, the survey indicated that the Memorial is strongly positioned to convene future conferences owing to its reputation as an authoritative commentator on military history and as an academic forum for discussion.

• It’s always a pleasure and a privilege to attend the AWM’s conference and have the opportunities to rub shoulders with very eminent historians. There was a good range of perspectives and aspects of the Gallipoli campaign to enhance my knowledge of it. All in all, it was a great experience that didn’t disappoint.

• As always this conference, like all AWM conferences, challenged historical myths and provided future food for thought and research. It provided a unique blend of academics, gifted amateurs, and world-class historians in an inspired program.

• I went with curiosity to better understand a major event celebrated by Australia. I came away euphoric. Topics varied and fascinating. So much to think about. So much new knowledge. I now feel competent to have an opinion on this campaign in the context of our nation.

Conference delegate comments, Gallipoli 1915: a century on.

The papers from the conference will be compiled and edited for publication.

d. online research facilities The Memorial’s collection search has continued development this year, with additional features being added and modifications being made in response to feedback and to the addition of new material to the site. In 2015 digitised documents papers from the collection of Field Marshall Lord William Riddell Birdwood were added to the website as part of the ongoing Anzac connections project.

This year data relating to units, places, and military events was also published on the website, with each entity being provided with a unique identifier. This data, when combined with biographical data and digitised collection records, has expanded the resources available to researchers. An Application Programming Interface (API) has been created to enable the sharing of Memorial data with other agencies. It has been shared with interested organistations, and the API will be used in GovHack July 2015. A transcription tool has been developed and will be in beta release in July 2015.

e. a shop that provides quality military history books and exhibition publications

The Memorial Shop continues to stock a comprehensive range of military history publications, as well as exhibition catalogues. The Online Shop also offers a range of these titles.

Other research activities

Family history outreach The Research Centre continues to offer an outreach training program for researching family history. The workshops focus on how visitors can use the collections and services of the Australian War Memorial (and other institutional collections that relate to Australian military service) to discover their family’s military service story. This financial year has seen visits to the Merrylands Central Library, Campsie Library, and Young and District Family History Group. There were also talks delivered at the Australasian Federation of Family History Organisations Congress, hosted by the Heraldry and Genealogy Society of Canberra and the Sapphire Coast Family History Expo.

Bryan Gandevia Prize for Military History A generous bequest by the family and friends of the late Professor Bryan Gandevia in 2009 enabled the establishment of a prize to commemorate Professor Gandevia’s contribution to the development of Australian military and medical history and to the historical research and publication activities of the Australian War Memorial. The Bryan Gandevia Prize of $5,000, awarded biennially, is one of the most generous awards for postgraduate studies in Australian history. It is awarded to an outstanding honours, masters, or doctoral thesis on a significant subject within Australian military history, military-medical history, or military-social history.

The 2014 Brian Gandevia Prize, for theses submitted in the years 2012-14, attracted a strong field of five PhD, one

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Masters, and two Honours history theses, each of a high standard and all of them worthy candidates for the award. The prize was judged internally by a panel of historians of the Australian War Memorial and externally by a distinguished professor of Australian military, social, and political history. The adjudicators all concurred in their judgement, unanimously recommending the award go to Dr Michael Molkentin for his thesis, “Australia, the Empire, and the Great War in the air” (PhD thesis, University of NSW, 2013). This work informed Dr Molkentin’s subsequent publication, Australia and the war in the air (Oxford University Press, 2014), the first volume in the series The centenary history of Australia and the Great War. Dr Molkentin is the second winner of the Bryan Gandevia Prize since its institution.

Honour rolls A variety of Roll of Honour and Commemorative Roll research projects were undertaken in addition to the ongoing administration of the rolls. These tasks included investigations into new cases for inclusion, the majority of which concerned the recently established Operational Service panels and First World War commemorative projects. Additionally, policy development research and work on improving existing data and data structures was ongoing throughout the year.

The names of 17 Australian soldiers were added to the Operational Service panels of the Roll of Honour in November 2014. They died serving in Papua and New Guinea in 1947-75 and in south-east Asia during 1955-75.

This year’s international history conference, Gallipoli 1915: a century on. Mr Les Carlyon AC (left) addresses the conference dinner, while historian Rana Chhina from the United Service Institution of India (below left) presents his paper on the role of Indian forces on Gallipoli.

BELOW: Dr Brendan Nelson presents the 2014 Bryan Gandevia Prize to Dr Michael Molkentin. The prize was established to foster and promote research into Australian military history, military-medical history, and military-social history.

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OUTPUT 1.8 Visitor Services Visitors to the Memorial and its outreach programs are provided with a standard of service that enhances their experience and encourages them to return and promote others to visit.

Overview The Australian War Memorial continues to provide a world-class visitor experience and was again recognised as one of the Top 10 Landmarks in Australia in the TripAdvisor 2015 Travellers’ Choice awards.

The delivery of front-of-house services is provided by a dedicated team of paid and volunteer staff who work together to provide an excellent standard of service. This is demonstrated by the many letters of appreciation received annually:

• I am writing in regards to my recent visit to the Australian War Memorial in April 2015. This was my first visit in five or so years and I was particularly drawn by the buzz surrounding the new First World War gallery, which I found to be brilliant in content as well as in design. What I had not expected was the exceptional service which I had received from all the staff in and throughout the galleries.

As well as our committed staff, recent additions at the Memorial have also contributed to the overall visitor experience. This was evident during the installation of the Camp Russell and Camp Holland memorials from Afghanistan and the official opening of the redeveloped First World War Galleries.

Performance information: Visitor services

Key performance indicator The provision of high-quality visitor services provides the necessary foundation for other programs to function effectively. The KPIs for the effectiveness of this program are:

KPI 1 At least 90 per cent of surveyed visitors believe that their visit had met or exceeded their expectations.

Result In 2014-15, 97 per cent of surveyed visitors stated that their visit to the Memorial had met or exceeded their expectations.

Interestingly, this positive rating was felt across all visitors surveyed, irrespective of gender or age; that is to say, no one group felt less than 97 per cent satisfied with their overall visit.

KPI 2 At least 80 per cent of surveyed visitors believe that the Memorial has maintained or improved its standard of service since their last visit.

Result Of the surveyed visitors making a repeat visit to the Memorial, 84 per cent believed the Memorial’s overall standard of service had improved since their last visit. This represents a nine per cent increase when compared to the performance rating last year (75 per cent), and can likely be attributed to the launch of the newly developed First World War Galleries.

• Every time we come, it seems there is something new to see.

• This is a return visit - the continual changes are excellent.

• I love the war memorial, it’s a very moving place and keeps getting better - love the effects.

Visitor comments, General Visitor Survey 2014-15

A further 15 per cent of repeat visitors believed the Memorial had maintained its overall standard of service. This was primarily experienced by visitors aged 35-44.

Deliverable 1 Front-of-house staff trained to deliver high-level customer service and voluntary guides trained to an introductory level of military history.

Result To ensure a memorable experience for the many visitors to the Memorial, a high priority is placed on training the Memorial’s paid front-of-house staff and its many volunteers. To assist the voluntary guides in maintaining a minimum level of proficiency and professionalism based on continuing professional development, an 11-month training and development program was designed and implemented in January 2015. Delivered across 53 sessions by experts from within the Memorial, this in-depth training covered Australia’s involvement in conflicts from colonial commitments through to recent operations in Iraq and Afghanistan, and also provided an opportunity for participants to refresh guiding techniques and customer service skills.

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Since the First World War Galleries re-opened in December 2014, visitation has grown by 25 per cent when compared to the same period last year. This has seen an ongoing need for all front-of-house staff to respond and adapt to an ever changing work environment while ensuring the highest level of customer service is maintained

The General Visitor Survey revealed that staff assistance rated highly overall, with 85 per cent of visitors providing a positive satisfaction rating (satisfied or very satisfied). While this demonstrates a small decrease compared to figures for 2013-14 (88 per cent), 67 per cent of visitors cited that they were very satisfied with staff assistance, and this remains consistent with the ratings from last year - an outstanding result given the challenges presented by increased visitation on-site.

Visitors regard staff as one of the Memorial’s greatest assets, and often refer to them as “friendly” and “helpful”. This is reflected in the feedback captured as part of the General Visitor Survey:

• The staff are always so welcoming and helpful, and very knowledgeable - no question is too hard and staff [are] always happy to assist.

• Each time I visit I am impressed with the care and respect given to the War Memorial. Today was the first time we had a guided tour. Our volunteer guide was wonderful. His knowledge, his passion for the subject and his patience made this visit very memorable.

• The friendly and helpful attitude of guides and staff was most impressive.

Visitor comments, General Visitor Survey 2014-15

Deliverable 2 High-quality and suitable public facilities such as restrooms, cafés, and way-finding signage.

Result The Memorial is safe and well-presented with appropriate public facilities such as restrooms, a first aid room, and parents’ room available. Further enhancements are planned for both internal and external signage.

In July 2014 the Memorial welcomed Create Consultants as the new provider of café services and functions booking services in its two purpose-built facilities: The Landing Place cafè in Anzac Hall and Poppy’s Café in the Eastern Precinct of the grounds.

The Anzac Hall bathrooms’ vanities, mirrors, and lighting were also upgraded, greatly improving their quality and function.

Annual evaluations were conducted for both Memorial cafés. Of the 835 responses, customers demonstrated similar satisfaction levels across various aspects of each of the cafés’ facilities and services. (The Landing Place cafè received an overall positive satisfaction rating of 78 per cent, while Poppy’s Café received 76 per cent.)

Visitor satisfaction with wayfinding signage at the Memorial is measured through the General Visitor Survey, with 72 per cent satisfied with the site’s signage, a figure comparable to that for 2013-14.

Deliverable 3 Opportunities for visitor feedback, such as Service Charter, Visitors’ Book, and evaluation services.

Result The Memorial welcomes feedback of all forms from visitors. A Visitor’s Book is located in the Orientation Gallery and the Service Charter is available online.

In the 2014-15 reporting period 47 compliments and 11 complaints were received via the Visitors’ Book. These comprised 46 compliments about staff and one about the Memorial’s exhibitions. Of the complaints, nine were about the exhibitions, one about the facilities provided and one about staff. Written responses were provided to all entries as appropriate. Approximately 60 emails were received via the online Service Charter. As with the Visitors’ Book, responses were provided to all correspondence.

An extensive program of evaluation monitors standards of services and visitor satisfaction. Further information about the Memorial’s evaluation and visitor research activities is provided under Output 1.10.

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Other visitor services activities

Volunteer services Volunteers at the Memorial continued to make a significant contribution, with more than 190 people volunteering their time, skills, and expertise to support both front-of-house services and projects in curatorial and conservation areas. The volunteers’ level of service and dedication is gratefully acknowledged by the Memorial and appreciated by the many visitors who have benefited from the time they so freely give.

At the front-of-house, voluntary guides delivered 12 free daily tours to general visitors. In October 2014, 60-minute themed tours and 30-minute Commemorative Area tours were introduced in addition to the 90-minute highlights tour. Additionally, voluntary guides delivered VIP and after-hours Commemorative Area tours (provided as part of the January 2015 late-night opening program) across the reporting period.

The Memorial continued to provide regular information and development sessions together with structured and ongoing training, such as the voluntary guide 2015 training and development program.

The Memorial’s volunteers also assisted the public to gain access to family history information and engaged with family and student visitors in the Discovery Zone.

Volunteer veterans participated in the Memorial’s school wreathlaying program, engaging with students about their service experiences. This successful program enhanced understanding of commemoration for the participating school groups.

LEFT: Mr Tim Sullivan, Assistant Director National Collection, with some of the Memorial’s longstanding volunteers at the end-of-year Christmas party and award presentation.

BELOW LEFT: The Memorial volunteer “class photo” 2014. Our volunteers play an invaluable role in supporting staff and visitors with front-of-house activities, curatorial projects, and conservation work.

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INTERNAL OUTPUTS Internal outputs contribute to the achievement of all Memorial external outputs.

OUTPUT 1.9 Corporate Governance The Council of the Australian War Memorial provides a strategic framework of policy and direction that guides the achievement of the Memorial’s outcome.

In accordance with its planned schedule, the full Council and the Finance, Audit, and Compliance Committee each met four times during the year. The Remuneration Committee met once. In May 2015 Council reviewed the terms of reference for all committees and resolved to cease the operations of the Corporate Support and Gallery Redevelopment Committees.

The Chair of the Council and the Director of the Memorial provided a briefing to the Minister for Veterans’ Affairs after each meeting. The Memorial’s senior management team also met with senior representatives of the Department of Veterans’ Affairs to discuss matters of business relevant to both parties.

Through the process of Council and committee meetings detailed papers and recommendations were presented by the Memorial’s management. The major considerations and decisions undertaken by Council related to:

• monitoring of progress associated with the redevelopment of the First World War Galleries;

• implementation of a broader program of events related to the Centenary of the First World War;

• progress in relation to the Official history of Australian peacekeeping, humanitarian, and post-Cold War operations;

• a scoping study of postwar medical and health issues affecting veterans from south-east Asian conflicts;

• a new official history on operations in East Timor, Iraq, and Afghanistan;

• purchasing of additional property for development of additional National Collection storage;

• stakeholder consultation associated with the MV Krait; and

• planning for the Spirit of Anzac Centenary Experience.

PricewaterhouseCoopers (PWC) continued as the Memorial’s Internal Auditor. Members of the Australian National Audit Office (ANAO) and PWC attended each of the Finance, Audit, and Compliance Committee meetings. A program of audits was approved by Council for the 2014-15 financial year and the outcomes of reviews undertaken were presented at each meeting.

In accordance with terms of reference, Council reviewed its performance in August 2015 via a survey completed by Council members, the Director, and senior management. Overall, the results of the review indicate that performance of Council

during 2014-15 was highly satisfactory, with 14 of the 20 criteria achieving an average score of four or more out of five.

Council membership changes during the year included the completion of terms for Mr Peter FitzSimons AM, Dr Allan Hawke AC, and Major General Paul Stevens AO (Retd), the reappointment for the third time of Mr Kerry Stokes AC in August 2014, and the appointments of Mrs Josephine Stone AM, Brigadier Alison Creagh CSC (Retd), and Major General Greg Melick AO RFD FANZCN SC in early 2015. All new appointments are for a period of three years.

Changes in membership associated with ex officio positions on Council also occurred at the time of the appointments of the respective new Chiefs of Navy and Army.

Major General Paul Stevens AO continued as Chair of the Finance, Audit, and Compliance Committee until the end of his term in March 2015. Ms Jillian Segal accepted the position of Chair from this date. A number of changes were made to membership of Council committees as a result of new appointments to Council.

Details of Council members are included in Appendices 1 and 2.

OUTPUT 1.10 Executive Strategic Management Effective leadership and management of the Memorial in accordance with the requirements of the Australian War Memorial Act 1980.

Executive leadership The Memorial’s executive leadership and management framework includes a Corporate Management Group (CMG), consisting of the Director and three Assistant Directors, and a Senior Management Group (SMG) comprising all section heads and members of CMG.

CMG meets weekly and considers a wide range of matters either brought forward by its members or via papers from section heads. Quarterly reports are presented to monitor performance against the approved Business Plan, as well as to review management of any identified business risks. The Chief Financial Officer (CFO) presents a set of financial statements on a regular basis and is able to provide independent and direct advice to senior management. A Centenary Funding Reserve has been established to provide for additional staffing resources needed to deliver and support programs associated with the centenary period and to respond to the increase in demands for information about the collection and personal records of servicemen and servicewomen. Funding from the general appropriation is being quarantined for this purpose. A number of new positions established in the 2013-14 financial year ceased at 30 June 2015 as planned.

The project management framework introduced to support changes in both corporate priorities and programs associated with the centenary period was further developed with the

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establishment of a Priority Projects Steering Committee and the appointment of a Program Manager. This committee is to provide high-level reporting across all projects being delivered and progress against key indicators: scope, budget schedule, quality, and risk.

The Information Management Steering Group (IMSG) meets monthly and is key to determining the strategic direction of Information Management, information and communications technology (ICT), and web initiatives. This area of business continues to grow and underpins many of the Memorial’s corporate objectives. The prioritisation of available resources is a major focus of IMSG. The Enterprise Architecture commissioned in the previous year continued throughout 2014-15. All sections were involved in the identification of key business capabilities and the commencement of a process to map current supporting ICT applications. The objectives of this review is to provide a clear understanding of the ICT requirements for the Memorial to meet its stated objectives, and to identify priority areas for further ICT investment from available resources.

A wide range of statistical information is collated and presented on a monthly basis to access trends across business activities. Where possible, comparatives are also provided against the performances of other collecting institutions.

The Director continued his efforts to secure corporate sponsorship support. A number of corporate sector

partnerships have either been secured or are in the process of being negotiated. Other opportunities are being explored with a range of individuals and corporations.

SMG also meets weekly and is a forum for the exchange of information and discussion of corporate issues. Feedback from CMG and SMG meetings is provided to all staff through weekly section meetings.

In addition to weekly CMG meetings, a Project Control Group (PCG) met monthly to monitor performance of the refurbishment of the First World War Galleries.

Strategic management The Memorial’s strategic planning framework encourages participation by all staff, promoting the concept of one team working to achieve common goals and recognising the importance of communication and ownership of decisions. Annual Business Plans and accompanying budgets are developed to support Council directions and Corporate Plan priorities. Once developed, annual Business Plans influence day-to-day operations, and achievements are monitored and reported on each month.

The new format and content of the Business Plan introduced in 2014-15 proved a successful enhancement for reporting to senior management and Council and assisted to focus resources on identified priorities.

Ms Lorraine Martin, Vice President of Lockheed Martin, lays a wreath during the Last Post Ceremony commemorating the service of Major George Darling Gould, 26th Battalion AIF, who died during the First World War.

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Risk management and business continuity planning The Memorial’s Risk Management and Fraud Control Plans for 2011-14 were completed during the year. Identified risks were monitored across the organisation, and for all major events and activities specific risk management plans were developed in advance. Planning for emergency evacuation continued, with trial evacuations completed in all buildings several times during the year. CMG and Council received quarterly reports against the Risk Register and the Fraud Control Plan’s key performance indicators.

A review of the Business Continuity Plan continued with assistance from the Memorial’s internal auditors, PricewaterhouseCoopers.

The Memorial participated in Comcover’s annual risk management benchmarking survey in 2015 and achieved an integrated ranking. The Memorial has developed and implemented a risk policy and comprehensive risk management framework that is embedded in the operations of the entity, and it is assessed and updated regularly. The Memorial reached the selected target maturity level for all the elements, and management and Council were satisfied with this result.

The Memorial continued its active participation in the Corporate Management Forum Insurance and Risk Management Working Group, believing that this network provides valuable support and information sharing.

Evaluation and visitor research

Evaluation Understanding the visitor experience has never been more important to the Memorial than during this past year.

The Centenary of Anzac has captured significant public interest in the First World War, while the demand for increased representation of current conflicts continues to remain important to our audience. The Memorial has endeavoured to respond to the diverse interests of its visitors through the delivery of both historic and contemporary exhibits, interpretive presentations, and commemorative events. A comprehensive program of evaluation and visitor research was undertaken in support of this.

Exhibition evaluations were conducted for:

• Australia in the Great War (First World War Galleries)

• Afghanistan: the Australian story

• Anzac voices

• Ben Quilty: after Afghanistan and Alex Seton, as of today … (joint exhibition)

Event evaluations were conducted for:

• Gallipoli 1915: a century on

Audience research and performance evaluation continued through the annual:

• General Visitor Survey 2014-15

• Café Survey (for both The Landing Place Café and Poppy’s Café)

Experiential, attitudinal, and demographic data was collected for each evaluation. The key findings provide a benchmark upon which the Memorial can gauge overall performance, and are referenced extensively throughout this report.

Prior to the official launch of the newly refurbished permanent First World War exhibition, Australia in the Great War, a remedial evaluation was undertaken to measure the impact of this exciting new gallery development against visitor expectations. Just over half (54 per cent) the surveyed respondents had visited the Memorial especially to see the new galleries, while more than 88 per cent of visitors stated that the newly refurbished galleries met or exceeded expectations. The gallery narrative is presented through traditional and emerging technologies, encouraging visitors to interact directly with the exhibition content. This aspect was a key focus of the remedial survey. The survey revealed that visitors were equally engaged (43 per cent on average made use of the technology) and inhibited (44 per cent on average did not use the technology) by the three large “touch wall” screens presented in the galleries. The soundscapes used within the galleries were well received, with 80 per cent of visitors taking the time to listen to some or all of the audio. Visitors also responded well to the smaller interactive elements, namely the digital labels, with 81 per cent of visitors accessing content on the devices. Gallery seating was most cited as an area requiring improvement.

Evaluations for the Afghanistan: the Australian story gallery continued, with 65 per cent of visitors saying that the gallery had met or exceeded their expectations. Given the ongoing relevance of the Afghanistan campaign and the need to ensure the exhibit remains up to date, the survey aimed to capture feedback relating to the delivery of content. Two-thirds (66 per cent) of visitors enjoyed hearing the personal stories of Defence personnel and civilians presented in the main audiovisual component of the exhibition. However, 18 per cent of visitors still sought further contextual information and 25 per cent felt the exhibition should have included more artefacts. The display of Ben Quilty’s works of art generated differing opinions as to the impact of this work on the exhibition.

Exit surveys were conducted for each of the special exhibitions on display throughout the year. Of the visitors surveyed for Anzac voices 73 per cent stated that the exhibition had met or exceeded their expectations. The exhibition was arranged thematically, with a focus on personal stories. Interestingly, no one theme was preferable to another; however, visitors highlighted a small selection of personal stories as the most

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interesting: Simpson and his donkey; journalist and Memorial founder Charles Bean; nurse Alice Ross-King; and the story about the Allen brothers, who were killed by the same shell in France.

Just over three-quarters (79 per cent) of surveyed visitors viewed both exhibits within the Ben Quilty: after Afghanistan and Alex Seton: as of today … exhibition, with the remaining 21 per cent viewing the Quilty display only. Some 65 per cent of visitors stated the joint exhibition had met or exceeded their expectations, while 34 per cent of visitors were surprised to learn that a number of the works of art on display were part of the Memorial’s National Collection.

An event evaluation was conducted for the international conference Gallipoli 1915: a century on, which was jointly presented by the Memorial and the Australian National University. More than 400 delegates attended the conference, and of these more than one-third (36 per cent) responded to the survey. Of these 90 per cent stated that the conference met or exceeded their expectations. Conference content and its relevance to the Centenary of Anzac was noted as the primary motivation (94 per cent) for attendance. The selection of keynote speakers also rated very highly (56 per cent) among delegates.

The Memorial’s overall performance continued to be evaluated via the General Visitor Survey. A total of 1,061 visitors responded to the survey, with 98 per cent of visitors stating that they were either “satisfied” or “very satisfied” with their visit. A fundamental shift in visitor demographics saw the Memorial reach a larger female audience than on-site in previous years (41 per cent this year compared to 39 per cent respectively for the last five years).

Visitor research The Memorial has continued to support the ongoing study On being Australian: exploring the role of Anzac museum and heritage interpretive experiences in developing visitors’ sense of national identity, conducted by the University of Queensland. This is a major study focused on understanding visitor attitudes and perceptions of how Australia’s wartime involvement has shaped our national identity. Furthermore, the study “explores the way in which generations of visitors engage with, reflect on, assimilate or reject national collective memories about the Anzac story”. As a research site, the Memorial has allowed the university to collect data from its visitors over the past year. The study commenced in 2013 and is nearing completion. Results are expected to be released in the coming year.

Visitation There is no doubt that the Memorial takes a central role in commemoration for the Australian public during the Centenary of the First World War, and visitation statistics for 2014-15 are a testament to this.

The Memorial attracted record attendance at its three major commemorative ceremonies (3,900 people were present at the Remembrance Day commemorative service; 128,700 at the Anzac Day Dawn Service; 31,500 at the Anzac Day National Ceremony); student attendance reached an all-time high (139,765 students); and general visitation to the galleries and commemorative areas continued to rise (788,471 visitors). Overall, the Memorial saw 1,142,814 people visit during 2014-15. This represents a 25 per cent increase on the previous year, and is the highest figure recorded in more than a decade (which time coincided with the official opening of Anzac Hall in 2000-01). Complete visitation statistics are highlighted in “Overall Performance against the Outcome” and throughout various sections of this report.

With such a sharp increase in on-site attendance it is fortunate that the Memorial has been able to more accurately record visitor traffic for 2014-15. During 2013-14 a new visitor-counting system (based on thermal technology) was installed at the main entrance and within select galleries. The system underwent significant auditing and calibration, and was fully functional by the start of 2014-15. As a result, the visitation statistics recorded for this year are more accurate than ever before.

Some of the Memorial’s regular visitors congregate around the National Servicemen’s Memorial.

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OUTPUT 1.11 Resource Management Management of the Memorial’s buildings and grounds, and its financial, human, and general service resources to the best advantage of external outputs.

Buildings and Services

Buildings Energy management continues to be a priority for the Memorial, and technical initiatives undertaken have maintained efficient energy consumption on the site. The refinement of the strategy for building climate control is ongoing, with emphasis still on managing temperature and humidity parameters to meet the needs of both collection material and energy efficiency. Electrical sub-meters are progressively being connected to the Building Management System (BMS) to enable a proactive response to consumption spikes. The electronic monitoring of a number of gas sub-meters for the Main Building have now been connected and BMS alarms have now been installed to advise if consumption is outside set parameters. Planning is well under way for the Main Building’s remaining gas sub-meters to also be included. The Heating Ventilation and Air-conditioning (HVAC) system of the Treloar A building, part of the Trelor Technology Centre located

in Mitchell, including the electrical switchboards, has been completely upgraded, including electronic sub-meters.

During the last six years there has been detailed consideration of the Mitchell precinct’s capacity for increased storage of the collection. In 2012 a formal plan for the development of the Mitchell precinct was completed. The plan considers the precinct footprint and the functionality of the facility, and outlines options for staged new development, as well as the renovation and/or extension of existing buildings. Additional properties now called Treloar E and Treloar F, adjacent to existing Memorial facilities at Mitchell, have been procured by the Memorial. These two purchases are integral to the long-term site development planning for the Memorial’s future growth and acquisitions. A Project Control Group has been formed to progress the next Site Development Plan cycle and to determine long-term corporate priorities.

The final stages of the accommodation and storage master plan developed in 2012-13 were implemented throughout last financial year. This plan delivers much-needed additional meeting, storage, and office space across all Memorial buildings. Work included major office refurbishment, kitchen fit-out, and collection storage upgrades within various areas of the Administration Building, Main Building, C.E.W Bean

Mr Francois Hollande, President of the French Republic, and the Honourable Tony Abbott MP, former Prime Minister of Australia, plant a French oak tree in the Memorial grounds to honour the indestructible bonds, forged in sacrifice, that unite Australia and France.

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Building, and Treloar C. Bennett and Trimble architects were engaged in May 2015 to review and update the previous accommodation plans to evaluate what has been completed, highlight immediate opportunities and investigate potential long-term planning in line with the accommodation principles and the Site Development Plans.

Several other projects were completed, including the Memorial Shop undergoing a half-life refurbishment, and a new purpose-built film studio within the C.E.W. Bean Building. A purpose-built plating area for Anzac Hall functions and catering is well under way.

Review and installation of roof height safety systems across all the Memorial buildings is also well under way, with the Administration, C.E.W. Bean, Anzac Hall, and Treloar A, B, and D buildings all upgraded to latest standards. Poppy’s Café, the Main Building, and Treloar C are next in line for review.

Grounds Grounds maintenance contracts are managed to ensure outstanding grounds presentation at all times. Detailed grounds maintenance and horticulture contracts are managed separately to ensure professional services are delivered. A specialist gardener is contracted for garden maintenance of the Commemorative Area, Eastern Precinct, and memorials and sculptures throughout the Western Precinct to ensure these locations are presented at a high standard.

An upgrade of all the Campbell sites’ irrigation system plans was carried out, with GPS coordinates installed to assist with location accuracy. Knowing exactly where all controllers, sprinklers, pipework, and isolation and solenoid valves are on-site with updated plans has many advantages. These include ease of maintenance, improved fault emergency responses to limit lawn and garden damage, and reduced repairs and costs associated with grounds projects and major event planning, including for Anzac Day.

Work on the Memorial’s Lighting Master Plan was completed prior to the 2015 centenary of the Gallipoli landings. The external lighting upgrade has greatly enhanced the appearance of the Main Building’s façade, emphasising architectural features such as the stained-glass windows and the Tomb of the Unknown Australian Soldier within the Hall of Memory while still achieving major energy savings. The Western Courtyard’s red gravel was also replaced following the installation of up-lights under the plane trees.

Several additional large power and data pits were installed this year around the forecourt and Parade Ground to support the growing infrastructure needs for events such as Anzac Day. These not only provide flexible power and data to the many service providers requiring such but have also reduced the number of generators needed on-site for large events and decreased cable infrastructure and trip hazards across roads and pathways.

A regular maintenance regime for the Lone Pine tree (Pinus halepensis) continues to assist with its longevity. A replacement pine, derived from a seed taken from the original Lone Pine tree, was planted by Their Royal Highnesses The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge on Anzac Day 2014. It is anticipated that this tree will have grown to a suitable size when the original Lone Pine tree reaches senescence. It is in a healthy state, and this is assisted by the fence and bird netting.

A French oak tree was planted outside the Western Courtyard on 19 November 2014 by Mr Francois Hollande, President of the French Republic. This tree was planted in honour of the indestructible bonds, forged in sacrifice, that unite Australia and France.

The cracked and worn bitumen road, footpath, and gutters in the Western Precinct between the Administration Building and the Main Building forecourt were all replaced to reduce trip hazards and improve aesthetics. The Parade Ground’s crushed red gravel was also replaced prior to Anzac Day 2015, greatly improving the appearance for the centenary event. Construction work commenced on the war correspondents memorial within the western Sculpture Gardens and was completed in September 2015, while planning and scheduling for further memorials within the Campbell precinct is well under way.

Security (including emergency planning) Compliance with the Protective Security Policy Framework has been an ongoing focus for the Memorial. A comprehensive security risk review was undertaken in early 2015 to ensure a strengthened focus on Memorial security arrangements, taking into consideration the increase in the national threat level.

Liaison with the Australian Federal Police (AFP) occurs for all high-profile visits and events. There is a particularly positive relationship with AFP (ACT Policing) for liaison, coordination, and the specific role it plays in relation to the Memorial’s high-profile events and ceremonies such as Anzac Day and Remembrance Day.

The secure master key system was reviewed again this year, with the existing electronic secure key system being further expanded to include National Collection stores. This has provided greater capacity for secure key storage and to improve audit and reporting capability of secure areas, including for all Treloar buildings. Electronic controlled access installations are now complete within Treloar A, Radiation Store and Chemical Store, and the Treloar C car park’s motorised gate.

All Security staff completed training for a Certificate II in Security Operations, standardising the team’s knowledge and greatly improving their understanding of the latest legislation, security practices, and procedures.

The Emergency Planning Committee met four times during 2014-15, and planning for and the conducting of emergency evacuation drills for all Memorial buildings has continued.

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Workshop services The Memorial’s workshop supports a wide range of Memorial activities, and work this year included trades support for the Ben Quilty: after Afghanistan and Alex Seton: as of today … exhibitions. Workshop staff have also been actively involved in the relocation of the First World War dioramas and their backgrounds, and have provided assistance with the installation of the First World War permanent exhibition. The workshop has also assisted with the fit-out of the new Memorial Boxes, as well as a range of building works, preparations for ceremonies, gallery maintenance, and general building and grounds maintenance works.

Mail Room Mail Room duties have continued in relation to records management, including scanning incoming mail to the electronic records management system (SharePoint) and the retrieval and rehousing of paper files. Pressure on the records management storage facility at Campbell has been alleviated by the transfer of seldom-accessed records to the Treloar D storage facility.

Mail Room security and safety is a particular focus this year, with the purchase of a Contaminated Mail Isolation Unit and a comprehensive review of all mail handling policies and procedures.

Finance

Financial planning and monitoring The Memorial has a well-established internal budget development and management process which includes oversight of a number of components to ensure corporate priorities are funded to an appropriate level. Many new projects and activities related to the Centenary of the First World War were funded from an internal reserve, with potential allocations forecast over several years to ensure adequate resourcing is available during the centenary period 2014-18.

Funding strategies were also developed for a range of capital projects planned over the next ten years, including National Collection storage, gallery refurbishments, building works, site development, software upgrades, and IT hardware replacement.

The Memorial continues to work closely with its on-site functions and catering contractor to maximise exposure and ensure the ongoing success of our popular visitor and corporate event facilities.

Regular financial reporting to management, Council, and the Department of Finance throughout the year included Memorial-wide financial results, budget review and analysis, cash balance reporting, capital management planning, and commercial operations.

The Memorial’s exhibitions were formally re-valued during 2014-15, resulting in a net increase in fair value of $4.4 million.

Financial policy The Chief Finance Officer (CFO) continued to participate in the development of whole-of-government reforms through attendance at formal working groups and developing input to key discussion papers and consultation processes, including the ongoing Public Management Reform Agenda, Performance Framework, and Cost Recovery Policy.

The CFO was also involved in activities to ensure the funding strategies for major projects and programs are achieved, including resource analysis and forecasts for projects associated with the Centenary of the First World War, and long-term accommodation and collection storage needs.

Support services and systems The Finance section provides a range of services to support Memorial activities, including accounts payable and receivable, domestic and overseas travel arrangements, budget management, procurement advice, assets management, Fringe Benefits Tax (FBT), contracts management advice, and investment management.

The section has a strong focus on the provision of high-quality procurement and contract advice, and several customised training sessions were delivered to inform staff of the key features of government policy.

Finance staff undertook training in a range of areas relating to financial management and procurement, and professional staff undertook the necessary training to maintain their CPA/ CA status.

Information Technology

Corporate systems The section supports a broad range of IT-based systems underpinning operations such as administrative, collection management, public access, gallery information and experience, retail, and online services. There is an excellent record of systems availability, achieved through dedicated attention to systems monitoring and well-planned upgrades.

The SharePoint-based electronic records management system was further consolidated and enhanced with the addition of automated workflows to achieve efficiencies and organisation-wide adoption.

The previously established service management application was extended to address service requests for both the buildings and services functions, including requests for changes to physical security controls.

Infrastructure for the delivery of the Memorial’s website was moved to a managed service on Amazon Web Services. The move has improved scale ability for periods of peak load while also addressing redundancy requirements and reducing technical support risk.

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Support was provided for a number of initiatives associated with the Centenary of the First World War, including the redevelopment of the First World War Galleries, the Roll of Honour Name Projections, and Roll of Honour Soundscape.

The MediaBin product, which provides for management of digital assets in the National Collection, was successfully upgraded and now provides improved responsiveness for users.

Videoconferencing facilities were established in two meeting rooms to improve remote interaction with clients and, in some cases, to minimise the need for travel.

ICT infrastructure The section develops and maintains a modern in-house IT platform which supports the systems referred to above.

Progress was made to address previously identified needs to converge the increasing number of IP networks. In addition to previously merged networks, such as building management, the connectivity for 130 digital gallery labels was also integrated into the Enterprise Network. Other control systems for the operation of audio delivery and the Roll of Honour Name Projections were also added.

The enterprise-wide wireless network was completed to also include outdoor coverage in the precinct of the Memorial building and the Parade Ground. Among many other benefits the wireless network is also supporting connectivity of wireless barcode scanners to enhance the tracking of collection items as they are moved.

Additional fibre cabling was installed to improve site facilities for media operators broadcasting live events and ceremonies.

The digital preservation storage repository was completely replaced due to its age and the increased storage requirements needed to accommodate the considerable volumes of data which will be generated by film digitisation (since film can no longer be preserved through film copying). Migration and verification of the existing data took longer than anticipated but was completed by early June 2015. Meanwhile, the new system provided considerable performance improvement for ingestion and retrieval of new digital objects. Current capacity is 250TB (effective), with the ability to expand as required during the expected five-year lifecycle.

A review of network security architecture was completed, as was the recommended replacement of the network’s firewall equipment. This project also addressed the need, identified by audit, for an Intrusion Protection System.

The potential of hyper-converged technology was investigated to replace the aging infrastructure which provides for the IT server virtualisation environment. This technology offers promise for reducing the management complexity and burden across a range of diverse components.

In order to generate savings the current fleet of desktop computers was retained for a fifth year of service. Planning was commenced for development of a new standardised operating environment (SOE), for deployment with new computers in early 2016.

Strategic planning and governance The Information Management Steering Group (IMSG) continued its oversight of information management and the application of technology-based systems. The previously initiated review of enterprise architecture was further progressed, revealing the complexity of inter-system data relationships, and will inform future decisions on the application of resources.

The ICT Information Security Plan was updated in accordance with audit requirements and established as a Director’s Instruction.

People management

Strategic people management/workforce planning The Memorial’s People Management Strategy identifies the following strategic workforce priorities:

• alignment of people and our business through positive performance culture

• promoting organisational health and wellbeing

• building leadership and management capability

• attracting and retaining the right people

• encouraging innovation and agility

Workforce planning will continue to evolve within the Memorial over the next few years to build and sustain a diverse workforce. This will deliver current and future business objectives and provide greater opportunity to attract, develop, and retain skilled, engaged, and committed employees.

It will allow the identification of critical capability gaps and enable the development of tailored strategies to assist in mitigating future workforce risk. This will lead to greater linkages and alignment with business to achieve the Memorial’s strategic objectives.

Workforce development The Memorial fosters a culture of professional development and enhances and supports staff expertise through a range of in-house and externally provided learning opportunities.

To coincide with the APS Commissioner’s new Performance Management Directions (effective 1 July 2015) further enhancements to the Memorial’s performance management approach saw training rolled out to all managers and supervisors to improve the quality of feedback provided to high achievers as well as underperformers across the Memorial.

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Further emphasis was also placed on enhancing capability in the area of work health and safety to support our staff within the areas of risk management, safe work methods statements, and mental health first aid.

In addition, specialist training programs, conferences, and seminars represent an important component of our learning and development strategy to support the range of expertise required within the Memorial.

The Memorial’s Studies Assistance Scheme provided support to 21 employees, enabling them to undertake formal qualifications relevant to their expertise.

People management and services Annual performance assessments continue to be an important foundation for the Memorial to manage and enhance the performance of our employees. Increased reporting of the annual assessment process is now being provided at the most senior levels of the organisation. A new Awards and Recognition Policy to ensure our high achievers are appropriately recognised is also in development.

The Workplace Relations Committee met on four occasions during the year and continues as an important forum for the agency in staff consultation, including policy development.

Enterprise bargaining towards the Memorial’s new Teamwork Agreement continued during 2014-15, with more than 14 meetings held and regular updates provided to staff. Management continues to bargain in good faith to ensure the best outcome for both the Memorial and its workforce into the future.

OUTPUT 1.12 Revenue Generation Generation of revenue in support of the Memorial’s mission and purpose.

Memorial Shop Shop revenue was $2,291,677 in 2014-15 against a target of $1,800,000. The net profit for the Memorial Shop was $435,681 before notional overhead costs.

Wage-to-sales, a key metric of shop performance, finished at 29 per cent compared to 33 per cent in the previous year. Combined transactional activity for the Shop and Orientation Gallery totalled $116,158, with the Shop’s average sale increasing by $2.83 to $23.16, an indication of the sale of higher-priced items. Net operating profit percentage finished at 19 per cent compared to 16 per cent in the previous year.

The Memorial Shop had a significant refurbishment in November which addressed traffic flow issues and provided a better shopping experience for visitors. A pop-up shop was set up outside the Second World War Galleries while the Memorial Shop was closed so visitors could still access Memorial merchandise.

The increase in sales is attributable to sales of centenary products developed by the Memorial as well as products produced under license with other suppliers, including the Royal Australian Mint, Australia Post, and a few other key partners. The centenary range included:

• 2015 Gallipoli medallion featuring one of the most prominent Gallipoli landing photos

• limited-edition medallion set

• circulating and non-circulating coins commemorating key events in Australian military history

• apparel and souvenir products featuring the First World War Centenary logo.

The Memorial launched a number of publications, including Anzac treasures: the Gallipoli collection of the Australian War Memorial by Peter Pedersen, and Lachlan Grant’s Australian soldiers in Asia-Pacific in World War II. The Memorial souvenir publications sold through the Orientation Gallery and Memorial Shop had a significant increase in sales compared with the last year and comprised four per cent of total revenue. These include the Australian War Memorial guide, A place to remember, and Hall of Memory.

e-Business The Memorial’s e-business revenue for 2014-15 was $1,536,083 against a target of $1,120,000. Revenue is generated from:

• costs associated with reproductions from the National Collection

• user fees associated with commercial use of the material

• the value of fees waived for use of materials for educational, private, or commemorative purposes

• Memorial Shop products sold online.

Given the significance of Anzac Day 2015 as the centenary of the Gallipoli landings, e-Business sales were up 170 per cent compared with the same period last year. Many documentaries were made and demand for the National Collection materials peaked over this period.

On-line Shop sales also grew 25 per cent over the previous year, with successful marketing campaigns including email newsletters, promotions through the Shop’s Facebook page, an educational resources brochure sent to all schools, and advertising in Wartime magazine.

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OUTPUT 1.13 Team Management Sections/teams are managed and administered to achieve Memorial outputs and foster equity, teamwork, and open communication.

This is a common output across the Memorial and recognises the promotion of teamwork to achieve corporate priorities. The Performance Assessment Framework is a key strategy for ensuring individual work plans are aligned with Business Plan activities.

Weekly senior management and section meetings continue to provide vehicles for effective communication across the Memorial. All-staff meetings are held periodically to provide updates from senior management on key strategic issues and major project developments. More specialist committees such as Workplace Relations, Work Health and Safety, Exhibition Planning, Emergency Planning and Evacuation, Publications Planning, Environment and Energy, and Information Management are essential forums for addressing cross-branch matters of importance.

Staff and management contributed and/or participated in community programs through fundraising activities.

The Memorial’s Employee Assistance Program, which provides counselling and support to staff and immediate family members, was accessed by only a small number of staff. The majority of matters referred to this service were of a non-work related nature.

An indicator of the effectiveness of teamwork at the Memorial is the willingness of staff to contribute to major events such as Anzac Day and Remembrance Day. The contribution made by staff, especially to the 2015 Anzac Day commemorative services, was exceptional and fundamental to the success of those events. This cross-organisational contribution is good for building teamwork across all areas of the Memorial.

The dedication of staff and commitment to achieving corporate priorities as approved in the Business Plan is very much appreciated by senior management and Council.

Authors Dr John Connor and Professor David Horner with Director Dr Brendan Nelson at the launch of their book The good international citizen, volume III of the Official history of peacekeeping, humanitarian and post-Cold War operations.

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ACCOUNTABILITY

Legislation, Functions, and Powers

Enabling legislation The Australian War Memorial is established as a corporation by the Australian War Memorial Act 1980 (the Act). The functions of the Memorial and the powers of the Memorial, the Minister, the Council, the Chair, and the Director are outlined in the Act.

Functions of the Memorial The functions of the Memorial are detailed in subsection 5(1) of the Act. They are:

(a) to maintain and develop the national memorial referred to in subsection 6(1) of the Australian War Memorial Act 1980 as a national memorial to Australians who have died:

(i) on or as a result of active service; or

(ii) as a result of any war or warlike operations in which Australians have been on active service;

(b) to develop and maintain, as an integral part of the national memorial referred to in paragraph (a), a National Collection of historical material;

(c) to exhibit, or to make available for exhibition by others, historical material from the memorial collection or historical material that is otherwise in the possession of the Memorial;

(d) to conduct, arrange for, and assist research into matters pertaining to Australian military history; and

(e) to disseminate information relating to:

(i) Australian military history;

(ii) the national memorial referred to in paragraph (a);

(iii) the memorial collection; and

(iv) the Memorial and its functions.

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This wooden gravemarker was made by the mates of Gunner Frederick Priddle, who was killed in action at Pozières, France, in 1916. The cross was recovered by Priddle’s father after the war. RELAWM12223

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Powers of the Memorial The powers of the Memorial are detailed in section 6 of the Act. They are:

to do all things necessary or convenient to be done for or in connection with the performance of its functions, including the power:

(a) to purchase, take on hire, accept as a gift, or take on deposit or loan historical material;

(b) to lend or hire out or otherwise deal with (other than by way of disposal) historical material;

(c) to accept gifts, devises, bequests, or assignments made to the Memorial, whether on trust or otherwise, and whether unconditionally or subject to a condition, to act as a trustee or to comply with the condition, as the case may be;

(d) to collect and make available (whether in writing or in any other form and whether by sale or otherwise) information relating to Australian military history;

(e) to make available (whether by sale or otherwise) reproductions, replicas, or other representations (whether in writing or in any other form) of historical material;

(f) to make available (whether in writing or in any other form and whether by sale or otherwise) information relating to the Memorial and its functions;

(g) to provide facilities to stimulate interest in Australian military history;

(h) to assist educational institutions in matters relating to Australian military history;

(j) to train members of the staff of the Memorial, and other such persons as the Council approves, in developing, caring for, and undertaking research in relation to the Memorial collection;

(k) to assist, on request, in the creation and maintenance of military museums in Defence Force establishments;

(m) to occupy, use, and control any land or building owned or held under lease by the Commonwealth and made available to the Memorial under section 7;

(n) to erect buildings;

(o) to purchase or take on hire, or to accept as a gift or on deposit or loan, and to dispose of or otherwise deal with furnishing, equipment, and other goods;

(p) to act as trustee of monies or other property vested in the Memorial on trust; and

(q) to act on behalf of the Commonwealth or of an authority of the Commonwealth in the administration of a trust relating to historical material or related matters.

Responsible Minister The Minister for Veterans’ Affairs has portfolio responsibility for the Memorial. Senator the Honourable Michael Ronaldson was the minister responsible for the Memorial for 2014-15.

Powers of the Minister The Minister has the following powers under the Act:

(a) to make available to the Memorial for the purposes of the Memorial land owned or held under lease by the Commonwealth, and any building, structure or other improvements on that land [subsection 7(1)];

(b) on behalf of the Commonwealth, to make arrangements, in writing, with the Memorial for:

(i) the transfer of the ownership of historical material from the Commonwealth to the Memorial for the purpose of inclusion of the material in the Memorial’s collection;

(ii) the deposit in the custody of the Memorial of historical material owned by the Commonwealth; and

(iii) the transfer to the Memorial of the ownership of, or the deposit in the custody of the Memorial of, such other goods or equipment owned by the Commonwealth as he or she considers to be of use to the Memorial, upon such terms and conditions as are specified in the arrangement [subsection 7(2)].

(c) to approve the disposal of historical material if the value of that material exceeds $5,000 [subsection 8(4)];

(d) to approve the appointment of a deputy to a member of Council [subsection 12(1)];

(e) to convene a meeting of Council at any time [subsection 17(2)];

(f) to grant leave of absence to the Director [section 23];

(g) to appoint a person to act in place of the Director, determine terms and conditions of the appointment, and terminate such an appointment [section 26];

(h) to approve contracts under which the Memorial is to pay or receive:

(i) in the case of historical material, an amount exceeding $250,000*; or

(ii) in any other case an amount exceeding $150,000* [section 35]; and

(i) to delegate his or her powers under the Act [section 39].

* Note: the financial limits in this clause were amended by a Regulation to $1,000,000 for both historical material and any other case.

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Internal and External Audits

Internal audit The Memorial’s internal audit services are outsourced to PricewaterhouseCoopers.

The Internal Audit Plan 2014-15 was approved by Council in May 2014 and work was completed as follows:

• Risk management review of major events planning and management

• Work health and safety management and compliance

• Review of collection management - high-risk items

The reviews resulted in no major concerns or weaknesses being identified. Minor recommended actions have been addressed or incorporated into the 2015-16 Business Plan.

The Internal Audit Plan 2015-16 was approved by Council in May 2015. The new plan will include:

• Review of collection management in the Research Centre

• Review and update of the Fraud Risk Assessment and Fraud Control Plan

• Review of collection management - high-value and high-risk items

• Review of IT security and infrastructure

• Review of systems, controls, and procedures to manage staff entitlements

External audit The audit of the 2014-15 Financial Statements was undertaken by Ernst & Young on behalf of the ANAO and resulted in a favourable report and unqualified audit certificate. The ANAO audit certificate for the Memorial’s 2014-15 Financial Statements is at page 68.

Fraud Control As required by the Commonwealth Fraud Control Guidelines 2011, the Memorial implements practices and procedures for effective fraud control. During 2014-15 the Memorial implemented the prevention, detection, and reporting procedures and processes as outlined in the Memorial’s Fraud Control Plan 2014-17, which is based on the Fraud Risk Assessment undertaken in December 2010. All reasonable measures were taken to minimise the incidence of fraud at the Memorial.

The Memorial has identified one significant fraud risk. It relates to the potential loss of collection items in storage. The strategies in place to manage this risk include:

• continuous improvements to the stocktake program;

• adherence to collection movement and security plans;

• high-quality security arrangements with controlled access; and

• continual pursuit of funding to ensure regular improvements to storage area security systems and stocktake procedures.

There were no fraud incidents reported during 2014-15.

An enterprise-wide Fraud Risk Assessment was undertaken in January 2014 and the Fraud Control Plan was updated for 2014-17. One significant fraud risk was identified - the misuse of entitlements including leave, flex, and time off in lieu. The Head of Human Resources is responsible for ensuring controls are in place and for reporting against them every six months. Controls include:

• a formal leave approval process in place;

• reconciliation of staff absences to leave applications submitted;

• timely updating of leave records;

• managers/supervisors are supported to proactively manage staff flex leave balances; and

• regular undertaking of reviews for spot audits and controls for leave and entitlements.

Effects of Ministerial Directions Government policy order under section 22 of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 Under section 22 of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 Council must ensure that the Memorial complies with the Government Policy Order to the extent that the Order applies to the authority. There are no General Policy Orders currently in effect.

Indemnities and Insurance Premiums The total insurance premium for 2014-15 was $278,762.65 (excluding GST), which remained relatively steady when compared to the premium for 2013-14. This figure includes the benchmarking discount of $24,042.75. The policy provided comprehensive cover for property and general liability (including professional indemnity), with the premiums being $161,531.97 and $140,383.78 respectively. Council members are provided with indemnity insurance through directors’ and officers’ liability cover.

Legal Actions There were no legal actions taken against the Memorial during 2014-15.

Ombudsman No issues were raised with the Ombudsman during 2014-15.

Social Justice and Equity The Memorial is committed to social justice and equity and aims to provide a high level of public access to its physical grounds, commemorative ceremonies, and public programs designed to increase understanding of the Australian experience of war and its impact on Australian society. The Memorial undertakes regular research studies to ensure it is

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informed on the changing needs of its diverse national and international audience.

The Memorial identifies audience groups and specific needs through varied and dedicated visitor research and evaluation. The Memorial regularly surveys its visitors to identify and monitor how well needs are being met. Results for 2014-15 indicate:

• About 3.4 per cent of the Memorial’s general visitors have a disability.

• The Memorial’s facilities and services for disabled visitors and their carers were rated very highly by those who used them (88 per cent rating of very satisfied).

• Among the visitors who used facilities and services for people with disabilities, the following proportions gave a rating of satisfied or very satisfied:

• 98 per cent - mobility-impaired access into the building (remains consistent with ratings from 2013-14)

• 97 per cent - mobility-impaired access within galleries and between floors (down from 98 per cent)

• 90 per cent - accessible toilets (remains consistent with ratings from 2013-14)

• 81 per cent - free wheelchairs and walkers (down from 90 per cent)

• 93 per cent - mobility-impaired parking (up from 84 per cent)

• These findings indicate that satisfaction with most disabled facilities and services, with the exception of the provision of free equipment (e.g. walking aids), has increased or remained consistent when compared to the previous year. The percentage of Australian visitors identifying as Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander people (three per cent of the Australian population) increased to 1.5 per cent (up from one per cent). Indigenous Australians were just as satisfied (100 per cent positive satisfaction rating) by their visit to the Memorial as non-Indigenous Australians (99 per cent positive satisfaction rating).

• About 28 per cent of Australian visitors were born overseas - a slightly higher proportion than that found in the Australian population (27.7 per cent). As in previous years, satisfaction levels remained equal for all Australian visitors regardless of their country of birth.

• About 17 per cent of Australian visitors speak a language other than English at home (up from 15 per cent), a lower percentage than that found in the Australian population (19 per cent). Those Australians who spoke solely English at home were more likely to be very satisfied (85 per cent) with their visit than those visitors who spoke another language at home (75 per cent).

Advertising and Market Research Expenditure In accordance with section 311A of the Commonwealth Electoral Act 1918, the following is a summary of amounts paid by the Memorial to advertising agencies, market research organisations, and media advertising organisations. As required, particulars of payments of less than $10,000 have not been included. The Memorial did not pay for the services of any polling or direct mail organisations.

Name Services provided Amount paid

WIN Television NSW Pty Ltd General Memorial advertising

$83,838.00

Prime Media Group Limited

General Memorial advertising $57,170.00

Fairfax Media General Memorial

advertising $42,772.39

Southern Cross Austereo

General Memorial advertising $42,264.00

Wingrove Design General Memorial advertising $32,940.00

Mediaheads General Memorial

advertising $30,000.00

oOH! Media Pty Limited

General Memorial advertising $27,784.00

Hardie Grant Magazines

General Memorial advertising $22,750.00

Canberra FM Radio Pty Ltd

General Memorial advertising $10,180.00

Nationwide News Pty Ltd

General Memorial advertising $10,000.00

Val Morgan & Co. (Aust.) Pty Ltd

General Memorial advertising $10,000.00

Seek Recruitment advertising $3,275.00

Advertising expenditure $369,698.39

Market research expenditure Nil

Total $369,698.39

Freedom of Information Act 1982 The Memorial publishes a broad range of information on its website in compliance with the Information Publication Scheme (IPS), which was established under Part 2 of the Freedom of Information Act 1982 and commenced on 1 May 2011. The Memorial’s IPS entry can be accessed at: http:// www.awm.gov.au/about/information-publication-scheme.

As part of its IPS entry, the Memorial publishes an Agency Plan on its website, available at: http://www.awm.gov.au/about/ AWM-IPS_Agency_Plan.pdf.

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The purpose of the Memorial’s Agency Plan is to show what information the Memorial proposes to publish, how and to whom the information will be made available, and how the Memorial will otherwise comply with the IPS requirements.

Categories of documents The Memorial has custody of four categories of documents which are treated differently for the purposes of the Freedom of Information Act 1982 (the FOI Act).

The four categories are:

(a) Administrative files and papers relating to all aspects of the Memorial’s functions. These are subject to the FOI Act, and charges relating to the provision of these are applied and calculated in accordance with the nature and extent of the request.

(b) Items in the Memorial collection within the meaning of the Australian War Memorial Act 1980, other than documents placed in the Memorial collection by any agency. By virtue of subsection 13(1) of the FOI Act, these are not deemed to be documents of an agency, and therefore are not subject to the provisions of the FOI Act. They are, however, made available to the public as part of the Memorial’s public reference facility.

(c) Items in the Memorial collection, within the meaning of the Australian War Memorial Act 1980, that have been placed in the collection by or on behalf of an agency. By virtue of subsection 13(2) of the FOI Act these are deemed for the purposes of the FOI Act to be in the possession of the agency that placed them in the Memorial collection. Access to these documents under the FOI Act is through the controlling agency.

(d) Commonwealth records owned by other agencies but in the custody of the Memorial. These are documents of the controlling agency and access to them under the FOI Act is through that agency.

Facilities for access The Memorial caters for public access to its collections, with reading rooms and staff available to assist with reference inquiries. The Memorial’s Research Centre specialises in the provision of public reference services. The facilities are available to any member of the public having gained approval for access to documents under the FOI Act. The access point at which members of the public may make inquiries on Freedom of Information (FOI) matters, submit formal requests for access to documents, or inspect documents to which access has been granted, is given below. The access point is open for business from 8.30 am to 4.51 pm, Monday to Friday (excluding public holidays). Information about access for people with disabilities can be obtained by contacting the FOI officer at the access point given below.

FOI procedures and initial contact points Enquiries may be made in writing, by telephone, or in person at the official FOI access point given below. It is suggested that enquirers provide a contact telephone number.

Reception Desk Australian War Memorial Treloar Crescent CAMPBELL ACT 2612

or

GPO Box 345 CANBERRA ACT 2601 Tel: (02) 6243 4290

If difficulty arises within the Memorial in identifying a document or in providing access in the form requested, an officer of the Memorial will contact the applicant with a view to resolving the difficulty. In consultation with applicants, documents will be made available as follows:

(a) by mail to an address specified by the applicant;

(b) at the official FOI access point; or

(c) at the information access office located within the regional office of the National Archives of Australia nearest to the applicant’s normal place of residence.

Officers authorised to make decisions under the Freedom of Information Act 1982 The classification and designation of officers authorised to approve and deny access to documents, to impose charges, and to remit charges and application fees under the FOI Act and FOI (Charges) Regulations are set out below:

Assistant Director and Branch Head National Collection Senior Executive Band 1

Assistant Director and Branch Head Public Programs Senior Executive Band 1

Assistant Director and Branch Head Corporate Services Senior Executive Band 1

Executive Officer Corporate Services Australian Public Service Class 6

Executive Officer National Collection Australian Public Service Class 6

Executive Officer Public Programs Australian Public Service Class 6

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The classification and designation of officers authorised to conduct an internal review under section 54 of the FOI Act are set out below:

Assistant Director and Branch Head National Collection Senior Executive Band 1

Assistant Director and Branch Head Public Programs Senior Executive Band 1

Assistant Director and Branch Head Corporate Services Senior Executive Band 1

Freedom of Information Act 1982, statistics 2014-15 In 2014-15 the Memorial received three requests for access to documents under the FOI Act. One request was granted in part, with all charges waived. No documents were found for one request and one was deemed to be exempt. The matter referred to the Administration Appeals Tribunal in the previous year was finalised in February 2015.

FOI Statistics Summary 2014-15

Received Granted in full Granted in part No documents found Withdrawn Exempt Refused on resource grounds

3 0 1 1 0 1 0

Environmental Protection and Biodiversity Conservation (EPBC) Act 1999, Section 516A Statement In accordance with section 516A of the Environmental Protection and Biodiversity Conservation (EPBC) Act 1999 (the EPBC Act), Australian government agencies are required to include in their annual reports information detailing the environmental performance of the organisation and the organisation’s contribution to ecologically sustainable development. This remains a key objective for the Memorial and is being applied to the development of plans for the enhancement and ongoing maintenance of the Memorial’s buildings and its operations. The Memorial does not administer any legislation nor does it have any appropriation directly related to the principles of environmental sustainability and development. Accordingly, the Memorial’s involvement relates to environmental practices within the Memorial. Social and equitable practices are included in the Memorial’s Teamwork Agreement 2011-14 and will be included in the next Teamwork Agreement, which is currently being negotiated.

Energy consumption and environmental management Consumption of electricity, gas, and water continues to be monitored closely and is a priority for the Memorial, with gas and electricity consumption remaining close to trend. The refinement of the control strategy for building climate control is ongoing, with emphasis still on managing temperature and humidity parameters to efficiently achieve both material conservation and energy efficiency needs.

Work on the Memorial’s Lighting Master Plan was completed in time for Anzac Day 2015 and has greatly enhanced the Main Building’s façade appearance, emphasising its architectural features while still achieving major energy savings compared to those existing currently.

Other energy-saving initiatives undertaken include the electronic monitoring of a number of gas sub-meters for the Main Building. Following on from the electronic monitoring of both gas and electricity meters in the Main Building, alarms have now been installed to advise if consumption is outside set parameters. Planning is well underway for the Main Building’s

Visitors remember their friends and families during the annual Aged Care wreathlaying ceremony. The Memorial holds many such ceremonies, small and large, throughout the year.

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remaining gas sub-meters to also be included. The Heating Ventilation and Air-conditioning (HVAC) system of the Treloar A building, including the electrical switchboards, has been completely upgraded. Included in this upgrade are electronic sub-meters, which are scheduled to be attached to the Building Management System to allow a proactive response to any consumption spikes. Fine-tuning of the new system continues.

The recycling of paper, cardboard, glass, plastic bottles, toner cartridges, and fluorescent tubes in the administration areas continues. The provision of recycling facilities for public events in the Memorial’s grounds, including Anzac Day and Remembrance Day, is ongoing. In addition, the recycling of old display lighting in the Memorial’s Main Building has commenced.

The replacement of gallery lighting with more energy-efficient lighting is ongoing, with electricity savings beginning to be realised.

Heritage management The Memorial’s endorsed Heritage Management Plan (HMP) continues to guide management of the Memorial’s heritage precinct and, when required, heritage specialists continue to provide advice in regard to proposed building works in heritage-sensitive areas.

Bird-deterrent installations used around the Main Building continue to be refined.

Ongoing maintenance of the Memorial building fabric continues and includes minor repairs to the stonework and the implementation of a stonework-cleaning regime. This in turn includes the application of a biocide to reduce fungal and algal growth.

Other general heritage conservation activities undertaken include regular conservation and cleaning of key sculptural elements. Before Anzac Day a major clean of sculptures and plinths was undertaken. This was in addition to a clean of the stonework in the Commemorative Area and the Main Building tower, and general cleaning of the stone façade of the Memorial’s Main Building.

In order to assist with its longevity, regular maintenance of the Lone Pine tree (Pinus halepensis) continues. The new Lone Pine tree, planted by Their Royal Highnesses The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge on Anzac Day 2014, remains in a healthy state, assisted by the fence and bird netting. It is anticipated that this tree will have developed significantly when the original tree reaches senescence.

Work Health and Safety

Executive commitment The Memorial is committed to safeguarding the health and safety of its employees, workers, and visitors by providing and maintaining a safe working environment. The Memorial aims to eliminate all preventable work-related injuries and illnesses through systematic management. Furthermore, the Memorial is committed to supporting and promoting the holistic wellbeing of its employees. In 2014 the Memorial completed a Work Health and Safety System Audit, and system improvements have been integrated into a 2015-16 Work Health and Safety Improvement Plan. In addition, the Senior Management Group attended a due diligence briefing in order to increase skills and capabilities in work health and safety.

Work Health and Safety Committee The Work Health and Safety Committee meets four times per year and assists the Memorial in developing, implementing, and reviewing measures designed to protect the health and safety of our workers and visitors. The committee is made up of worker and management representatives, and provides one of the key consultation mechanisms with workers in accordance with relevant legislation.

The Memorial’s work health and safety function is managed through human resources, with assistance from professional experts who provide advice to the committee, assist with hazard and incident investigations and case management, and provide relevant training as required. In 2014 a program was conducted across the Memorial for the re-election of health and safety representatives.

Health and Wellbeing Program The Memorial promotes health awareness among its employees by delivering an annual Health and Wellbeing Program. This is focused on health and lifestyle initiatives to create positive health changes for workers. Employee consultation is a key element of the program and staff participated in a Health and Wellbeing Survey in June 2015 to assist with development of the 2015-16 Program. This year programs included staff workshops to inform the development of a work health and safety framework, with particular emphasis on mental health and wellbeing. To support this framework, ongoing programs of mental health awareness for managers and supervisors, and mental health first aid for Security and Front of House staff, were also implemented. The aim of these programs is to increase our agility and resilience as an organisation and validate the unique working environment of the Memorial.

Other programs included quit smoking sessions and flu vaccinations.

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Ongoing initiatives In 2015 the Memorial implemented a program of training workshops on risk assessment and safe work method statements for managers, supervisors, and staff. This program is part of the Work Health and Safety Improvement Plan, with an enhanced focus on documented safety risk management and contractor management.

First aid officers are located throughout the Memorial buildings to ensure immediate assistance is available when required. Emergency response support has also been enhanced with additional cardiac defibrillators purchased for the Campbell and Mitchell sites.

The Memorial has a no-tolerance approach to bullying and harassment. The Memorial also has a number of contacts available should an employee or manager require advice regarding an instance of bullying or harassment. These include harassment contact officers across all business areas and the Employee Assistance Program. The Memorial addresses formal and informal allegations of bullying or harassment promptly and sensitively.

Outcome measures The Memorial has maintained a focus on prompt reporting and management of accidents and incidents. Implementation of an early intervention program has delivered increased support for employees and has shown improved injury recovery rates. Implementation of enhanced early intervention and hazard identification and risk assessment processes is under way and aims to recognise cost benefits going forward.

No directions or notices under the Work Health and Safety Act 2011 were given to the Memorial.

The Research Centre’s Jennifer Milward assists a client with family research in the Memorial’s Reading Room. Memorial staff regularly assist members of the public with enquires relating to family history, military history, and collection material.

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REPORT BY THE AUDITOR-GENERAL AND FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

The embroidered cross-belt pouch of an officer of the New South Wales Volunteer Artillery, c. 1880-1900. REL/06911

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Note 2015 2014

$ $

EXPENSES Employee benefits 4A 23 329 252 25 537 528

Supplier 4B 24 488 163 18 535 551

Depreciation and amortisation 4C 19 824 597 18 892 459

Write-down and impairment of assets 4D 60 531 5 364

Losses from asset sales 6 761 20 707

Total expenses 67 709 304 62 991 609

OWN-SOURCE INCOME Own-source revenue

Sale of goods and rendering of services 5A 4 975 521 4 361 496

Interest from deposits 2 558 612 3 061 152

Resources received free of charge 5B 796 508 1 093 073

Donations and sponsorships 5C 10 819 872 3 418 534

Other revenue 5D 380 666 213 398

Total own-source revenue 19 531 179 12 147 653

Gains

Gains from sale of assets 65 296 -

Total gains 65 296 -

Total own-source income 19 596 475 12 147 653

Net cost of services 48 112 829 50 843 956

Revenue from Government 5E 44 008 000 40 900 000

(Deficit) Surplus (4 104 829) (9 943 956)

OTHER COMPREHENSIVE INCOME Items not subject to subsequent reclassification to profit or loss

Changes in asset revaluation surplus 4 423 109 16 901 015

Total other comprehensive income 4 423 109 16 901 015

Total comprehensive income 3 318 280 6 957 059

STATEMENT OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME for the period ended 30 June 2015

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

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Note 2015 2014

$ $

ASSETS Financial assets

Cash and cash equivalents 7A 7 109 567 5 709 642

Trade and other receivables 7B 1 045 213 1 278 269

Investments 7C 61 000 000 67 000 000

Accrued interest 1 190 859 1 513 097

Total financial assets 70 345 639 75 501 008

Non-financial assets

Land and buildings 8A, F 143 489 809 139 869 189

Property, plant and equipment 8B, F 5 679 510 5 026 042

Heritage and cultural assets 8C, F 1 018 562 197 1 020 279 755

Exhibitions 8D, F 42 574 569 28 361 649

Intangibles 8E, F 4 664 104 4 949 241

Inventories 734 047 819 668

Prepayments 8G 656 804 1 158 581

Total non-financial assets 1 216 361 040 1 200 464 125

Total assets 1 286 706 679 1 275 965 133

LIABILITIES Payables

Suppliers 9A 1 480 724 3 169 776

Other payables 9B 1 025 710 1 151 434

Total payables 2 506 434 4 321 210

Provisions

Employee provisions 10A 9 004 486 9 210 445

Total provisions 9 004 486 9 210 445

Total liabilities 11 510 920 13 531 655

NET ASSETS 1 275 195 759 1 262 433 478

EQUITY Contributed equity 96 152 000 83 708 000

Asset revaluation reserves 620 479 581 616 056 472

Retained surplus 558 564 178 562 669 006

Total equity 1 275 195 759 1 262 433 478

STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL POSITION as at 30 June 2015

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

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STATEMENT OF CHANGES IN EQUITY

for the period ended 30 June 2015

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

Retained earnings Asset revaluation surplus Contributed equity/capital Total equity

2015 2014 2015 2014 2015 2014 2015 2014

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

Opening balance 1 July

Balance carried forward from previous period

562 669 006 572 612 962 616 056 472 599 155 457 83 708 000 58 450 000 1 262 433 478 1 230 218 419

Adjusted opening balance 562 669 006 572 612 962 616 056 472 599 155 457 83 708 000 58 450 000 1 262 433 478 1 230 218 419

Comprehensive income

Surplus (Deficit) for the period (4 104 829) (9 943 956) - - - - (4 104 829) (9 943 956)

Other comprehensive income - - 4 423 109 16 901 015 - - 4 423 109 16 901 015

Total comprehensive income attributable to the Australian Government (4 104 829) (9 943 956) 4 423 109 16 901 015 - - 318 280 6 957 059

Transactions with owners

Contributions by owners

Equity injection - - - - 12 444 000 25 258 000 12 444 000 25 258 000

Total transactions with owners - - - - 12 444 000 25 258 000 12 444 000 25 258 000

Closing balance as at 30 June 558 564 178 562 669 006 620 479 581 616 056 472 96 152 000 83 708 000 1 275 195 759 1 262 433 478

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Note 2015 2014

$ $

OPERATING ACTIVITIES Cash received

Receipts from Government 44 008 000 40 900 000

Sales of goods and rendering of services 4 728 249 4 217 294

Interest 2 880 850 2 778 488

Net GST received 3 658 040 3 278 957

Donations and sponsorships 10 331 171 3 210 384

Other 266 931 213 398

Total cash received 65 873 241 54 598 521

Cash used

Employees (23 439 211) (24 766 320)

Suppliers (28 140 412) (20 057 764)

Total cash used (51 579 623) (44 824 084)

Net cash from operating activities 11 14 293 618 9 774 437

INVESTING ACTIVITIES Cash received

Proceeds from sales of property, plant and equipment 65 296 2 210

Investments 89 000 000 81 500 000

Total cash received 89 065 296 81 502 210

Cash used

Purchase of property, plant, equipment and intangibles (31 402 990) (30 697 602)

Investments (83 000 000) (82 500 000)

Total cash used (114 402 990) (113 197 602)

Net cash used by investing activities (25 337 693) (31 695 392)

FINANCING ACTIVITIES Cash received

Contributed equity 12 444 000 25 258 000

Total cash received 12 444 000 25 258 000

Net cash from financing activities 12 444 000 25 258 000

Net (decrease)/increase in cash held 1 399 925 3 337 045

Cash and cash equivalents at the beginning of the reporting period 5 709 642 2 372 597

Cash and cash equivalents at the end of the reporting period 7A 7 109 567 5 709 642

CASH FLOW STATEMENT for the period ended 30 June 2015

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

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The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

SCHEDULE OF COMMITMENTS as at 30 June 2015

Note 2015 2014

$ $

By type Commitments receivable Rental income (806 438) -

Sponsorship (591 130) (3 269 264)

Grants (5 855 674) -

Other receivables (643 098) -

GST recoverable on commitments (322 292) (2 319 452)

Total commitments receivable (8 218 632) (5 588 716)

Commitments payable Capital commitments 1.18

Land and buildings 68 612 397 820

Infrastructure plant and equipment - 52 701

Exhibitions 109 849 6 098 907

Intangibles 46 750 -

National Collection 1 859 888 1 663 056

Total capital commitments 2 085 099 8 212 484

Other commitments Operating leases 1.18 150 424 1 159 644

Project commitments 19 275 2 644 760

Other 9 186 760 16 766 350

Total other commitments 9 356 459 20 570 754

Total commitments payable 11 441 558 28 783 238

Net commitments by type 3 222 926 23 194 522

By maturity Commitments receivable Within one year (3 636 129) (3 217 950)

From one to five years (4 453 838) (2 370 766)

More than five years (128 665) -

Total commitments receivable (8 218 632) (5 588 716)

Commitments payable Capital commitments Within one year 495 714 6 480 548

From one to five years 174 059 1 731 936

More than five years 1 415 326 -

Total capital commitments 2 085 099 8 212 484

Operating lease commitments Within one year 92 440 653 593

From one to five years 57 984 506 051

More than five years - -

Total operating lease commitments 150 424 1 159 644

Other commitments

Within one year 4 624 238 17 244 572

From one to five years 4 581 797 2 166 538

More than five years - -

Total other commitments 9 206 035 19 411 110

Total commitments payable 11 441 558 28 783 238

Net commitments by maturity 3 222 926 23 194 522

Commitments are GST inclusive where relevant.

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NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS For the period ended 30 June 2015

Index to the notes to and forming part of the financial statements

Note Description

1 Summary of Significant Accounting Policies

2 Events After the Reporting Period

3 Net Cash Appropriation Arrangements

4 Expenses

5 Income

6 Fair Value Measurement

7 Financial Assets

8 Non-Financial Assets

9 Payables

10 Provisions

11 Cash Flow Reconciliation

12 Contingent Assets

13 Senior Management Remuneration

14 Related Party Disclosures

15 Remuneration of Auditors

16 Financial Instruments

17 Financial Assets Reconciliation

18 Assets Held in Trust

19 Reporting of Outcomes

20 Budget Reports and Explanations of Major Variances

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NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS For the period ended 30 June 2015

1. SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES

1.1 Objectives of the Memorial The Memorial was established by section 4 of the Australian War Memorial Act 1980 and is a not-for-profit Australian government controlled entity.

The objective and outcome of the Memorial is to assist Australians in remembering, interpreting, and understanding the Australian experience of war and its enduring impact through maintaining and developing the National Memorial, its collection and exhibition of historical material, commemorative ceremonies and research.

The continued existence of the Memorial in its present form and with its present programs is dependent on government policy and on continued funding by parliament for the Memorial’s administration and programs.

1.2 Basis of preparation of the Financial Statements The financial statements are general purpose financial statements and are required by section 42 of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013.

The financial statements have been prepared in accordance with:

• Financial Reporting Rule (FRR) for reporting periods ending on or after 1 July 2014; and

• Australian Accounting Standards and Interpretations issued by the Australian Accounting Standards Board (AASB) that apply for the reporting period.

The financial statements have been prepared on an accrual basis and are in accordance with the historical cost convention, except for certain assets and liabilities at fair value. Except where stated, no allowance is made for the effect of changing prices on the results or the financial position.

The financial statements are presented in Australian dollars and where specified, some values are rounded to the nearest thousand.

Unless an alternative treatment is specifically required by an accounting standard or the FRR, assets and liabilities are recognised in the statement of financial position when and only when it is probable that future economic benefits will flow to the Memorial, or a future sacrifice of economic benefits will be required and the amounts of the assets or liabilities can be reliably measured. However, assets and liabilities arising under executory contracts are not recognised unless required by an accounting standard. Liabilities and assets that are unrecognised are reported in the Schedule of Commitments or at Note 12.

Unless an alternative treatment is specifically required by an accounting standard, income and expenses are recognised in the statement of comprehensive income, when and only when the flow, consumption, or loss of economic benefits has occurred and can be reliably measured.

1.3 Significant accounting judgements and estimates In the process of applying the accounting policies listed in this note, the Memorial has made the following judgements that have the most significant impact on the amounts recorded in the financial statements:

• The fair value of the National Collection is considered to be market selling price (where such a market exists), or depreciated replacement cost, taking into consideration the intrinsic value of historically significant objects. Owing to the size of the National Collection, a representative sample of all major categories is selected, valued and extrapolated to determine a total fair value.

• The fair value of land and buildings is considered to be the market value of similar assets, taking into account the heritage aspects of the buildings where appropriate, and using depreciated replacement cost if no active market is identified.

• The Memorial’s primary liability, employee provisions, includes an estimation component in respect of long-term employee benefits measured as the present value of estimated future cash outflows.

No accounting assumptions and estimates have been identified that have a significant risk of causing a material adjustment to carrying amounts of assets and liabilities within the next accounting period.

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NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS For the period ended 30 June 2015

1.4 New accounting standards

Adoption of new Australian Accounting Standard requirements No accounting standard has been adopted earlier than the application date as stated in the standard.

The following new standards were issued by the Australian Accounting Standards Board (AASB) prior to the sign-off date, which are not expected to have a financial impact on the Memorial. They are disclosed to provide users with information about the main requirements:

• AASB 15 Revenue from Contracts with Customers (issued December 2014)

The AASB has issued new standard AASB 15. This new Standard requires reporting about the nature, amount, timing, and uncertainty of revenue and cash flows arising from a contract with a customer. The new Standard applies to reporting periods beginning on or after 1 January 2017.

The following revised and amending standards were issued by the AASB, which are relevant to the Memorial and are not expected to have a financial impact for future reporting periods. They are disclosed to provide users with information about the main requirements:

• AASB 9 Financial Instruments (issued December 2014)

This Standard incorporates the classification and measurement requirements for financial liabilities, the recognition and derecognition requirements for financial instruments and the classification and measurement requirements for financial assets. The changes will apply to reporting periods beginning on or after 1 January 2018.

• AASB 2015-2 Amendments to Australian Accounting Standards - Disclosure Initiative: Amendments to AASB 101 (AASB 7, 101, 134 and 1049) (issued January 2015)

This Standard amends AASB 101 to provide clarification regarding the disclosure requirements in AASB 101. The Standard proposes to address concerns about existing presentation and disclosure requirements and to allow entities to use judgement when applying a Standard in determining what information to disclose in their financial statements. The changes will apply to reporting periods beginning on or after 1 January 2016.

All other new standards, revised standards, interpretations and amending standards that were issued prior to the sign-off date and are applicable to future reporting periods are not expected to have a future financial impact on the Memorial.

1.5 Revenue Revenue from the sale of goods is recognised when:

• the risks and rewards of ownership have been transferred to the buyer;

• the Memorial retains no managerial involvement in or effective control over the goods;

• the revenue and transaction costs incurred can be reliably measured; and

• it is probable that the economic benefits associated with the transaction will flow to the Memorial.

Revenue from rendering of services is recognised by reference to the stage of completion of contracts at the reporting date. The revenue is recognised when:

• the amount of revenue, stage of completion and transaction costs incurred can be reliably measured; and

• the probable economic benefits associated with the transaction will flow to the Memorial.

The stage of completion of contracts at the reporting date is determined by reference to the proportion that costs incurred to date bear to the estimated total costs of the transaction.

Receivables for goods and services, which have 30-day terms, are recognised at the nominal amounts due less any impairment allowance account. Collectability of debts is reviewed at the end of the reporting period. Allowances are made when collectability of the debt is no longer probable.

Project-specific sponsorship funding which meets the requirements of a contribution in accordance with AASB 1004 Contributions is recorded as revenue when the Memorial obtains control of the contribution or right to receive the contribution, it is probable that the economic benefits comprising the contribution will flow to the Memorial, and the amount can be measured reliably.

Interest revenue is recognised using the effective interest method as set out in AASB 139 Financial Instruments: Recognition and Measurement.

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NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS For the period ended 30 June 2015

Revenues from Government Funding received or receivable from non-corporate Commonwealth entities (appropriated to the non-corporate Commonwealth entity as a corporate Commonwealth entity payment item for payment to the Memorial) is recognised as revenue from government by the corporate Commonwealth entity unless it is in the nature of an equity injection or a loan.

1.6 Gains

Resources Received Free of Charge Resources received free of charge are recognised as gains when, and only when, a fair value can be reliably determined and the services would have been purchased if they had not been donated. Use of those resources is recognised as an expense.

Resources received free of charge are recorded as either revenue or gains depending on their nature.

Contributions of assets at no cost of acquisition or for nominal consideration are recognised as gains at their fair value when the asset qualifies for recognition.

Sale of Assets Gains from disposal of assets are recognised when control of the asset has passed to the buyer.

1.7 Transactions with the Government as Owner

Equity injections Amounts appropriated that are designated as “equity injections” for a year (less any formal reductions) are recognised directly in contributed equity in that year.

1.8 Employee Benefits Liabilities for “short-term employee benefits” (as defined in AASB 119 Employee Benefits) and termination benefits due within 12 months of the end of reporting period are measured at their nominal amounts.

The nominal amount is calculated with regard to the rates expected to be paid on settlement of the liability.

Other long-term employee benefits are measured as the present value of the estimated future cash outflows to be made in respect of services provided by employees up to the reporting date.

Leave The liability for employee benefits includes provision for annual leave and long service leave. No provision has been made for sick leave as all sick leave is non-vesting and the average sick leave taken in future years by employees of the Memorial is estimated to be less than the annual entitlement for sick leave.

The leave liabilities are calculated on the basis of employees’ remuneration at the estimated salary rates that will be applied at the time the leave is taken, including the Memorial’s employer superannuation contribution rates to the extent that the leave is likely to be taken during service rather than paid out on termination.

The liability for long service leave is recognised and measured at the net present value of the estimated future cash flows to be made in respect of all employees at 30 June 2015. In determining the present value of the liability, including related on-costs, attrition rates, and pay increases through promotion and inflation have been taken into account.

Superannuation The Memorial’s staff are members of the Commonwealth Superannuation Scheme (CSS), the Public Sector Superannuation Scheme (PSS), AustralianSuper, or the PSS accumulation plan (PSSap).

The CSS and PSS are defined benefit schemes for the Australian government. The PSSap is a defined contribution scheme.

The liability for defined benefits is recognised in the financial statements of the Australian government and is settled by the Australian government in due course. This liability is reported in the Department of Finance’s administered schedules and notes.

The Memorial makes employer contributions to the employees’ superannuation schemes at rates determined by an actuary to be sufficient to meet the current cost to the government. The Memorial accounts for the contributions as if they were contributions to defined contribution plans.

The liability for superannuation recognised as at 30 June represents outstanding contributions for the final fortnight of the quarter.

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AUSTRALIAN WAR MEMORIAL ANNUAL REPORT 2014-2015

NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS For the period ended 30 June 2015

1.9 Leases A distinction is made between finance leases and operating leases. Finance leases effectively transfer from the lessor to the lessee substantially all the risks and rewards incidental to ownership of leased assets. An operating lease is a lease that is not a finance lease. In operating leases, the lessor effectively retains substantially all such risks and benefits.

Operating lease payments are expensed on a straight-line basis which is representative of the pattern of benefits derived from the leased assets.

The Memorial does not hold any finance leases.

1.10 Cash Cash is recognised at its nominal amount. Cash and cash equivalents include cash on hand and any deposits in bank accounts with an original maturity of three months or less that are readily convertible to known amounts of cash and subject to insignificant risk of changes in value.

1.11 Financial Assets The Memorial classifies its financial assets in the following categories:

• held-to-maturity investments

• receivables

The classification depends on the nature and purpose of the financial assets and is determined at the time of initial recognition. Financial assets are recognised and derecognised upon trade date.

Effective interest method The effective interest method is a method of calculating the amortised cost of a financial asset and of allocating interest income over the relevant period. The effective interest rate is the rate that exactly discounts estimated future cash receipts through the expected life of the financial asset, or, where appropriate, a shorter period.

Income is recognised on an effective interest rate basis except for financial assets that are recognised at fair value through profit and loss.

Held-to-maturity investments Non-derivative financial assets with fixed or determinable payments and fixed maturity dates that the Memorial has the positive intent and ability to hold to maturity are classified as held-to-maturity investments. Held-to-maturity investments are recorded at amortised cost using the effective interest method less impairment, with revenue recognised on an effective yield basis.

Receivables Trade receivables and other receivables that have fixed or determinable payments that are not quoted in an active market are classified as “receivables”. Receivables are measured at amortised cost using the effective interest method less impairment. Interest is recognised by applying the effective interest rate.

Impairment of financial assets Financial assets are assessed for impairment at the end of each reporting period.

• Financial assets held at amortised cost - if there is objective evidence that an impairment loss has been incurred for receivables or held-to-maturity investments held at amortised cost, the amount of the loss is measured as the difference between the asset’s carrying amount and the present value of estimated future cash flows discounted at the asset’s original effective interest rate. The carrying amount is reduced by way of an allowance account. The loss is recognised in the Statement of Comprehensive Income.

1.12 Financial Liabilities The Memorial classifies its financial liabilities as other financial liabilities. Financial liabilities are recognised and derecognised upon trade date.

Other Financial Liabilities Supplier and other payables are recognised at amortised cost. Liabilities are recognised to the extent that the goods or services have been received (and irrespective of having been invoiced).

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AUSTRALIAN WAR MEMORIAL ANNUAL REPORT 2014-2015

NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS For the period ended 30 June 2015

1.13 Acquisition of assets Assets are recorded at cost on acquisition except as stated below. The cost of acquisition includes the fair value of assets transferred in exchange and liabilities undertaken. Financial assets are initially measured at their fair value plus transaction costs where appropriate.

Assets acquired at no cost, or for nominal consideration, are initially recognised as assets and income at their fair value at the date of acquisition. Significant donated National Collection items are recognised at the time of acquisition, and other donated collection items are brought to account at the time of revaluation.

1.14 Property, Plant and Equipment

Asset Recognition Threshold Purchases of property, plant and equipment are recognised initially at cost in the statement of financial position, except for purchases costing less than $2,000, which are expensed in the year of acquisition (other than where they form part of a group of similar items that are significant in total).

The initial cost of an asset includes an estimate of the cost of dismantling and removing the item and restoring the site on which it is located.

Revaluations Fair values for each class of assets are determined as shown below.

Asset class Fair value measured at:

Land Market selling price

Buildings Market selling price/depreciated replacement cost

Exhibitions Depreciated replacement cost

Plant and Equipment Market selling price/depreciated replacement cost

Following initial recognition at cost, property, plant and equipment were carried at fair value less subsequent accumulated depreciation and accumulated impairment losses. Valuations were conducted with sufficient frequency to ensure that the carrying amounts of assets did not differ materially from the assets’ fair values as at the reporting date. The regularity of independent valuations depended upon the volatility of movements in market values for the relevant assets.

Revaluation adjustments were made on a class basis. Any revaluation increment was credited to equity under the heading of asset revaluation reserve except to the extent that it reverses a previous revaluation decrement of the same asset class that was previously recognised in the surplus/deficit. Revaluation decrements for a class of assets were recognised directly in the surplus/ deficit, except to the extent that they reversed a previous revaluation increment for that class.

Any accumulated depreciation as at the revaluation date is eliminated against the gross carrying amount of the asset and the asset restated to the revalued amount.

Depreciation Depreciable property, plant and equipment assets are written-off to their estimated residual values over their estimated useful lives to the Memorial using, in all cases, the straight-line method of depreciation.

Depreciation rates (useful lives), residual values and methods are reviewed at each reporting date and necessary adjustments are recognised in the current reporting period, or current and future reporting periods, as appropriate.

Depreciation rates applying to each class of depreciable asset are based on the following useful lives:

2015 2014

Buildings and building improvements 10 to 175 years 10 to 175 years

Plant and equipment 2 to 30 years 2 to 30 years

Exhibitions 4 to 20 years 5 to 15 years

Impairment All assets will be assessed for impairment at 30 June 2015. Where indications of impairment exist, the asset’s recoverable amount is estimated and an impairment adjustment made if the asset’s recoverable amount is less than its carrying amount.

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AUSTRALIAN WAR MEMORIAL ANNUAL REPORT 2014-2015

NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS For the period ended 30 June 2015

The recoverable amount of an asset is the higher of its fair value less costs of disposal and its value in use. Value in use is the present value of the future cash flows expected to be derived from the asset. Where the future economic benefit of an asset is not primarily dependent on the asset’s ability to generate future cash flows, and the asset would be replaced if the Memorial were deprived of the asset, its value in use is taken to be its depreciated replacement cost.

Derecognition An item of property, plant and equipment is derecognised upon disposal or when no further future economic benefits are expected from its use or disposal.

1.15 Heritage and Cultural Assets The Memorial’s collection of heritage and cultural assets comprises a wide range of objects relating to Australia’s military history, including but not limited to:

• Works of art (various mediums) • Film

• Large technology objects • Military heraldry and technology items

• Photographs • Audio

• Official and private records • Ephemera

Pursuant to section 8 of the Australian War Memorial Act 1980, the Memorial has the authority to dispose of heritage and cultural items which are not required as part of the National Collection, or are unfit for inclusion. Section 8 of the Australian War Memorial Act 1980 dictates the appropriate approvals to dispose of National Collection assets.

The decision whether or not to acquire or retain an item for the National Collection is based on two criteria:

1. Assessment to establish that the item is of significance to Australian military history.

2. Assessment that the benefit and resource implications of acquiring or retaining the item are acceptable.

The evaluation process ensures that the history and provenance of objects is recorded at the time of acquisition and records the significance of the item to the Australian community, provides a systematic assessment of the values of objects against the existing collection and other collecting institutions, and assists in setting priorities for collection management and conservation resources.

The Memorial’s Collection Development Plan for heritage and cultural assets can be found at:

https://www.awm.gov.au/sites/default/files/collection_development_plan.pdf

The Memorial’s preservation and curatorial policies for heritage and cultural assets can be found at:

http://www.awm.gov.au/collection/conservation

Revaluations The National Collection is carried at fair value, which is measured at depreciated replacement cost or market selling price (for items where a market exists).

Following initial recognition at cost, the National Collection is carried at fair value less accumulated depreciation and accumulated impairment losses. Valuations are conducted with sufficient frequency such that the carrying amounts of assets do not differ materially from the assets’ fair values as at the reporting date. The regularity of independent valuations depends upon the volatility of movements in market values for the relevant assets.

Depreciation All items in the National Collection are written off over their estimated useful life to the Memorial using the straight-line method of depreciation.

Depreciation rates (useful lives) have been estimated based on the condition and physical composition of items in each sub-class, and range from 5 to 600 years. Rates and methods are reviewed at each reporting date and necessary adjustments are recognised in the current, or current and future reporting periods, as appropriate.

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AUSTRALIAN WAR MEMORIAL ANNUAL REPORT 2014-2015

NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS For the period ended 30 June 2015

1.16 Intangibles The Memorial’s intangibles comprise purchased software, which is carried at cost less accumulated amortisation and accumulated impairment losses.

Software is amortised on a straight-line basis over its anticipated useful life. The useful lives range from 2 to 10 years (2014: 2 to 10 years).

All software assets will be assessed for indications of impairment at 30 June 2015.

1.17 Inventories The Memorial holds inventory for sale only, and this is reported at the lower of cost and net realisable value. Costs incurred in bringing each item of inventory to its present location and condition are assigned as follows:

• stores - average purchase cost; and

• finished goods and works-in-progress - cost of direct materials and labour plus attributable costs that are capable of being allocated on a reasonable basis.

Inventories acquired at no cost or at nominal consideration are initially measured at current replacement cost at the date of acquisition.

1.18 Commitments Capital commitments include current undertakings and contractual payments related to the provision of items for National Collection works in progress. Other commitments are related to contracts for provision of casual staff, buildings and grounds maintenance and security services.

The Memorial in its capacity as a lessor of the property located at block 18 section 21 Mitchell (Treloar F) receives annual rent of $239,226 (adjusted for CPI annually in March). Monthly rental is payable in advance and the lease term is initially for five years with options to renew.

Commitments are GST inclusive where relevant.

The nature of operating lease commitments is as follows:

Nature of operating lease General description of leasing arrangement

Agreements for the provision of motor vehicles The lessor provides pool vehicles as required. There are no purchase options available to the Memorial, and no contingent rentals exist.

Lease of computer equipment The lessor provides all computer equipment designated as necessary in the supply contract for three years plus a further year at the Memorial’s option, with a reduction of fees available. The initial equipment has, on average, a useful life of three years from the commencement of the lease. The Memorial may take out additional leases at any time during the contract period. The Memorial has an option to purchase the equipment at the end of the lease.

1.19 Taxation The Memorial is exempt from all forms of taxation except the Fringe Benefits Tax (FBT) and the Goods and Services Tax (GST).

Revenues, expenses and assets are recognised net of GST except:

• where the amount of GST incurred is not recoverable from the Australian Taxation Office; and

• for receivables and payables.

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AUSTRALIAN WAR MEMORIAL ANNUAL REPORT 2014-2015

NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS For the period ended 30 June 2015

3. NET CASH APPROPRIATION ARRANGEMENTS

2015 2014

$ $

Total comprehensive income less depreciation/amortisation expenses previously funded through revenue appropriations 10 706 520 17 163 431

Plus: depreciation/amortisation expenses previously funded through revenue appropriation 10 388 240 10 206 372

Total comprehensive income - as per the Statement of Comprehensive Income 318 280 6 957 059

From 2010-11 the Government introduced net cash appropriation arrangements where revenue appropriations for the National Collection depreciation expenses ceased. The Memorial now receives a separate capital budget provided through equity appropriations. Capital budgets are to be appropriated in the period when cash payment for capital expenditure is required.

4. EXPENSES

4A. Employee benefits

Wages and salaries 17 685 281 19 073 010

Superannuation

Defined contribution plans 1 580 692 1 817 641

Defined benefit plans 1 875 252 1 954 690

Leave and other entitlements 886 205 1 971 309

Separation and redundancies 916 846 131 347

Other employee benefits 384 976 589 531

Total employee benefits 23 329 252 25 537 528

2. EVENTS AFTER THE REPORTING PERIOD There was no subsequent event that had the potential to significantly affect the ongoing structure and financial activities of the Memorial.

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AUSTRALIAN WAR MEMORIAL ANNUAL REPORT 2014-2015

NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS For the period ended 30 June 2015

2015 2014

$ $

4B. Suppliers

Goods and services supplied or rendered

Property and support services 5 380 553 5 219 040

Professional services (contractors and consultants) 2 802 659 2 037 856

Staff support 3 373 980 3 134 168

Advertising and promotions 752 766 991 715

Cost of goods sold 1 570 927 1 607 643

IT services 871 425 1 037 093

Exhibitions 6 506 819 1 645 768

Travel 488 762 471 001

Other 1 982 616 1 883 512

Total goods and services supplied or rendered 23 730 507 18 027 796

Goods supplied in connection with

Related parties 5 222 172 690

External parties 2 532 697 2 924 386

Total goods supplied 2 537 919 3 097 076

Services rendered in connection with

Related parties 1 674 854 1 283 542

External parties 19 517 734 13 647 178

Total services rendered 21 192 588 14 930 720

Total goods and services supplied or rendered 23 730 507 18 027 796

Other supplier expenses

Operating lease rentals in connection with External parties - minimum lease payments 266 722 323 390

Workers compensation expenses 490 934 184 365

Total other supplier expenses 757 656 507 755

Total suppliers 24 488 163 18 535 551

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AUSTRALIAN WAR MEMORIAL ANNUAL REPORT 2014-2015

NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS For the period ended 30 June 2015

2015 2014

$ $

4C. Depreciation and Amortisation Depreciation:

Buildings and building improvements 4 855 408 4 392 129

Property, plant and equipment 1 045 283 862 760

Heritage and cultural assets 10 388 240 10 206 372

Exhibitions 2 715 904 2 666 728

Total depreciation 19 004 835 18 127 989

Amortisation:

Intangibles (computer software) 819 762 764 470

Total amortisation 819 762 764 470

Total depreciation and amortisation 19 824 597 18 892 459

4D. Write-down and impairment of assets Asset write-downs and impairment from:

Impairment of receivables 19 854 205

Impairment of inventories 40 677 5 159

Total write-down and impairment of assets 60 531 5 364

5. INCOME

5A. Sale of goods and rendering of services Sale of goods in connection with

Related parties 55 045 46 907

External parties 2 980 555 2 517 955

Total sale of goods 3 035 600 2 564 862

Rendering of services in connection with

Related parties 186 632 39 404

External parties 1 753 289 1 757 230

Total rendering of services 1 939 921 1 796 634

Total sale of goods and rendering of services 4 975 521 4 361 496

5B. Resources received free of charge

Resources received free of charge in relation to

Related parties 17 862 102 222

External parties 778 646 990 851

Total resources received free of charge 796 508 1 093 073

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AUSTRALIAN WAR MEMORIAL ANNUAL REPORT 2014-2015

NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS For the period ended 30 June 2015

2015 2014

$ $

5C. Donations and sponsorships Donations 4 719 365 2 188 869

Sponsorships 5 611 806 1 021 515

Donated collection items 488 701 208 150

Total donations and sponsorships 10 819 872 3 418 534

5D. Other revenue

Friends of the Memorial 150 372 162 449

Royalties and licensing income 108 546 40 949

Rental income 113 734 -

Other 8 014 10 000

Total other revenue 380 666 213 398

5E. Revenue from Government Department of Veterans’ Affairs

Corporate entity payment item 44 008 000 40 900 000

Total revenue from Government 44 008 000 40 900 000

6. FAIR VALUE MEASUREMENTS The following tables provide an analysis of assets and liabilities that are measured at fair value. The different levels of the fair value hierarchy are defined below.

Level 1: Quoted prices (unadjusted) in active markets for identical assets or liabilities that the Memorial can access at measurement date.

Level 2: Inputs other than quoted prices included within Level 1 that are observable for the asset or liability, either directly or indirectly.

Level 3: Unobservable inputs for the asset or liability.

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AUSTRALIAN WAR MEMORIAL ANNUAL REPORT 2014-2015

NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS For the period ended 30 June 2015

6A. Fair Value Measurements, Valuation Techniques and Inputs Used

Fair value measurements at the end of the reporting period

For levels 2 and 3 fair value measurements

2015 2014 Level Valuation technique(s)

1

Inputs used Range

(weighted average)

2

$ $

Non-financial assets

Land 12 385 520 9 700 000 2 Market approach Recent sales of comparable land N/A

Buildings on freehold land 131 104 289 130 169 189 2 Gross current cost Current replacement cost and current

reproduction cost

N/A

Exhibitions 42 548 119 18 369 583 3 Depreciated

replacement cost

Original cost adjusted for CPI from date of acquisition

Calculation of useful lives and market based residual values

Items are highly specialised with no comparable market

Heritage and cultural 590 304 801 591 164 050 2 Market approach Auction prices of comparable items

in Australia and overseas

N/A

427 967 143 429 115 705 3 Depreciated

replacement cost

Professional appraisals of items $0.7M to $117.2M $0.6M

Other property, plant and equipment 5 679 510 5 026 042 2 Market approach Market prices of comparable items N/A

Total non-financial assets 1 209 989 382 1 183 544 569

Total fair value measurements of assets in the Statement of Financial Position 1 209 989 382 1 183 544 569

There were no liabilities not measured at fair value in the Statement of Financial Position.

Fair value measurements The highest and best use of all non-financial assets is the same as their current use. 1. No change in valuation technique occurred during the period. 2. Significant unobservable inputs only. Not applicable for assets or liabilities in the Level 2 category.

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AUSTRALIAN WAR MEMORIAL ANNUAL REPORT 2014-2015

NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS For the period ended 30 June 2015

Recurring and non-recurring Level 3 fair value measurements - valuation processes The Memorial procured independent valuation services from the Australian Valuation Office for property, plant and equipment, Herron Todd White for land and buildings, Simon Storey Valuers for the National Collection, and Asset Valuation Services for exhibitions. The Memorial has relied on valuation models provided by these valuers. The Memorial tests the procedures of the valuation model at least once every 12 months. All valuers have provided written assurance to the Memorial that the model developed is in compliance with AASB 13.

Recurring Level 3 fair value measurements - sensitivity of inputs The significant unobservable inputs used in the fair value measurement of the Memorial’s heritage and cultural assets are identical or similar items through recorded auction sales, catalogues and known private collections. Significant increases (decreases) in any of those inputs in isolation would result in a significantly higher (lower) fair value measurement.

Generally, a change in the assumption used for professional appraisals of similar iconic items is accompanied by a directionally similar change in the assumption used for private sales of similar iconic items.

6B. Level 1 and Level 2 Transfers for Recurring Fair Value Measurements Recurring fair value measurements transferred between Level 1 and Level 2 for assets and liabilities

No assets were transferred between Levels 1 and 2 during the reporting period. The Memorial’s policy for determining when transfers between levels are deemed to have occurred can be found in Note 1.3.

6C. Reconciliation for Recurring Level 3 Fair Value Measurements

Recurring Level 3 fair value measurements - reconciliation for assets

Non-financial assets

Exhibitions Heritage and cultural1 Total

2015 2014 2015 2014 2015 2014

$ $ $ $ $ $

Opening balance 1 July 18 369 583 18 369 583 429 115 705 429 115 705 447 485 288 447 485 288

Purchases2 22 471 334 - 3 262 488 - 25 733 822 -

Revaluation 4 423 109 - - - 4 423 109 -

Depreciation (2 715 907) - (4 411 050) - (7 126 957) -

Closing balance 42 548 119 18 369 583 427 967 143 429 115 705 470 515 262 447 485 288

1. Heritage and Cultural assets contain Level 2 and Level 3 fair value measurements. The figures shown above are for Level 3 inputs only.

2. Purchases are inclusive of transfers from assets under construction.

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AUSTRALIAN WAR MEMORIAL ANNUAL REPORT 2014-2015

NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS For the period ended 30 June 2015

7. FINANCIAL ASSETS

2015 2014

$ $

7A. Cash and cash equivalents Cash on hand 8 250 7 650

Deposits 7 101 317 5 701 992

Total cash and cash equivalents 7 109 567 5 709 642

7B. Trade and other receivables

Goods and services receivables in connection with

Related parties 98 689 98 688

External parties 970 259 1 031 019

Total goods and services receivables 1 068 948 1 129 707

Other receivables

GST receivable from the Australian Taxation Office (4 903) 148 543

Other receivables 117 19

Total other receivables (4 786) 148 562

Total trade and other receivables (gross) 1 064 162 1 278 269

Less impairment allowance (goods and services) (18 949) -

Total trade and other receivables (net) 1 045 213 1 278 269

Receivables are expected to be recovered in no more than 12 months (2014: no more than 12 months).

Current terms for receivables are net 30 days (2014: 30 days).

Trade and other receivables are aged as follows:

Not overdue 968 167 1 167 364

Overdue by:

- 0 to 30 days 23 858 99 743

- 31 to 60 days 10 773 3 262

- 61 to 90 days 42 415 7 900

- More than 90 days 18 949 -

Total trade and other receivables (gross) 1 064 162 1 278 269

Reconciliation of the impairment allowance

Goods and services 2015

Goods and services 2014

$ $

Opening balance - -

Amounts written off 206 160

Amounts recovered and reversed 957 -

(Increase) in provision for doubtful debts (20 111) (160)

Closing balance (18 949) -

7C. Investments The Memorial’s investments represent term deposits held with Australian banks with terms greater than 90 days. Maturity dates range from July 2015 to June 2016. Effective interest rates range from 2.78 per cent to 3.65 per cent (2014: 3.55 per cent to 4.14 per cent).

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AUSTRALIAN WAR MEMORIAL ANNUAL REPORT 2014-2015

NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS For the period ended 30 June 2015

8. NON-FINANCIAL ASSETS

8A. Land and Buildings

2015 2014

$ $

Land - at fair value 12 385 520 9 700 000

Buildings

Buildings - at fair value 138 423 419 132 632 911

Accumulated depreciation (7 319 130) (2 463 722)

Total buildings 131 104 289 130 169 189

Total land and buildings 143 489 809 139 869 189

No indicators of impairment were found for land and buildings.

No land and buildings are expected to be sold or disposed of within the next 12 months.

8B. Property, plant and equipment

Property, plant and equipment - at fair value 8 404 959 6 604 932

Accumulated depreciation (2 725 449) (1 578 890)

Total property, plant and equipment 5 679 510 5 026 042

No indications of impairment were found for property, plant and equipment.

No property, plant and equipment is expected to be sold or disposed of within the next 12 months.

8C. Heritage and Cultural Assets

Assets under construction - at cost 290 253 -

National Collection - at fair value 1 053 875 325 1 045 494 896

Accumulated depreciation (35 603 381) (25 215 141)

Total heritage and cultural assets 1 018 562 197 1 020 279 755

Assets under construction comprise commissioned artworks in progress.

No indicators of impairment were found for heritage and cultural assets.

No heritage and cultural assets are expected to be sold or disposed of within the next 12 months.

8D. Exhibitions

Assets under construction - at cost 26 450 9 992 066

Exhibitions - at fair value 43 928 954 27 429 349

Accumulated depreciation (1 380 835) (9 059 766)

Total exhibitions 42 574 569 28 361 649

No indicators of impairment were found for exhibition assets.

No exhibitions are expected to be sold or disposed of within the next 12 months.

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AUSTRALIAN WAR MEMORIAL ANNUAL REPORT 2014-2015

NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS For the period ended 30 June 2015

Revaluations of non-financial assets The Memorial’s exhibitions were revalued as at 31 December 2014 by an independent valuer, in accordance with the policy stated in note 1.14. The fair value was determined by reference to the assets’ depreciated replacement cost or market selling price (for items where a market exists). The carrying amount is included in the valuation figures above and is separately disclosed in Table 8F below.

A revaluation increment of $4,423,109 (2014: $0) for exhibitions was credited to the asset revaluation reserve by asset class and included in the equity section of the Statement of Financial Position; no increments were expensed (2014: nil expensed).

2015 2014

$ $

8E. Intangibles

Computer software:

Purchased 11 480 364 10 971 992

Accumulated amortisation (6 816 260) (6 022 751)

Total intangibles 4 664 104 4 949 241

No indicators of impairment were found for intangible assets.

No intangibles are expected to be sold or disposed of within the next 12 months.

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AUSTRALIAN WAR MEMORIAL ANNUAL REPORT 2014-2015

NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS For the period ended 30 June 2015

8F. Reconciliation of the opening and closing balances of property, plant and equipment and intangibles (2014-15)

Land Buildings Total land

and buildings

Other

property, plant and equipment

Heritage and cultural assets Exhibitions Intangibles Total

$’000 $’000 $’000 $’000 $’000 $’000 $’000 $’000

As at 1 July 2014

Gross book value 9 700 150 496 160 196 6 605 1 045 495 37 422 10 973 1 260 691

Accumulated depreciation/amortisation - (20 327) (20 327) (1 579) (25 215) (9 060) (6 024) (62 205)

Net book value as at 1 July 2014 9 700 130 169 139 869 5 026 1 020 280 28 362 4 949 1 198 486

Additions 2 686 5 595 8 281 1 705 8 651 12 720 535 31 892

Revaluations recognised in other comprehensive income

- - - - - 4 423 - 4 423

Depreciation/amortisation expense - (4 855) (4 855) (1 045) (10 388) (2 716) (820) (19 825)

Other movements - 195 195 15 19 (214) - 15

Disposals - - - (21) - - - (21)

Net book value as at 30 June 2015 12 386 131 104 143 490 5 680 1 018 562 42 575 4 664 1 214 970

Net book value as at 30 June 2015 represented by:

Gross book value 12 386 156 287 168 673 8 289 1 054 165 54 351 11 508 1 296 985

Accumulated depreciation/amortisation - (25 183) (25 183) (2 609) (35 603) (11 776) (6 844) (82 015)

Total as at 30 June 2015 12 386 131 104 143 490 5 680 1 018 562 42 575 4 664 1 214 970

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AUSTRALIAN WAR MEMORIAL ANNUAL REPORT 2014-2015

NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS For the period ended 30 June 2015

8F. (Cont’d) Reconciliation of the opening and closing balances of property, plant and equipment and intangibles (2013-14)

Land Buildings Total land

and buildings Other property, plant, and equipment

Heritage and cultural assets Exhibitions Intangibles Total

$’000 $’000 $’000 $’000 $’000 $’000 $’000 $’000

As at 1 July 2013

Gross book value 9 190 122 905 132 095 4 843 1 035 390 30 056 10 531 1 212 915

Accumulated depreciation/amortisation - (15 935) (15 935) (726) (15 009) (6 393) (5 258) (43 321)

Net book value as at 1 July 2013 9 190 106 970 116 160 4 117 1 020 381 23 663 5 273 1 169 594

Additions - 6 987 6 987 1 796 10 105 11 579 440 30 907

Revaluations recognised in other comprehensive income

510 16 391 16 901 - - - - 16 901

Depreciation/amortisation expense - (4 392) (4 392) (863) (10 206) (2 667) (764) (18 892)

Other movements - 4 213 4 213 9 - (4 213) - 9

Disposals - - - (33) - - - (33)

Net book value as at 30 June 2014 9 700 130 169 139 869 5 026 1 020 280 28 362 4 949 1 198 486

Net book value as at 30 June 2014 represented by:

Gross book value 9 700 150 496 160 196 6 605 1 045 495 37 422 10 972 1 260 690

Accumulated depreciation/amortisation - (20 327) (20 327) (1 579) (25 215) (9 060) (6 023) (62 204)

Total as at 30 June 2014 9 700 130 169 139 869 5 026 1 020 280 28 362 4 949 1 198 486

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AUSTRALIAN WAR MEMORIAL ANNUAL REPORT 2014-2015

NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS For the period ended 30 June 2015

2015 2014

$ $

8G. Other non-financial assets Prepayments 656 804 1 158 581

Total other non-financial assets 656 804 1 158 581

Other non-financial assets expected to be recovered

No more than 12 months 395 219 1 158 581

More than 12 months 261 585 -

Total other non-financial assets 656 804 1 158 581

9. PAYABLES

9A. Suppliers Trade creditors 1 480 724 3 169 776

Total suppliers 1 480 724 3 169 776

Supplier payables expected to be settled within 12 months.

Supplier payables - related parties 251 848 19 000

Supplier payables - external parties 1 228 876 3 150 776

Total suppliers 1 480 724 3 169 776

Settlement was usually made within 30 days (2014: 30 days).

9B. Other payables Wages and salaries 920 860 978 357

Payments received in advance 50 000 64 754

Paid parental leave 4 616 5 049

Customer orders not yet supplied 50 234 103 274

Total other payables 1 025 710 1 151 434

Other payables are expected to be settled in no more than 12 months (2014: no more than 12 months).

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AUSTRALIAN WAR MEMORIAL ANNUAL REPORT 2014-2015

NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS For the period ended 30 June 2015

2015 2014

$ $

10. PROVISIONS

10A. Employee provisions

Leave 7 977 313 8 631 512

Separations and redundancies 544 240 96 000

Other 482 933 482 933

Total employee provisions 9 004 486 9 210 445

Employee provisions are expected to be settled in:

No more than 12 months 5 151 320 6 630 793

More than 12 months 3 853 166 2 579 652

Total employee provisions 9 004 486 9 210 445

11. CASH FLOW RECONCILIATION

Reconciliation of cash and cash equivalents as per the Statement of Financial Position to Cash Flow Statement

Cash and cash equivalents as per:

Cash flow statement 7 109 567 5 709 642

Statement of financial position 7 109 567 5 709 642

Discrepancy - -

Reconciliation of net cost of services to net cash from operating activities:

Net cost of services (48 112 829) (50 843 956)

Add revenue from Government 44 008 000 40 900 000

Surplus (Deficit) (4 104 829) (9 943 956)

Adjustment for non-cash items

Depreciation and amortisation 19 824 597 18 892 459

Net write down of other assets 60 531 5 364

Loss (gain) from disposal of assets (58 535) 20 707

Donated assets (488 701) (208 150)

Change in assets/liabilities

Decrease/(Increase) in net receivables 213 202 (469 945)

Decrease/(Increase) in inventories 44 943 (137 443)

Decrease/(Increase) in accrued interest 322 238 (282 664)

Decrease/(Increase) in other non-financial assets 500 906 (860 476)

(Decrease)/Increase in trade creditors (1 336 567) 1 661 589

(Decrease)/Increase in other payables (574 208) 325 743

(Decrease)/Increase in employee provisions (109 959) 771 208

Net cash from operating activities 14 293 618 9 774 437

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AUSTRALIAN WAR MEMORIAL ANNUAL REPORT 2014-2015

NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS For the period ended 30 June 2015

12. CONTINGENT ASSETS AND LIABILITIES Contingent assets and liabilities are not recognised in the statement of financial position but contingent assets are disclosed when settlement is probable but not virtually certain and contingent liabilities are disclosed when settlement is greater than remote.

The Memorial has one quantifiable contingent asset in respect of a bequest $113,300 (2014: nil). This amount represents a distribution after the sale of property. There were no contingent liabilities in the current reporting period (2014: nil).

13. SENIOR MANAGEMENT PERSONNEL REMUNERATION 2015 2014

$ $

Short-term employee benefits

Salary 1 435 691 1 396 210

Performance bonuses 53 222 51 690

Motor vehicle and other allowances 108 013 128 498

Total short-term employee benefits 1 596 926 1 576 398

Post-employment benefits:

Superannuation 201 116 196 956

Total post-employment benefits 201 116 196 956

Other long-term employee benefits:

Annual leave (104 123) (123 562)

Long-service leave (129 343) 34 994

Total other long-term employee benefits (233 466) (88 568)

Termination benefits 283 827 12 764

Total senior executive remuneration expenses 1 848 403 1 697 550

The total numbers of senior management personnel that are included in the above table are 21 (2014: 19). When senior executives are on extended leave, or act for the Director, their positions are back-filled. The above figures include payments made to staff acting in senior executive positions. The Memorial has one more senior executive than in 2014 and the membership of the Council has also increased by one member.

14. RELATED PARTY DISCLOSURES No loans or grants were made to any members of the Council, and no Council member has received or become entitled to receive a benefit by reason of a contract made by the Memorial with the Council member or an entity in which she/he has a substantial financial interest.

Council members are paid in accordance with Remuneration Tribunal determinations as provided by section 13 of the Australian War Memorial Act 1980.

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AUSTRALIAN WAR MEMORIAL ANNUAL REPORT 2014-2015

NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS For the period ended 30 June 2015

15. REMUNERATION OF AUDITORS

2015 2014

$ $

Fair value of services received

Financial statement audit services 59 000 57 000

Total fair value of services received 59 000 57 000

The Memorial’s auditor is the Australian National Audit Office, which has retained Ernst & Young (Australia) to assist with the assignment.

No other services were provided by the Australian National Audit Office or Ernst & Young (Australia).

16. FINANCIAL INSTRUMENTS

16A. Categories of financial instruments Financial Assets

Held-to-maturity investments

Deposits on short-term investment 61 000 000 67 000 000

Total held-to-maturity investments 61 000 000 67 000 000

Loans and receivables

Cash at bank 7 101 317 5 701 992

Trade and other receivables 1 045 213 1 278 269

Accrued interest revenue 1 190 859 1 513 097

Total loans and receivables 9 337 389 8 493 358

Total financial assets 70 337 389 75 493 358

Financial Liabilities

At amortised cost:

Trade creditors 1 480 724 3 169 776

Total financial liabilities measured at amortised cost 1 480 724 3 169 776

Total financial liabilities 1 480 724 3 169 776

16B. Net gains or losses on financial assets Held-to-maturity investments

Interest revenue 2 338 027 2 888 021

Net gains on held-to-maturity investments 2 338 027 2 888 021

Loans and receivables

Interest revenue 220 586 173 131

Impairment (18 949) -

Net gains on loans and receivables 201 637 173 131

Net gains on financial assets 2 539 663 3 061 152

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AUSTRALIAN WAR MEMORIAL ANNUAL REPORT 2014-2015

NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS For the period ended 30 June 2015

16C. Fair value of financial instruments

Financial Assets The net fair values of cash, short-term deposits and trade and other receivables approximate their carrying amounts.

None of the classes of financial assets are readily traded on organised markets in standardised form.

Financial Liabilities The net fair values for trade creditors, which are short-term in nature, approximate their carrying amounts.

None of the classes of financial liabilities are readily traded on organised markets in standardised form.

16D. Credit risk The Memorial’s maximum exposures to credit risk at reporting date in relation to each class of recognised financial assets is the carrying amount of those assets as indicated in the Statement of Financial Position. The Memorial has no significant exposures to any concentrations of credit risk. The Memorial does not hold collateral or other security and therefore the figures for credit risk represent the maximum credit risk exposure.

The following table illustrates the Memorial’s gross exposure to credit risk, excluding any collateral or credit enhancements.

2015 2014

$ $

Financial assets

Trade and other receivables 1 064 162 1 278 269

Cash at bank 7 101 317 5 701 992

Accrued interest revenue 1 190 859 1 513 097

Deposits on short-term investment 61 000 000 67 000 000

Total 70 356 338 75 493 358

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AUSTRALIAN WAR MEMORIAL ANNUAL REPORT 2014-2015

NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS For the period ended 30 June 2015

Credit quality of financial instruments not past due nor individually determined as impaired.

Not past due nor impaired

2015 $

Not past due nor impaired

2014 $

Past due or impaired

2015 $

Past due or impaired

2014 $

Financial assets

Deposits on short-term investments 61 000 000 67 000 000 - -

Cash at bank 7 101 317 5 701 992 - -

Trade and other receivables 968 167 1 513 097 95 995 110 905

Accrued interest revenue 1 190 859 1 167 364 - -

Total 70 260 343 75 382 453 95 995 110 905

Ageing of financial assets that are past due but not impaired for 2015:

0 to 30 days

$

31 to 60 days

$

61 to 90 days

$

90+ days

$

Total

$

Trade and other receivables 23 858 10 773 42 415 - 77 045

Total 23 858 10 773 42 415 - 77 045

Ageing of financial assets that are past due but not impaired for 2014:

0 to 30 days

$

31 to 60 days

$

61 to 90 days

$

90+ days

$

Total

$

Trade and other receivables 99 743 3 262 7 900 - 110 905

Total 99 743 3 262 7 900 - 110 905

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AUSTRALIAN WAR MEMORIAL ANNUAL REPORT 2014-2015

NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS For the period ended 30 June 2015

16E. Liquidity risk The Memorial’s financial liabilities are trade payables. The exposure to liquidity risk is based on the notion that the Memorial will encounter difficulty in meeting its obligations associated with financial liabilities. This is highly unlikely due to appropriation funding and internal policies and procedures put in place to ensure there are appropriate resources to meet the Memorial’s financial obligations. All trade payables will mature within one year (2014: within one year).

16F. Market risk The Memorial holds basic financial instruments that do not expose it to certain market risks. The Memorial is not exposed to “currency risk” or “other price risk”.

Interest rate risk Interest rate risk refers to the risk that the fair value or future cash flows of a financial instrument will fluctuate because of changes in market interest rates. The Memorial is exposed to interest rate risk primarily from held-to-maturity investments and cash at bank.

The table below details the interest rate sensitivity analyses of the Memorial at the reporting date, holding all other variables constant. A 40-basis-point change is deemed to be reasonably possible and is used when reporting interest rate risk.

Effect on Effect on

Risk variable Change in variable

Profit or loss 2015

$

Equity 2015

$

Profit or loss 2014

$

Equity 2014

$

Interest rate risk Interest

+0.40% (2014: +0.60%) 272 405 272 405 436 212 436 212

Interest rate risk Interest

-0.40% (2014: -0.60%) (272 405) (272 405) (436 212) (436 212)

The method used to arrive at the possible risk of 40 basis points was based on both statistical and non-statistical analysis. The statistical analysis has been based on the cash rate for the past five years issued by the Reserve Bank of Australia (RBA) as the underlying dataset. This information is then revised and adjusted for reasonableness under the current economic circumstances.

17. FINANCIAL ASSETS RECONCILIATION

2015

$

2014

$

Financial assets

Total financial assets as per balance sheet 70 345 639 75 501 008

Less: non-financial instrument components 8 250 7 650

Total non-financial instrument components 70 337 389 75 493 358

Total financial assets as per financial instruments note 70 337 389 75 493 358

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AUSTRALIAN WAR MEMORIAL ANNUAL REPORT 2014-2015

NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS For the period ended 30 June 2015

18. ASSETS HELD IN TRUST The following monies are not available for other purposes of the Memorial and are not recognised in the financial statements.

18A. Florance Foundation Trust Fund - monetary asset During 1979-80 an amount of $3,000 was provided by Mrs D. Florance of Bowral, New South Wales, on condition that it was invested and the interest be used to bring disadvantaged children to the Memorial. To this the Memorial added $5,000, bringing the total of the Florance Foundation to $8,000. In 1985-86 the Australian War Memorial paid a further $10,000 into the Florance Foundation so that sufficient interest was generated to ensure the purpose of the Florance Foundation can continue. The Florance Foundation’s current financial position, which is reported on a cash basis, is as follows:

2015 2014

$ $

Total amount held at the beginning of the reporting period 20 783 21 507

Interest received 560 598

Payments made (580) (1 322)

Total amount held at the end of the reporting period 20 763 20 783

The current policy is for the trust fund to contribute the interest earned on the account towards the cost of fares associated with the transportation of disadvantaged children to the Memorial as part of the Anzac Day commemorations. The Legacy Coordinating Council and the Memorial together meet the balance of the fares’ cost.

18B. Australian War Memorial Krait Trust Fund - monetary asset In April 1985 the Memorial received the MV Krait and $50,000 from the Z Special Unit Association Krait Public Museum Fund. The monies, together with interest, are held in a separate bank account as provided for in the agreement with the trustees of the Krait Fund. These funds are for the conservation of the Krait. The interest earned is transferred to the National Maritime Museum for maintenance work on the Krait. The financial position of the fund, which is reported on a cash basis, is as follows:

2015 2014

$ $

Total amount held at the beginning of the reporting period 41 365 41 562

Interest received 1 094 1 160

Payments made (1 173) (1 357)

Total amount held at the end of the reporting period 41 286 41 365

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AUSTRALIAN WAR MEMORIAL ANNUAL REPORT 2014-2015

NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS For the period ended 30 June 2015

19C. Major Classes of Departmental Expense and Income by Outcome Outcome 1

2015 2014

$ $

Expenses 67 709 304 62 991 609

Income from non-government sector

Activities subject to cost recovery 4 733 844 4 275 186

Interest 2 558 612 3 061 152

Resources received free of charge - external entities 778 646 990 852

Donations and Sponsorships 10 819 872 3 418 534

Other 380 666 213 397

Total income from non-government sector 19 271 640 11 959 121

Other own-source income

Sale of goods and services - to related entities 241 677 86 310

Resources received free of charge - related entities 17 862 102 222

Other - -

Total other own-source income 259 539 188 532

Net cost (contribution) of outcome 48 178 125 50 843 956

The net costs shown include intra-government costs that were eliminated in calculating the actual Budget Outcome.

19. REPORTING OF OUTCOMES

19A. Outcome of the Memorial The Memorial is structured to meet the following outcome:

Australians remembering, interpreting, and understanding the Australian experience of war and its enduring impact through maintaining and developing the national Memorial and its collection and exhibition of historical material, commemorative ceremonies, and research.

19B. Net cost of outcome delivery

Outcome 1

2015

$

2014

$

Expenses 67 709 304 62 991 609

Own-source income 19 596 475 12 147 653

Net cost (contribution) of outcome delivery 48 112 829 50 843 956

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AUSTRALIAN WAR MEMORIAL ANNUAL REPORT 2014-2015

NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS For the period ended 30 June 2015

20. BUDGETARY REPORTS AND EXPLANATIONS OF MAJOR VARIANCES

20A. Budgetary Reports

STATEMENT OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME for the period ended 30 June 2015 Budget estimate

Actual Original1 Variance2

2015 2015 2015

$ $ $ % Ref

EXPENSES

Employee benefits 23 329 252 25 898 000 2 568 748 10%

Supplier 24 488 163 23 019 000 (1 469 163) (6%)

Depreciation and amortisation 19 824 597 20 580 000 755 403 4%

Write-down and impairment of assets 60 531 - (60 531)

Losses from asset sales 6 761 - (6 761)

Total expenses 67 709 304 69 497 000 1 787 696

OWN-SOURCE INCOME

Own-source revenue

Sale of goods and rendering of services 4 975 521 3 255 000 (1 720 521) (53%) (i)

Interest from deposits 2 558 612 2 470 000 (88 612) (4%)

Resources received free of charge 796 508 - (796 508)

Donations and sponsorships 10 819 872 5 700 168 (5 119 704) (90%) (ii)

Other revenue 380 666 138 832 (241 834) (174%) (iii)

Total own-source revenue 19 531 179 11 564 000 (7 967 179)

Gains

Gains from sale of assets 65 296 - (65 296)

Total gains 65 296 - (65 296)

Total own-source income 19 596 475 11 564 000 (8 032 475)

Net cost of services 48 112 829 57 933 000 9 820 171

Revenue from Government 44 008 000 47 808 000 3 800 000 8% (iv)

(Deficit) Surplus (4 104 829) (10 125 000) (6 020 171)

OTHER COMPREHENSIVE INCOME

Items not subject to subsequent reclassification to profit or loss

Changes in asset revaluation surplus3 4 423 109 - (4 423 109)

Total other comprehensive income 4 423 109 - (4 423 109)

Total comprehensive (loss) income 318 280 (10 125 000) (10 443 280) 103%

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AUSTRALIAN WAR MEMORIAL ANNUAL REPORT 2014-2015

NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS For the period ended 30 June 2015

STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL POSITION As at 30 June 2015

Budget estimate

Actual Original1 Variance2

2015 2015 2015

$ $ $ % Ref

ASSETS

Financial assets

Cash and cash equivalents 7 109 567 1 202 000 (5 907 567) (491%) (v)

Trade and other receivables 1 045 213 876 000 (169 213) (19%) (vi)

Investments 61 000 000 61 000 000 - -

Accrued interest 1 190 859 1 255 000 64 141 5%

Total financial assets 70 345 639 64 333 000 (6 012 639)

Non-financial assets

Land and buildings 143 489 809 139 456 000 (4 033 809) (3%)

Property, plant and equipment 5 679 510 5 556 000 (123 510) (2%)

Heritage and cultural assets 1 018 562 197 1 018 646 000 83 803 -

Exhibitions 42 574 569 42 546 000 (28 569) -

Intangibles 4 664 104 4 241 000 (423 104) (10%)

Inventories 734 047 687 000 (47 047) (7%)

Prepayments 656 804 298 000 (358 804) (120%) (vii)

Total non-financial assets 1 216 361 040 1 211 430 000 (4 931 040)

Total assets 1 286 706 679 1 275 763 000 (10 943 679)

LIABILITIES

Payables

Suppliers 1 480 724 1 608 000 127 276 8%

Other payables 1 025 710 29 000 (996 710) (3437%) (vi)

Total payables 2 506 434 1 637 000 (869 434)

Provisions

Employee provisions 9 004 486 9 133 000 128 514 1%

Total provisions 9 004 486 9 133 000 128 514

Total liabilities 11 510 920 10 770 000 (740 920)

NET ASSETS 1 275 195 759 1 264 993 000 (10 202 759)

EQUITY

Contributed equity 96 152 000 96 152 000 - -

Asset revaluation reserves 620 479 581 616 056 000 (4 423 581) (1%)

Retained surplus 558 564 178 552 785 000 (5 779 178) (1%)

Total equity 1 275 195 759 1 264 993 000 (10 202 759)

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AUSTRALIAN WAR MEMORIAL ANNUAL REPORT 2014-2015

NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS For the period ended 30 June 2015

STATEMENT OF CHANGES IN EQUITY for the period ended 30 June 2015

Retained earnings Asset revaluation surplus Contributed equity/capital Total equity

Budget estimate Budget estimate Budget estimate Budget estimate

Actual Original

1

Variance

2

Actual Original

1

Variance

2

Actual Original

1

Variance

2

Actual Original

1

Variance

2

2015 2015 2015 2015 2015 2015 2015 2015 2015 2015 2015 2015

$ $$ $ $$ $ $$ $ $$

Opening balance 1 July

Balance carried forward from previous period 562 669 006 562 910 000 240 994 616 056 472 616 056 000 (472) 83 708 000 96 152 000 12 444 000 1 262 433 478 1 275 118 000 12 684 522

Adjusted opening balance 562 669 006 562 910 000 240 994 616 056 472 616 056 000 (472) 83 708 000 96 152 000 12 444 000 1 262 433 478 1 275 118 000 12 684 522

Comprehensive Income

Surplus (Deficit) for the period (4 104 829) (10 125 000) (6 020 171) -

- - - - - (4 104 829) (10 125 000) (6 020 171)

Other comprehensive income - - - 4 423 109 - (4 423 109) - -- 4 423 109 - (4 423 109)

Total comprehensive income attributable to the Australian Government

(4 104 829) (10 125 000) (6 020 171) 4 423 109 - (4 423 109) - - - 318 280 (10 125 000) (10 443 280)

Transactions with owners

Contributions by owners

Equity injection - - - - - - 12 444 000 - (12 444 000) 12 444 000 - (12 444 000)

Total transaction with owners - -

- - - - 12 444 000 - (12 444 000) 12 444 000 - (12 444 000)

Closing balance attributable to Australian Government 558 564 178 552 785 000 (5 779 178) 620 479 581 616 056 000 (4 423 581)

96 152 000 96 152 000 - 1 275 195 759 1 264 993 000 (10 202 759)

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AUSTRALIAN WAR MEMORIAL ANNUAL REPORT 2014-2015

NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS For the period ended 30 June 2015

CASH FLOW STATEMENT for the period ended 30 June 2015

Budget estimate

Actual Original1 Variance2

2015 2015 2015

$ $ $ % Ref

Operating activities

Cash received

Receipts from Government 44 008 000 47 761 000 3 753 000 8%

Sales of goods and rendering of services 4 728 249 3 255 000 (1 473 249) (45%) (i)

Interest 2 880 850 2 470 000 (410 850) (17%)

Net GST received 3 658 040 - (3 658 040)

Donations and sponsorships 10 331 171 3 505 000 (6 826 171) (195%) (ii)

Other 266 931 2 034 000 1 767 069 87% (iii)

Total cash received 65 873 241 59 025 000 (6 848 241)

Cash used

Employees (23 439 211) (25 901 000) (2 461 789) 10%

Suppliers (28 140 412) (23 019 000) 5 121 412 (22%) (viii)

Total cash used (51 579 623) (48 920 000) 2 659 623

Net cash from operating activities 14 293 618 10 105 000 (4 188 618)

Investing activities

Cash received

Proceeds from sales of property, plant and equipment

65 296 - (65 296)

Investments 89 000 000 76 500 000 (12 500 000) (16%) (v)

Total cash received 89 065 296 76 500 000 (12 565 296)

Cash used

Purchase of property, plant, equipment and intangibles

(31 402 990) (34 843 000) (3 440 010) 10%

Investments (83 000 000) (64 500 000) 18 500 000 (29%) (v)

Total cash used (114 402 990) (99 343 000) 15 059 990 (15%)

Net cash used by investing activities (25 337 693) (22 843 000) 2 494 693

Financing activities

Cash received

Contributed equity 12 444 000 12 444 000 - -

Total cash received 12 444 000 12 444 000 -

Net cash from financing activities 12 444 000 12 444 000 -

Net (decrease) / increase in cash held 1 399 925 (294 000) (1 693 925)

Cash and cash equivalents at the beginning of the reporting period 5 709 642 1 496 000 (4 213 642)

Cash and cash equivalents at the end of the reporting period 7 109 567 1 202 000 (5 907 567)

1. The Memorial’s original budgeted financial statement that was first presented to parliament in respect of the reporting period (that is, from the Memorial’s 2014-15 Portfolio Budget Statements (PBS)).

2. Between the actual and original budgeted amounts for 2015. Explanations for major variances are provided at Note 20B below.

3. No budget was developed for asset revaluation increments.

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AUSTRALIAN WAR MEMORIAL ANNUAL REPORT 2014-2015

NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS For the period ended 30 June 2015

20B. Major Budget Variances for 2015 Affected line items (and statement) Explanations of major variances

(i) (53%) Own-Source Revenue - Sale of goods and rendering of services (Statement of Comprehensive Income) Increase in revenue through retail and online sales attributable to interest in the Centenary of Anzac and

higher than expected visitor numbers. (45%) Operating Activities - Cash received - Sales of goods and rendering of services (Cash Flow Statement)

(ii) (90%) Own-Source Revenue - Donations and Sponsorships (Statement of Comprehensive Income) Donations, sponsorships and bequests received that were not anticipated at the time of framing the

budget. (195%) Operating Activities - Cash received - Donations and Sponsorships (Cash Flow Statement)

(iii) (174%) Own-Source Revenue - Other revenue (Statement of Comprehensive Income) Increase in revenue attributable to increases in royalties and licensing income and rental income

(Treloar F). 87% Operating Activities - Cash received - Other (Cash Flow Statement)

(iv) 8% Revenue from Government (Statement of Comprehensive Income) Approved movement of funds to future years.

(v) (491%) Assets - Financial assets - Cash and cash equivalents (Statement of Financial Position) Cash on hand transitions between operating accounts and decisions to place investments depend on cash

liquidity requirements, and fluctuate during the period. (16%) Investing Activities - Cash received - Investments (Cash Flow Statement)

(29%) Investing Activities - Cash used - Investments (Cash Flow Statement)

(vi) (19%) Assets - Financial assets - Trade and other receivables (Statement of Financial Position) Increased interest in Centenary of Anzac activities has led to higher retail and online sales, which are

often prepaid. Invoices for licensing fees for the use of the Memorial’s centenary logo have also increased. Increased sales result in increased inventory purchases.

(3437%) Liabilities - Payables - Other payables (Statement of Financial Position)

(vii) (120%) Assets - Financial assets - Prepayments (Statement of Financial Position) The variation in the level of prepayments reflects the timing, period and the nature of the amounts being

paid. In 2013-14 many prepayments for software support reached the final year of their arrangements, so the amount remaining as prepaid was minimal. As these arrangements were renewed in 2014-15 the level of prepayments increased.

(viii) (22%) Operating Activities - Cash used - Suppliers (Cash Flow Statement) The final result reflects the timing and total value, excluding GST, of supplier invoices on hand at the

year’s end.

| 109 AUSTRALIAN WAR MEMORIAL ANNUAL REPORT 2014-2015

7

APPENDICES

APPENDIX 1

Council membership

Chair Rear Admiral K.A. Doolan AO RAN (Retd) - reappointed 12 November 2012

Members Air Marshal G.C. Brown AO - appointed July 2011

Mr L. Carlyon AC - appointed 12 June 2014

The Honourable G.J. Edwards AM - appointed 3 June 2013

Vice Admiral T. Barrett AO CSC RAN - appointed 1 July 2014

Lieutenant General D.L. Morrison AO - term concluded 15 May 2015

Lieutenant General A. Campbell DSC AM - appointed 16 May 2015

Ms J. Segal AM - appointed 19 June 2014

Mr K.M. Stokes AC - appointed 4 August 2014

Ms G. Trainor - appointed 30 June 2013

Mrs J. Stone AM - appointed 26 February 2015

Brigadier A. Creagh CSC - appointed 26 March 2015

Major General G. Melick AO RFD FANZCN SC - appointed 26 March 2015

Mr P.J. FitzSimons AM - term concluded 29 April 2015

Dr A. Hawke AC - term concluded 20 March 2015

Major General J.P. Stevens AO (Retd) - term concluded 20 March 2015

Profiles of Council Members can be found in Appendix 2.

A fur “overboot” salvaged from the crashed aircraft of Baron Manfred von Richthofen, otherwise known as the “Red Baron”, by Australian troops in 1918. RELAWM00705

ES

A fur “overboot” salvaged from von Richthofen, otherwise know troops in 1918. RELAWM00705

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AUSTRALIAN WAR MEMORIAL ANNUAL REPORT 2014-2015

Council Committee membership Note: The Chief of Navy, the Chief of Army, and the Chief of Air Force (ex officio members of Council) are usually not formally Committee members, but are invited to attend all Standing Committee meetings other than Remuneration.

Finance, Audit, and Compliance Committee Major General J.P. Stevens AO (Retd) - Chair to 10 March 2015 Ms J. Segal AM - Chair from 10 March 2015 The Honourable G.J. Edwards AM Dr A. Hawke AC - to 10 March 2015 Ms G. Trainor - from 10 March 2015 Major General G. Melick AO RFD FANZCN SC - Deputy Chair from 20 May 2015

In attendance: Director, Australian War Memorial Assistant Director, Corporate Services Chief Finance Officer

Invited members for relevant portions of the meeting: Representatives from the Australian National Audit Office (ANAO) Representatives from Internal Audit

Terms of reference

Objective The Finance, Audit, and Compliance Committee (the Committee) is established as an advisory committee to provide independent assurance and advice to Council on the Memorial’s risk, control, and compliance framework, financial statement responsibilities, legislative and policy compliance, and internal and external audit activities.

Sub-committees To assist the Committee in meeting its responsibilities, the following sub-committees are established:

Audit and Risk The principle responsibilities of the Audit and Risk Sub-committee are:

• approval of internal annual and strategic audit plans;

• review of all audit reports and advice to the Director on action to be taken on any matters of concern raised in a report of the internal or external auditors;

• recommendation on certification of the annual financial statements;

• assurance, through the audit function, that a suitable risk management and internal control framework is developed and implemented by Memorial management; and

• assurance, through the audit function, that the Memorial management activity is fully compliant with relevant laws and regulations.

Finance and Budget The principle responsibilities of the Finance and Budget Sub-committee are:

• scrutiny and monitoring of the management and reporting of financial performance;

• review of and advice to the Director on the development of budgets and financial estimates; and

• endorsement of long-term capital funding and investment strategies.

Membership of the Committee Membership of the Committee will comprise up to five members of Council (excluding the Chair of Council), all of whom shall be independent of management. The Chair of Council, the Director, the Assistant Director and Branch Head, Corporate Services, and the Chief Finance Officer will also attend the Committee meetings. Invited members for the Audit and Risk Sub-committee will comprise representatives from the Australian National Audit Office and the Australian War Memorial Internal Audit Team.

Members will be appointed by Council for an initial term of three years. An extension of the term will be subject to a review of each member’s performance and contribution to the Committee. The Committee will elect a Chair from among its members. The Chair should be elected for a minimum period of one year and should preferably have served as a member of the Committee before becoming Chair. An alternative Chair will be appointed at any meeting where the Chair is unable to attend.

Responsibilities of Committee members Members of the Committee are expected to understand and observe the legal requirements of the Australian War Memorial Act 1980 and other relevant legislative instruments. Members are also expected to:

• act in the interests of the Memorial;

• apply good analytical skills, objectivity, and good judgement; and

• express opinions constructively and openly, raise issues that relate to the Committee’s responsibilities, and pursue independent lines of enquiry.

Skills, experience, and qualities of Committee members To be fully effective in supporting Council, the Committee must: be independent of management; understand the accountability relationships and their impact on financial performance, risk, and controls; and maintain a good relationship with management and internal and external auditors.

Members must have an understanding of the business of the Memorial and the ability to ask relevant questions of management and internal and external auditors. Members

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should have sufficient understanding of the Memorial’s financial reports and audit requirements as well as some broad business and/or financial management experience. At least one member of the Committee should have accounting or related financial management experience and/or qualifications and an understanding of accounting and auditing standards. If necessary, the Committee will seek external financial advice.

The Chair of the Committee should have the qualities and abilities to lead discussions, encourage openness and transparency in discussions, facilitate the participation of other members, and conduct meetings in a manner that establishes effective communications with all stakeholders for continuous improvement.

Frequency of meetings, quorum, and operation of the Committee The Committee will meet at least quarterly, prior to Council meetings, and at other times as necessary. A quorum will be deemed to exist when a majority of members is present.

Members, through the Chair, will have direct access to the Director; to the Assistant Director, Branch Head, Corporate Services; to the Chief Finance Officer; and to external and internal auditors as necessary on matters relating to the Committee’s function.

Minutes of the Committee’s meetings will be provided to Council for each quarterly meeting, based on the agenda of the Committee meeting and its principal responsibilities. Copies of the minutes will be available, as necessary, to ANAO or its subcontractor as part of the annual audit process. A summary report of matters dealt with will be issued to Council by the Committee after each meeting.

The Committee will review the performance of internal audit with Memorial management annually, and formally evaluate its own performance against its charter, with input sought from management, the Director, Council, and internal and external auditors.

Conflicts of interest Once each year, members of the Committee will provide written declarations declaring any potential or actual conflicts of interest they may have in relation to their responsibilities.

At the beginning of each meeting of the Committee members are required to declare any potential or actual conflicts of interest that may apply to specific matters on the meeting agenda. Where required by the Chair, the member will be excused from the meeting or from the Committee’s consideration of the relevant agenda item(s). Details of potential or actual conflicts of interest declared by members and action taken will be appropriately minuted.

Induction New members will receive relevant information and briefings on their appointment to assist them to meet their Committee responsibilities.

Assessment arrangements The Chair of the Committee, in consultation with the Chair of Council, will initiate an annual review of the performance of the Committee. The review will be conducted on a self-assessment basis, with appropriate input sought from Council members, Committee members, senior management, internal and external auditors, and other relevant stakeholders as determined by the Chairman of Council.

The Chair of the Committee will provide advice to Council on a member’s performance where an extension of the member’s tenure is being considered.

Review of terms of reference The Committee will review its terms of reference every two years, in consultation with Council. Any substantive changes will be recommended by the Committee and formally endorsed by Council.

Remuneration Committee Rear Admiral K.A. Doolan AO RAN (Retd) - Chair

The Honourable G. Edwards AM

Ms G. Trainor

Terms of reference The Remuneration Committee will:

• on Council’s behalf, agree annually with the Director of the Australian War Memorial the basis for his/her performance appraisal;

• on Council’s behalf, conduct the performance appraisal of the Director of the Australian War Memorial in accordance with the agreed Performance Appraisal and the Remuneration Guidelines laid down by the Minister for Veterans’ Affairs;

• communicate, as necessary, with the Remuneration Tribunal in relation to remuneration arrangements for the Director of the Australian War Memorial; and

• consider and pursue other matters that may be referred by Council concerning the Director or other senior management of the Australian War Memorial in relation to remuneration and conditions of service.

Council Membership Committee Rear Admiral K.A. Doolan AO RAN (Retd) - Chair to 11 March 2015

Ms G. Trainor - Chair from 20 May 2015

Mr L. Carlyon AC - from 20 May 2015

Brigadier A. Creagh CSC - from 20 May 2015

Terms of reference To provide advice to the Minister for Veterans’ Affairs through the Chair.

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Council Members’ Attendance

Council Committees

Member Eligible meetings Att Eligible meetings Att

Air Marshal G.C. Brown AO 4 3(1a ) - -

Mr L. Carlyon AC 4 4 - -

Rear Admiral K.A. Doolan AO RAN (Retd) 4 4 1 1

The Honourable G.J. Edwards AM 4 4 5 5

Mr P.J. FitzSimons AM 3 3 - -

Dr A. Hawke AC 3 3 - -

Lieutenant General D.L. Morrison AO 3 3 - -

Vice Admiral T. Barrett AO CSC RAN 4 1(3a ) - -

Ms J. Segal AC 4 2 3 3

Major General J.P. Stevens AO (Retd) 3 3 3 3

Mr K.M. Stokes AC 4 2 - -

Ms G. Trainor 4 4 3 3

Major General G. Melick AO RFD FANZCN SC 1 1 4 4

Brigadier A. Creagh CSC 1 1 - -

Lieutenant General A. Campbell DSC AM 1 1 - -

Mrs J. Stone AM 2 2 - -

a - Attended by deputy

APPENDIX 2

Council profiles

Chair Rear Admiral Ken Doolan AO RAN (Retd) was appointed to Council in November 2009 for a three-year term and again in 2012 for a further three years. He was elected Chair on 8 March 2012. Admiral Doolan joined the Royal Australian Navy as a 13-year-old cadet midshipman in 1953 and completed full-time service in 1993 in the rank of rear admiral. He served in the destroyer Vampire during the Confrontation with Indonesia in 1966 and in the guided missile destroyer Perth in 1970-71 during the Vietnam War. He was the first Commanding Officer of the amphibious heavy-lift ship Tobruk and commanded the guided missile destroyer Brisbane in the mid-1980s. During the Gulf Crisis and Gulf War of 1990-91, Admiral Doolan was Maritime Commander Australia, and was Operational Commander of all Australian combatant forces deployed to that conflict. He was appointed an Officer in the Order of Australia in January 1991. Admiral Doolan has filled several remunerated and honorary positions, including membership of the Defence Force Remuneration Tribunal, National Secretary of the Order of Australia Association, and President of the Australian Institute of Navigation. He has written several books and established a publishing firm. Admiral Doolan has served for many years as a member of the National Defence Committee of the Returned & Services League of Australia (RSL). In September 2009 he was elected National President of the RSL and has subsequently been re-elected annually to this position. From 2010 to 2011 Admiral Doolan was a

member of the National Commission for the Anzac Centenary, and in mid-2011 was appointed as an ex officio member to its successor, the Anzac Centenary Advisory Board. Other appointments include Chairman of the Forces Entertainment Board; Vice President of the Australian Institute of Navigation; member of the Defence Reserves Support Council; and member of the Hoc Mai Australia Vietnam Medical Research Foundation.

Vice Admiral Tim Barrett AO CSC RAN joined Council in July 2014 when he assumed command of the Royal Australian Navy. His naval career began in 1976 as a seaman officer and later specialised in aviation. A dual-qualified officer, Vice Admiral Barrett served in HMAS Melbourne, Perth, and Brisbane and HMS Orkney as a seaman officer and then as flight commander in HMAS Stalwart, Adelaide, and Canberra. His staff appointments include Deputy Director Air Warfare Development, Director Naval Officer’s Postings, and Director General of Defence Force Recruiting. He has served as Commanding Officer 817 Squadron, Commanding Officer HMAS Albatross, Commander Australian Navy Aviation Group, Commander Border Protection Command, and most recently as Commander of the Australian Fleet. Receiving a Conspicuous Service Cross in 2006 for his achievements in naval aviation, Vice Admiral Barrett became a Member of the Order of Australia in 2009 for his service as Director Naval Officers’ Postings and Commander Navy Aviation Group. He was made an Officer of the Order of Australia in 2014 for his leadership of Border Protection Command and the Australian Fleet. Vice Admiral Barrett holds a Bachelor of Arts in Politics and History and a Masters of Defence Studies, both from the

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University of New South Wales. He recently completed the Advanced Management Program at Harvard Business School

Council members Air Marshal Geoff Brown AO was appointed to Council in July 2011. He joined the RAAF in 1980, graduating from No. 111 Pilot’s Course in 1981. During the first half of his career Air Marshal Brown served in a number of positions, including 12SQN Amberley flying Chinooks, 2FTS Pearce as a Flying Instructor, CFS East Sale, as a member of the Roulettes, at Williamtown for Hornet conversion, 77SQN, and 75SQN Tindal as a Flight Commander. In 1993 Air Marshal Brown was posted back to 77SQN as the Executive Officer and in 1995 and was posted to HQ Air Command as Staff Officer Operational Evaluation. From 1997 to 2000 Air Marshal Brown commanded 3SQN. In 2000 he completed F-111 conversion and assumed the position of Officer Commanding 82WG. In 2003 he commanded all F/A-18 and C-130 operations in Operation Iraqi Freedom and was appointed a Member of the Order of Australia and a Legion of Merit for his service in the operation. He was Officer Commanding Airborne Early Warning and Control Systems Program Office from June 2003 until December 2004, and spent 2005 at the Centre for Defence and Strategic Studies. He then commanded Air Combat Group from 2006 until taking up an appointment as Director General Capability Planning in Air Force Headquarters. Air Marshal Brown was appointed Deputy Chief of Air Force in June 2008 and Chief of Air Force in July 2011. He was appointed an Officer in the Order of Australia in the Australia Day 2012 Honours List for his outstanding contribution to the RAAF and the Australian Defence Force.

Lieutenant General Angus Campbell DSC AM was appointed to Council in May 2015. He joined the Australian Army in 1981, graduating from the Royal Military College, Duntroon, in 1984. He was assigned to the Royal Australian Infantry Corps and initially served as a platoon commander in the 3rd Battalion (Parachute), Royal Australian Regiment (3RAR). He then served in troop and squadron command appointments within the Special Air Service Regiment. In 2001 he was appointed the Commanding Officer of 2RAR. While in command, the battalion group deployed to East Timor as a component of the United Nations Transitional Administration East Timor. Lieutenant General Campbell has also served in a range of staff appointments, including as Aide-de-Camp to the Chief of Army, as a strategic policy officer in Army Headquarters, as an instructor at the Australian Command and Staff College, and as Chief of Staff to the Chief of the Defence Force. In late 2005 he joined the Department of Prime Minister and Cabinet as a First Assistant Secretary to head the Office of National Security. He was subsequently promoted to Deputy Secretary and was then appointed Deputy National Security Adviser. In these roles he was responsible for the preparation of advice to the Prime Minister on national security matters and for coordinating the development of whole-of-government national security policy. Upon his return to the Australian

Defence Force in early 2010 he was appointed to the rank of Major General and led the Military Strategic Commitments staff in Defence Headquarters until January 2011, when he assumed command of Australian forces deployed in the Middle East Area of Operations. Lieutenant General Campbell subsequently served as Deputy Chief of Army from February 2012 to September 2013, when he was promoted to his current rank and put in command of the Joint Agency Task Force responsible for the implementation of Operation Sovereign Borders. Lieutenant General Campbell was appointed Australia’s Chief of Army on 16 May 2015. He holds a Bachelor of Science (Honours) from the University of New South Wales, a Master of Philosophy in International Relations from Cambridge University, and is a graduate of the Australian Army Command and Staff College.

Mr Les Carlyon AC was appointed to Council in June 2014 for a three-year term. He has previously served on Council from May 2006 and April 2009, each time for three-year terms. He has been editor of The Age, editor-in-chief of the Herald and Weekly Times group, and visiting lecturer in journalism at RMIT. He has received both the Walkley Award (1971 and 2004) and the Graham Perkin Journalist of the Year Award (1993). He is the author of Gallipoli, a bestseller in Australia, New Zealand, and Britain, and winner of the Queensland Premier’s History Prize. His most recent book, The Great War, published in 2006, was the joint winner of the Prime Minister’s prize for Australian history and was voted Book of the Year at the Australian Publishers’ Book Industry Awards. Mr Carlyon holds a Bachelor of Commerce degree from the University of Melbourne and was made a Companion of the Order of Australia in June 2014.

Brigadier Alison Creagh CSC (Retd) was appointed to Council in March 2015 for a three-year term. She is the Executive Director of the Spirit of Anzac Centenary Experience, a Non-Executive Director of the Repat Foundation, and a committee member on the Australian Peacekeeping Memorial Project. She retired from the Australian Army in March 2015 after a 30-year career in which she held such senior appointments as Commanding Officer Defence Force School of Signals, Chief CJ1 (Chief of Personnel) Headquarters International Assistance Force Afghanistan, Director-General Public Affairs, Director-General Strategic Communication, and Director-General ADF Theatre Project (The long way home). Having joined the Australian Army in 1985, she graduated from the Officer Cadet School, Portsea, to the Royal Australian Corps of Signals. Brigadier Creagh served on operations in Cambodia (United Nations Transitional Authority Cambodia) in 1993, East Timor (International Force East Timor) in 1999-2000, in Iraq in 2006, and in Afghanistan (Headquarters International Security Assistance Force) in 2008-09. Brigadier Creagh was awarded the Conspicuous Service Cross in 1994 for her work as Quartermaster, Force Communications Unit, in Cambodia, and she received the NATO Meritorious Service Medal in 2008 for her work as Chief CJ1 in Afghanistan. In 2014 she was awarded a Chief of the Defence Force Commendation for leading the ADF Theatre Project. Brigadier Creagh holds a Master of

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Management Studies, a Master of Defence Studies, a Graduate Diploma in Strategic Studies, and a Graduate Diploma in Communications and Information Systems Management, and she was awarded a scholarship to attend the Women’s Leadership Forum at Harvard Business School in 2014.

The Honourable Graham Edwards AM was appointed to Council in June 2010 for a three-year term and again in 2013 for a further three years. He is a Vietnam veteran and former Member of Parliament. He attended the Christian Brothers’ College in Perth and later Leederville Technical College. Mr Edwards was employed by Western Australian Government Railways, and served in the regular army for three years (1968-71), seeing active service in Vietnam with the 7th Battalion, Royal Australian Regiment, in 1970. Mr Edwards was wounded twice in Vietnam, the second time losing his legs to a “jumping jack” anti-personnel land mine. After discharging from the army and a period of rehabilitation he spent ten years with the Commonwealth Public Service in the Department of Defence, the Department of Veterans’ Affairs, and the Vietnam Veterans’ Counselling Service. Mr Edwards was elected as a Councillor with the City of Stirling in 1980, and in 1983 was elected to the Parliament of Western Australia. He served for 14 years, including seven years as a minister. In 1998 he was elected to the House of Representatives and retired in 2007. He was recognised by the RSL with the Anzac of the Year award in 1991 for his service to the veteran community, and has also been awarded the Rotary Paul Harris Fellow and the Lions Melvin Jones Fellow. He is a Life Member of the Vietnam Veterans’ Association. Mr Edwards was recently made a Freeman of the City of Wanneroo in Western Australia, and is a member of the Prime Minister’s Advisory Council on Veterans. Mr Edwards was appointed as a Member of the Order of Australia in the 2012 Queen’s Birthday Honours List for service to the parliament and to the community through contributions to veterans and disabled welfare.

Mr Peter FitzSimons AM was appointed to Council in March 2012. He is a renowned sports columnist, writer, journalist, and author. He was Australia’s bestselling non-fiction writer in 2001 and 2004 and is the author of nearly 20 books, including Kokoda, Tobruk, and his biographies of Kim Beazley, servicewoman Nancy Wake, and several sportsmen. He is a former Australian Rugby Union player and radio host on Sydney’s 2UE. He is currently a member of the Anzac Centenary Advisory Board. Mr FitzSimons was appointed a Member of the Order of Australia in the 2011 Queen’s Birthday Honours List for service to literature as a biographer, sports journalist, and commentator, and for service to the community through contributions to conservation, disability care, social welfare, and sporting organisations. Mr FitzSimon’s Council term concluded on 29 April 2015.

Dr Allan Hawke AC was appointed to Council in March 2012. He was previously High Commissioner to New Zealand, President of the Repatriation Commission, and Secretary of the Department of Veterans’ Affairs, the Department of Transport

and Regional Services, and the Department of Defence. He is a Fellow of the Australian Institute of Public Administration, the Australian Institute of Management, and the Australian Institute of Company Directors. Dr Hawke served a three-year term as Chancellor of the Australian National University from 2006 to 2009 and now serves on a range of public and private sector boards. Until recently he was Chair of the Prime Ministerial Advisory Council on Ex-Service Matters. He is also involved in charitable, community, and sporting organisations and was appointed a Companion of the Order of Australia in the 2010 Queen’s Birthday Honours List. Dr Hawke’s Council term concluded on 20 March 2015.

Major General Greg Melick AO RFD FANZCN SC was appointed to Council in March 2015. Based in Hobart, he is a Senior Counsel, and has served as a member of the Australian Defence Force (ADF) Reserves since 1966. He commanded at all levels from section to brigade before becoming Australia’s most senior Reserve officer in 2007, and in 2011 became the ADF’s Head, Centenary of Anzac Planning Team. Units in which he served include 2RNSWR, 1 Commando Company, 12/40 RTR, and the 8th Brigade. He has been a Principal Crown Counsel in the Tasmanian Crown Law Office, a Statutory Member of the National Crime Authority and the New South Wales Casino Control Authority, and was appointed a part-time Deputy President of the Administrative Appeals Tribunal in September 2014. He is Cricket Australia’s anti-corruption special investigator and has conducted several investigations, including the one into the Beaconsfield mine collapse. He is a member and former chair of the board of St John Ambulance Tasmania.

Lieutenant General David Morrison AO was appointed to Council in June 2011. He joined the Australian Army in 1979 and graduated from the Officer Cadet School, Portsea, to the Royal Australian Infantry Corps. Senior appointments include: Commanding Officer of the 2nd Battalion, Royal Australian Regiment (2RAR); Chief Instructor Command, Staff Operations Wing; Colonel Operations, Headquarters International Force East Timor (INTERFET); and Chief of Staff Deployable Joint Force Headquarters. On promotion to brigadier in 2002 he commanded the 3rd Brigade until 2004. Morrison was appointed Director-General Preparedness and Plans for the Australian Army in 2004 until his promotion to major general in 2005. Between 2006 and 2008 he was Commander of the Australian Defence Colleges, Head Military Strategic Commitments, and Deputy Chief of Army. He was appointed Land Commander Australia in 2008 and became the Australian Army’s first Forces Commander in 2009. Lieutenant General Morrison was made a Member of the Order of Australia in 1999 for his services as Brigade Major, Director of Preparedness and Mobilisation, and as Commanding Officer 2RAR, and was upgraded in 2010 to an Officer in the Order of Australia for his service as Commander Australian Defence College, Head Military Strategic Commitments, and Deputy Chief of Army. Lieutenant General Morrison was appointed

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Chief of Army in June 2011. His Council term concluded on 15 May 2015.

Ms Jillian Segal AM was appointed to Council in June 2014 for a three-year term. Currently, Ms Segal is a Non-Executive Director of the National Australia Bank, ASX Limited, the Garvan Institute of Medical Research and the Australia-Israel Chamber of Commerce. She is Deputy Chancellor of the University of New South Wales, and Chair of the General Sir John Monash Foundation, a national scholarship organisation. She is a Trustee of the Sydney Opera House Trust. She has previously held a range of other corporate and government board positions, including as a member of the federal government’s Remuneration Tribunal, Chair of Administration Review Council, and Chair of the Banking Industry Ombudsman Board (now FOS). From October 1997 to June 2002 Ms Segal was a Commissioner and later Deputy Chair of the Australian Securities and Investments Commission. Prior to this, Ms Segal was a partner at Allen, Allen & Hemsley (now Allens Linklaters). Ms Segal has a BA/LLB from the University of New South Wales and an LLM from Harvard Law School. She was awarded a Centenary Medal in 2003 for services to society through business leadership, and appointed a Member of the Order of Australia in 2005 for services to business law, particularly in the areas of financial services reform and market regulation.

Major General Paul Stevens AO (Retd) was appointed to Council in March 2012. He was the Repatriation Commissioner from 1997 to 2003 and Director of the Office of Australian War Graves from 2006 to 2010. He graduated from the Royal Military College, Duntroon, in 1967 and served in Vietnam with the 105th Field Battery and the Headquarters of the 1st Field Regiment, Royal Australian Artillery. He was the Australian Army’s Chief of Personnel from 1993 until his retirement in 1997. General Stevens was made an Officer of the Order of Australia in 1999 and was recently appointed Chair of the Ceremonial and Commemorative Working Group of the Anzac Centenary Advisory Board. General Stevens’ Council term concluded on 20 March 2015.

Mr Kerry Stokes AC was appointed to Council in August 2007 and again in April 2011. He is Chairman of Seven Group Holdings and Seven West Media. Seven Group Holdings - through WesTrac, one of the five biggest Caterpillar dealerships in the world - has a market-leading presence in media in Australia and the resource services sector in Australia and China. The company also has a significant investment in media, with major shareholdings in Seven West Media and Consolidated Media. Seven West Media brings together a market-leading presence in broadcast television through the Seven Network, magazines and newspaper publishing through Pacific Magazines and West Australian Newspapers, and online through Yahoo!7 and other expanding new communications platforms. Through his private holdings, Australian Capital Equity, Mr Stokes has broad business interests and investments in a range of major business sectors: property, construction, mining resources, oil, and gas exploration. In 2008 Mr Stokes

was the recipient of the Companion in the General Division in the Order of Australia, then Australia’s highest honour, having been awarded the Officer in the General Division of the Order of Australia in 1995. He holds a Centenary Medal for Corporate Governance, and presented the Boyer Lectures in 1994 and the Andrew Olle Lecture in 2001. Mr Stokes holds a Life Membership of the Returned and Services League of Australia and is a recipient of the Rotary Paul Harris Fellow Award. He is also a former Chair of the National Gallery of Australia. Mr Stokes’ Council term concluded on 6 April 2014, and was re-appointed on 4 August 2014.

Mrs Josephine Stone AM was appointed to Council on 26 February 2015 for a three-year term. She is a graduate of the Melbourne Law School, the first in her family of post- Second World War migrants to complete a university degree. Mrs Stone has worked in both private practice and public institutions in the Northern Territory, including with the Legal Aid Commission, where she managed the distribution of funds in the jurisdictions of civil and family law. During her time at the Law Society Northern Territory she was instrumental in developing the ethical and professional standards and guidelines for the Territory, as well as the introduction of the reformed Legal Profession Act, the largest piece of legislation in the Territory’s history. She has held various positions in a number of charitable organisations in Alice Springs and Darwin, and at 25 was the youngest person to be appointed Chair of the Zonta Club. Her later roles on the Chief Minister’s Womens’ Advisory Council and the Darwin Private Hospital Advisory Board saw the introduction of several new initiatives. In 1998 she chaired the Red Cross (Katherine Flood) Appeal, which raised substantial funds for the community and its surrounds. Mrs Stone has played an active role in various schools both in the Northern Territory and in Queensland. In 2006 she published a 100-year history of St Mary’s Primary School and inaugurated its alumni association. Mrs Stone was subsequently recognised as a member of the Order of Australia for her contribution to the legal profession and to the community for a variety of charitable activities over 25 years.

Ms Gabrielle Trainor was appointed to Council in June 2013. Her chair and director roles span public, private, not-for-profit and government organisations in industries including tourism, urban development, transport, education, the arts, and sport. Ms Trainor was a founding partner and co-owner of John Connolly & Partners, a communications and public affairs firm. Her present appointments include Chair of the National Film and Sound Archive, membership of the advisory board of Leighton Contractors, director of the Cape York Group, and membership of the board of trustees of the University of Western Sydney. She co-chaired the 2012 federal government review of the Australia Council for the Arts. Ms Trainor holds a Bachelor of Laws from the University of Melbourne and recently completed an MA in Cultural and Creative Practice. She is an Honorary Associate in the Graduate School of Government at Sydney University and a Fellow of the Australian Institute of Company Directors.

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Senior Staff profiles

Director Dr Brendan Nelson

Dr Brendan Nelson commenced as Director of the Australian War Memorial on 17 December 2012. Before this he was the Australian Ambassador to Belgium, Luxembourg, the European Union, and NATO (2009-12). Apart from overseeing a major transformation in Australia’s relationships with the European Union and NATO, Dr Nelson forged deep links with the communities of Flanders, where almost 13,000 Australians lost their lives during the First World War.

Dr Nelson studied at Flinders University, South Australia, where he graduated with a Bachelor of Medicine and Surgery. He worked as a medical practitioner in Hobart from 1985 to 1995. In 1993 he was elected unopposed as National President of the Australian Medical Association.

In 1996 Dr Nelson was elected to the Commonwealth Parliament of Australia. After the 2001 election he was promoted from his role as Parliamentary Secretary for Defence to the senior portfolio of Minister for Education, Science and Training, driving major reforms to universities and a focus on school standards and reporting. In 2006 he became Minister for Defence, during which time troops were deployed to Iraq, Afghanistan, East Timor, and the Solomon Islands. He oversaw major new investments in Defence, including the decision to purchase 24 FA-18F Super Hornets, three air warfare destroyers, two Landing Helicopter Docks, two additional battalions for the Australian Army, and a multi-billion-dollar recruitment and retention package. In November 2007 Dr Nelson was elected leader of the Liberal Party of Australia, serving as Leader of the Opposition until September 2008. The following year he retired from federal politics before taking up his ambassadorial appointment.

Senior Staff Rhonda Adler was appointed Assistant Director, Branch Head Corporate Services, in December 2007. Before taking up this role she held the position of Chief Finance Officer and Head of the Finance Section. She has a Bachelor of Economics from the Australian National University, majoring in accounting. Since joining the Memorial in 1981 she has held a number of different positions across all branches, has managed a number of initiatives, and has sponsored the implementation of e-Business. She has instigated many accounting reforms within the Memorial and has been recognised for her contribution to “whole-of-government” initiatives. She participates actively in external forums, especially to represent cultural agencies, and is the current Chair of the Cultural Institutions Corporate Management Forum. Rhonda attended the 2003 Museum Leadership Program (MLP) at the University of Melbourne Business School and has participated in the MLP Alumi Masterclass program since that time. She also holds the position of Company Secretary for the Australian War Memorial Anzac Foundation.

Anne Bennie was appointed Assistant Director, Branch Head Public Programs, in January 2015 and has continued to coordinate many projects for the Centenary of the First World War. Anne joined the Memorial in 2003 as e-Business Manager and in 2004 was appointed Head, Retail and Online Sales, which brought together the e-Business Unit and the Memorial Shop. Anne’s background is in private enterprise, where she held numerous analytical roles with Nielsen market research, followed by senior account management roles in advertising agencies. She has delivered strategy across a number of websites and e-commerce initiatives, with a strong focus on web integration, usability, and business outcomes. In 2012 Anne moved into the Centenary of the First World War Coordinator role to assist in managing the demand for Memorial services and projects in the lead-up to 2015. She completed the Cultural Management Development Program in 2005 and a Graduate Certificate in Public Sector Management in 2009.

Mark Campbell was appointed Head of Retail and Online Sales in November 2014. Mark has more than 15 years’ experience in retail, specifically in product development, buying, and operations. Before joining the Memorial, Mark was responsible for developing the full retail operation for the then new Wet’n’Wild theme park in Sydney. Mark has won a number of Worldwide Industry Awards for products he developed, and he is currently completing his MBA through Southern Cross University.

Major General Brian Dawson AM CSC (Retd) was appointed to the position of Anzac Centenary Travelling Exhibition Executive Manager on 11 December 2013 and has also taken on the role of Acting Head Collection Services. Before taking up this role he was as a member of a consultant project team that developed a proposal for the New South Wales Department of Transport regarding the implementation of a

APPENDIX 3

Memorial Director Dr Brendan Nelson with one of the schoolchildren recording names for the Roll of Honour Soundscape. Visitors to the Commemorative Area cloisters can hear the children reciting the names and ages of those listed on the First World War Roll of Honour.

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grain harvest management scheme (May to October 2013). In April 2013 he retired from the Australian Regular Army at the rank of Major General, having completed 40 years’ service. Senior appointments held during his time in the army included Australia’s first Military Representative to the North Atlantic Treaty Organisation (NATO) and the European Union (2010-13); Head of the Australian Department of Defence Public Affairs Organisation (2008-10); Deputy Commander of the Australian Joint Task Force in Iraq, based in Baghdad (2007-08); Commandant of the Australian Defence Force Academy (2006-07); and Chief of Staff Land Headquarters (2002-05). In 2000 he was made a Member of the Order of Australia for his work in Defence logistics, and was awarded the Conspicuous Service Cross for service in Somalia in 1995.

Ashley Ekins is Head of the Military History Section and has worked as a military historian at the Memorial for more than 25 years. A graduate of the University of Adelaide, he specialises in the history of the First World War and the Vietnam War. He has published widely, has presented at international conferences, and leads the Memorial’s annual battlefield tours to Gallipoli. His publications on the First World War include: 1918: year of victory: the end of the Great War and the shaping of history (published in 2010, shortlisted for the Templer Medal); War wounds: medicine and the trauma of conflict (with Elizabeth Stewart, 2011); and Gallipoli: a ridge too far (2013, revised edition 2015). He compiled and wrote the introduction to a special third edition of The Anzac book, the classic anthology of soldiers’ writings and art from Gallipoli (published 2010). He also researched and wrote two volumes of the Official history of Australian involvement in Southeast Asian conflicts 1948-1975 covering Australian ground operations in Vietnam: volume eight, On the offensive: the Australian Army in the Vietnam War, 1967-1968 (co-written with the late Dr Ian McNeill, published 2003); and volume nine, Fighting to the finish: the Australian Army and the Vietnam War 1968-1975 (published 2012).

David Fitzgerald joined the Memorial in 2006 in the Corporate Services Branch as Manager Buildings, became Acting Head of Buildings and Services in January 2013, and was promoted to this position in February 2015. David came to the Memorial from private enterprise, and has substantial facilities management experience. He has trade certificates for electrical and refrigeration services and has completed various facilities and business management courses. He was previously employed as Building Manager on Canberra Total Asset Management contracts, including the Department of Foreign Affairs and Department of Immigration and Citizenship buildings. David completed the Cultural Management Development Program in 2008.

Nick Fletcher began working at the Memorial in 1995 and was appointed Head of Military Heraldry and Technology in 2009. In March 2011 he was temporarily transferred to the Exhibitions Section as Concept Leader for the redevelopment of the First World War Galleries, a task completed with the

official opening of the new galleries in February 2015. He has a Bachelor of Arts (Graphic Design) and completed the Cultural Management Development Program in 2006. Nick became the first Memorial staff member to visit Afghanistan as an official curator in 2009, and made a second visit in 2011. He is also a regular leader of Australian War Memorial battlefield tours on both Gallipoli and the Western Front.

Frances Henderson has been Acting Head of Human Resources since April 2014. She joined the Memorial in May 2013 as the Manager of Performance and Employee Relations. Frances has held senior HR roles within both the public and private sectors, including ten years with the US Department of State, providing regional HR expertise throughout the South Pacific region. Frances has a business degree from Monash University and is a Certified Professional of the Australian Human Resources Institute.

Sarah Hitchcock first joined the Memorial’s Education and Visitor Services Section in August 2008 after 12 years with Australian Capital Tourism, serving her final year as General Manager. From 2010 to 2012 Sarah returned to the ACT government and held the position of Director of the Centenary of Canberra. Working with Creative Director Robyn Archer AO, Sarah led the formation and establishment of the Centenary of Canberra team, governance arrangements, and she prepared the program of events and activities scheduled for the centenary. Sarah re-joined the Memorial in September 2012 as Head of the Commemoration and Visitor Engagement Section. She is an active member of the Board of Management of the Tidbinbilla Nature Reserve and Birragai Education Centre.

Ryan Johnston was appointed Head of Art in October 2012. Before joining the Memorial he was Acting Director of the Shepparton Art Museum, where he oversaw a major redevelopment of the Museum and its subsequent re-launch. Ryan has also worked as a lecturer in the School of Creative Arts at the University of Melbourne. He is currently finalising his PhD on Scottish artist Eduardo Paolozzi, also at the University of Melbourne. His research has been published in local and international journals, including The Australian and New Zealand Journal of Art, The Journal of Surrealism and the Americas, and Broadsheet. He has also been recognised with several awards, including a Yale University Fellowship. Ryan was also a founding editor of emaj, Australia’s first online refereed journal of art history, and he is a current member of the boards of the Canberra Contemporary Art Space and the Canberra Youth Theatre.

Katherine McMahon is Head of Exhibitions and has worked at the Memorial since 2002. She has played an instrumental role in developing the strategic direction of the Memorial’s exhibitions program. She has overseen the delivery of seven major gallery redevelopment projects, with a combined value of approximately $70 million, and more than 20 temporary and travelling exhibitions. Katherine most recently oversaw the $32 million redevelopment of the Memorial’s historic and heritage-listed First World War Galleries. This project was a key

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part of the package of commemorative events and initiatives comprising the Australian government’s Anzac Centenary Program 2014-18. Katherine has a Bachelor of Arts (Art History and Curatorship) from the Australian National University.

Leanne Patterson has been Chief Finance Officer and Head of Finance since December 2007. She joined the Memorial in December 1999 as Manager, Financial Reporting and Analysis, and was primarily focused on developing the framework to support the funding, valuation and depreciation of the Memorial’s billion-dollar collection of heritage and cultural assets. As CFO Leanne has successfully influenced the outcome of government-wide financial and budget reforms as they relate to the Memorial, through regular participation in formal working groups, inquiries, and other consultative processes. She is an FCPA and has a Bachelor of Commerce (Accounting) from James Cook University. Leanne is an active member of the ACT CPA Public Sector Accountants Committee.

Hans Reppin is applying his expertise as a digital advocate and innovator to digital content management and preservation within a museum environment. His background includes a diverse range of managerial positions and technical responsibilities. Since March 2014 Hans has been the Head of Photographs, Film and Sound at the Memorial. Substantively, he manages the Multimedia and Digital Asset Management System. Hans’ specialised professional background encompasses digital preservation management, Prolab experience within the television industry (motion picture, news, traditional film base processing, exhibition, and commercial print outputs), and more than 20 years’ experience in press and production photography.

Tim Sullivan was appointed Assistant Director Branch Head National Collection in May 2013. He graduated from the University of Sydney, where he studied history, English literature, and education. Tim has qualifications in earth sciences and a Masters in management, with a focus on museum development from the University of Technology, Sydney. His career has encompassed technical and managerial roles in the Geological Survey of New South Wales, the New South Wales Department of Mineral Resources, the Australian Museum, and the Sovereign Hill Museums Association, Ballarat. For 1999-2000 he was a Visiting Fellow with the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of the American Indian in Washington DC. He is a member of the National Cultural Heritage Committee, a Senior Visiting Fellow of the University of Ballarat, and a member of the Museums Board of Victoria. He has served on a diverse range of committees promoting regional research and development, heritage management, commemorative projects, and museum development. He has contributed to national and international forums on museum practice and development and has written widely on the role of museums in promoting learning and developing regional heritage tourism.

Robyn van Dyk is Head of the Australian War Memorial’s Research Centre, in which capacity she leads the Research Centre team to develop, manage, preserve, and provide access to the Memorial’s archival and published collections. Robyn has curated a variety of exhibitions, including as co-curator of the MAGNA award winning exhibition Anzac voices (2014) and a joint exhibition with Australian Geospatial-Intelligence Organisation, Gallipoli to Afghanistan and the future: 100 years of mapping (2015). She is the concept leader for Anzac connections, the Memorial’s major centenary web project to enhance availability of and access to digital content. Robyn has produced museum-related publications and delivered papers at national conferences. In October 2012 she travelled to Afghanistan as the Memorial’s Official Curator, and spent several weeks observing conditions and collecting records and objects. Robyn will also partner with the Australian National University in an ARC-funded research project into Borneo in the Second World War.

Daryl Winterbottom joined the Memorial in 1989 to direct implementation of the Collection Management System, and established the Information Technology Section in 1992. Previously, his career involved electronics and computer technology, and included: the development of astronomy instrumentation at Mount Stromlo; the establishment of electronics support sections at the Royal Military College, Duntroon; and the implementation of computer networks at the Australian Defence Force Academy, University of New South Wales. He holds a Diploma of Applied Science from the University of Canberra and has managed the establishment, maintenance, and development of the Memorial’s information technology infrastructure and business-critical applications. He is an active member of IMSG, which sets and monitors strategic directions for information technology and management. He initiated and manages the Memorial’s new Enterprise Content Management project. He also represents the Memorial as the Chief Information Officer in government forums.

Allan Yates joined the Memorial as Head of Communications and Marketing in March 2014. He has a strong background as a communications and marketing manager and practitioner to state and federal government agencies, as well as to national and international organisations in the public and private sectors. He worked as a journalist in national and international media for almost 20 years, including 12 years in the Federal Parliamentary Press Gallery. He has a strong understanding of the requirements of institutional and corporate communications and marketing areas, and has worked at iconic national institutions such as the Australian Institute of Sport in the lead-up to the Sydney Olympics.

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APPENDIX 4

Selected VIP visits, events, and ceremonies

VIP visits 14 July 2014 Lieutenant General Mazhar Jamil, Military Secretary, Pakistan

22 July 2014 Department of Defence Delegation, Australia

3 August 2014 Department of Defence Delegation, Singapore

5 August 2014 General Raheel Sharif, Chief of Army Staff, Pakistan

6 August 2014 Major General Rustam Patnaik, Indian Army

6 August 2014 Major General Milinda Peiris, Vice Chancellor, Kotelawala Defence University, Sri Lanka

6 August 2014 General Shigeru Iwasaki, Chief of Staff of the Joint Staff Council, Japan Air Self-Defence Forces

7 August 2014 First World War Commemoration Group

20 August 2014 Major General Agung Risdhianto, Indonesia

20 August 2014 Her Excellency Dr Ruth Adler, Australian Ambassador to Ireland

2 September 2014 Parliamentary Delegation, Latin America

3 September 2014 Department of Defence Delegation, Singapore

4 September 2014 The Right Honourable Hugo Swire MP, Minister of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, United Kingdom

10 September 2014 Foreign Defence Attaché Delegation

12 September 2014 Rear Admiral Hideki Yuasa, Commander, Japanese Maritime Self-Defence Forces Training Squadron

14 September 2014 Mr Peter Watkins CBE, Director General of the Defence Academy of the United Kingdom

20 September 2014 General Vincent Brooks, Commanding General, United States Army

21 September 2014 General Sverker Göranson, Supreme Commander of the Swedish Armed Forces

23 September 2014 National Defence College Delegation, Bangladesh

23 September 2014 Political Delegation, United States of America

24 September 2014 Grand National Assembly, Turkey

24 September 2014 Rear Admiral Thorsten Kähler, Federal Ministry of Defence, Germany

25 September 2014 Congressman Michael J. Rogers, United States of America

29 September 2014 Mr Antonio José Cabral, Deputy Director General of Economic and Financial Affairs DG, European Commission

1 October 2014 The Right Honourable John Bercow MP, Speaker of the House of Commons, United Kingdom

3 October 2014 Major General Perry Lim, Chief of the Singapore Army

8 October 2014 Mr Kent Breedlove, Afghanistan Defense Intelligence Agency, United States of America

10 October 2014 Brigadier Adnan Saleem, Director of the Pakistan Army Museum

11 October 2014 Mr Daniel Smith, Assistant Secretary of State for Intelligence and Research, United States of America

14 October 2014 Major General Shahid Baig Mirza, Pakistan Army

15 October 2014 Vice Admiral Charles-Henri du Ché, International Relations and Partnerships, French Navy

29 October 2014 His Excellency Mr Burhan Gafoor, Singapore High Commissioner

3 November 2014 Mr Stephen Hadley, Lowy Institute for International Policy, United States of America

4 November 2014 His Beatitude and Eminence Patriarch Cardinal Mar Bechara Boutros Rai, Maronite Patriarch of Antioch and All the East

6 November 2014 Admiral Cecil Haney, Commander, United States Strategic Command, United States Navy

7 November 2014 United States of America and Japan Delegation

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8 November 2014 Mr László Kövér, Speaker of the National Assembly of Hungary

10 November 2014 Major General Haluk Sahar, Chief of Strategy and Force Planning Branch, Turkish Air Force HQ

14 November 2014 St Kilda Football Club, Australia

14 November 2014 The Right Honourable David Cameron MP, Prime Minister of the United Kingdom

17 November 2014 Admiral Tomohisa Takei, Chief of Staff, Japanese Maritime Self-Defence Force

18 November 2014 The Honourable Narendra Modi MP, Prime Minister of India

18 November 2014 Australian Cricket Team

19 November 2014 Mr François Hollande, President of the French Republic

22 November 2014 Lieutenant General John Wissler, Commanding General, III Marine Expeditionary Force, United States Marine Corps

23 November 2014 Police Major General Zaw Win, Director General of Myanmar Police Force

24 November 2014 General Mark Welsh III, Chief of Staff, United States Air Force

25 November 2014 Ministerial Delegation, Myanmar

27 November 2014 His Eminence Archbishop Dominique Mamberti, Secretary of Relations with States, Holy See

2 December 2014 Ms Cathy McGowan AO MP, Federal Member for Indi, Australia

8 December 2014 Mr Lionel Jospin, Former Prime Minister of France

11 December 2014 General Necdet Özel, Chief of the General Staff, Turkish Armed Forces

12 December 2014 His Excellency Mr Petro Poroshenko, President of the Ukraine & Her Excellency Mrs Maryna Poroshenko

17 December 2014 Ambassador Stephen Evans, Assistant Secretary General for Operations, NATO

17 January 2015 General Knud Bartels, Chairman of the NATO Military Committee

10 February 2015 Mr Avirmid Battur, Vice Minister of Defense, Mongolia

11 February 2015 His Excellency General the Honourable Sir Peter Cosgrove AK MC (Retd) Governor-General of the Commonwealth of Australia

11 February 2015 Mr Jacob Keidar, Inspector General of the Foreign Ministry, Israel

17 February 2015 General Knud Bartels, Chairman of the NATO Military Committee

22 February 2015 General Dennis Via, Commander, United States Army Materiel Command

23 February 2015 His Majesty King Harald V of Norway and Her Majesty Queen Sonja of Norway

3 March 2015 Parliamentary Delegation, Fiji

11 March 2015 Lieutenant General Chaichana Nakkerd, Commanding General, Counter Terrorism Operations Centre, Thailand

18 March 2015 Major General Antony Anderson, Chief of Defence Staff, Jamaica Defence Force

24 March 2015 Mr Jonisio Mara, Deputy Secretary, Ministry of Defense, Fiji

26 March 2015 His Excellency Mr Linas Linkevi ’ ius, Minister of Foreign Affairs, Lithuania

29 March 2015 Senate Delegation, Czech Republic

31 March 2015 Lieutenant General Christopher Burne, Judge Advocate General, United States Air Force

1 April 2015 Mr Uwe Beckmeyer, Parliamentary State Secretary at the Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs and Energy, and Federal Government Coordinator for the Maritime Industry, Germany

1 April 2015 Air Vice Marshal Shreesh Mohan VM, Assistant Chief of Air Staff (Intelligence), India

1 April 2015 Ms Christine Wormuth, Under Secretary of Defense for Policy, United States of America

6 April 2015 His Royal Highness Prince Henry of Wales

13 April 2015 Lieutenant Général Antoine Creux, Director General of the French Air Force

14 April 2015 General Tom Middendorp, Chief of Defence of the Armed Forces of the Netherlands

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15 April 2015 Major General Micael Bydén, Chief of Staff, Swedish Air Force

20 April 2015 Mr Keith Tan, Deputy Secretary (Policy), Ministry of Defence, Singapore

22 April 2015 His Excellency Mr Xanana Gusmão, Minister of Planning and Strategic Investment, Democratic Republic of Timor-Leste

23 April 2015 Air Marshal Atilla Gulan, Head of Logistics, Turkish General Staff

23 April 2015 Major General David Gawn MBE, Chief of Army, New Zealand

24 April 2015 Gold Coast Suns AFL Team

25 April 2015 His Royal Highness The Duke of Kent KG GCMG GCVO ADC(P), President of the Commonwealth War Graves Commission

25 April 2015 His Excellency Lieutenant General the Right Honourable Sir Jerry Mateparae GNZM QSO, Governor-General of New Zealand

25 April 2015 His Excellency Reha Keskintepe, Turkish Ambassador to Australia

27 April 2015 Major General David Cullen CB OBE, Assistant Chief of the General Staff, British Army

29 April 2015 Mr Kenji Harada, Parliamentary Vice-Minister for Defense, Japan

7 May 2015 His Excellency Mr Vladimir Morozov, Ambassador of Russia, and His Excellency Mr Viktar Shykh, Ambassador of Belarus

13 May 2015 Air Marshal Paul Evans CB QHP FRAeS, Surgeon General, Royal Air Force, United Kingdom

13 May 2015 His Excellency Mr Sumio Kusaka, Ambassador of Japan

14 May 2015 Mr Chan Yeng Kit, Permanent Secretary (Defence), Singapore

14 May 2015 Lieutenant General Georgios Paraschopoulos, Chief of Staff, Hellenic National Defence General Staff, Greece

25 May 2015 Mr Lee Seok Hyun, Deputy Speaker of the National Assembly, Republic of Korea

25 May 2015 His Excellency Mr Pier Francesco Zazo, Italian Ambassador to Australia

26 May 2015 Mr Abhay Tripathi, Joint Secretary and Senior Directing Staff (Civil Services), National Defence College, India

27 May 2015 Lieutenant General Anthony Ierardi, Deputy Chief of Staff G-8, United States Army

27 May 2015 The Honourable Rajiv Pratap Rudy, Union Minister of State (Independent Charge), Ministry of Skill Development and Entrepreneurship, Union Minister of State, Ministry of Parliamentary Affairs Special Invitee, Rules Committee, India

28 May 2015 His Excellency Lieutenant General the Right Honourable Sir Jerry Mateparae GNZM QSO, Governor-General of New Zealand, and Her Excellency Lady Janine Mateparae

2 June 2015 Ms Stephanie O’Sullivan, Principal Deputy Director of National Intelligence, United States of America

4 June 2015 Lieutenant General H.R. McMaster, Director, Army Capabilities Integration Center, and Deputy Commanding General, Futures, US Army Training and Doctrine Command, United States of America

15 June 2015 Mr Gorazd Žmavc, Minister for Slovenians Abroad, Slovenia

19 June 2015 His Excellency Mr Edgars Rinkevics, Minister of Foreign Affairs of the Republic of Latvia

19 June 2015 Mr Martin Chungong, Secretary General, Inter-Parliamentary Union, Geneva

23 June 2015 His Excellency the Honourable Hieu Van Le AO, Governor of South Australia

23 June 2015 Rear Admiral John Kingwell, Director, Development, Concepts and Doctrine Centre, United Kingdom

24 June 2015 Mr Ravi Kant, Joint Secretary, Ministry of Defence, India

26 June 2015 Lieutenant General John Toolan Jr, Commanding General, United States Marine Corps Forces, Pacific

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Events and Ceremonies 2 July 2014 Volume III of the Official history of peacekeeping, humanitarian and post-Cold War operations book launch

9 July 2014 Defence Indigenous wreathlaying ceremony

24 July 2014 Official launch of Poppy’s Café

24 July 2014 Public launch of Poppy’s Café

27 July 2014 Australian Army Training Team Vietnam wreathlaying ceremony

4 August 2014 Roll of Honour Soundscapes launch

4 August 2014 Roll of Honour Name Projections launch and Last Post Ceremony

26 August 2014 42nd Battalion, Australian Imperial Force, plaque dedication ceremony

29 August 2014 National Malaya and Borneo Veterans Association of Australia wreathlaying ceremony

3 September 2014 Battle for Australia wreathlaying ceremony

5 September 2014 National Student Leadership Forum

8 September 2014 National Servicemen’s Association of Australia wreathlaying ceremony

15 September 2014 Battle of Britain wreathlaying ceremony

17 September 2014 Australian Federation of Totally and Permanently Incapacitated Ex Servicemen and Women wreathlaying ceremony

19 September 2014 Royal Australian Army Pay Corps wreathlaying ceremony

3 October 2014 National Council of Women of Australia wreathlaying ceremony

5 October 2014 Australian Air League wreathlaying ceremony

12 October 2014 ACT Sole Piping and Drumming Championship Competition

13 October 2014 41st Battalion, Australian Imperial Force, plaque dedication ceremony

15 October 2014 Anzac treasures: the Gallipoli collection of the Australian War Memorial book launch

16 October 2014 Wandering Warriors Walk and Australian Special Air Service Plaque Dedication Ceremony

29 October 2014 Defence Widows Support Group wreathlaying ceremony

2 November 2014 Soldier On Ride 2 Remember

4 November 2014 Campbell High School wreathlaying ceremony

7 November 2014 Royal Australian Corps of Signals wreathlaying ceremony

10 November 2014 Roll of Honour Ceremony

11 November 2014 Remembrance Day National Ceremony

25 November 2014 First World War Galleries sponsors preview

26 November 2014 First World War Galleries politicians preview

11 December 2014 Ben Quilty: after Afghanistan and Alex Seton: as of today … joint exhibition launch and Last Post Ceremony

9 February 2015 Parliamentary Last Post Ceremony

21 February 2015 Napier Waller Reflection Ceremony

22 February 2015 Official opening of the First World War Galleries

27 February 2015 HMAS Perth wreathlaying ceremony and Last Post Ceremony

28 February 2015 Of words and war: poetry at the Memorial

2 March 2015 Australian Army Birthday wreathlaying ceremony and Last Post Ceremony

18-20 March 2015 Gallipoli 1915: a century on conference and Last Post Ceremony

21 March 2015 Operation Slipper Welcome Home Parade and Last Post Ceremony

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8 April 2015 Anzac Day aged care wreathlaying ceremony

13 April 2015 Tour de Legacy 2015 launch

18 April 2015 “On every Anzac Day” commemorative performance

25 April 2015 Anzac Day Dawn Service

25 April 2015 Anzac Day National Ceremony

25 April 2015 Anzac Day Last Post Ceremony

8 May 2015 Victory in Europe: a symposium and Last Post Ceremony

12 May 2015 Nurses and midwives wreathlaying ceremony

15 May 2015 Australian Hospital Ship Centaur wreathlaying and Last Post Ceremony

29 May 2015 National Sandakan Remembrance Day wreathlaying ceremony

31 May 2015 Bomber Command wreathlaying ceremony

12 June 2015 ACT RSL Congress wreathlaying ceremony

27 June 2015 Reserve Forces Day wreathlaying and Last Post Ceremony

28 June 2015 Rabual and Montevideo Maru wreathlaying ceremony

28 June 2015 23rd Field Regiment wreathlaying and Last Post Ceremony

30 June 2015 National Servicemen’s Association of Australia wreathlaying ceremony.

Ben Quilty: after Afghanistan, and Alex Seton with sculptures from his As of today… exhibition. These exhibitions were popular among visitors, portraying two different consequences of the Afghanistan conflict.

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APPENDIX 5 Key acquisitions and disposals

Acquisitions Art 1. Imants Tillers and the Australian Tapestry Workshop, Avenue of remembrance, 2015 (tapestry). This large-scale

tapestry is a commemorative response to the Centenary of Anzac, inspired by Keith Murdoch’s “Gallipoli letter” and funded through a generous donation from the Geoff and Helen Handbury Foundation.

2. Rosie Ware, Torres Strait Light Infantry Battalion, 2015 (textile tryptych). Rosie Ware is a senior Torres Strait Islander artist based on Muralag (Thursday Island). This work reflects on the experience of the Second World War in the Torres Strait.

3. Collection of nine portraits of Australian servicemen by Hilda Rix Nicholas, completed during the First World War. This rare collection of work provides new insight into the Australian experience of the First World War. It was acquired directly from the artist’s granddaughter with the support of the federal government’s National Cultural Heritage Account.

4. Eric Thake, Self portrait in a broken shaving mirror, 1945 (drawing).

5. Arthur Streeton, Amiens Cathedral, 1918 (oil on canvas).

Military Heraldry and Technology 1. The memorial cenotaphs used on ceremonial occasions by Australian personnel at Camp Holland and Camp Baker in Afghanistan were received and, after a period of display

outside the Memorial’s main entrance, have now been positioned for longer term display in the grounds. As a result of curatorial assessments undertaken in the field, a container-load of significant material collected from Tarin Kowt in Uruzgan province, Afghanistan, was also received.

2. The medals of Sergeant Jack Whittle VC DCM and Private Horace William “Slim” Madden GC were donated during the year. Both of Whittle’s awards were granted for extraordinary gallantry during the AIF’s advance to the Hindenburg Line in early 1917, while Madden’s posthumous George Cross for his humanity and stubborn resistance as a prisoner of war was the highest honour awarded to an Australian during the Korean War.

3. Other significant medal groups acquired include those of pioneer aviator Sir Patrick Gordon Taylor GC MC, First World War prisoner-of-war escapee Herbert Johnson MC, Indigenous serviceman Charlie Burns, who saw overseas service in both world wars, and Herman Bottcher, a German-American who lived in Australia for ten years before the Second World War and was highly decorated as a US soldier before being killed in 1944.

4. An important purchase for the technology collection was an ornately carved Mauser rifle captured in South Africa during the Boer War by Trooper William Bell of the 5th Victorian Mounted Rifles.

Photographs, Film and Sound 1. An aesthetically and historically significant donation of more than 300 photographs by Gervaise Purcell, a professional Second World War photographer and

“camoufleur”. Purcell was a member of the Australian Camouflage Unit whose job it was to advocate for and design camouflage appropriate to local conditions.

2. A donation by Richard Denison of his documentary film, Boys of the Dardanelles, and interviews of First World War veterans recorded at the Australian War Memorial and Government House in 1985. The interviews comprise three hours of pristine colour negative and original audio, and were shot at the inaugural opening of the Memorial’s Gallipoli Gallery. This would have been among the last opportunities to document the lives of the 200 surviving Gallipoli veterans. The footage includes extended interviews with a number of these veterans, and 80 per cent of this footage has never been seen outside the editing studio.

3. Footage of HMAS Canberra (III) entering Sydney Harbour, including its commissioning ceremony, which features speeches from His Excellency General the Honourable Sir Peter Cosgrove AK MC (Retd) and the former Prime Minister, the Honourable Tony Abbott MP. The footage was provided by Andrew Dakin on behalf of Navy Imagery East, Garden Island.

4. A rare collection of 15 superb vintage panoramic photographs of Gallipoli taken in May-June 1915. Three of the photographs in this set are of the little-known airfield that was temporarily located at Cape Helles. They show a Maurice Farman biplane MF465, attached to No. 3 Squadron, Royal Naval Air Service, then based on the nearby island of Tenedos. These planes were used to take the aerial photographs of the Gallipoli peninsula.

5. Ten images by acclaimed photojournalist Ben Bohane, who was embedded with Guam Battalion and other units in Afghanistan from 2 October to 2 November 2013. These photographs represent Australian soldiers with indigenous backgrounds currently serving within the Australian Defence Force (ADF) and include Papua New Guineans, Solomon Islanders, Maoris, and Indigenous Australian soldiers. The images also show contemporary technology in dealing with IEDs (Improvised Explosion Devices) and modern-day camp life, large technology items, uniforms, and ammunition currently used by the ADF.

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Research Centre 1. Vietnam Battle Intelligence Computer tapes used in Vietnam in the first ever computer database used by Australians in a combat theatre.

2. Maritime Headquarters signals from the First Gulf War (1990-91). These comprise 95 boxes of signals and other material covering the whole period of the war under Operation Damask.

3. An original, signed Second World War surrender document from Morotai Island, acquired in September 1945 by a soldier serving in the lithography unit that printed it.

4. The personal log from HMAS Sydney (I). The unidentified author tracks events on the ship from the time of its commissioning in June 1913 until Christmas Day 1915. It includes a description of the Sydney-Emden battle as well as other activities during this period.

5. Seven letters written by General Sir Harry Chauvel dating from the Boer War and the First World War. These include a detailed and descriptive letter containing some passages included in Hill’s biography of Chauvel.

6. The original diary of Able Seaman Harry Lambert of the Australian Naval and Military Expeditionary Force, 1914. Lambert served with the Naval Brigade and participated in the initial landings and fighting in German New Guinea.

7. The 500-letter collection of Chief Warrant Officer Alexander Scott Cameron, compiled during his service in the Boer War and the First World War with the Royal Australian Naval Bridging Train.

Disposals

Military Heraldry and Technology 1. Three collection items were de-accessioned for presentation to the Turkish government on the centenary of the Gallipoli campaign: RELAWM01093 (folding

periscope), RELAWM07804 (Turkish cricket ball grenade from Hill 60), and REL/00092.001 and .002 (Anzac Day marching banner of the 2nd Divisional Train AASC).

Photographs, Film and Sound 1. One photographic object (P11621.001) was de-accessioned. This inferior duplicate was replaced with a high-quality original.

Research Centre 1. Disposal of 5.5 shelf metres of Second World War Department of Home Security records. The collection, including diagrams and photographs, was transferred to

the National Archives of Australia under the NAA-AWM Agreement 2000.

BELOW: Visitors watch a fly-over as part of the Operation Slipper Welcome Home Parade. In the foreground are the two recently installed memorials from Camp Russell and Camp Holland in Afghanistan.

BELOW RIGHT: Memorial Director Dr Brendan Nelson accepts a mixed donation from Paul and Megan Jolly, the material of which once belonged to Captain Charles Jolly.

Handovers: Lieutenant General Laurie O’Donnell AC (Retd) (left) donates his father’s medals to the Memorial. The medals were accepted by Mr Tim Sullivan, Assistant Director, Branch Head National Collection.

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APPENDIX 6

Travelling exhibitions Total travelling exhibitions visitation: 1 July 2014 to 30 June 2015

From To

Shaun Gladwell: Afghanistan

Anne and Gordon Samstag Museum of Art, Adelaide, SA 04/04/2014 18/07/2014

John Curtin Gallery, Perth, WA 02/08/2015 14/09/2015

Nurses: from Zululand to Afghanistan

Roma on Bungil gallery, Roma, QLD 27/06/2014 03/08/2014

Museum of Tropical Queensland, Townsville, QLD 04/09/2014 26/10/2014

Remember me: the lost diggers of Vignacourt

Queensland Museum, Southbank, QLD 05/07/2014 20/07/2014

State Library of South Australia, Adelaide, SA 05/08/2014 19/10/2014

State Library of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 01/11/2015 18/01/2015

Western Australian Museum, Perth, WA 06/06/2015 30/08/2015

Ben Quilty: after Afghanistan

John Curtin Gallery, Perth, WA 02/08/2015 14/09/2015

Flinders University Art Museum and City Gallery, Adelaide, SA 27/09/2014 30/11/2014

Australian War Memorial, Canberra, ACT 11/12/2014 17/06/2015

Reality in flames: modern Australian art and the Second World War

New England Regional Art Museum, Armidale, NSW 24/04/2014 13/07/2014

Gosford Regional Gallery, Gosford, NSW 19/07/2014 07/09/2014

Rockhampton Art Gallery, Rockhampton, QLD 11/10/2014 30/11/2014

A camera on Gallipoli (framed)

Norman Lindsay Gallery and Museum, Faulconbridge, NSW 08/08/2014 14/09/2014

Berrima District Museum, Berrima, NSW 26/01/2015 22/03/2015

A camera on Gallipoli (graphic)

Royal Automobile Club of Australia, Sydney, NSW 15/08/2014 31/08/2014

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A camera on Gallipoli (graphic/powerpoint)

New South Wales

Alliance Française de Sydney Sydney

Australian Rotary Health Parramatta

Banks Public School St Clair

Bathurst Regional Council Bathurst

Bega Valley Genealogy Society Pambula

Bega Valley Historical Society Bega

Bulahdelah War Memorial trust Bulahdelah

Camden Council Library Service Camden

Camden Show Society Camden

City of Canterbury Council Campsie

Clyde River and Batemans Bay Historical Society Batemans Bay

Concord District RSL Sub-Branch Concord West

Council of the City of Ryde Ryde

Danebank Anglican School for Girls Hurstville

Dharug and Lower Hawkesbury Historical Society Gunderman

Gilgandra Shire Council Gilgandra

Goulburn Public School Goulburn

Grafton Library Grafton

Gresford Public School Gresford

Gundaroo and District Historical Society Gundaroo

Gunning and District Historical Society Gunning

Gwydir Shire Council Bingara

Hawkesbury City Council Windsor

Holroyd City Council Merrylands

Jervis Bay Maritime Museum Huskisson

Kingsgrove RSL Sub-Branch Kingsgrove

Ku-ring-gai Council Gordon

Kurrajong Community Forum Kurrajong

Kurrajong-Comleroy Historical Society Kurrajong

Lake Macquarie City Council Speers Point

Lane Cove Library Lane Cove

Lithgow City Council Lithgow

Liverpool City Council Liverpool

Lord Howe Island Historical Society and Museum Lord Howe Island

Maitland Regional Art Gallery Maitland

Mayflower Village Gerringong Gerringong

Merimbula-Imlay Historical Society Merimbula

Murringo Community Association Murringo

North Sydney Council North Sydney

NSW Office of State Revenue Parramatta

Orange City Library Orange

Penrith City Council Penrith

Petersham RSL Club Petersham

Primrose Park Photography Cremorne

Riverina Regional Library Wagga Wagga

Rotary Club of Belrose Forestville

Singleton Shire Council Singleton

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St Aloysius’ College Cadet Unit Kirribilli

St Luke’s Grammar School Dee Why

Tenterfield Shire Council Tenterfield

The Hills Shire Council Castle Hill

Tilba Anzac Exhibition Committee Tilba Tilba

Toukley Library, Wyong Shire Council Toukley

Tumut Show Society Tumut

Waverley Council Bondi Junction

Wyong Family History Group Wyong

Wyong Shire Council Library Tuggerah

Northern Territory

Alice Springs RSL Alice Springs

City of Darwin Libraries Darwin

Northern Territory Officers’ Ball Committee

Queensland

Augathella Diggers Rodeo Association Augathella

Blackall-Tambo Regional Council Blackall

Caboolture East State School Caboolture

Cooktown Historical Centre Cooktown

Currumbin RSL Currumbin

Headquarters 1st Division Enoggera

Hinchinbrook Shire Council Hinchinbrook

Mareeba State School Mareeba

Moreton Bay Regional Council Moreton Bay

Mount Isa City Council Owned Enterprises Mount Isa

Rockhampton Agricultural and Citizens Show Society Rockhampton

South Burnett Regional Council Kingaroy

St George RSL Sub-Branch St George

St Joseph’s College, Gregory Terrace Spring Hill

Tablelands Regional Council Atherton

Tamborine Mountain State School Tambourine Mountain

Townsville City Council Townsville

Waltzing Matilda Centre and Dinosaur Stampede Winton

South Australia

Barossa Regional Gallery Tanunda

City of Port Lincoln Port Lincoln

Mount Gambier Library Mount Gambier

State Library of South Australia Adelaide

Tasmania

Australasian Military Medicine Association Hobart

Department of Veterans’ Affairs Hobart

Learning Services (South) Department of Education Warrane

Victoria

Alfred Deakin Prime Ministerial Library Geelong

Bass Coast Shire Council Wonthaggi

Brauer Secondary College Warrnambool

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Coimadai Avenue of Honour Restoration Association Long Forest

Fort Queenscliff Museum Queenscliff

Gallipoli and Beyond Camberwell

Hatch Contemporary Arts Space Banyule

Lavalla Catholic College Traralgon

Mallacoota and District Historical Society Mallacoota

Manningham Art Gallery Doncaster

Mary MacKillop Catholic Regional College Leongatha

Osborne Park Association North Geelong

St Francis Xavier College Beaconsfield

Star of the Sea College Brighton

Thoona Memorial Hall Committee Thoona

Turaton Music Company Shepparton

Westall Secondary College Clayton

Western Australia

ArtGeo Cultural Complex Busselton

City of Albany Yakamia

City of Cockburn Spearwood

City of Wanneroo Wanneroo

Dowerin and Districts Museum Dowerin

St Hilda’s Anglican School for Girls Mosman Park

International

Maritime Operational Support Group, Bahrain Bahrain Bahrain

Australian Embassy, Brazil Lote Brazil

Australian High Commission, Canada Ottawa Canada

Australian Embassy, Greece Athens Greece

Australian Embassy, Kuwait Kuwait City Kuwait

Australian Embassy, Lebanon Beirut Lebanon

Australian High Commission, Malta Ta’ Xbiex Malta

Australian Embassy, Mexico Mexico City Mexico

Australian High Commission, Nigeria Abuja Nigeria

Australian Embassy, Philippines Manila Philippines

Isbank Museum Ístanbul Turkey

Australian Defence Force Jacksonville, FL USA

Australian Embassy, Washington Washington DC USA

Australian High Commission, Bangladesh Dhaka Bangladesh

Shanghai Association Shanghai China

Australian Consulate-General Chennai India

Australian High Commission, India Delhi India

Australian Embassy, Riyadh Riyadh Saudi Arabia

Australian High Commission, Pretoria Pretoria South Africa

Australian Embassy, Seoul Seoul South Korea

Dornoch and District Community Association Dornoch UK

Australian Embassy, Abu Dhabi Abu Dhabi United Arab Emirates

Australian Defence Staff (Washington) Washington DC USA

Bring in your memorabilia days

No Bring in your memorabilia events were conducted this financial year.

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AUSTRALIAN WAR MEMORIAL ANNUAL REPORT 2014-2015

APPENDIX 7

Selected staff publications, lectures, and talk

Kate Ariotti Book chapter “Australian prisoners of the Turks: negotiating culture clash in captivity”

Other fronts, other wars? First World War studies on the eve of the centennial, Brill Publishing

The Netherlands 1 August 2014

Lecture “Queenslanders and captivity: prisoners of war in Turkey during the First World War”

Brisbane History Group: World War I Symposium

Brisbane, QLD 6 September

2014

Talk - on-site “Coping with captivity: Australian prisoners of the Turks during the First World War”

Public (talk/tour) BAE Systems Theatre, Australian War Memorial, Canberra, ACT

12 January 2015

Book chapter “‘At present everything is making us most anxious’: families of Australian prisoners in Turkey” in Beyond surrender: Australian prisoners of war in the twentieth century

Melbourne University Press

1 June 2015

Simon Aylott (PP volunteer) Talk - on-site Gallery talk: HMAS Sydney Public (talk/tour) Second World War Galleries, Australian War

Memorial, Canberra, ACT

30 June 2015

Claire Baddeley Article “Art in a time of war: the experience of 1914-18 seen through the eyes of Australian artists”

Wartime Issue 67 Winter 2014

Talk - on-site “The work of art in Germany during the First and Second World Wars”

Public (talk/tour) Art Print Room, Administration Building, Australian War Memorial, Canberra, ACT

25 July 2014

Talk - on-site “The end of the Second World War in art” Australian War Memorial

Information Assistants

Galleries, Australian War Memorial, Canberra, ACT 10 September 2014

Article “Selling the war: Australian and German World War 1 Propaganda Posters”

KULTUR Magazine (Goethe-Institut Australia)

Issue 25 22 September

2014

Talk - on-site “Colonial legacies: the art of the Maori wars, the war in Sudan, and the Boxer Uprising”

Public (talk/tour) Art Print Room, Administration Building, Australian War Memorial, Canberra, ACT

10 October 2014

Conference paper “Place, commemoration and national identity: the

architecture and landscape heritage of the Australian War Memorial”

War memorialisation and the nation conference, University of Otago

Dunedin, New Zealand 14 November 2014

Talk - on-site “R. Malcolm Warner and the Australian airmen of the EATS”

Public (talk/tour) Art Print Room, Administration Building, Australian War Memorial, Canberra, ACT

21 November 2014

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Talk - on-site “The visual imagery of the Australian Comforts Fund during the First and Second World Wars”

Public (talk/tour) Art Print Room, Administration Building, Australian War Memorial, Canberra, ACT

9 January 2015

Talk - on-site “The art of the book: artists’ books in the Australian War Memorial collection”

Public (talk/tour) Art Print Room, Administration Building, Australian War Memorial, Canberra, ACT

6 March 2015

Conference paper “With their service: Australian visual imagery

of nurses, VADs, and the Red Cross in WWI”

The First World War: local, global and Imperial perspectives conference

University of Newcastle, NSW

26 March 2015

Talk - on-site “Fight or buy bonds: American First World War and Second World War posters”

Public (talk/tour) Art Print Room, Administration Building, Australian War Memorial, Canberra ACT

1 May 2015

Claire Baddeley and Daniel Eisenberg

Talk - on-site “Artists on film” (combined talk on art and film in the Australian War Memorial’s collection)

Public (talk/tour) BAE Systems Theatre, Australian War Memorial, Canberra ACT

29 August 2014

Stuart Baines Talk - on-site Gallery talk: First World War diorama - Pozières Public (talk/tour) First World War Galleries, Australian

War Memorial, Canberra ACT

5 January 2015

Talk - on-site Gallery talk: First World War diorama - Ypres Public (talk/tour) First World War Galleries, Australian

War Memorial, Canberra ACT

12 January 2015

Talk - offsite “Broadening Anzac: understanding the social context of the Anzac story”

Education audience University of Canberra, ACT 19 February 2015

Talk - offsite “The Anzac story: difference and aspiration” Education audience Young High School, NSW

27 March 2015

Talk - offsite “The Anzac consensus: social relevance in enduring legacies”

Education audience Young High School, NSW 27 March 2015

Katherine Barnes Talk - on-site “Posters, poets, and protest: the broadsheet publishers”

Public (talk/tour) Art Print Room, Administration Building, Australian War Memorial, Canberra, ACT

12 September 2014

Craig Blanch Talk - on-site Gallery talk: Fromelles battlefield relics Public (talk/tour) Galleries, Australian War Memorial,

Canberra, ACT

21 July 2014

Craig Blanch and Bridie Macgillicuddy

Talk - on-site Gallery talk: Hall of Valour awards and artworks Public (talk/tour) Hall of Valour, Australian War

Memorial, Canberra, ACT

15 December 2014

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AUSTRALIAN WAR MEMORIAL ANNUAL REPORT 2014-2015

Stephanie Boyle Article “‘Picking high fruit in the arid expanse’: the Memorial’s Official Film Commission to Afghanistan”

Wartime Issue 67 Winter 2014

Article “Recording from the front line: interviewing contemporary veterans”

Australasian Sound Recording Association

Issue 39 Spring 2014

Talk - on-site “Barons, boots, and beer: a little look into the First World War oral history collection”

Public (talk/tour) BAE Systems Theatre, Australian War Memorial, Canberra, ACT

7 November 2014

Conference paper “From a stunt on the front to moonwalking in

Rome: comprehending a collection of memories”

Australasian Sound Recording Association annual conference

National Library of Australia 19 November 2014

Article “Exploding like clockwork” Memorial blog www.awm.gov.au 16 April 2015

Lecture “Tales from the vault: wrangling audio visual collections at the Australian War Memorial”

Charles Sturt University audiovisual archiving course

Delivered via Internet 26 May 2015

Al Bridges (PP volunteer) Talk - on-site Gallery talk: First World War diorama - Mont St

Quentin

Public (talk/tour) First World War Galleries, Australian War Memorial, Canberra, ACT

6 January 2015

8 January 2015

Steven Bullard Talk - offsite “The Emperor’s army” Public (talk/tour) Southern Cross Club, Jamison, ACT 30 October 2014

Talk - onsite “Perspectives on Operation Slipper” Public (talk/tour) BAE Systems Theatre, Australian War

Memorial, Canberra, ACT

20 March 2014

Peter Burness Talk - offsite “Camera on Gallipoli” Public (talk/tour) Historical Society Museum, Berrima, NSW 24 January 2015

Book Australians at the Great War 1914-1918 Murdoch Books March 2015

Talk - offsite “Australians in the great war” Public (talk/tour) Marrickville Library, Marrickville, NSW

8 April 2015

Book Cesarettepe (The Nek: Turkish translation) Türkiye is Bankası Kültür Yayınları

(publishers)

2014-15

Peter Burness and Karl James Talk - on-site “The Australian-American alliance in the First and

Second World Wars”

Private (talk/tour): Australian-American Leadership Dialogue, Young Leadership Dialogue

First and Second World War Galleries, Australian War Memorial, Canberra, ACT

14 May 2015

Penny Burns (PP volunteer) Talk - on-site Gallery talk: The Centaur Public (talk/tour) Second World War Galleries, Australian

War Memorial, Canberra, ACT

14 July 2014

Emma Campbell Talk - offsite “‘Women’s work’: Dame Alice Chisholm and women of the First World War”

Queen’s Club, Sydney Sydney, NSW 22 April 2015

Eric Carpenter and Theresa Cronk

Talk - on-site Anzac connections and the Research Centre Private (talk/ tour): ANU History

Department annual research program introduction

Bean Building, Australian War Memorial, Canberra, ACT

4 August 2014

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AUSTRALIAN WAR MEMORIAL ANNUAL REPORT 2014-2015

Gabrielle Considine

Article “Short-waves of hope? Japanese radio propaganda in the Second World War”

Wartime Issue 68 Spring 2014

Conference paper “Short-waves of hope? War on the airwaves:

Second World War radio recordings”

Australasian Sound Recording Association: annual conference

National Library of Australia 18 November 2014

Nick Crean Talk - on-site Gallery talk: Gallipoli: the evacuation Public (talk/tour) First World War Galleries, Australian

War Memorial, Canberra, ACT

7 April 2015 20 April 2015

Theresa Cronk Talk - on-site Gallery talk: Voices from the front Public (talk/tour) First World War Galleries, Australian

War Memorial, Canberra, ACT

24 March 2015 16 June 2015 23 June 2015 30 June 2015

Conference paper “Anzac connections: archival records to the

web”

Archives and Records Association of New Zealand/Australian Society of Archivists joint conference

Christchurch, New Zealand 1 October 2014

Article “Digitising and

accommodating archival collections in a museum collection management system: the Anzac connections experience”

Practical Technology for Archives http:// practicaltechnology

forarchives.org/issue4 _cronk

1 June 2015

Sue Ducker Talk - on-site “The man with the donkey” Public (talk/tour) Bean Building, Australian War Memorial, Canberra, ACT

19 May 2015

Ashley Ekins Talk - offsite “The first draft: Charles Bean, the Great War, and the making of the Anzac legend”

National Press Club Barton, ACT 31 July 2014

Talk - offsite “The wounds of war: the enduring impact of the Great War”

Adelaide University Alumni National Portrait Gallery, Canberra, ACT

22 October 2014

Article “Gallipoli: who do you think you are” Guide post: dispatches for the

voluntary guides of the Australian War Memorial

Volume 20, issue 9 October 2014

Book chapter “Discipline, crime, and punishment” in David Horner (ed.), Gallipoli 100

Faircount Media Group Sydney, NSW November 2014

Talk - offsite “Ashley Ekins digs into the truth of those who served in WWI”

Conversations with Richard Fidler, ABC Radio, Brisbane

http://www.abc.net.au/ local_ stories/2015/03 /09/4192888.htm

9 March 2015

Conference paper “Executing justice: military discipline and punishment

on Gallipoli”

Gallipoli 1915: a century on Australian National University, Acton, ACT

19 March 2015

Book Gallipoli: A ridge too

far (ed. second revised edition)

Exisle Publishing April 2015

Book A guide to the battlefields, cemeteries and memorials of the Gallipoli peninsula (sixth revised edition)

Australian War Memorial

April 2015

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AUSTRALIAN WAR MEMORIAL ANNUAL REPORT 2014-2015

Ashley Ekins with Karl James Article “Climax - August: the turning point of the

Gallipoli campaign”

Spirit of regional Australia Issue 24 Winter 2015

Daniel Eisenberg Talk - on-site “Moving battle lines: animation and war” Public (talk/tour) BAE Systems Theatre, Australian War

Memorial, Canberra, ACT

4 December 2014

12 March 2015

Talk - on-site “‘A most miserable hotchpotch’: Charles Bean and the First World War film collection”

Public (talk/tour) BAE Systems Theatre, Australian War Memorial, Canberra, ACT

26 February 2015

Nick Fletcher and Kate Morschel Talk - on-site Gallery talk: Gallipoli from above

Public (talk/tour) First World War Galleries, Australian War Memorial, Canberra, ACT

26 March 2015

David Gist Talk - on-site “Lost and found: identifying soldiers from the Thuillier collection”

Public (talk/tour) BAE Systems Theatre, Australian War Memorial, Canberra, ACT

29 January 2015

Talk - on-site “A tale of two lenses” Public (talk/tour) BAE Systems Theatre, Australian War Memorial, Canberra, ACT

23 April 2015

Talk - on-site “The directorate of public relations in Vietnam” Public (talk/tour) BAE Systems Theatre, Australian War

Memorial, Canberra, ACT

18 June 2015

Lachlan Grant Talk - on-site “The Nazi-Soviet war: the Eastern Front in Western memory”

Public (talk/tour) BAE Systems Theatre, Australian War Memorial, Canberra, ACT

12 August 2014

Talk - offsite “The end of the line: the experiences of Australian prisoners of war in Japan”

Academic audience Australian National University, Acton, ACT 12 August 2014

Article “The end of the line: the experiences of Australian prisoners of war in Japan”

Wartime Issue 68 Spring 2014

Book Australian soldiers in Asia- Pacific in World War II NewSouth 1 November 2014

Talk - on-site “Making friends with all races and creeds? AIF encounters with Asia and Empire 1941-42”

Public (talk/tour) BAE Systems Theatre, Australian War Memorial, Canberra, ACT

25 November 2014

Talk - on-site “Remembering Stalag XVIIIA Wolfsberg: the experiences of Australian prisoners of war in Nazi Germany” (Stalag XVIIIA Wolfsberg reunion)

Public (talk/tour) Bean Building, Australian War Memorial, Canberra, ACT

7 February 2015

Book chapter “Hellships, prisoner transport and unrestricted submarine warfare in World War II” in Joan Beaumont, Lachlan Grant, and Aaron Pegram (eds.), Beyond surrender: Australian prisoners of war in the twentieth century

Melbourne University Press

1 June 2015

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AUSTRALIAN WAR MEMORIAL ANNUAL REPORT 2014-2015

Book chapter “Breaking barriers: the diversity of POW camps in Japan and Australian contacts with Japanese civilians” in Beaumont, Grant, and Pegram (eds.), Beyond surrender: Australian prisoners of war in the twentieth century

Melbourne University Press

1 June 2015

Talk - on-site “Rethinking Australia’s Second World War encounters with south-east Asia and New Guinea”

Australian War Memorial Volunteer Guides

BAE Systems Theatre, Australian War Memorial, Canberra, ACT

3 June 2015

Talk - on-site “Australia and the Second World War in Europe” 2015 Guide Training and Development

Program

BAE Systems Theatre, Australian War Memorial, Canberra, ACT

5 June 2015

Lachlan Grant (edited with Joan Beaumont and Aaron Pegram)

Book Beyond surrender:

Australian prisoners of war in the twentieth century

Melbourne University Press 1 June 2015

Lachlan Grant (with Joan Beaumont and Aaron Pegram)

Book chapter “Rethinking captivity” in Beaumont, Grant, and Pegram (eds.), Beyond surrender: Australian prisoners of war in the twentieth century

Melbourne University Press 1 June 2015

Anthea Gunn Talk - on-site Gallery talk: Art of the First World War Public (talk/tour) First World War Galleries, Australian

War Memorial, Canberra, ACT

23 January 2015

5 June 2015

Talk - on-site Gallery talk: Ben Quilty: after Afghanistan and Alex Seton: as of today …

Public (talk/tour) Special Exhibitions Gallery, Australian War Memorial, Canberra, ACT

4 February 2015

8 April 2015

22 April 2015

20 May 2015

Talk - on-site Gallery talk: Art of the Second World War Public (talk/tour) Galleries, Australian War Memorial,

Canberra, ACT

26 September 2014

Talk - on-site Art at the Australian War Memorial Private (talk/tour) for ANU art history

students

BAE Systems Theatre, Australian War Memorial, Canberra, ACT

7 October 2014

Conference paper “Big historical pictures: First World War official

war art and Australian art history”

Art Association of Australian and New Zealand

Launceston, TAS 6 December 2014

Talk - on-site “Art of the First World War” Private (talk/tour) for Australian War

Memorial Volunteer Guides

BAE Systems Theatre, Australian War Memorial, Canberra, ACT

26 February 2015

Lecture “Art of the First World War” Private (talk/tour) for art history students

Australian National University, Acton, ACT 18 March 2015

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AUSTRALIAN WAR MEMORIAL ANNUAL REPORT 2014-2015

Talk - on-site “Will Dyson” Private (talk/tour) for

art history students Art Print Room, Administration Building, Australian War Memorial, Canberra, ACT

25 March 2015

Talk - on-site “Slow Art Day” Public (talk/tour) Galleries, Australian War Memorial, Canberra, ACT

11 April 2015

Talk - offsite “Marrickville’s Winged Victory” Marrickville Town Hall Marrickville, NSW 20 April 2015

Article “Selfies of an ‘unsound mind’: the mysterious art of Thomas Hinton”

The Conversation https://theconversation. com/selfies-of-an-unsound-mind-the-mysterious-art-of-thomas-hinton-41187

15 May 2015

Talk - on-site “The Anzac book” Private (talk/tour) for Yale PhD students Art Print Room, Administration

Building, Australian War Memorial, Canberra, ACT

4 June 2015

Talk - offsite “Art of the First World War” Anzac conversations: artistic voices

Friends Meeting House, Canberra, ACT 21 June 2015

Anthea Gunn and Craig Blanch Talk - on-site “Bravo Private Jacka!” Public (talk/tour) Art Print Room, Administration

Building, Australian War Memorial, Canberra, ACT

15 May 2015

Vick Gwyn Talk - on-site “Through a lens darkly: the George Aspinall prisoner-of-war negatives”

Public (talk/tour) Galleries, Australian War Memorial, Canberra, ACT

11 September 2014

Meleah Hampton Conference paper “The key to victory: Australia’s military

contribution on the Western Front”

The First World War: local, global and Imperial perspectives conference

Newcastle University, NSW 26 March 2015

David Heness Talk - on-site Gallery talk: Voices from the front Public (talk/tour) First World War Galleries, Australian

War Memorial, Canberra, ACT

Every Tuesday, March-June 2015

Warwick Heywood

Talk - on-site Gallery talk: Ben Quilty: after Afghanistan and Alex Seton: as of today ...

Public (talk/tour) Special Exhibitions Gallery, Australian War Memorial, Canberra, ACT

18 January 2015

21 January 2015

19 April 2015

Talk - offsite “Reality in flames” Gosford Regional Gallery Gosford, NSW 18 July 2014

Talk - on-site Gallery talk: Victory in the Pacific vest Public (talk/tour) Galleries, Australian War Memorial,

Canberra, ACT

15 September 2014

Talk - offsite “Official war art of Shaun Gladwell” Bega Art Gallery Bega, NSW 2 May 2015

Conference paper “An incandescent vision: modern Australian art and

the Asia-Pacific war”

Asia-Pacific war in the visual conference Korea University Center for Japanese Studies

16 June 2015

Talk - on-site “Reality in flames” Australian War Memorial Volunteer Guides

BAE Systems Theatre, Australian War Memorial, Canberra, ACT

25 June 2015

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Eleni Holloway Talk - offsite “Song of a sock” Weston Creek View Club Weston Creek ACT 2 September 2014

Talk - on-site Gallery talk: Victory in the Pacific vest: Miss Lois Martin

Public (talk/tour) Second World War Gallery Australian War Memorial, Canberra, ACT

15 September 2014

Talk - on-site “Song of a sock: knitted histories of the First World War”

Public (talk/tour) BAE Systems Theatre, Australian War Memorial, Canberra, ACT

10 December 2014

Talk - on-site Gallery talk: Comfort for the troops Public (talk/tour) First World War Galleries, Australian

War Memorial, Canberra, ACT

19 January 2015

Talk - on-site “Love and secrets” Private (talk/tour) for Friends of the Australian War Memorial

Galleries, Australian War Memorial, Canberra, ACT

15 February 2015

Talk - on-site “First World War handicrafts” Private (talk/tour) for Goulburn Regional

Art Gallery

Western Courtyard Gallery, Australian War Memorial, Canberra, ACT

2 April 2015

Talk - offsite “Song of a sock” Woden View Club Woden, ACT 28 April 2015

Talk - on-site Gallery talk: Clothing the colonials Public (talk/tour) Colonial Galleries, Australian War

Memorial, Canberra, ACT

18 May 2015

Conference paper “A practical approach: knitted histories of the

First World War”

Museums Australia National Conference Sydney Town Hall, Sydney, NSW

24 May 2015

Article “Knitted in Australia: First World War centenary commemorations”

Museums Aotearoa Quarterly New Zealand June 2015

Karin Huckstepp Talk - on-site NAIDOC Week talk Public (talk/tour) Galleries, Australian War Memorial, Canberra, ACT

9 July 2014

Talk - on-site Gallery talk: Poetry by Dorothea McKellar Public (talk/tour) Galleries, Australian War Memorial,

Canberra, ACT

25 September 2014

Deb Jackson (PP volunteer) Talk - on-site Gallery talk: Poetry from Vietnam

Public (talk/tour) Galleries, Australian War Memorial, Canberra, ACT

23 September 2014

7 October 2014

Karl James Talk - on-site “Charles Bean and the Memorial” Private (talk/tour) for University of

Wollongong history students

Galleries, Australian War Memorial, Canberra, ACT

25 July 2014

Article “The war that shaped Australia” The Sydney Morning Herald/The Age

http://www.smh.com. au/national/the-war-that-shaped-australia-20140904-10c1wx.html

5 September 2014

Article “Australia and the outbreak of the Second World War” Spirit: Regional Australia

Issue 21 Spring 2014

Article “Taking MacArthur back” Wartime Issue 68 Spring 2014

Talk - on-site “They also returned: Australians in the liberation of the Philippines”

Public (talk/tour) BAE Systems Theatre, Australian War Memorial, Canberra, ACT

21 October 2014

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AUSTRALIAN WAR MEMORIAL ANNUAL REPORT 2014-2015

Talk - offsite Commemorative Address: Kokoda 7th Australian Division AIF

Association commemorative service and wreathlaying ceremony

7th Australian Division memorial wall, Bass Hill, NSW

25 October 2014

Lecture “Remembering Australia’s Pacific war” War in the islands: the Second World

War in the Pacific

Australian National University, Acton, ACT 29 October 2014

Talk - on-site “Java 1942” Private (talk/tour):

2/2nd Pioneer Battalion Association

Commemorative Area, Australian War Memorial, Canberra, ACT

3 November 2014

Conference paper “The Kokoda campaign and key military battle

sites”

Kokoda military heritage workshop, Kokoda Initiative

Australian National Botanic Gardens, Canberra, ACT

11 November 2014

Talk - on-site “‘Australia has got to play her part’: Australia’s late Pacific campaigns, 1944-45”

Public (talk/tour) BAE Systems Theatre, Australian War Memorial, Canberra, ACT

2 December 2014

Article “Faces of the fallen: Trooper Albert Cotter, 12th Light Horse Regiment”

The Weekend Australian

17-18 January 2015

Talk - on-site Gallery talk: Tobruk and Kokoda Private (talk/tour) for students from the

Australian Command and Staff College

Galleries, Australian War Memorial, Canberra, ACT

13 February 2015

Talk - offsite “Kiama’s sacrifice: Kiama and the Great War” Kiama Lions Club Kiama, NSW 9 April 2015

Book chapter “‘I hope you are not too ashamed of me’: prisoners in the siege of Tobruk, 1941” in Beaumont, Grant, and Pegram (eds.), Beyond surrender: Australian prisoners of war in the twentieth century

Melbourne University Press Melbourne, VIC 1 June 2015

Ryan Johnston Talk - on-site Gallery talk: Ben Quilty: after Afghanistan and Alex Seton: as of today …

Public (talk/tour) Special Exhibitions Gallery, Australian War Memorial, Canberra, ACT

7 January 2015

28 January 2015

Conference paper “Comparative commemoration”

Australian Historical Association 33rd Annual Conference

University of Queensland, QLD 6 July 2014

Article “Art and politics at the Gwangju Biennale: burning down the house”

The Conversation https://theconversation. com/art-and-politics-at-the-gwangju-biennale-burning-down-the-house-31012

25 September 2014

Talk - offsite Ben Quilty: after Afghanistan exhibition opening speech

Flinders University Art Museum and City Gallery

Adelaide, SA 26 September 2014

Talk - on-site “Contemporary art and contemporary conflict” Public (talk/tour) Galleries, Australian War Memorial,

Canberra, ACT

24 October 2014

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AUSTRALIAN WAR MEMORIAL ANNUAL REPORT 2014-2015

Talk - offsite Panel discussion with Baden Pailthorpe and Sally Cunningham

Newcastle Art Gallery Newcastle, NSW 7 February 2015

Lecture “Art at the Australian War Memorial” Art history students Australian National University, Acton , ACT

18 March 2015

Talk - on-site “The official war art scheme” Australian War Memorial Volunteer

Guides

BAE Systems Theatre, Australian War Memorial, Canberra, ACT

7 April 2015

Talk - offsite “First landing to Last Post” Panel discussion Parliament House, Canberra ACT 19 April 2015

Talk - offsite “Australian First World War propaganda”: opening of Fall-in! Enlistment and WW1 exhibition

Western Plains Cultural Centre Dubbo, NSW 16 May 2015

Conference paper “The reception of Wallace Anderson”

Gallipoli/Gelibolu: marking the centenary of the allied landing at Gallipoli

Art Gallery of New South Wales, NSW 22 May 2015

Talk - offsite “The official war art scheme: recent commissions”

The Australian Club Melbourne, VIC 11 June 2015

Ryan Johnston and Kerry Neale Talk - on-site “IEDs in the MHT and Art collections”

Public (talk/tour) Galleries, Australian War Memorial, Canberra, ACT

2 February 2015

Michael Kelly Article “First to fight” Wartime Issue 67 Winter 2014

Talk - offsite “First to fight: the formation and deployment of the Australian Naval and Military Expeditionary Force”

Naval, Military and Air Force Club Adelaide, SA 21 August 2014

Talk - onsite Gallery talk: The Korean War Private (talk/tour) ANU Korean Studies

Group

Galleries, Australian War Memorial, Canberra, ACT

9 September 2014

Lecture “Korea, Malaya, and the Indonesian Confrontation” Australian War Memorial Military

History Course

Galleries and Council Room, Australian War Memorial, Canberra, ACT

September 2014

Talk - offsite “‘Not even a fool’s hope’: the Gallipoli campaign” First Fleet Association

Sydney, NSW 24 January 2015

Talk - offsite “‘Not a fool’s chance’: why the Gallipoli campaign was doomed before it began”

Fellowship of First Fleeters Australia Day Luncheon

The Pullman Hotel, Sydney, NSW 24 January 2015

Article “Lieutenant Colonel Charles Hercules Green DSO”

Wartime Issue 69 Summer 2015

Talk - onsite “Korean War Anniversary” Public (talk/tour) Galleries, Australian War Memorial, Canberra, ACT

25 June 2015

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AUSTRALIAN WAR MEMORIAL ANNUAL REPORT 2014-2015

Emma Kindred Talk - on-site Gallery talk: Ben Quilty: after Afghanistan and Alex Seton: as of today …

Public (talk/tour) Special Exhibitions Gallery, Australian War Memorial, Canberra, ACT

11 February 2015

6 May 2015

Talk - on-site Gallery talk: Streeton and the Somme Public (talk/tour) First World War Galleries, Australian

War Memorial, Canberra, ACT

12 January 2015

Bridie Macgillicuddy Talk - on-site Gallery talk: Ben Quilty: after Afghanistan and Alex

Seton: as of today …

Public (talk/tour) Special Exhibitions Gallery, Australian War Memorial, Canberra, ACT

18 February 2015

11 March 2015

15 April 2015

Talk - offsite Reality in flames: modern Australian art and the Second World War

Rockhampton Regional Art Gallery Rockhampton, QLD 11 October 2014

Talk - offsite “New perspectives on the legacy of the First World War”

Talks held in conjunction with the exhibition Home/ Front

Penrith Regional Gallery, NSW 3 May 2015

Bridie Macgillicuddy and Garth O’Connell

Talk - on-site Stella Bowen’s Bomber crew and the Australian bomber crews during the Second World War

Public (talk/tour) Art Print Room, Administration Building, Australian War Memorial, Canberra, ACT

27 April 2015

Marian Mazey Talk - on-site Gallery talk: First World War diorama - the Somme Public (talk/tour) First World War Galleries, Australian

War Memorial, Canberra, ACT

13 January 2015

15 January 2015

19 January 2015

Talk - on-site Gallery talk: Gallipoli - the AE2 Public (talk/tour) First World War Galleries, Australian

War Memorial, Canberra, ACT

16 April 2015

23 April 2015

Jennifer Milward Talk - on-site Family history research talk Public (talk/tour) Bean Building, Australian War

Memorial, Canberra, ACT

1 April 2015

Talk - on-site Family history research talk Private (talk/tour) for Young District Family

History Group

Research Centre, Australian War Memorial, Canberra, ACT

5 May 2015

Kerry Neale Talk - on-site Gallery talk: The Wirraway and Archer “doing the impossible”

Public (talk/tour) Aircraft Hall, Australian War Memorial, Canberra, ACT

7 July 2014

1 September 2014

Conference paper “‘All pioneer work’: interpreting the First

World War medical records of the Queen’s Hospital for facial cases”

The Australian Historical Association 33rd Annual Conference, Conflict in history

University of Queensland, St Lucia, QLD

9 July 2014

Talk - on-site Gallery talk: Cowra breakout Public (talk/tour) Second World War Galleries, Australian

War Memorial, Canberra, ACT

4 August 2014

Talk - offsite Panel discussion University of Sydney centenary website launch: Beyond 1914: the University of Sydney and the Great War - war, death, and memory

University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 9 September 2014

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Conference paper “‘A healthy rivalry’: British and Dominion facial

surgeons and patients at the Queen’s Hospital, Sidcup”

Association for Canadian Studies in Australia and New Zealand conference, Remembrance and representation: Canada, Australia, and New Zealand in World War I

Australian National University, Acton, ACT 8 December 2014

Conference paper “Disfigurement and social stigma”

Unseen wounds: the personal cost of modern warfare

University of New South Wales, Canberra, ACT

18 February 2015

Talk - on-site Gallery talk: Bullecourt tank Public (talk/tour) First World War Galleries, Australian

War Memorial, Canberra, ACT

1 June 2015

Robert Nichols Talk - on-site “Emden: beached and done for” Public (talk/tour) BAE Systems Theatre, Australian War

Memorial, Canberra ACT

9 November 2015

Jennie Norberry Talk - on-site Gallery talk: Anzac voices Public (talk/tour) Special Exhibitions Gallery, Australian War Memorial, Canberra, ACT

2 July 2014

30 July 2014

17 September 2014

24 September 2014

22 October 2014

Talk - on-site “Researching Australian military history service: family tree time tour”

Public (talk/tour) Bean Building, Australian War Memorial, Canberra, ACT

13 March 2015

Talk - on-site Research Centre talk Private (talk/tour): The Heraldry and Genealogy Society of Canberra

Research Centre, Australian War Memorial, Canberra, ACT

26 March 2015

Garth O’Connell Talk - on-site Gallery talk: Singapore surrender table Public (talk/tour) Second World War Galleries, Australian

War Memorial, Canberra, ACT

16 February 2015

Talk - on-site Gallery talk: On the tail of a Komet Public (talk/tour) Aircraft Hall, Australian War Memorial,

Canberra, ACT

20 April 2015

Talk - on-site Gallery talk: Coral Sea battle Public (talk/tour) Aircraft Hall, Australian War Memorial,

Canberra, ACT

4 May 2015

Talk - on-site Reconciliation Week talk: Indigenous Australians at war

Public (talk/tour) Western Courtyard Gallery, Australian War Memorial, Canberra, ACT

29 May 2015

Gary Oakley Talk - on-site NAIDOC Week talk: Indigenous service Public (talk/tour) Galleries, Australian War Memorial,

Canberra, ACT

10 July 2014

Talk - on-site “Black diggers: Indigenous Australians and the First World War”

Public (talk/tour) BAE Systems Theatre, Australian War Memorial, Canberra, ACT

22 March 2015

Lauren Ogden Talk - on-site Gallery talk: HMAS Perth Public (talk/tour) Second World War Galleries, Australian War Memorial, Canberra, ACT

15 July 2014

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Talk - on-site Gallery talk: First World War diorama - Dernancourt

Public (talk/tour) First World War Galleries, Australian War Memorial, Canberra, ACT

29 January 2015

Jane Peek Talk - on-site Gallery talk: Waler at war Public (talk/tour) Special Exhibitions Gallery, Australian War Memorial, Canberra, ACT

16 March 2015

Aaron Pegram Lecture “Distinguished service, reckless valour: Albert Jacka, Pompey Elliott, and the dawn on the Anzac legend”

RSL National Conference

Crown Promenade, Melbourne, VIC 17 September 2014

Talk - offsite “Politicians at war: the wartime experiences of Australian senators and members in the First World War”

Senate Occasional Lecture Series Parliament House Canberra, ACT

10 April 2015

Book chapter “Bold bids for freedom: escape and Australian prisoners of war in Germany, 1916-1918” in Beaumont, Grant, and Pegram, Beyond surrender: Australian prisoners of war in the twentieth century

Melbourne University Press 1 June 2015

Article “Australian prisoners of the First World War, 1915-1918” 1914-1918-online: international

encyclopedia of the First World War

Freie Universität Berlin, Germany

Aaron Pegram (edited with Joan Beaumont and Lachlan Grant)

Book Beyond surrender:

Australian prisoners of war in the twentieth century

Melbourne University Press 1 June 2015

Aaron Pegram (with Joan Beaumont and Lachlan Grant)

Book chapter “Rethinking captivity” in Beaumont, Grant, and Pegram (eds.), Beyond surrender: Australian prisoners of war in the twentieth century

Melbourne University Press 1 June 2015

Lenny Preston and Jennifer Selby

Talk - on-site Gallery talk: The story of the Lanser disc Public (talk/tour) First World War Galleries, Australian

War Memorial, Canberra, ACT

15 January 2015

Cherie Prosser Talk - on-site “The conscription referendum” Public (talk/tour) Art Print Room, Administration

Building, Australian War Memorial, Canberra, ACT

1 August 2014

Talk - on-site Gallery talk: Ben Quilty: after Afghanistan and Alex Seton: as of today …

Public (talk/tour) Special Exhibitions Gallery, Australian War Memorial, Canberra, ACT

25 February 2015

Talk - on-site “Horace Moore-Jones: the landing at Anzac, 25 April 2015”

Public (talk/tour) First World War Galleries, Australian War Memorial, Canberra, ACT

20 March 2015

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Tristan Rawlings (PP volunteer) Talk - on-site Gallery talk: Poetry from modern conflicts

Public (talk/tour) Galleries, Australian War Memorial, Canberra, ACT

30 September 2014

9 October 2014

Ally Roche Talk - on-site “Tim Page: iconic photographer of Vietnam” Public (talk/tour) Western Courtyard Gallery, Australian War

Memorial, Canberra, ACT

23 October 2014

Cameron Ross Talk - on-site Gallery talk: Black Week battles Public (talk/tour) Colonial Galleries, Australian War

Memorial, Canberra, ACT

2 March 2015

Cameron Ross and Martin Tanti Talk - on-site Gallery talk: Conservation of the 4.5-inch howitzer

Public (talk/tour) BAE Systems Theatre, Australian War Memorial, Canberra, ACT

24 June 2015

Dianne Rutherford

Talk - on-site Gallery talk: Anzac voices Public (talk/tour) Special Exhibitions Gallery, Australian War Memorial, Canberra, ACT

16 July 2014 13 August 2014 17 August 2014 3 September 2014 21 September 2014 1 October 2014

Talk - on-site Gallery talk: Rescuing the De Gaulles Public (talk/tour) Second World War Galleries, Australian

War Memorial, Canberra, ACT

1 December 2014

Talk - on-site Gallery talk: Mrs Rattigan and the Anzac Buffet Public (talk/tour) First World War Galleries, Australian

War Memorial, Canberra, ACT

13 April 2015

Lucinda Shawcross (PP volunteer)

Talk - on-site NAIDOC Week talk: The Lovett family Public (talk/tour) Second World War Galleries, Australian

War Memorial, Canberra, ACT

8 July 2014

Joanne Smedley Talk - on-site “My son fighting in France: reverse-painted glass framed portraits”

Public (talk/tour) Special Exhibitions Gallery, Australian War Memorial, Canberra, ACT

20 November 2014

Talk - on-site “Algernon Darge’s 19,000 soldiers: photographs of the First World War”

Public (talk/tour) BAE Systems Theatre, Australian War Memorial, Canberra, ACT

14 May 2015

Andrew Tennison Talk - on-site “Cirkut panorama photographs” Public (talk/tour) BAE Systems Theatre, Australian War

Memorial, Canberra, ACT

12 February 2015

Talk - on-site “Stephen Dupont: a photographic practise” Public (talk/tour) BAE Systems Theatre, Australian War

Memorial, Canberra, ACT

21 May 2015

Craig Tibbits Talk - on-site Gallery talk: Anzac voices Public (talk/tour) Special Exhibitions Gallery, Australian War Memorial, Canberra, ACT

23 July 2014 20 August 2014 27 August 2014 15 October 2014 29 October 2014 5 November 2014 19 November 2014 26 November 2014 30 November 2014

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Alex Torrens Talk - on-site Gallery talk: Ben Quilty: after Afghanistan and Alex Seton: as of today …

Public (talk/tour) Special Exhibitions Gallery, Australian War Memorial, Canberra, ACT

4 March 2015 18 March 2015 1 April 2015

Talk - on-site Gallery talk: Katy Mutton secret skies Public (talk/tour) Galleries, Australian War Memorial,

Canberra, ACT

4 July 2014

Talk - on-site “TASS: partisan eagles and fascist donkeys” Public (talk/tour) BAE Systems Theatre, Australian War

Memorial, Canberra, ACT

12 August 2014

Talk - on-site Gallery talk: TASS studio posters Public (talk/tour) Link Gallery, Australian War Memorial,

Canberra, ACT

7 November 2014

Talk - on-site Gallery talk: Artist prisoners of war in the Second World War

Public (talk/tour) Second World War Galleries, Australian War Memorial, Canberra, ACT

6 February 2015

Talk - on-site Gallery talk: George Lambert: Gallipoli and Palestine

Public (talk/tour) Special Exhibitions Gallery, Australian War Memorial, Canberra, ACT

17 April 2015

Alex Torrens and Nick Zihrul Article “Partisan eagles and

fascist donkeys: Soviet stencilled posters”

Imprint Volume 49, issue 3 Spring 2014

Alana Treasure and Laura Webster

Talk - on-site Gallery talk: Conserving the dioramas Public (talk/tour) Special Exhibitions Gallery, Australian War

Memorial, Canberra, ACT

20 February 2015

Robyn van Dyk Talk - on-site Gallery talk: Anzac voices Public (talk/tour) Special Exhibitions Gallery, Australian War Memorial, Canberra, ACT

9 July 2014 13 July 2014 6 August 2014 10 September 2014 8 October 2014 26 October 2014 12 November 2014

Talk - on-site Gallery talk: Anzac voices and Anzac connections Private (talk/tour) for Department of

Foreign Affairs and Trade Graduates and International Diplomats Tour

Special Exhibitions Gallery, Australian War Memorial, Canberra, ACT

22 August 2014

Conference paper “Anzac connections: delivering and connecting

real content and data online”

Australian Library Information Association National Conference

Melbourne, VIC 16 September 2014

Talk - offsite Anzac connections Annual Seminar, Armidale Family History Society

Armidale, NSW 18 October 2014

Talk - offsite Anzac connections Webinar for Society of Australian Genealogists

23 October 2014

Talk - offsite “Commemorating the centenary of the First World War”

Eddison Day Club, Weston Canberra, ACT 24 October 2014

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Talk - offsite “Anzac connections: delivering new collections and open data”

Libraries Australia Forum 2014 National Library of Australia, Parkes,

ACT

31 October 2014

Article “Anzac connections: delivering and connecting real content and data online”

The Australian Library Journal Published online 17 December 2014

Conference paper “Anzac connections: the centenary of the First

World War and what’s new online at the Australian War Memorial”

16th Australian Computer Conference for Seniors

Sydney, NSW 19 December 2014

Talk - offsite “Anzac connections: publishing letters and diaries online”

6th Annual Australian Digital Alliance Copyright Forum

National Library of Australia, Parkes, ACT

13 February 2015

Talk - offsite “Digitisation for access and preservation: how Anzac connections relates to migrant heritage”

University of Western Sydney, NSW

18 February 2015

Talk - offsite “Australian War Memorial case study on preserving, curating, linking, crowd sourcing, and visualising data”

A digital preservation government assembly

Rydges, Canberra, ACT 25 February 2015

Talk - offsite “Remembrance: the Australian War Memorial” Bribie Island Seaside Museum

Bribie Island, QLD 27 February 2015

Talk - on-site “Anzac connections: delivering and connecting real content and data online”

Private (talk/tour) for Australian Library and Information Association Universities and Research Libraries’ Group

BAE Systems Theatre, Australian War Memorial, Canberra, ACT

26 March 2015

Talk - on-site “Gallipoli to Afghanistan and the future: 100 years of mapping”

Public (talk/tour) Research Centre, Australian War Memorial, Canberra, ACT

1 May 2015

Talk - offsite “Connecting people, collections and the First World War to mark the Centenary of Anzac”

Museums Australia conference Sydney, NSW 24 May 2015

Talk - on-site “Gallipoli to Afghanistan and the future: 100 years of mapping”

Public (talk/tour) Research Centre, Australian War Memorial, Canberra, ACT

1 June 2015

Ashleigh Wadman (PP volunteer)

Talk - on-site Gallery talk: Oscar aircraft relief Public (talk/tour) Aircraft Hall, Australian War Memorial,

Canberra, ACT

18 August 2014

Laura Webster Talk - on-site Gallery talk: Ben Quilty: after Afghanistan and Alex Seton: as of today …

Public (talk/tour) Special Exhibitions Gallery, Australian War Memorial, Canberra, ACT

14 December 2014 17 December 2014 14 January 2015 25 March 2015 29 April 2015 17 May 2015 27 May 2015

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Gordon Weir (PP volunteer) Talk - on-site Gallery talk: First World War diorama - Semakh

Public (talk/tour) First World War Galleries, Australian War Memorial, Canberra, ACT

22 January 2015 27 January 2015

Talk - on-site Gallery talk: Gallipoli - the VCs Public (talk/tour) First World War Galleries, Australian

War Memorial, Canberra, ACT

13 April 2015 21 April 2015

Talk - on-site Gallery talk: MV Krait Public (talk/tour) Second World War Galleries, Australian War Memorial, Canberra, ACT

17 July 2014

Talk - on-site Gallery talk: Poetry from the First World War Public (talk/tour) Special Exhibitions Gallery, Australian War

Memorial, Canberra, ACT

22 September 2015 2 October 2015

David Whyte (PP volunteer) Talk - on-site Gallery talk: Gallipoli - Lone Pine

Public (talk/tour) First World War Galleries, Australian War Memorial, Canberra, ACT

9 April 2015 14 April 2015

Talk - on-site NAIDOC Week talk: Albert Knight DCM Public (talk/tour) Galleries, Australian War Memorial,

Canberra, ACT

7 July 2014

Talk - on-site Gallery talk: First World War diorama - Lone Pine Public (talk/tour) First World War Galleries, Australian

War Memorial, Canberra, ACT

20 January 2015

Talk - on-site Gallery talk: Operation Jaywick Public (talk/tour) Second World War Galleries, Australian

War Memorial, Canberra, ACT

29 June 2015

Laura Wiles Talk - on-site Double vision: 3D stereographic cards from the Boer War

Public (talk/tour) Western Courtyard Gallery, Australian War Memorial, Canberra, ACT

9 October 2014

Alison Wishart Conference paper “Shrine and online: war memorials in the digital

age”

War memorialisation and the nation conference

University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand 13 November 2014

Article “Images of postwar migration” History Australia Volume 11, issue 3 11 December 2014

Talk - on-site "50 shades of bully beef: food at Gallipoli” Public (talk/tour) BAE Systems Theatre, Australian War

Memorial, Canberra, ACT

18 December 2014

Conference paper “Shrine and online: war memorials in the digital

age”

The First World War: local, global and Imperial perspectives conference

University of Newcastle, NSW 27 March 2015

Article “Gallipoli: through the soldiers’ lens” Public Domain Review

http:// publicdomainreview. org/collections/ gallipoli-through-the-soldiers-lens

9 April 2015

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Talk - on-site Gallery talk: Sydney’s Anzac Buffet in the Domain

Public (talk/tour) First World War Galleries, Australian War Memorial, Canberra, ACT

9/04/2015

Talk - on-site “Shrine and online: war memorials in the digital age”

Public (talk/tour) BAE Systems Theatre, Australian War Memorial, Canberra, ACT

4 June 2015

Talk - offsite “Photography in the twentieth century” Melbourne Docklands Library

Melbourne, VIC 9 June 2015

Lecture “Using photographs as historical sources” Melbourne Docklands Library

Melbourne, VIC 10 June 2015

Jeff Wray Talk - on-site “Ready, aim, record: recording sound effects of military equipment”

Public (talk/tour) Galleries, Australian War Memorial, Canberra, ACT

25 September 2014

Nick Zihrul Talk - on-site “TASS stencilled posters: materials, conservation, and exhibition”

Public (talk/tour) BAE Systems Theatre, Australian War Memorial, Canberra, ACT

12 August 2014

Mr Gary Oakley presents his talk on Indigenous service at the conference Gallipoli 1915: a century on. Mr Oakley was active for many years as the Memorial’s Indigenous Liaison Officer.

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APPENDIX 8

Staffing overview as at 30 June 2015

The staff of the Memorial are appointed or employed under the Public Service Act 1999.

Ongoing and non-ongoing staff by gender (excludes Statutory Officer)

2013-14 2014-15

Female Male Total Female Male Total

Ongoing full-time 133 123 256 114 117 231

Ongoing part-time 13 3 16 16 3 19

Non-ongoing full-time 27 21 48 8 8 16

Non-ongoing part-time 5 3 8 1 1

Casual 19 9 28 16 11 27

Total 197 160 357 155 139 294

Senior Executive Staff by gender

2013-14 2014-15

Female Male Total Female Male Total

Band 1 2 1 3 2 1 3

Total 2 1 3 2 1 3

Staff by classification and gender

2013-14 2014-15

Female Male Total Female Male Total

APS 1 0 0 0 0 0 0

APS 2 13 18 31 10 15 25

APS 3 39 26 65 31 27 58

APS 4 20 15 35 19 11 30

APS 5 16 16 32 12 14 26

APS 6 33 25 58 29 24 53

AWM BBB 2 1 3 2 0 2

AWM BB1 0 3 3 0 3 3

AWM BB2 0 1 1 0 1 1

AWM BB3 33 20 53 22 11 33

AWM BB4 1 4 5 1 4 5

EL 1 29 17 46 22 16 38

EL 2 9 12 21 5 12 17

SES 2 1 3 2 1 3

STAT OFF 0 1 1 0 1 1

Total 197 160 357 155 140 295

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Representation of equal employment opportunity groups as a percentage of staff by occupational groups

Total Staff ATSI BO BO+ENFL PWD

No. Women % No. % No. % No. % No. %

APS 1-2 25 10 40.0 1 4.0 1 4.0

APS 3-4 88 50 56.8 2 2.2 2 2.2 2 2.2

APS 5-6 79 41 51.9 1 1.3 6 7.6 1 1.3 1 1.3

BBB-AWMBB1 5 2 40.0 1 20.0

AWMBB2-BB3 34 22 64.7 3 8.8 1 2.9 1 2.9

AWMBB4 5 1 20.0 2 40.0 1 20 1 20

EL 1 38 22 57.9 4 10.5 1 2.6

EL 2 17 5 29.4 3 17.6

SES and STAT 4 2 50.0

Total 295 155 52.7 1 0.3 21 7.1 7 2.4 6 2.0

Note:

ATSI = Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander BO = born overseas BO+ENFL = born overseas and did not speak English as a first language PWD = people with a disability

APPENDIX 9

Major sponsors The Australian War Memorial gratefully acknowledges the generous support of the following individuals and organisations for the 2014-15 financial year.

Benefactors

Benefactors are those who have contributed more than $250,000

Seven Network (Operations) Ltd

Seven Group Holdings Ltd

Mr Dick Smith AC and Mrs Pip Smith

State Government of New South Wales

State Government of Victoria

Mr Kerry Stokes AC

Tattersall’s

Telstra

Tenix Pty Ltd

Thyne Reid Foundation

Vincent Fairfax Family Foundation

Wingnut Films

Australia and New Zealand Banking Group Ltd

Australian Submarine Corporation

BAE Systems Australia

Dame Beryl Beaurepaire AC DBE and the late Mr Ian Beaurepaire CMG*

BHP Billiton Sustainable Communities

Boeing Australia

Coles Myer Ltd

Commonwealth Government of Australia

De Lambert Largesse Foundation

Estate of the late Ruth Margaret Jenkins

Estate of the late Edgar Henry King

Mr Kerry Packer AC

Mr Richard Pratt AC

Qantas

John T. Reid Charitable Trusts

Rio Tinto Ltd

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AUSTRALIAN WAR MEMORIAL ANNUAL REPORT 2014-2015

Pacific Dunlop

Sedcom Communications Pty Ltd

Returned and Services League of Australia (Victorian Branch) Inc.

RSL and Services Clubs Association Ltd NSW

RSL Queensland

Mr Robert Strauss MBE

State Government of Queensland

State Government of South Australia

State Government of Tasmania

State Government of Western Australia

Thales Australia

The Australian Women’s Weekly

The Balgownie War Memorial Fund

The Bruce and Joy Reid Foundation

The Pratt Foundation

The Sidney Myer Fund

TransACT

Mr Harry O. Triguboff AO

Sir Bruce Watson AC and Lady June Watson

Wesfarmers Limited

Weta Digital

Mr John Wicking AM

ActewAGL

Sir James Balderstone AC

Commonwealth Bank of Australia

CSR Limited

Estate of the late Ella Maud Clarke

Estate of the late Elsie Ada McGrath

Estate of the late James Frederick Blythe

Estate of the late Kingsley Juan Clark OAM

Mr T.V. Fairfax

Foster’s Brewing Group Ltd

General Dynamics Land Systems Australia

Google Ireland Ltd

Gordon Darling Foundation

Government of the Australian Capital Territory

Howard Smith Ltd

Kingold

Lambert Vineyards

Lockheed Martin Australia Pty Ltd

National Australia Bank Ltd

Newcrest Mining Ltd

News Limited

Oracle Corporation

Companions

Companions are those who have contributed more than $50,000

Patrons

Patrons are those who have contributed more than $20,000

National Roads and Motorists Association

OPSM

PricewaterhouseCoopers

Lady C. Ramsay

Raytheon Australia Pty Ltd

Renison Goldfields Consolidated Ltd

Rosebank Engineering Pty Ltd

Mrs Margaret Ross AM

Shell Company of Australia

Spicers Paper

John and Betty Skipworth

Teys Bros (Holdings) Pty Ltd

The Laminex Group

WESFI Manufacturing Pty Ltd

Australia Remembers - ACT Committee

Aviation Art

Bearcage Productions

Burmah Castrol

Casinos Australia International

Sir William Durrant and Lady Durrant AM

Dr Ron Houghton DFC and Mrs Nanette Houghton

Estate of the late Beryl Martin

Estate of the late J.S. Millner AM

Gandevia Foundation

Government of the Northern Territory

Incapacitated Servicemen and Women’s Association of Queensland

Macquarie Bank Foundation

Mr Dugald MacTaggart

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GLOSSARY

AC Companion of the Order of Australia

ADF Australian Defence Force

AIF Australian Imperial Force

AM Member of the Order of Australia

ANAO Australian National Audit Office

ANU Australian National University

Anzac Australian and New Zealand Army Corps

AO Officer of the Order of Australia

APS Australian Public Service

AWM Australian War Memorial

CAS Client Access System

CEO Chief Executive Officer

CFO Chief Finance Officer

CIT Canberra Institute of Technology

CMG Corporate Management Group

CMG* Companion of the Order of St Michael and St George

Comcare Commonwealth Workers Compensation company

Comcover Commonwealth insurance company

CPA Certified Practising Accountant

CSC Conspicuous Service Cross

CVO Commander of the Royal Victorian Order

DBE Dame Commander of the Order of the British Empire

DFC Distinguished Flying Cross

DVA Department of Veterans’ Affairs

EDRMS Electronic Document and Record Management System

EPBC Environmental Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999

FACC Finance, Audit, and Compliance Committee

FBT Fringe Benefits Tax

FOI Act Freedom of Information Act 1982

GST Goods and Services Tax

HMAS His/Her Majesty’s Australian Ship

HMP Heritage Management Plan

HMT His/Her Majesty's Transport

HR Human Resource

ICT Information and Communications Technology

IMSG Information Management Steering Group

IT Information Technology

KPI Key Performance Indicator

LTO Large Technology Object

MBE Member of the Order of the British Empire

MC Military Cross

MG Medal for Gallantry

MICA Memorial Integrated Collection Access System

MP Member of Parliament

OAM Medal of the Order of Australia

PGPA Act Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013

PICTION Collection management and ordering system

RAAF Royal Australian Air Force

RAN Royal Australian Navy

RSL Returned and Services League of Australia

SACE Spirit of Anzac Centenary Experience

SC Senior Counsel

SG Star of Gallantry

SMG Senior Management Group

UPS uninterruptable power supply

VC Victoria Cross

VIP Very Important Person

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COMPLIANCE INDEX

The table below shows compliance with Commonwealth Companies (Annual Reporting) Orders 2011 as continued in section 7AB of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability (Consequential and Transitional Provisions) Rule 2014, issued 24 June 2015.

Requirement Page

Letter of transmittal iv

Approval by directors (acceptance of report by Council) v

Enabling legislation and responsible minister 59

Ministerial directions and other statutory requirements

Effects of ministerial directions 61

Commonwealth Electoral Act 1918 Section 311A statement

62

Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 Section 516A statement

64

Freedom of Information Act 1982 Statistics

62 63

Work Health and Safety Act 2011 Section 74 statement

65

Fraud control report 61

Service Charter report 47

Information about directors

Council members 112

Council member profiles 112

Organisational structure and location 10

Statement on governance 1, 49

Risk management 51

Judicial decisions and reviews by outside bodies 59-61

Indemnities and insurance premiums for officers 61

Key activities and changes affecting the authority 13

Financial statements 67

Table of contents ix

Glossary 151

Alphabetical index 153

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INDEX

A camera on Gallipoli 11, 28, 36, 126, 127

Abbott MP, the Honourable Tony viii, xiii, 18, 38, 53, 124,

Afghanistan: the Australian story 6, 9, 26, 27, 51

Albert, Mr Tony xiii, 36

Alex Seton: as of today … 22, 26, 28, 36, 42, 51, 52, 55, 122, 123

ANAO See Australian National Audit Office 4, 49, 61, 68, 110, 111

Anzac connections 24, 25, 38, 43, 44, 118

Anzac Day 2, 11, 14, 16, 22, 25, 34, 35, 36, 37, 54, 57, 58, 64, 65, 102

Anzac Day Dawn Service xii, xiv, 2, 5, 14, 16, 17, 52, 123

Anzac Day National Ceremony vi, xii, xiv, 2, 3, 5, 14, 16, 17, 34, 52, 123

Anzac treasures: the Gallipoli collection of the Australian War Memorial 3, 37, 38, 42, 57, 122

Anzac voices 26, 28, 36, 51, 118

Audacity: stories of heroic Australians in wartime 34

Australian Defence Force 2, 6, 16, 18, 23, 24, 38, 113, 114, 117, 118, 124

Australian Federal Police 6, 16, 54

Australian Federation Guard 18, 31

Australian National Audit Office 3, 4, 49, 68, 98, 110

Australian War Memorial Act 1980 4, 10, 49, 59, 63, 77, 82, 97, 110

Australian in the Great War 1914-1918 xii, xiii, 14, 18, 26, 27, 51

BAE Systems 3, 8, 149

Ben Quilty: after Afghanistan 7, 26, 28, 36, 42, 51, 52, 55, 122, 123, 126

BHP Billiton Sustainable Communities 3, 8, 18, 149

Boeing Australia 3, 8, 50, 153

Book Council of Australia 34

Bryan Gandevia Prize for Military History 3, 44, 45, 45, 150

Cameron MP the Right Honourable David 18, 19, 120

CCG See Collection Coordination Group 6, 22

CFO See Chief Finance Officer

Chair/Chairman of Council iv, v, vi, viii, 3, 4, 8, 10, 49, 59, 70, 109, 110, 111, 112,

Bean, Mr Charles Edwin Woodrow 3, 5, 6, 14, 52

centenary brand 35, 36, 37, 37

Centenary of the First World War 1, 2, 11, 12, 14, 16, 26, 28, 29, 37, 39, 42, 52, 55, 56, 116

Chief Finance Officer 11, 49, 55, 110, 111, 116, 118

CMG See Corporate Management Group

Collection Coordination Group 6, 23

Commemorative Area 6, 8, 19, 19, 20, 29, 31, 33, 37, 48, 52, 54, 65

Commemorative Crosses 6, 32

Commonwealth Electoral Act 1918 62, 152

Corporate Management Group 8, 11, 49, 50, 51

Corporate Services 10, 11, 63, 64, 110, 111, 116, 117

Council of the Australian War Memorial v, 1, 2, 3, 4, 4, 8, 10, 49, 50, 51, 55, 58, 59, 60, 61, 97, 109, 110, 111, 112

Dawn Service See Anzac Day Dawn Service

De Lambert Largesse Foundation 3, 8, 50, 149

Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade 117

Department of Veterans’ Affairs 3, 8, 10, 17, 18, 28, 32, 34, 42, 43, 49, 60, 87, 114, 128

Director, Australian War Memorial iv, 3, 4, 8, 10, 11, 49, 50, 59, 60, 97, 110, 111, 116

Discovery Zone 34, 48

Doolan AO RAN (Retd), Rear Admiral Ken iv, v, vi, viii, 3, 3, 4, 8, 10, 109, 111, 112

e-business 11, 57, 116

Environmental Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 64, 152

external audit 4, 61, 110, 111

Facebook xiv, 25, 33, 37, 57

First World War 1, 2, 6, 14, 16, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 33, 38, 40, 42, 43, 51, 116, 117, 124, 125

First World War Galleries iii, xii, xiii, 1, 3, 5, 5, 6, 7, 8, 14, 18, 22, 23, 25, 26, 27, 37, 42, 46, 47, 49, 50, 51, 55, 56, 117, 122

Flickr xiv, 37

Foxtel’s History Channel xii, 7, 37

fraud control 10, 11, 51, 61

Freedom of Information Act 1982 62, 63, 64, 152

Gallipoli 2, 3, 5, 6, 7, 16, 22, 25, 26, 33, 37, 42, 43, 44, 57, 117, 124, 125

Gallipoli 1915: a century on conference 6, 15, 39, 43, 44, 45, 51, 52, 122, 147

General Visitor Survey 2014-15 14, 15, 30, 31, 36, 46, 47, 51, 52

Google 7, 150

Hall of Memory viii, 6, 7, 8, 19, 29, 31, 54

heritage management 19, 65, 118

His Excellency General the Honourable Sir Peter Cosgrove AK MC (Retd) vi, 16, 18, 27, 120, 124

His Royal Highness Prince Henry of Wales vi, xiii, 18, 120

Hollande, Mr François 18, 53, 54, 120

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AUSTRALIAN WAR MEMORIAL ANNUAL REPORT 2014-2015

Howard OM AC, the Honourable John 2, 3, 16, 16

improvised explosive devices (IEDs) 124

insurance 61

internal audit 4, 11, 61, 110, 111

Keighran VC, Corporal Daniel 2, 16

Kingold 3, 7, 8, 22, 150

Last Post Ceremony xiv, 5, 7, 11, 14, 16, 17, 18, 31, 32, 34, 50, 122, 123

Leader of the Opposition viii

legal actions 61

Lighting Plan 6, 20, 54, 64, 65

Lockheed Martin 3, 8, 50, 150

Lone Pine tree 21, 54, 65

Memorial Boxes xiv, 30, 32, 55

Memorial Shop 8, 11, 39, 44, 54, 57, 116

Menin Gate lions 22, 22

“Mephisto” 7, 12, 12, 22, 28

Minister for Veterans’ Affairs iv, viii, 2, 3, 8, 18, 43, 49, 60, 111

National Collection xiv, 2, 8, 10, 11, 13, 22, 24, 29, 37, 48, 49, 52, 54, 55, 56, 57, 59, 63, 64, 75, 77, 81, 82, ,83, 84, 89, 91, 118, 125

Nelson, Dr Brendan iv, vi, 3, 3, 4, 7, 8, 8, 10, 16, 45, 58, 116, 116, 125

NORFORCE - Tony Albert xiii, 36

Official history of Australian peacekeeping, humanitarian and post-Cold War operations 3, 6, 11, 40, 49, 58, 122

official war art scheme 6

Oliver, Mr Neil xiii, 7, 37

Ombudsman 61, 115

operational service 2, 9, 11, 21, 38, 45

organisation chart 10

Parliament House iv

plaque dedication 14, 17, 21, 122

Pool of Reflection 20

Poppy’s Café xiii, 7, 18, 47, 51, 54, 122

PricewaterhouseCoopers 49, 51, 61, 150

Prime Minister viii, xiii, 7, 18, 38, 43, 53, 124

Protective Security Policy Framework 54

Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 iv, v, vii, 3, 10, 61, 77, 152

Public Management Reform Agenda 55

Public Programs xiv, 3, 8, 10, 11, 25, 30, 31, 37, 41, 61, 63, 64, 116

PWC See PricewaterhouseCoopers

Qantas 3, 8, 149

Reading Room xiv, 14, 38, 39, 43, 63, 66

Reality in flames: modern Australian art and the Second World War 28, 36, 42, 126

Remember me: the lost diggers of Vignacourt 7, 28, 36, 126

Remembrance Day viii, xiv, 2, 3, 11, 14, 15, 16, 16, 17, 33, 34, 36, 37, 52, 54, 58, 65, 122

Returned and Services League of Australia 3, 8, 36, 112, 114, 115, 123, 150, 151

Roberts-Smith VC MG, Corporal Ben 22, 23, 25

Roll of Honour viii, 6, 7, 11, 16, 18, 19, 21, 21, 33, 33, 38, 45, 116, 122

Roll of Honour Projections 6, 16, 19, 56, 122

Roll of Honour Soundscape 16, 19, 33, 56, 116, 122

Ronaldson, Senator the Honourable Michael viii, 2, 8, 18, 43, 60

RSL See Returned and Services League of Australia

school wreathlaying xiv, 14, 17, 29, 48, 122

Senior Management Group 49, 50, 58, 65, 76, 97, 111, 151

Service Charter 47, 152

Seven Group Holdings 8, 115, 149

Seven Network 3, 8, 115, 149

Shorten MP, the Honourable Bill viii

SMG See Senior Management Group

Smith SG MC, Lieutenant Colonel Harry xiii, 7

Social Justice and Equity 61

Soldiers in Residence 29

Spirit of Anzac Centenary Experience travelling exhibition 2, 2, 10, 22, 49, 113, 151

Spotlight on the collection 12

Stokes AO, Mr Kerry 4, 8, 49, 109, 112, 115

Summer Scholars 40, 41

Thales Australia 3, 7, 8, 150

Their Royal Highnesses The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge 21, 54, 65

TripAdvisor 36, 46

Unknown Australian Soldier 17, 31, 54

Visitors’ Book 47

Wartime 39, 42, 43, 57, 130, 132, 133, 134, 137, 139, 142

website vii, xiv, 6, 7, 11, 14, 23, 33, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 44, 55, 62, 116

Work Health and Safety 57, 58, 61, 65, 66, 151

workforce planning 56