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Department of Arts, Heritage and Environment - Report - Year - 1985-86


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The Parliament of the Commonwealth of Australia

DEPARTM ENT OF ARTS, HERITAGE AND ENVIRONM ENT

Annual Report

1985-86

Presented 26 November 1986 Ordered to be printed 27 November 1986

Parliamentary Paper No. 364/1986

Department of Arts, Heritage and Environment

Annual Report 1985-86

A ustralian G overnm ent Publishing Service C an b erra 1986

© Commonwealth of Australia 1986 ISSN 0816-1461

Printed in Australia by Canberra Publishing & Printing Co., Fyshwick, A.C.T.

DEPARTMENT OF ARTS, HERITAGE AND ENVIRONMENT

GPO BOX 1252, CANBERRA, ACT 2601. TELEPHONE 467211. TELEX AA62960

OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY

25 November 1986

T he H on. B arry C ohen, M.P. M inister fo r Arts, H eritage and E nvironm ent Parliam ent H ouse C anberra, A .C.T. 2600

D ear M inister

I am pleased to p resen t the A nnual R eport o f the D epartm ent o f Arts, H eritage and E nvironm ent for the year en d ed 30 J u n e 1986.

T h e year’s achievem ents have been considerable. O f these, the G overnm ent’s decision to ad o p t a C om m onw ealth rainforest conservation policy an d to provide som e $22 million for the related program stands out. T h e D e p artm en t’s involvem ent with you in the developm ent o f this proposal is a prim e exam ple o f its policy developm ent, co-ordination and im plem entation role. Its close involvem ent too in the processes which led to the

G overnm ent’s decision to protect the conservation values o f N ational Estate areas in T asm ania proposed for w oodchipping d em onstrated both the significance o f the en vironm ent assessm ent a n d heritage legislation as well as the im p o rtan t role for an en vironm ent d ep a rtm en t in fulfilling the G overnm ent’s conservation objectives. T h e

publications ‘State o f the E nvironm ent in A ustralia 1985’ and ‘Objectives, achievem ents and priorities in E nvironm ent, C onservation an d H eritage’ were a first and, I ju d g e , a successful a n d im p o rtan t initiative in inform ing the A ustralian people no t only of the G overnm ent’s aims and achievem ents but perh ap s m ore im portantly o f the concerns

which rem ain to be addressed by governm ent and the public.

T h e rep o rt details a n u m b er o f significant events and initiatives which enhanced the G overnm ent’s record in up h o ld in g conservation values an d d em onstrated the im portance o f national, in tern atio n al and com m unity action if these values are to be m aintained. T h e establishm ent o f jo in t m anagem ent arran g em en ts for the S outh West T asm anian W orld H eritage area, the extension o f the G reat B arrier R eef M arine Park area, the incorporation into K akadu N ational Park o f Stage 2, the re tu rn o f U luru

N ational Park to its traditional ow ners, the extraordinary developm ent o f the catalytic N ational T re e P rogram (with $37 million spent so far on tree related projects u n d e r the C om m unity E m ploym ent Program ), the accession to the L ondon D um ping C onvention and a successful A ustralian co-sponsored resolution to extend indefinitely the

m oratorium on the d u m p in g o f radioactive wastes at sea, were all issues in which the D ep artm en t played an im p o rtan t part. Its initiative with the U nited N ations E nv iro n m en t P rogram (UNEP) concerning desertification o f the w orld’s drylands reached reality with an In tern atio n al C onference on the Econom ics o f D ryland

D egradation in C anberra in M arch 1986.

T h e D e p artm en t’s heritage tasks have been equally notew orthy. Whilst welcoming the G o v ern m en t’s decision, the D ep artm en t’s resources have been stretched by the need to establish fo r opening, in 1988, the A ustralian N ational M aritim e M useum in Sydney. T h e review o f the role o f the C om m onw ealth in the protection o f the N ational Estate is

close to com pletion. T h e m ethod o f review involving the seeking o f subm issions from the

com m unity an d the conduct o f a w orkshop for all concerned may well provide a m odel for fu tu re reviews o f legislation a n d institutional arran g em en ts within the portfolio. A significant achievem ent o f the D epartm ent d u rin g the year was the en actm ent o f the

Protection of Movable Cultural Heritage Act 1986. T h e com ing year will involve m uch p rep arato ry work an d com m unity discussion to en su re the necessary adm inistrative arran g em en ts are ready for its proclam ation.

At your initiative the D epartm ent has been involved in raising com m unity aw areness o f the im portance o f A ustralian folklife. An inquiry was launched in M arch 1986.

S upport for the arts, including institutional arran g em en ts an d relations with the States, continued to provide a highly contentious and d em an d in g set o f policy issues. T h e D epartm ent has been directly involved in resolving the fu tu re o f the A ustralian O pera and, th ro u g h the C ultural M insters Council, in attem p tin g to reach sensible arran g em en ts for the provision o f arts support. T h e first m eeting o f that C ouncil d u rin g

the year represents an historic lan d m ark in this co u n try ’s cultural developm ent.

This R eport records not only significant events and achievem ents but also details the m any tasks carried ou t in su p p o rt o f your M inistry an d the G overnm ent. T h e adm inistration o f th e 10BA Schem e for film production, the Public L ending Right Scheme, A rtbank, the N ational T re e Program , the grants to V oluntary C onservation O rganisations schem e, and the p rogram s o f assistance concerning the N ational Estate,

Historic Shipwrecks, and H istoric M em orials indicate this diversity. M eeting these requirem ents an d at the sam e tim e coping with an increasing d em an d for sound policy advice and effective im plem entation o f decided policy have, at times, placed strains on all of us. Doing so at the sam e tim e as effecting the G overnm ent's Financial an d Public Service reform s has not been easy.

I was pleased with the results from the restru ctu rin g o f the D epartm ent d u rin g the year. It is now organised m ore effectively and is m ore able to adjust readily to changes in priorities and dem ands. It certainly is b etter able to cope with the requirem ents o f the G overnm ent in relation to the co-ordination o f activities within the portfolio an d of

portfolio budgeting. T h e additional dem ands from the G overnm ent’s decision on rainforest conservation, am endm ents to the Environment Assessment (impact of Proposals) Act, the Protection of Movable Cultural Heritage Act, and the increasing req u irem en t for portfolio co-ordination will call fo r additional resources and some fu rth e r adjustm ents in

1 he D epartm ent does not work, o f course, in isolation. It is first your D epartm ent. I believe we have served you an d th e G overnm ent well this year. I thank you on behalf o f the D epartm ent for your leadership and support. As Secretary to the D ep artm en t I wish to record also my personal g ratitu d e to my colleagues in the D epartm ent and to those within the portfolio for their considerable efforts and su p p o rt o f the G overnm ent’s arts, heritage a n d environm ent policies and program s d u rin g 1985— 86.

Yours sincerely

1986-87.

P. J. Galvin Secretary

Introduction

T h e D e p artm en t o f A rts, H eritage and E nvironm ent is responsible for:

• E nvironm ent and C onservation • C ultural A ffairs including su p p o rt for the arts a n d film • N ational Collections • N ational H eritage

In D ecem ber 1985 the D ep artm en t assum ed responsibility for the A ustralian N ational B otanic G ardens a n d fo r the adm inistration o f the A C T National Memorials Ordinance 1928 following their

tran sfer to the portfolio from th at o f the M inister fo r T erritories.

T h e Arts, H eritage an d E nvironm ent D e p artm en t was created in D ecem ber 1984. Its environm ental origins extend back to the D ep artm en t o f E nvironm ent and C onservation established in 1972 and

its cultural origins to the H om e Affairs portfolio created in D ecem ber 1977. T hese two m ain stream s o f responsibility were b ro u g h t to g eth er in the D e p artm en t o f

H om e A ffairs and E nvironm ent in N ovem ber 1980.

T h e D ep artm en t’s central activities are organised into fo u r m ajor program s — arts, heritage, en v iro n m en t an d corporate services.

T his R eport is concerned with the C entral Office Divisions o f the D epartm ent to g eth er with the N ational Film an d Sound Archive, th e A ustralian N ational M aritim e

M useum an d the A ustralian National Botanic G ardens.

T w o o th er A uthorities whose staff are part o f the D epartm ent — the A ustralian Archives a n d A ustralian H eritage C om m ission— present separate A nnual

Reports.

Legislation Legislation adm inistered by the M inister for Arts, H eritage an d E nvironm ent is as follows:

Archives Act 1983 Australia Council Act 1975 Australian Film, Television and Radio School Act 1973

Australian Film Commission Act 1975 Australian Heritage Commission Act 1975 Captains Flat (Abatement of Pollution) Agreement Act 1975 Environment (Financial Assistance) Act 1977 Environment Protection (Alligator Rivers

Region) Act 1978 Environment Protection (Impact of Proposals) Act 1974 Environment Protection (Nuclear Codes) Act

1978 Environment Protection (Sea Dumping) Act 1981 Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Act 1975 Historic Shipurrecks Act 1976 Koongarra Project Area Act 1981 National Gallery Act 1975 National Library Act 1960 National Memorials Ordinance 1928

National Museum of Australia Act 1980 National Parks and Wildlife Conservation Act 1975 Protection of Movable Cultural Heritage Act

1986 Public Lending Right Act 1985 States Grants (Air (Quality Monitoring) Act

1976 States Grants (Nature Conservation) Act 1974 Urban and Regional Development (Financicd Assistance) Act 1974, insofar as it relates to

national estate grants Whale Protection Act 1980 Wildlife Protection (Regulation of Exports and

Imports) Act 1982

World Heritage Properties Conservation Act 1983

The Minister I lie 1 io n Barry C ohen, MP, has been the M inister for Arts, H eritage an d E nvironm ent since M arch 1983. In so far as his en v iro n m en t responsibilities are concerned M r C ohen becam e A ustralia’s

longest serving C om m onw ealth M inister in | tine 1986.

Mr ( Alien has been the M em ber for Robertson in the H ouse o f R epresentatives since 1969. R obertson is an industrial, sem i-rural and residential electorate centred on the coastal city o f G osford, about 100 kilom etres n o rth o f Sydney.

P rio r to being elected to the C om m onw ealth Parliam ent, M r C ohen was a businessm an. H e holds a B achelor o f Arts D egree from the A ustralian N ational

l 'Diversity.

M em bers o f M r C o h en ’s personal staff at 30 ] m ie 1986 were:

Mr Peter Conway

Mr Jo n a th a n West Ms M argaret C halker

Ms Ruth R utherford Ms Judith Barlow Ms B arbara Smith

Mr 1'ony Sansom

Ms Jacquie S pring

Senior Private Secretary Private Secretary Assistant Private Secretary

Personal Secretary Steno-secretary A dm inistrative O fficer Electorate A ssistant

Electorate Assistant

Mi C ohen m aintains offices in P arliam ent I louse, C anberra (Tel. [062] 73 1964) an d in G osford (Tel. [043] 26 1604).

D epartm ental R e stru c tu rin g A rest m etin g of the D epartm ent took place (luring the year to enable it to continue success!ully to carry out its role o f supporting the M inister in co-ordinating, initiating and advising on policy relating to its considerable range o f functions an d activities.

A m ajor aim o f the re a rra n g e m e n t was to establish a Division to u n d ertak e effective

co rporate planning, servicing an d co­ ordination an d to provide su p p o rt to o th er organisations w ithin the portfolio. T h e C o rp o rate an d Portfolio S u p p o rt Division was created by com bining a n d re arra n g in g the previous C o-ordination, M anagem ent Services and Studies B ranches.

In addition changes w ere m ade in the two E nvironm ent Divisions, to b e tte r reflect the spread o f responsibilities betw een them and to spread m ore evenly th e load on senior officers.

A review o f the effectiveness o f the new organisational stru ctu re is p lan n ed for the conclusion o f the 1986-87 bu d g et process,

following consideration by the M inister of the G o v ern m en t’s priorities for the Portfolio.

S taffing D uring the year to 30 J u n e 1986 the D e p artm en t utilized 919 staff years including 420 for the A ustralian Archives an d 23 for the A ustralian H eritage Com m ission. T his com pares w ith 770 staff

years in 1984— 85. T h e increase occurred principally because o f the tra n sfe r to the D epartm ent o f the A ustralian National Botanic G ardens, the C an b erra N ational

M em orials C om m ittee an d the establishm ent o f the A ustralian N ational M aritim e M useum .

T h e m ajority o f the 476 C entral Of fice staff covered by this R eport w ork in fo u r locations in C an b erra — T asm an H ouse an d the CM L B uilding in the central city area, A cton H ouse, in A cton an d the A ustralian N ational B otanic G ardens in C anberra and Jervis Bay. T h e Arts, Film an d H eritage Division also m aintains two small and separate offices in Sydney servicing the Public L ending R ight Schem e and A rtbank. In addition, the N ational Film an d Sound Archive has offices in C anberra, Sydney and M elbourne, and the A ustralian N ational M aritim e M useum in Sydney.

C ontact addresses an d telephone num bers for senior officers o f the D epartm ent are provided in A ppendix 1 o f this R eport.

Significant events In the 1985-86 B udget, b ro u g h t dow n on 20 A ugust 1985, $ l9 9 m was allocated to the portfolio. T his was an increase o f $24m

(14%) over the previous year and applied across the ra n g e o f the p ortfolio’s activities including:

• fu rth e r com m itm ent by the G overnm ent to restore arts fu n d in g to 1975— 76 levels in real term s; • the co n tin u ed developm ent o f the

N ational Film and S ound Archive; • the initiation o f a research p ro g ram into the C row n o f T h o rn s Starfish; and

• fu rth e r d evelopm ent o f the m ajor N ational Parks; • grants to V oluntary C onservation O rganisations which w ere increased by

11% to $945,000.

Arts and Heritage U n d er legislation in tro d u cted to P arliam ent on 4 J u n e 1985 the G overnm ent ap p ro v ed construction o f a $30 million building at D arling H a rb o u r in Sydney for the A ustralian National

M aritim e M useum . T h e building is due to be com pleted in 1988.

An enquiry into A ustralian Folklife was launched in M arch 1986, to re p o rt in January 1987.

T h e G overnm ent agreed to a special once-only cash injection o f $1,737,000 to the A ustralian O pera. T h e New South Wales an d Victorian G overnm ents agreed

to m ake up the balance o f the $2,500,000 needed to m aintain the O pera.

T h e A dm inistration o f the A C T National Memorials Ordinance 1928 and responsibility for the m anagem ent o f the

A Royal occasion for the Australian National Botanic Gardens — a tour of inspec tion after the official opening of the Visitor’s Centre on 7 November (left to right): T he Director of the Gardens, Dr R. Boden; HRH the Prince and Princess of Wales; Mrs Boden

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T he popular golden paper daisy, now named / lelickrisum bracteatum, Princess o f Wales, to commemorate the Royal visit to the Australian National Botanic Gardens.

A ustralian N ational Botanic G ardens was tran sferred from the portfolio o f the M inister for T erritories.

1 he A ustralian National Botanic G ardens Visitor Inform ation C entre was o p en ed by their Royal H ighnesses the Prince and Princess o f Wales.

On 25 N ovem ber the M inister tabled the report o f the N ational Film an d Sound Archive Advisory C om m ittee Time in our Hands.

Australia hosted the 42nd C ongress o f the International Federation o f Film Archives in C anberra.

Assent was given to the Protection of Movable Cultural Heritage Act 1986 which provides control over export o f A ustralia’s cultural heritage an d im port o f th e cultural

heritage o f o th er countries.

1 he taxation concession for investm ent in qualifying A ustralian films was reduced

from 133% to 120%, and exem ption from incom e tax on film revenue from 33% to 20% (of the am o u n t o f investm ent). T h e T re a su re r a n n o u n ced an increase in the A ustralian Film C om m ission’s Special

P roduction F und from $4m to $6m. Significant am endm ents w ere m ade to the National Gallery Act 1975 a n d the Historic Shipwrecks Act 1976 by the Statute Law (Miscellaneous Provisions) Act (No. 1) 1985 and to th e National Museum of Australia Act

1980 by the Statute Law (Miscellaneous Provisions) Act (No. 2) 1985. Assent was given to the Public Lending Right Act 1985.

E n v iro n m en t T h e M inister a n n o u n ced the G overnm ent’s in-principle agreem ent to ad o p t a C om m onw ealth R ainforest C onservation Policy a n d provide $22.25m for the program .

T h e M urray-D arling Basin M inisterial Council was established at a m eeting of C om m onw ealth and State m inisters to prom ote an d co-ordinate effective

planning an d m anagem ent for equitable, efficient and sustainable use o f the land.

T he Minister, Mr Barry Cohen, and the Secretary, Mr Pat Galvin, delighted with the news that the Commonwealth Government approved $22.25m for the im plementation of a National Rainforest Conservation Program.

4

water an d enviro n m en tal resources o f the M urray-D arling Basin.

T he G overnm ent decided in late 1985 to renew T asm anian w oodchip export licences for 15 years afte r 1988 on the

condition th at there w ould be no logging in N ational Estate areas before a form al process o f consultation had been

com pleted and the C om m onw ealth was satisfied th e N ational Estate values will be protected.

Jo in t m an ag em en t a rran g e m e n ts were m ade betw een the C om m onw ealth and T asm anian G overnm ents in reg ard to the W orld H eritage area o f S outh W est Tasm ania. T h e C om m onw ealth m ade a contribution o f $2m for interim

m anagem ent plus $5m for tourist developm ents.

In D ecem ber 1985 the G overnm ent ann o u n ced the incorporation into Kakadu N ational P ark o f Stage 2.

In A ugust 1985 P arliam ent enacted legislation to enable tran sfer o f the title of U luru N ational Park (which contains Ayers

Rock) to th e U luru-K atatjuta Aboriginal h a n d T ru st, and the subsequent ‘lfase back’ o f the land to the D irector o f N ational Parks and W ildlife for

m anagem ent as a N ational Park. T h e G overnor-G eneral, Sir N inian S tephen, AK, GCMG, GCVO, KBE, KStJ handed over the title deeds to M r Yami Lester

rep resen tin g the A boriginal traditional owners.

T h e N ational T re e P rogram was extended th ro u g h links with the C om m unity E m ploym ent Program . E x p en d itu re of $37m an d the creation o f 3,700 jobs in the

past two years was achieved. T h e them e of the N ational T re e C are A w ard for 1985 was ‘Farm T re e P lanning’. T h e aw ard was won by M r and Mrs D Foulis of

W ilm ington, South A ustralia.

A public sem inar was held in C anberra as p art of the D e p artm en t’s review o f the G overnm ent’s role in the conservation of the national estate. T h e re p o rt o f the review is to be m ade public by the M inister in S eptem ber 1986.

T h e G overnm ent n om inated to the W orld H eritage C om m ittee, rainforest areas in New S outh W ales for inclusion in the W orld H eritage List.

An International Drylands C onference in C an b erra in M arch 1986 initiated a strategy to im prove the econom ic basis o f decision-m aking in dealing with desertification o f the w orld’s drylands.

At the ninth m eeting o f the contracting parties to the L ondon D um ping C onvention, A ustralia co-sponsored a successful resolution which indefinitely extends the m oratorium on the dum p in g o f radioactive wastes at sea.

A M em orandum o f U n d erstan d in g was signed by the M inister for co-operation with New South Wales, Victoria and the A C T for the m an ag em en t o f A ustralian

Alps N ational Parks.

T h e D ep artm en t co-sponsored a N ational C onference on the m an ag em en t of hazardous wastes.

T h e M inister tabled in Parliam ent the re p o rt o f the Interim C onsultative C om m ittee for the N ational C onservation Strategy.

T h e D ep artm en t’s Second National E nvironm ental E ducation Sem inar and W orkshops were held in C anberra.

T h e second phase o f com piling the A ustralian Inventory o f Chem ical Substances, a key elem ent in the proposed national chemicals notification and

assessm ent schem e, com m enced.

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P rofiles o f Senior O fficers

P J (Pat) Galvin Secretary

Pat ( ialvin was born on St Patrick’s Day in 1933. In J u n e 1984 he was ap p o in ted to the office o f Secretary o f the (then) D epartm ent o f H om e Affairs an d Environm ent, now Arts, H eritage and Environm ent.

Mr ( ialvin is a career Public Servant w ho joined the service in Adelaide as a Personnel C adet in 1950. He has held a num ber o f senior ap pointm ents including : Assistant Secretary, D epartm ent o f

Kxternal T erritories including direction of tlie A ustralian G overnm ent O ffice in Papua New G uinea, C o-ordinator o f the

International W om en’s Year Secretariat, Kxecutive D irector o f the A ustralia-Japan F oundation, Secretary o f the R em uneration T rib u n al and A cadem ic Salaries T rib u n al, D irector o f C om m onw ealth Property in the fo rm er D epartm ent o f A dm inistrative Services and Deputy Secretary o f the D e p artm en t ol I lom e Affairs and E nvironm ent.

I le has a B achelor o f Arts, D iplom a in Arts and Education from the University o f Adelaide an d a M anagem ent Certificate I m m the S outh A ustralia School o f Mines.

His father, also Pat Galvin, was the Labor Μ P for the Federal seat o f K ingston (SA) from 1951 until 1966.

Mr Galvin’s interests include reading, films and theatre. H e is a respected actor in ( Canberra theatre a n d in earlier days

rep resen ted S outh A ustralia in sw im m ing an d the A C T in A ustralian football.

Alan Kerr Deputy Secretary Alan K err studied law part-tim e at the A ustralian N ational U niversity while em ployed in a variety o f C om m onw ealth d ep artm en ts a n d jo in ed the D epartm ent o f E xternal T errito ries in 1969 in its governm ent and constitutional area. He was responsible, am ong o th e r things, for work on the transition o f executive pow er to P apua New G uinea. A fter th at co u n try ’s independence in 1975 he w orked in the G overnm ent Division o f the D epartm ent o f Prim e M inister and C abinet. In 1977 he headed the T ra d e Practices an d C onsum er Affairs Division o f the th en D ep artm en t of

Business an d C onsum er Affairs. In 1980 he was ap p o in ted D eputy C om m onw ealth O m budsm an an d took up the position o f D eputy Secretary in April 1985. His interests include reading, music and people.

Max Bourke

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Max Bourke First Assistant Secretary Corporate and Portfolio Support Division Max B ourke was for seven years the D irector o f the A ustralian H eritage Com m ission an d p rio r to th at had been a

senior officer on the Royal Com m ission into A ustralian G overnm ent A dm inistration an d in various G overnm ent d epartm ents. H e has

university qualifications in A gricultural Science, A rt History an d in C onservation of C ultural Sites. Max is the a u th o r o f n u m erous publications in the scientific

field and has edited journals and o th er publications in the cultural field including a book for U N ESC O ‘P rotecting the Past for the F u tu re ’. Recently he was engaged by U N ESC O to develop the M anual for the Protection of World Heritage Sites an d has

been a consultant on the m an ag em en t o f the R om an city o f Jerash in Jo rd a n . Max’s interests include m edieval architecture, skiing an d still trying to pick the sheep

from the goats.

Digby Gascoine First Assistant Secretary Environment Contaminants and Co-ordination

Division Digby G ascoine studied econom ics at the U niversity o f A delaide an d com m enced his career in th e A ustralian Public Service in

1967, w orking on econom ic statistics. He came to the environm ent function within the C om m onw ealth adm inistration in 1978 in the fo rm er D ep artm en t o f

E nvironm ent, H ousing and C om m unity

D evelopm ent, having previously served in the D e p artm en t o f U rban an d Regional D evelopm ent. In 1985 he was app o in ted as

head o f th e present D e p artm en t’s E nvironm ent C ontam inants an d Co­ ordination Division. For a n u m b er o f years he has led the A ustralian delegation to

m eetings o f the OECD E nvironm ent D irectorate’s program on environm entally hazardous chemicals a n d has served for several years as V ice-C hairm an o f the Chem icals G roup. In May 1985 he was elected V ice-C hairm an o f the OECD E nvironm ent C om m ittee. His recreations include skiing, bushw alking an d tennis.

Cathy Santamaria First Assistant Secretary (Acting) Arts, Film and Heritage Division C athy Santam aria, is presently seconded to

the D epartm ent from the N ational Library o f A ustralia. For som e years she has m anaged the Library’s special A ustralian collections an d services. She has been

involved in a range o f arts activities particularly in the A C T including local com m unity arts festivals. She is a m em ber o f a n u m b er o f cultural boards and

presently chairs the A C T Arts D evelopm ent B oard. H e r interests include perform ing arts — in particular th eatre — the land and A ustralian Rules football.

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Ken Thompson First Assistant Secretary Conservation and Environment Assessment Division Ken T h o m p so n g rad u ated as a B achelor o f Civil E ngineering from the U niversity o f

W estern A ustralia, an d later as a M aster of E ngineering from th e University o f New South Wales. A fter w orking w ith the State Electricity Com m ission in Victoria and

C om m onw ealth Industrial Gases in W estern A ustralia, he worked in E ngland in structural engineering. For five years he

worked in C anada as a traffic e n g in ee r and a tran sp o rt p lanner, both in g o v ernm ent and in a consulting firm . R etu rn in g to

Australia, h e jo in e d a consulting en gineering firm , w orking on projects in several cities in A ustralia and New Zealand. H e jo in e d the C om m onw ealth

B ureau o f Roads in M elbourne in 1967 and later the B ureau o f T ra n sp o rt Economics in C anberra. In 1974 h e was ap p o in ted D irector o f the B u reau o f

E nvironm ental Studies. Since th e n he has had responsibility for a wide ra n g e o f environm ental policy a n d program activities in successive C om m onw ealth environm ent departm ents. W ork and

family are m ain interests. Holidays usually involve travel with a focus on snorkelling, walking an d photography.

Vale

Dr Phung Tran D r P h u n g T ra n , D irector o f the D e p artm en t’s Statistics Section, was aw arded the D e p artm en t’s 1986 A ustralia Day Medal by th e Secretary,

M r P.J. Galvin, in recognition o f his work in the developm ent an d publication o f two im p o rtan t G overnm ent docum ents in 1985 — the first State of the Environment in Australia re p o rt and the G overnm ent’s statem ent Objectives, achievements and priorities in Environment Conservation and Heritage. T h e docum ents were tabled in

P arliam ent in N ovem ber 1985 w here th eir im portance as key rep o rts in the c u rre n t G o v ern m en t’s p rogram s was acknow ledged.

D r T ra n died in February this year. H e first cam e to the D e p artm en t as an Assistant R esearch O fficer in 1978 an d

in his b rief career becam e o ne o f the m ost senior V ietnam ese-born m em bers o f the A ustralian Public Service. Dr T ra n ’s m any friends an d colleagues th ro u g h o u t th e D epartm ent reg ret his loss and wish his wife a n d children well in the future.

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Arts, Film and Heritage

Arts, Film and Heritage

T h e Arts, Film and H eritage Division provides policy advice, develops proposals, adm inisters legislation, im plem ents program s and co-ordinates the G overnm ent’s involvem ent in cultural affairs a n d A ustralia’s heritage. C om plem entary statutory authorities are

the A ustralian Archives, A ustralian H eritage Com m ission, A ustralian N ational Gallery, N ational M useum o f Australia, National Library o f A ustralia, the Australia

Council, th e A ustralian Film, Television and Radio School a n d the A ustralian Film C om m ission. Each o f these authorities also reports annually to P arliam ent and fu rth e r

details o f th eir operations may be obtained by consulting their an n u al reports.

In addition, in the revised adm inistrative arran g em en ts issued on 12 D ecem ber 1985 the C an b erra N ational M em orials C om m ittee (established u n d e r the

provisions o f the National Memorials Ordinance 1928) was tran sferre d from the responsibility o f the M inister for T errito ries to the M inister for Arts,

H eritage and E nvironm ent.

T h e C om m onw ealth G overnm ent recognises the need for cultural and heritage policies an d program s which ensure a balanced developm ent o f the

cultural potential o f the A ustralian com m unity and which will preserve and protect th e n atio n ’s heritage. T h e success o f these policies and program s continues to

dep en d to a considerable extent on co­ operation betw een th e C om m onw ealth, States a n d local governm ent.

T h e Division corkists of:

• A rts B ranch — A rts S u p p o rt Section — A rts D evelopm ent Section — Public L ending Right Section

• Film B ranch — Film and Television Section — Film C ertification Section — S ecretariat Section • H eritage B ranch

— N ational Estate an d W orld H eritage Section — M useum s an d Collections Section — Institutions Section

Arts T h e Arts B ranch m onitors an d provides advice to the M inister on the adm inistration o f the Australia Council Act

1975 an d arts fu n d in g m atters generally; develops policy initiatives an d program s in accordance with the G overnm ent’s arts policies; adm inisters the Public L ending

R ight Schem e; is the liaison point for the A ustralia Council, the G overnm ent’s arts fu n d in g body, a n d the N ational Institute o f D ram atic A rt; a n d adm inisters the C om m onw ealth’s schem e o f

indem nification o f m ajor cultural exhibitions.

M ajor arts fu n d in g issues this year have included su p p o rt for T h e A ustralian O pera, the fu tu re developm ent o f orchestras in A ustralia and tax averaging o f artists’ incomes.

C u rre n t developm ental activities focus on international arts m atters, education an d the arts, D roit-de-Suite an d the

safeguarding o f A ustralian folklife. T h e B ranch provides a secretariat to the present C om m ittee o f Inquiry into Folklife

in A ustralia, which was established in M arch 1986.

D uring the year the B ranch prepared approxim ately 550 replies to correspondence received by the M inister on arts m atters an d p re p are d briefs an d

speeches for his atten d an ce at arts f unctions. Notably, the M inister delivered a m ajor address to the A nnual G eneral M eeting of the A ustralian Society o f A uthors in M arch 1986.

A rts F u n d in g D ebate I lie year has seen continued debate on the issue of arts fu n d in g arran g em en ts. T h e D epartm ent has continued to m o n ito r and evaluate developm ents in this area to enable it to provide the M inister with

inform ed advice on the views o f fu n d in g agencies a n d the arts com m unity.

In ( ) ( tober 1985 the M inister m ade a m ajor S tatem ent in the P arliam ent on Arts Policv.

T h e M inister o utlined the achievem ents o f i lie ( iovernm ent in the field o f arts and ( till m al activities and highlighted the ( iovernm ent's contributions to m ajor cultural institutions an d program s such as

the Australia Council, the A ustralian National Gallery, A rtbank and assistance to the film industry th ro u g h the A ustralian Film C om m ission an d the T ax incentives

for Films Scheme.

fh e M inister focused on the relationship of the G overnm ent to its arts fu n d in g body, the A ustralia Council and the arran g e m e n t u n d e r yvhich decisions on

funding the arts are m ade at arm s length from the G overnm ent. In this process the G overnm ent provides the funds b u t has no

say in th eir disposition nor, u n d e r the present legislation, can it give specific directions o r guidance to the Council.

O ver the ten years o f the present arran g em en ts th e issues have, on som e occasions, given rise to confusion; a n d are th erefo re in need o f re-definition.

In concluding his statem ent the M inister said: ‘Artists provide the life blood for what yve feel as people: It is up to governm ent to en su re that they receive adequate

m onetary rew ards for the fruits o f th eir labours an d th at they continue to exist and flourish. T his d em ands a clear and im portant role for the G overnm ent in the developm ent o f artistic life in this co u n try .’

C onsequently, in Ja n u a ry 1986 the M inister asked the A ustralia C ouncil to review its role, stru ctu re an d processes having reg ard to the developm ents in arts

fu n d in g arran g em en ts th ro u g h o u t A ustralia since the C ouncil yvas established. T h e C ouncil will rep o rt to the M inister in O ctober 1986.

T h e A u stra lian O p e ra T h e D e p artm en t played an im portant role in the form ulation o f m easures required to m aintain T h e A ustralian O p e ra as a full-tim e national com pany.

In N ovem ber 1985 the C ultural M inisters C ouncil considered fu n d in g for the O pera in the light o f the recom m endations o f the consultants C oopers and Lybrand, a n d M r Kim Williams, the C hief Executive o f the A ustralian Film Com m ission. Fhe consultants w ere com m issioned by the Australia Council. T h e C onsultants’ recom m endations included a once-only cash injection o f $2.5m, the ado p tio n o f certain cost reduction m easures by the C om pany and addressed the m atter o f

fu tu re C om m onw ealth a n d State subsidies.

In Ja n u a ry 1986 the C om m onw ealth agreed to provide $ 1.737m th ro u g h the A ustralia C ouncil tow ards th e once-only special cash injection for the O p era, the

Neyv South Wales and Victorian G overnm ents agreeing to m ake u p the balance o f the required $2.5 m illion. T h e cash injection yvas conditional on the O p era continuing full-tim e operations and ado p tin g certain cost

reduction m easures identified in the consultants' report; and on an ag reem en t being reached betw een the C om m onw ealth, the States and the O pera on a fu n d in g form ula which would set the limit for fu tu re C om m onw ealth subsidies.

T h e G overnm ent also decided th at a suitable C om m onw ealth official should be app o in ted to the B oard o f the O pera. Mr.P.J. Galvin, the Secretary o f the

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D e p artm en t, will re p re se n t the G overnm ent on the B oard.

In May 1986 th e C u ltu ral M inisters C ouncil considered options p u t to it by th e C om m onw ealth fo r a fo rm u la for

fu tu re gov ern m en t fu n d in g for the O pera. T h e G overnm ent is to consider this m atter in Ju ly 1986 and an a n n o u n c em en t o f fu tu re fu n d in g is expected in the 1986— 87 budget.

Public Lending Right (PLR) T h e Public Lending R ight seeks to com pensate the creators o f A ustralian books, both authors an d publishers, for use

o f th eir books in A ustralian public libraries. It was in troduced in 1974 and annual p rogram s began in 1975— 76.

T h e PLR Schem e is adm inistered by a Sydney-based section o f th e Arts B ranch. T h is section also services the PLR C om m ittee, which advises the M inister on

PLR in A ustralia an d reviews the policy an d operations o f the Schem e.

T h e PLR C om m ittee, ap p o in ted by the M inister, com prises two representatives o f A ustralian authors, one representative of A ustralian publishers, one o f librarians

a n d representatives from the N ational Library o f A ustralia an d the A ttorney- G eneral’s D epartm ent . T h e A ustralian B ureau o f Statistics provides a consultant.

M em bership o f the C om m ittee is shown in A ppendix 2.

As foreshadow ed in last year’s re p o rt, the G overnm ent introduced legislation to fulfil a com m itm ent m ade in 1983 to give PLR a statutory basis. O n 16 D ecem ber 1985 the

Public Lending Right Act 1985 received Royal Assent. T h e Act is to com e into o p eratio n on a date to be fixed by Proclam ation. T h e details o f the scheme,

which can be m odified from tim e to time by the M inister, will be contained in a Notice to be published in the G overnm ent Gazette. T h e legislation a n d a Ministerial

Notice to su p p o rt it will provide a fram ew ork o f accountability a n d a source o f authority for the PLR C om m ittee.

D uring the year the basic rate o f paym ent p er book in public libraries stood at 70 cents for au th o rs an d 17.5 cents for publishers. For 1985— 86 the $1,675 million

ap p ro v ed by the C om m ittee rep resen ted an increase o f 6.2% over the previous year. T h e re w ere approxim ately 22,000 books a n d 6,400 claim ants registered with the

Schem e d u rin g th e year.

T h e re w ere several changes in C om m ittee m em bership d u rin g th e year. W ell-known a u th o r, M r R oger M cD onald, was ap p o in ted as a second representative of

au th o rs to succeed Ms B arbara Jefferis who acted as C hairperson o f the C om m ittee d u rin g the latter p art o f 1985 a n d who had been a m em ber for six years.

T h e term o f ap p o in tm en t for M r Brian C louston, a representative o f publishers, en d ed on 31 D ecem ber 1985. M r C louston h ad been a m em ber o f th e C om m ittee since 1981. T h e term o f ap p o in tm en t for

Mrs Ja n e La Scala, a representative of librarians, en d ed on 30 J u n e 1986.

An analysis o f paym ents m ade u n d e r the PLR Schem e is in A p pendix 3.

Indemnification of Touring Art Exhibitions In 1979 the C om m onw ealth in troduced a schem e u n d e r which m ajor to u rin g art exhibitions could be ap p ro v ed for

C om m onw ealth indem nity against loss o r dam age. T h e p u rp o se o f the schem e is to en su re th at the A ustralian public has the

o p p o rtu n ity to see m ajor international and A ustralian to u rin g a rt exhibitions which w ould n o t be possible w ithout indem nity, because o f the prohibitive costs o f

insurance. T h e schem e also extends to im p o rtan t A ustralian exhibitions travelling overseas w here indem nity is not available from th e host country. T h e schem e is adm inistered by th e D epartm ent. In 1985

guidelines for the schem e were revised and an increased level was set o f $ 150 million for C om m onw ealth indem nity at any one time. (Copies o f the guidelines are available from the D epartm ent).

T h e D ep artm en t continues to m onitor an d review the application o f the guidelines for

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the Schem e with a view to addressing any polit y issues which m ight arise.

D uring 1985— 86, fo u r exhibitions were indem nified by the C om m onw ealth, th ree of which w ere m anaged by the International C ultural C orp o ratio n of

Australia Lim ited (ICCA) an d o n e by the A ustralian N ational Gallery, Each exhibition attracted large audiences and approxim ately one m illion people attended the four exhibitions. T h e exhibitions m anaged by ICCA w ere Turner Abroad, Claude Monet — Painter o f Light and ( '•olden Summers. T h e Twentieth Century Masters from the Metropolitan Museum, New York exhibition was m anaged by the A ustralian N ational Gallery.

D uring 1985— 86 the total value o f m aterial indem nified was $178,073,011 alth o u g h at any one tim e the $150 million lim it was not exceeded.

T h e re were no com pensation claims m ade d u rin g the year. How ever, com pensation and restoration paym ents am o u n tin g to $83,000 w ere m ade in respect o f dam age to the painting Les Trots Cranes which form ed p art o f the earlier Picasso exhibition.

International Cultural Corporation of Australia Limited (ICCA) ICCA is A ustralia’s m ajor exhibitions to u rin g body and works closely with the

D epartm ent on the indem nification o f overseas an d A ustralian exhibitions o f cultural property. D irectors o f the B oard ol the C orporation are listed in A ppendix 4.

I he C orporation h ad a m ost successful year d u rin g 1985— 86 with record crowds atten d in g the Claude Monet — Painter of Light and Golden Summers exhibitions.

Discussions were held with the Visual Arts B oard of the A ustralia Council concerning the m anagem ent by ICCA o f a Regional Exhibition T o u rin g Scheme.

National Institute of Dramatic Art (NIDA) N1DA was established in 1958 u n d e r the auspices of the University o f New South

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Wales, the A ustralian Elizabethan T h ea tre T ru st an d the A ustralian B roadcasting Com m ission, to encourage a n d pro m o te the know ledge a n d appreciation o f dram a, opera, m usic an d o th er kinds o f th eatre by providing vocational training courses for live th eatre, film, radio an d television. It is a com pany lim ited by g u aran tee u n d e r the provisions o f the Companies Act 1936 and the C om m onw ealth G overnm ent, th ro u g h the D epartm ent, provides capital and re cu rre n t financial support. T h e m em bership o f the B oard o f D irectors is show n in A ppendix 5.

In 1985— 86 the G overnm ent allocated $1.6 million to NIDA towards recu rren t expenditure. T h e new N ID A b uilding is due to be com pleted by M arch 1987. It will rem ain C om m onw ealth pro p erty an d be leased to N ID A re n t free.

In 1985— 86 NID A graduates continued to contribute greatly to the developm ent o f A ustralian theatre, film, television and o th er en tertain m en t.

Film: A n u m b er o f NID A graduates have achieved success in the film industry as film producers and directors: T im Burstall, G reg T e p p e r, Ben G annon an d Don Crom bie.

Robyn Nevin, associate director o f the Sydney T h e a tre C om pany directed a highly successful film, The More Things Change, starring a recent g raduate, Victoria Longley.

H ugo W eaving an d H elen B uday starred in For Love Alone, while Ju d y Davis, Colin Friels and J o h n W alton had leading roles in Kangaroo.

Television: N ID A graduates are equally p rom inent in television productions, particularly in the distinguished m ini­ series Palace o f Dreams, 1915, Shout, Cowra Break Out, Burke and Wills, Tusitala, The Flying Doctors and A Fortunate Life.

T h eatre: G raduates are active in professional and com m ercial th eatre in all capital cities and m any country centres.

U nder J o h n K rum m el’s direction, the N orthside T h e a tre in Sydney has become the fo u rth largest th eatre com pany in Australia.

A broad, P ennie Dovvnie an d Michael Siberry are playing leading roles with the Royal S hakespeare C om pany in S tratford and L ondon. Jo a n n a M cCallum is starring in the W est End, while Fiona Williams is adm inistrator o f the L ondon Riverside Studios.

In Ju ly 1985, Elizabeth B u tch er AM, A dm inistrator o f NID A, retired as C hairm an o f the T h e a tre B oard o f the A ustralia Council. Jo h n C lark AM, the D irector, is a m em ber o f the N orthside T h e a tre C om pany B oard a n d the Interim

M anagem ent C om m ittee o f the N o rth ern T errito ry T h e a tre C om pany.

N ID A participates in an ongoing program o f cultural exchange with th e N ational School o f D ram a (NSD) in New Delhi

fu n d ed by the D ep artm en t o f Foreign Affairs. N ID A is about to establish an exchange p ro g ram with the C entral Academ y o f D ram atic A rt in Beijing, C hina.

Taxation Averaging Proposals are being developed to give effect to th e G ov ern m en t’s election

com m itm ent to ex ten d tax averaging provisions to artists in th e perfo rm in g and visual arts. T h e D ep artm en t is consulting with th e A ustralia Council, the T reasury

a n d the A ustralian T ax atio n Office in this m atter.

Australian Folklife In May 1985 a broadly based Folk C ulture Steering G roup was established which considered the conclusions em anating

from the m eeting in Ja n u a ry 1985 o f the U N ESC O C om m ittee o f G overnm ent E xperts on the S afeguarding o f Folklore. T h e S teering G ro u p also identified priority areas for governm ent action and recom m ended term s o f reference for a

possible inquiry.

O n 26 M arch 1986, the M inister an n o u n ced the establishm ent o f a C om m ittee o f Inquiry into Folklife in A ustralia. T h e Inquiry is being sponsored by the D epartm ent, the N ational M useum o f A ustralia, the A ustralia C ouncil an d the

A ustralian Institute o f M ulticultural Affairs. It is being chaired by M r H ugh A nderson, a m em ber o f the E ducation

Members o f the Committee of Inquiry into Folklife in Australia — Chairman, Mr Hugh Anderson (left); Dr Keith McKenry, and Ms Gwenda Davey (fourth and fifth from left) — discuss submissions with departm ental officers, David Schlemaker and Julie Miller.

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D epartm ent o f V ictoria fo r 39 years an d now a full-tim e w riter specialising in A ustralian history an d folklore. M r A nderson is M anaging E ditor o f the Red

Rooster Press. T h e o th er m em bers o f the C om m ittee are Ms G w enda Davey, a folklorist an d S enior L ectu rer in M ulticultural Studies an d C h ild ren ’s

Folklore at the Footscray Institute o f Technology, Victoria, and D r Keith McKenry, a folk p erfo rm er an d researcher and Acting Assistant Secretary o f the Arts

Branch o f the D epartm ent.

The C om m ittee has been asked to consider and re p o rt on:

• the nature, diversity and significance o f A ustralian folklife; • existing institutional an d o th er arran g em en ts fo r safeguarding

A ustralian folklife and the need for new arrangem ents, having regard, in particular to: — collection, docum entation,

conservation an d dissem ination o f folklife m aterials; — su p p o rt for th e practice and developm ent o f folk arts; M embers o f the inquiry have visited capital cities and m ajor regional centres to speak with interested persons an d organisations.

T h e C om m ittee will re p o rt to the M inister in Jan u a ry 1987 after taking into consideration all submissions, relevant reports an d docum ents brought to its

notice.

Inquiry into Commonwealth Assistance to the Arts In April 1985 the H ouse o f Representatives S tanding C om m ittee on E xpenditure decided to resum e th e inquiry into C om m onw ealth assistance to th e arts.

I he purpose o f the inquiry is to survey, review and re p o rt on the C om m onw ealth G overnm ent’s ex p en d itu re on assistance lor the arts. U n d e r revised term s o f reference, the inquiry was to pay special attention to the procedures for the allocation and distribution of C om m onw ealth funds for the arts, the

im pact o f existing ex p en d itu re an d o ther

16

m eans o f su p p o rt such as taxation incentives, c u rre n t issues and concerns in the art industry and the C om m onw ealth’s role in arts funding. T h e inquiry is being conducted by a Sub-C om m ittee, chaired by

M r Leo McLeay, MP.

In May 1985 the D epartm ent o f Arts, H eritage and E nvironm ent m ade a w ritten subm ission to the inquiry.

O n 7 N ovem ber 1985 Ms Sue W alker, AM, C hairperson, A rtbank, M r G raem e S turgeon, D irector, A rtbank an d M r R.J. M cA rthur, Assistant Secretary, H eritage B ranch gave evidence at the C om m ittee’s hearing in C anberra.

Mr P.J. Galvin, Secretary to the D epartm ent o f Arts, H eritage and E nvironm ent, to g eth er with Ms C athy S antam aria, A cting First Assistant Secretary, Arts, Film and H eritage Division and M r Alan Jo h n so n , A dm inistrator, Public L ending Right Schem e, gave evidence at the C om m ittee’s h earing in C anberra on 27 N ovem ber 1985. Mr Galvin gave fu rth e r evidence at the C om m ittee’s hearin g in Sydney on 10 J u n e

1986.

Visit of Chinese Cultural Minister T h e M inister o f C ulture in the P eople’s Republic o f C hina, His Excellency, M r Zhu

Muzhi, m ade a 12-day to u r o f A ustralia in M arch.

His visit stem m ed from an invitation extended by the M inister for Arts, H eritage an d E nvironm ent, M r Barry C ohen, when he visited C hina in April

1984.

B oth Mr C o h en ’s visit, and th at o f M r Zhu, were p art o f the on-going A greem ent on C ultural C o-operation between the G overnm ent o f A ustralia and the P eople’s

Republic o f C hina, signed on 29 April 198l. Since then, contacts betw een the two countries have been pursued by the M inistry o f C u ltu re in C hina an d by A ustralian G overnm ent’s cultural bodies, such as the A ustralia Council, the A ustralia-C hina Council, and the

D epartm ents o f Arts, H eritage and E nvironm ent and Foreign Affairs.

Pointing the way to better understanding on cultural matters, the Minister for Arts, Heritage and Environm ent, Mr Barry Cohen, and the Minister of Culture in the People’s Republic of China, His Excellency, M rZhu Muzhi

W hile in A ustralia, Mr Z hu visited C anberra, Sydney, P erth, A delaide, M elbourne an d B allarat. In C anberra, he held talks with the M inister and with the

Secretary, M r Pat Galvin, an d senior officers o f the D epartm ent. H e also visited the N ational Library o f A ustralia, the A ustralian N ational G allery an d the

National Film and Sound Archive.

In the States, M r Zhu m et with M inisters responsible for the Arts, an d visited galleries, libraries, m useum s a n d theatres. In Sydney, he held discussions with officers o f the A ustralia Council, the N ational

Institute o f D ram atic A rt, the A ustralian Film Com m ission a n d the A ustralian B icentennial A uthority. H e viewed the Golden Summers exhibition at the A rt Gallery o f NSW an d saw the A ustralian

B allet’s p erform ance o f Don Qidxote.

M r Zhu was accom panied on his to u r by th ree senior officers o f th e B ureau of E xternal C ultural R elations, C hinese

M inistry o f C ulture, an d by Ms Jenny G leeson o f the D e p artm en t an d Ms Ju d i H olgate, O verseas Visits O fficer, D epartm ent of the Prim e M inister and

C abinet.

Investigation of Droit de Suite Regulations T h e D epartm ent, in conjunction with the A ustralia Council, has com m issioned the

A ustralian C opyright C ouncil to investigate w h eth er D roit de Suite regulations are ap p ro p ria te for Australia. D roit de Suite is the term given to the right

o f artists to receive p a rt o f the proceeds ol the resale o f th eir work. T h e study w ill exam ine both negative an d positive aspects o f introducing D roit de Suite regulations an d the im plications for relevant interest groups. T h e D ep artm en t, with the A ustralia Council, is m onitoring and overseeing the consultancy project d u e to be com pleted in late 1986.

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I he opening o f the Curtin/Chifley Exhibition in King’s Hall, Parliament House: the form er Prime Minister’s son, Mr Ben Chifley, his wife, Pauline, and their children (from left to right) Sarah, Mathew, Mark, Damien and Grattan (front) with the Prime Minister, Mr Hawke, and the Minister lor Arts, 1 leritage and Environment, Mr Cohen

Curtin/Chifley Centenary Exhibition D uring 1985— 86 the D epartm ent, at the r equest o f the M inister, arran g ed an exhibition to com m em orate the cen ten ary

in 1985 of the births of form er Prim e Ministers Jo h n C urtin and Ben Chifley.

I'he exhibition was fu n d ed by the D epartm ent. T h e N ational Library o f A ustralia assem bled the exhibition from its significant collection o f m aterial docum enting the lives and careers o f the

two Prim e Ministers. It consisted o f photographs an d facsimiles o f im p o rtan t docum ents and, in som e locations, featured items lent by their families.

I he exhibition was shown in five places: Ballarat, n ea r Creswick, w here C urtin was

born; P enrith, Chifley’s birthplace; F rem antle a n d B athurst, m ajor centres in the electorates they re p resen te d in the Federal Parliam ent; an d in Parliam ent H ouse, C anberra, w here it was opened by the Prim e M inister. T h e exhibition was on

public display for a period o f th ree weeks in each location an d created considerable interest.

Education and the Arts T h e D epartm ent co ntinued to m onitor developm ents in the field o f education and

the arts. T h e B otsm an R eport on the Review o f Arts, E ducation and T ra in in g was released for public com m ent in O ctober 1985. T his R eport was com m issioned jointly by the Australia

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Council a n d the C om m onw ealth T ertiary Education C om m ission. T h e D epartm ent is p re p a rin g its subm ission on the re p o rt to

be provided to the T ertiary E ducation C om m ission which is co-ordinating response.

Festival of Pacific Arts T h e Festival is a m ajor cultural event which A ustralia shares with its Pacific neighbours. At the F ebruary 1985 m eeting

o f the C ouncil o f Pacific Arts, A ustralia successfully bid to host the 5th Festival in 1988.

T h e Festival was first held in Fiji in 1972 in response to the perceived erosion o f the cultural h eritag e o f the region th ro u g h exposure to w estern influences. It aims to

give people pride in th eir culture and way o f life an d to foster a sense o f identity and belonging.

Festivals have been held in New Zealand (1976), P ap u a New G uinea (1980) and F rench Polynesia (1985). T h ey have drawn to g eth er fo r cultural exchange people from over 25 Pacific nations an d o f diverse ethnic backgrounds.

Townsville has been selected as the venue for the 5th Festival. In A ugust 1985 Mr C ohen ap p o in ted an Interim Steering C om m ittee, consisting o f representatives o f the C ouncil o f the City o f Townsville, A boriginal and Islander com m unities and

the C om m onw ealth, to oversee initial planning fo r the Festival. T h e com m ittee was chaired by M r Chicka Dixon, C hairm an o f the A boriginal Arts B oard o f

the A ustralia Council. A list o f the m em bers o f the C om m ittee is at A ppendix 6.

T h e ex ten t o f C om m onw ealth financial su p p o rt fo r the Festival has yet to be d eterm in ed by the G overnm ent.

Film s T h e Film B ranch provides advice on the A ustralian film and television industry; adm inisters the T axation Incentives for

Films Schem e; and provides secretariat services to the C ultural M inisters Council, its S tanding C om m ittee an d W orking

G roups, the C onference o f C ultural A uthorities an d the A ustralian Libraries an d In fo rm atio n Council.

Film and Television Policy D uring the year the D e p artm en t consulted with the A ustralian Film C om m ission, the A ustralian Film, Television an d Radio

School, the A ustralian C h ild ren ’s Television F oundation an d the film industry generally as well as o th er G overnm ent d ep a rtm en ts on a wide range

o f policy issues.

T h e year has seen a quickening pace in technological developm ents affecting the film and television industry. T h ese have th e potential to m ake a significant im pact on local film and television production. T h e D epartm ent has co ntinued to m onitor developm ents such as pay television, satellite delivery o f television an d related e n tertain m e n t services a n d high definition

television proposals. T h e D epartm ent seeks to en su re th at the cultural im plications o f these developm ents are clearly identified at the tim e decisions arc-

taken and the likely im pact on the local production industry is evaluated.

T h e D ep artm en t has also been involved in in terd ep artm en tal considerations leading to decisions on the fu rth e r developm ent o f com m ercial television in A ustralia.

D isputation betw een film producers and industry unions has co n tin u ed on the difficult issue o f the im portation o f foreign actors to play roles in A ustralian films. T h e

D ep artm en t m ade a m ajor subm ission to the D ep artm en t o f Im m igration and E thnic A ffairs’ review o f the policy and procedures bearing on the adm ission of overseas en tertain ers an d associated

personnel.

In 1984-85 the A ustralian Film C om m ission foreshadow ed that it would be p re p arin g a discussion p a p e r on long term

film industry assistance m easures which m ight be ad o p ted by G overnm ent. C onsultations have com m enced with the C om m ission on the co n ten t o f the report.

D uring the year th e following m ajor policy m atters were finalised with D epartm ental involvem ent:

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• I he G overnm ent decided not to accept the recom m endations bearing on C om m onw ealth responsibilities o f the New S outh Wales Inquiry into the

D istribution an d Exhibition o f A ustralian Films in NSW; • T h e A ustralian Film C om m ission’s proposals for a two year trial program to

provide the m eans for the A ustralian film industry to participate in fo u rteen international co-productions over a two year period.

Film, TV and Radio School ( )n 20 June 1986 the M inister unveiled a foundation plaque an d planted a tree to m ark the com m encem ent o f construction o f a new building to house the A ustralian

Film, Television an d Radio School, on a site adjacent to M acquarie U niversity in Sydney. It is expected to be com pleted in early 1988. T h e M inister took this oppo rtu n ity to ann o u n ce the fu tu re plans

lor the School recom m ended by its New Directions Review. O n 24 J u n e th e School’s Act was am en d ed to include ‘R adio’ in its title to reflect this im portant p art o f the School’s activities.

Children’s Television File D epartm ent continues to take a keen interest in the activities and achievem ents o f the A ustralian C h ild ren ’s Television

F oundation. T his non-profit com pany was established in 1982 with C om m onw ealth, State and T errito ry G overnm ent (except for Q ueensland) encouragem ent and continuing financial support.

It was established to encourage the developm ent, production and transm ission o f quality A ustralian children’s television. I he F oundation is achieving this th ro u g h

investm ent in script developm ent and program p roduction as well as educational and inform ation activities. T h e C om m onw ealth’s contribution in 1985— 86 was $0.5 m illion m aking a total o f $2.25

million contributed to date. F u rth e r inform ation on the F oundation’s activities is provided in its annual report.

Film Certification T h e T axation Incentives for Films Scheme is a m ajor p art o f the G ov ern m en t’s com m itm ent to the developm ent o f the A ustralian film industry.

In accordance with the relevant provisions o f Division 10BA o f the Income Tax Assessment Act 1936 it is the responsibility of the M inister for Arts, H eritage and

E nvironm ent to determ ine qualifying A ustralian films an d to issue provisional and final certificates. A m ajor function of the Film C ertification Section is the exam ination o f applications for certification an d the p rep aratio n o f reports

for the M inister.

At the com m encem ent o f this financial year th ere was a degree o f uncertainty as to the fu tu re o f the Division 10BA Schem e as the G overnm ent’s D raft W hite P aper on T axation R eform , presented in J u n e 1985,

had proposed its discontinuation.

T his uncertainty was resolved in S eptem ber 1985 w hen the T re a su re r announced a reduction o f the taxation concession on capital ex p en d itu re in qualifying A ustralian films from 133 p er cent to 120 p er cent, and o f exem ption

from incom e tax on film revenue from 33 p er cent to 20 p er cent (of the am o u n t o f investm ent). T h e new rates apply for investm ent in qualifying A ustralian films m ade u n d e r investm ent contracts en tered into after 19 S eptem ber 1985.

As p art o f the new assistance m easures, the A ustralian Film C om m ission’s Special Production F und was increased from $4M to $6M in 1985-86. T h e fund is used to assist projects o f perceived high quality and com m ercial potential.

T h e revised concessional arrangem ents were agreed to f ollowing discussions with industry representatives, including m eetings with the M inister an d the Prim e M inister and consideration o f m any written representations an d subm issions following the release o f the G ov ern m en t’s W hite Paper.

C om m enting on the new rates o f concessions the M inister said th at the G overnm ent had been concerned that the

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explosion in prod u ctio n levels d u rin g 1984— 85 was placing at risk th e quality o f A ustralian film production. T h e new assistance m easures w ere aim ed at

sustaining a quality industry with a realistic cost to the taxpayer.

T h e G overnm ent was faced with the difficult task o f selecting an assistance package which balanced the need to reverse the d ra in on G overnm ent funds

th ro u g h incom e foregone, while avoiding too sh arp a reduction in the level o f investm ent an d m aintaining its stated com m itm ent to the A ustralian film

industry.

T h e full effect o f the reduction in taxation concessions on investm ent in qualifying A ustralian films in 1985-86 will not be realised until next financial year. Many

projects which secured investm ent this year w ere able to o ffer investors the fo rm er 133 p er cent taxation concession because u nderw riting had been arran g e d p rior to

the T re a su re r’s an n o u n c em en t in S eptem ber 1985.

T h e following table shows th e value o f the budgets o f qualifying A ustralian films secured in 1985— 86, to g eth er with com parative figures for 1983— 84 and

1984-85.

Film Type

No of Film Projects

Total Budgets Secured $M

1985-86 1984-85 1983-84 1985-86 1984-85 1983-84

Feature Film 36 31 30 105.6 67.4 76.0

Mini-Series 5 24 10 19.5 84.4 41.5

Telemovie 12 20 18 14.3 15.8 13.0

Documentary 80 95 79 19.6 18.1 15.0

TOTALS 133 170 137 159.0 185.7 145.5

The figures confirm the Government’s expectation of a reduced level of private investment in 1985— 86 following the reduction in tax benefits for investors.

T h e M inister issued 425 provisional and 127 final certificates d u rin g the year, a decrease o f 96 in the n u m b er of provisional certificates issued bu t an

increase o f 17 in the n u m b er o f final certificates issued com pared to 1984— 85. T h e decrease in the n u m b e r o f provisional

certificates issued is also an indication of the anticipated dow n tu rn in fu tu re production levels d u e to the revised rate of taxation concessions available. A statistical

analysis o f the Schem e is at A ppendix 7.

A lthough th e T re a su re r’s S eptem ber 1985 an n o u n c em en t o f the revised taxation concessions rem oved uncertainty at that tim e as to th e Schem e’s fu tu re, rum ours again developed in the early m onths of

1986 th at th e Schem e was to be axed.

T h e M inister laid these ru m o u rs to rest in P arliam ent d u rin g May by reaffirm ing the G o v ern m en t’s com m itm ent to the A ustralian film industry an d stating that

th e c u rre n t concessions would not be altered in the 1986— 87 B udget.

T h e D epartm ent continues to develop and stren g th en links with the industry. P roducers regularly visit the D epartm ent to discuss aspects o f th eir applications. In Ju n e , officers from th e B ranch attended a

sem inar in Sydney on film investm ent which drew people from all parts o f the industry.

Cannes Film Festival T his year a record ten A ustralian films w ere en tered in com petitive an d n o n ­ com petitive sections at the prestigious

C annes Film Festival. T his was exceeded only by those o f the host country, France. C om m enting on the record A ustralian

entry, the M inister said th at he was delighted at the extraordinary recognition th at had been accorded the A ustralian film industry and th at it firm ly answ ered m any

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The Secretary of the Departm ent, Pat Galvin (left), meets producer Hilary Furlong, and actor, John Hargreaves, during filming of The Place at the Coast at Durras, NSW.

critics who have bem oaned the dem ise o f the industry.

D uring the year the M inister hosted fo u r parliam entary film screenings — Rebel, Burke and, Wills, For Love Alone a n d the record breaking Crocodile Dundee. T h e screenings were introduced several years ago to enable P arliam entarians a n d their guests to view recently released A ustralian films.

H eritage T h e H eritage B ranch provides advice on m atters relating to the preservation o f the national estate, including the W orld

H eritage C onvention; adm inisters the National Estate G rants Program ; adm inister grants-in-aid to the N ational t rusts and taxation incentives for property gifts to N ational T ru st bodies; advises on all m useum s policies and m atters relating to the preservation o f A ustralia’s m ovable

heritage; adm inisters the Historic Shipwrecks Act 1976; advises on m atters relating to the com m em oration o f historic events and fam ous persons; adm inisters the T axation Incentives for the Arts Scheme; provides secretariat su p p o rt for

The Minister, Mr Barry Cohen, and producer, Jane Scott, at the Parliamentary screening of Crocodile Dundee in Canberra on 30 April

the Historic M em orials C om m ittee and the C anberra N ational M em orials C om m ittee; consults with national collecting institutions, principally A rtbank, the A ustralian N ational Gallery, the A ustralian N ational M aritim e M useum , the N ational Library o f A ustralia and the N ational M useum o f A ustralia; and provides secretariat su p p o rt to the Advisory C om m ittee on N ational Collections. T h e B ranch also adm inistered the P ort A rth u r C onservation Project.

World Heritage List T h e W orld H eritage List defines areas o f the w orld’s cultural an d natu ral heritage of ‘outstanding universal value’, the disappearance o r destruction o f which would constitute a ‘harm ful im poverishm ent o f the heritage o f all

nations o f the w orld’. It was set u p u n d e r the UN ESCO C onvention for the Protection o f the W orld C ultural and N atural H eritage which came into force in

1975. A ustralia was an early signatory to the C onvention which has been accepted by 89 national governm ents. T h e C onvention is adm inistered by a W orld

H eritage C om m ittee o f 21 nations elected

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T he striking ‘Walls of C hina’ lunette, Lake Mungo National Park, Willandra Lakes Region — one of the five Australian World Heritage sites

from those which are party to the C onvention. A ustralia has served as a m em ber o f this C om m ittee continuously

since 1976.

T o date th e W orld H eritage List includes 216 places, ranging from the great national parks such as Yellowstone (U.S.A.), the Pyram id Fields o f Egypt, M ayan sites such as C opan (H onduras), C hartres C athedral

(France) a n d the C hurch an d Dom inican C onvent o f Santa M aria delle Grazie with The IxLst Supper by L eonardo da Vinci (Italy).

Australia has five places on the W orld H eritage List:

— K akadu N ational Park — G reat B arrier R eef — W illandra Lakes Region o f W estern N.S.W.

— Lord How e Island G roup — W estern T asm ania W ilderness N ational Parks.

T h e processes involved in seeking W orld H eritage listing require extensive

international appraisal an d consideration. N om inations for the W orld H eritage List can only be subm itted by the national governm ents which are parties to the

W orld H eritage C onvention. T hose governm ents forw ard th eir proposals to the S ecretariat o f the W orld H eritage C om m ittee at the h ead q u arters o f

U N ESC O in Paris, using the de-iailed nom ination form developed for that purpose.

N om inations have to be received by 31 D ecem ber in any year for consideration at the m eeting o f the W orld H eritage C om m ittee later the next year. Extensive

p rep arato ry work is req u ired by the nom inating g o v ernm ent to ensure that the stringent conditions o f outstanding universal value are m et. Professional n o n ­ governm ent organisations such as the

International C ouncil on M onum ents an d Sites (ICOM OS), the International U nion for the C onservation o f N ature and N atural Resources (IU CN ), and the

International C entre for the Study o f the

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Preservation an d R estoration o f C ultural Property in Rome (ICCROM ), are asked to provide assessm ents an d advice concerning the nom inations.

In D ecem ber 1984 the NSW G overnm ent subm itted to the C om m onw ealth G overnm ent a suggested nom ination for the W orld H eritage List o f a package o f NSW rainforests. T his subm ission req u ired detailed d raftin g an d was forw arded by the G overnm ent to UN ESCO in N ovem ber

1985. In Ja n u a ry 1986 D r Jam es T horsell, chief adviser to UN ESCO on n atu ra l areas nom inated for W orld H eritage listing, inspected the nom inated rain fo rest areas,

kite nom ination will be considered by the W orld H eritage C om m ittee at its D ecem ber 1986 m eeting. T h e NSW ( lovernm ent has an n o u n ced its com m itm ent to the protection o f these areas.

Since the nom ination o f the NSW rainforests proposal, no firm proposals have been pu t forw ard by a State o r Territory for W orld H eritage nom ination.

However, d u rin g 1985— 86 discussions were held at both m inisterial a n d officer level betw een the C om m onw ealth and W estern A ustralia reg ard in g the possible nom ination o f S hark Bay, W.A. T hese discussions are continuing.

National Estate Review At the end o f J u n e 1985 the M inister announced th at there would be a review o f the C om m onw ealth G overnm ent’s role in the C onservation o f the N ational Estate.

In particular the review exam ined:

— scope o f the C om m onw ealth’s role, including the functions and responsibilities ol the A ustralian H eritage C om m ission and developm ents since the 1974 R eport of the C om m ittee o f Inquiry into the

National Estate;

— relations with C om m onw ealth, State and local governm ents and with th e private sector, including business organisations

and voluntary conservation bodies; — the concept o f the R egister o f the National Estate an d its operation and

procedures, including criteria for inclusion in and rem oval from the Register; — resources, including C om m onw ealth, State and o th er (this encom passed

financial assistance — the N ational Estate G rants P rogram , G rants-in-aid to the N ational T ru st, taxation m easures and staffing).

T h e D ep artm en t u n d erto o k the review an d is p re p a rin g a re p o rt which will take into account the recom m endations o f the

H odges C om m ittee re p o rt concerning the Australian Heritage Commission Act 1975 (the H odges C om m ittee was the H ouse o f R epresentatives S tanding C om m ittee on

E nvironm ent an d C onservation which presented a re p o rt in 1979 entitled Environmental Protection : Adequacy of Legislative and Administrative Arrangements).

O ver 150 subm issions were received and 100 participants atten d ed a two-day sem inar in N ovem ber 1985. T h e M inister expects to release the Review re p o rt for a period o f public com m ent in S eptem ber

1986. T his will allow the G overnm ent to obtain the views o f all parties involved in the conservation o f A ustralia’s heritage so that d evelopm ent and conservation interests receive equitable and balanced consideration.

National Estate Grants Program An am o u n t o f $3.05 m illion was provided for the 1985— 86 National Estate G rants Program .

Each State received $339 500 for new work in 1985— 86 an d also had $85 500 com m itted for continuation o f w ork in 1986-87, with a fu rth e r $27 000 in 1987­ 88.

T h e N o rth ern T errito ry received $154 000 with $39 000 a n d $12 000 in forw ard obligations. T h e A C T 1985— 86 program totalled $77 000 with a fu rth e r $22 000 being com m itted for the next two years.

O ne h u n d re d and ninety th ree projects th ro u g h o u t A ustralia were su p p o rted in the 1985— 86 program . Details are in A ppendix 8.

D uring the th irteen years the National Estate G rants P rogram has been in

24

operation, about $35 m illion has been provided fo r some 2700 projects th ro u g h o u t A ustralia fo r the conservation and preservation o f the n atio n ’s heritage

for p resen t an d fu tu re generations. Details o f funding are:

1973-74 $0.29m 1979-80 $2.0m

1974-75 $7.04m 1980-81 $2.2m

1975-76 $3.9m 1981-82 $2.2m

1976-77 $ 1.25m* 1982-83 $2.2m

1977-78 $2.6m 1983-84 |2.77m

1978-79 $2.6m 1984- 85

1985- 86

$2.9m $3.05m

* (no new projects — program under review)

T h e C om m onw ealth G o v e rn m en t’s ap p ro ach to the p ro g ram is one o f p artn ersh ip , as sound conservation program s can only be achieved with the

co-operation o f o th er spheres of g o v ernm ent and the com m unity. T h e G overnm ent works with State, T errito ry and local governm ent a n d com m unity

groups, such as the N ational T ru sts and voluntary conservation groups, to dem o n strate concern an d to conserve the best o f the natural an d m an-m ade heritage

o f A ustralia.

State and Territory governm ents have been given the prim ary responsibility for developing an d adm inistering th eir own priorities for the program . It is co­

ordinated-at the national level by the D ep artm en t in liaison with the relevant State and T errito ry authorities an d the A ustralian H eritage Com m ission.

A pplications for fu n d in g are considered each year by the State a n d T errito ry authorities which subm it them th ro u g h ap p ro p ria te H eritage C om m ittees to their

M inisters, who in tu rn seek the C om m onw ealth M inister’s form al approval. G rants are m ade to an d th ro u g h the State a n d T errito ry G overnm ents and th ro u g h th e D ep artm en t o f T erritories in

the ACT.

T h e conservation work is carried ou t by State, T errito ry and local governm ent d ep a rtm en ts and authorities, academ ic institutions, N ational T rusts, professional an d com m unity organisations and by

individual consultant firm s w orking for them .

Following the successful com pletion o f the 1985— 86 N ational E state G rants Program consideration is being given to fu rth e r stream line an d standardise the procedures

for fu tu re program s.

Grants to National Trusts T h e D e p artm en t adm inisters the G rants- in-Aid Program for the A ustralian C ouncil o f N ational T ru sts a n d th e N ational T ru st

bodies in each State a n d T erritory. T h e grants help m eet adm inistrative and survey classification expenses carried ou t for the G overnm ent by the T rusts.

T h e T ru sts are voluntary organisations with m ore th an 80 000 m em bers in total. T h e ir objectives are to:

— acquire, protect a n d preserve, land and buildings o f beauty o r o f national historic, scientific, architectural o r cultural interest, for the benefit o f the public; — safeguard natu ral features and scenic

landscapes, conserve wildlife; and — encourage an d p ro m o te public appreciation, know ledge an d enjoym ent o f

th e national heritage.

In addition, the T ru sts provide invaluable assistance to the D ep artm en t an d the A ustralian H eritage Com m ission in carrying o ut the G o v ern m en t’s national estate policies.

In 1985— 86 fu n d in g by the G overnm ent for the T ru st m ovem ent th ro u g h o u t A ustralia am o u n ted to $505,000; the A ustralia Council received $145,000 and each o f the State, N o rth e rn T erritory and A C T T rusts received $45,000.

Heritage Administrators Conference T h e C om m onw ealth-State H eritage A dm inistrators’ C onference for 1985 was held on 10—11 O ctober in Sydney.

T h e m ain topics covered included adm inistration o f th e N ational Estate G rants P rogram , the B icentennial P rogram , heritage surveys an d a proposed

H eritage C om m ittee to advise C om m onw ealth an d State M inisters on heritage topics.

25

Port Arthur Conservation and Development 1985-86 was the last year o f a seven-year program to conserve an d develop the Port A rth u r re g io n . U nder the program the C om m onw ealth G overnm ent provided T asm ania with $6 m illion on a $2 for $1

basis between 1979— 80 and 1985— 86. Prior to the im plem entation o f the p ro g ram the C om m onw ealth had also provided alm ost $900,000 in N ational Estate a n d T o u rism G rants betw een 1972-73 and 1978— 79.

In S eptem ber 1985 the T asm anian G overnm ent requested that the ( Commonwealth extend the P ort A rth u r program beyond the previously agreed cessation date o f 30 J u n e 1986. T h e Prim e

M inister w rote to the Prem ier o f T asm ania on 8 May 1986 advising him that, although the C om m onw ealth fully appreciates the significance o f Port A rth u r fo r the cultural

heritage o f T asm ania and A ustralia, he could not agree to the T asm anian G overnm ent’s request. T h e Prim e M inister noted the C om m onw ealth’s past su p p o rt

for Port A rth u r a n d said that the ( Commonwealth believed that now was an

ap p ro p riate tim e for T asm ania to assum e full financial responsibility.

Property Gifts to National Trusts T h e 1984— 85 B udget allowed as incom e tax deductions, donations to N ational T ru st bodies o f real property having heritage significance.

A fter consideration o f various processing options, the N ational Estate a n d W orld H eritage section held discussions with the A ustralian T axation Office, the A ustralian Institute o f Valuers, and d o n o r representatives. A form ula for processing the exem ptions quickly, efficiently and satisfactorily, was presented and favourably received by ail parties. This system is now in operation.

P roperty which is eligible u n d e r this schem e is confined to that which is listed on the Register o f the N ational Estate. O ne o f the initial gift proposals is the Saumarez H om estead, an Edw ardian style house and outbuildings, built 1888, and situated 10 kilom etres south o f A rm idale, NSW. T h e Saumarez property is currently un d erg o in g the valuation process.

Saumarez’ Homestead, built 1888, 10 km south of Armidale (NSW) — the first gift of property to be processed for tax exemption u n d er the Property Gifts for National Trusts Scheme.

Taxation T he T ax atio n Incentives for the Arts Schem e has been o p eratin g since 1 Jan u a ry 1978 u n d e r section 78 o f the Income Tax Assessment Act 1936. T h e aim o f the Schem e is to encourage th e donation of items held in private collections as gifts to

public art galleries, m useum s an d libraries, by allowing d o n o rs a taxation concession. An advisory com m ittee, serviced by the D epartm ent, recom m ends approval of valuers o f various classes o f property. T h e ap p o in tm en t o f these valuers is the responsibility o f the Secretary o f the D epartm ent. The C om m ittee also exam ines th e docu m en tatio n for donations

u n d e r the Schem e an d particularly the veracity o f valuations. M em bership o f the C om m ittee is listed in A ppendix 9.

T h e G uide to T axation Incentives for the Arts an d List o f A pproved V aluers is available from the D epartm ent.

At 30 June 1 35 institutions th ro u g h o u t Australia h ad benefited u n d e r the t axation Incentives for the A rts Scheme. T h e value o f donations m ade u n d e r the

Schem e was $23.5m. D onations w orth $41 nr were m ade d u rin g the year.

Historic Memorials Committee T h e H istoric M em orials C om m ittee, established in 1911, is responsible for com m issioning or acquiring p ortraits o f all

G overnors-G eneral, Prim e M inisters, Presidents o f the Senate, Speakers o f the H ouse o f R epresentatives, C hief Justices o f the H igh C o u rt an d o th e r distinguished A ustralians fo r the Historic M em orials Collection. Paintings recording special events connected with the C om m onw ealth

P arliam ent are also com m issioned. M em bers o f the C om m ittee are listed in A ppendix 10.

D uring 1985— 86 the following portraits were com pleted an d accepted by the C om m ittee:-• T h e G overnor-G eneral, Sir Ninian

S tephen, AK, GCMG, GCVO, KBE, KStJ by Albert fu ck er, AO • T h e P resident o f the Senate, the H on Douglas M cClelland, by R eg Cam pbell

• T h e fo rm er Speaker o f the H ouse of R epresentatives, the H o n Dr H arold Jenkins, by Wes W alters.

C onservation work has b een carried ou t on a n u m b er o f paintings in the collection d u rin g the year.

A policy for the loan o f works o f art from the collection for exhibition by public institutions has been established. A loan agreem ent, sim ilar in term s to those used

by the national collecting institutions, has been form ally approved by the m em bers of the C om m ittee. T h e Presiding O fficers will consider each loan request and the

S ecretariat is responsible for m onitoring the loan ag reem en t an d the adherence to the conditions by the borrow er. O ne work has been lent to the N ational T ru st of A ustralia (New South Wales).

Canberra National Memorials Committee T h e C anberra N ational M em orials C om m ittee is established u n d e r the provisions o f the A C T National Memorials

Ordinance 1928. T h e adm inistration o f this O rdinance an d the provision ol a S ecretariat service to the C om m ittee was tran sferre d from the D e p artm en t of

T errito ries on 12 D ecem ber 1985.

T h e function o f the C om m ittee is to consider proposals on th e location and character o f national m em orials in the A ustralian Capital T errito ry ; consider

nam es o f the divisions (suburbs) of C anberra; and to consider any objection lodged in regard to the Gazettal o f the d eterm ination o f a nam e for a public place

in the A ustralian C apital T erritory. Proposals are p resen ted to the C om m ittee by the M inister for Arts, H eritage and E nvironm ent. M em bers o f the C om m ittee

are listed in A ppendix 1 1.

O n 3 M arch 1986, the N ational Memorial to the Royal A ustralian Navy was unveiled by H er Majesty, the Q ueen. T he unveiling m arked the 75th A nniversary o f the RAN. O n 4 F ebruary 1986 the C om m ittee’s approval for the establishm ent o f a

N ational M em orial to the A ustralian Army was an n o u n ced by the Prim e Minister. T he m em orial design is the subject o f a national

27

com petition which was launched by the Prim e M inister in J u n e 1986. T h e m em orial is scheduled for com pletion in 1988. It will com m em orate the service to the nation o f the A ustralian A rm y an d will

com plem ent existing m em orials to the Royal A ustralian Air Force a n d the Royal A ustralian Navy, in Anzac Parade.

Street Names in the ACT U nder the A C T National Memorials Ordinance 1928 th e function o f recom m ending the nam es o f public places in the A.C.T. was tran sferred from the

D epartm ent o f T erritories on 12 D ecem ber 1985. T h e O rd in an ce provides that the M inister for Arts, H eritage and

E nvironm ent m ay d eterm ine th e nam es o f public places in th e A CT, a pow er which lias been delegated to the Assistant Secretary, H eritage Branch.

T h e schem e for the nom enclature o f C an b erra’s public places is based on the com m em oration o f the nam es o f persons fam ous in A ustralian exploration,

navigation, pioneering, colonisation, adm inistration, politics, education, science o r letters an d who have m ade notable contributions to the existence o f Australia

as a nation. T h e nam es o f A ustralian flora, the nam es o f things characteristic of Australia o r A ustralians and A boriginal words may also be used.

Names determ ined for use are published in the G azette an d a period o f twenty one days is allowed for any objections to be

lodged.

The determ ination o f street nam es for a subdivision o f Lyneham in J u n e 1986 com m enced the D e p artm en t’s program of determ ination and gazettal o f public place

nam es for C an b erra’s newly developed areas.

Commemoration of Historic Events and Famous Persons I he sum o f $90 000 was provided in 1985— 86 to fu n d the program for the C om m em oration o f Historic Events and

Famous Persons. T h e P rogram is designed

to provide a source o f su p p o rt for C om m onw ealth obligations reg ard in g com m em orations o f national significance o th er than Bicentennial projects.

T h e ran g e o f projects ap p ro v ed tends to fit within th e broad categories o f com m em orating the activities o f fam ous A ustralians such as politicians, explorers and those who have m ade significant contributions to A ustralian culture, or recognising m ajor historical events, both h ere and overseas, in which A ustralians participated.

Projects su p p o rted in 1985— 86 include the following:

— $60 000 for a m ajor new p erm a n en t exhibition on the 1854 E ureka uprising, to be m o u n ted in the Gold M useum in Ballarat; — $1500 tow ards the initial p rep arato ry

work for a M em orial Park at the site of the fo rm er POW C am p at Sandakan, Sabah, East Malaysia. Sandakan is rem em bered for its association with the infam ous R anau S andakan death m arch which resulted in th e deaths of m ore than 2000 A ustralian an d British POWs. O nly 6 o f the original 2750 POWs, all A ustralians, w ere still alive at Sandakan at the cessation o f hostilities; — $5000 towards the cost o f Stage 1 o f a

proposed C om m em orative Wall fo r the City o f Liverpool. T h e first stage is to com m em orate the 175th A nniversary o f the City since its fo u n d in g in 1810; — $ 1650 tow ards the cost o f replacing two

bayonets stolen from the D esert M ounted C orps M em orial at Albany, W.A; — $4258 for a tou rin g exhibition to

com m em orate the centenary o f the births o f two great A ustralian Prim e M inisters, J o h n C urtin an d Ben Chifley. T h e exhibition was seen in P enrith, Ballarat, B athurst and Frem antle, and was op en ed in C anberra by the Prim e M inister in N ovem ber 1985; — $ 10 000 towards the C entenary

C elebrations o f the A ustralian W orkers’ U nion. T h e U nion has played a m ajor role in the social and political

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developm ent o f the nation. It was also prim arily responsible for the creation of the A ustralian L abor Party.

UNESCO Conventions Legislation relating to the protection o f movable cultural pro p erty was given Royal

Assent in May 1986. T h e Protection of Movable Cultural Heritage Act 1986 will allow A ustralia to accede to th e 1970 UNESCO C onvention o f the M eans o f

Prohibiting a n d P reventing th e Illicit Im port, E xport an d T ra n sfe r o f the O w nership o f C ultural Property.

T he Act provides for the protection of A ustralia’s h eritag e o f im p o rtan t movable cultural objects by intro d u cin g ex p o rt controls. It also protects the cultural

heritage o f o th e r countries th ro u g h im port controls. T h e legislation will replace existing provisions o f the Customs Act 1901, with a m ore com prehensive a n d m ore

readily accessible scheme.

U nder the Act the ex p o rt o f A ustralian protected objects will be prohibited unless an ap p ro p ria te perm it o r certificate has been issued by the M inister. A N ational C ontrol List o f protected cultural property w hich will identify categories o f objects

prohibited from export o r req u irin g export authorization is being developed. T he Act recognises an individual’s right to enjoym ent o f p roperty whilst establishing the nation’s right to restrict the m ovem ent of that p ro p erty w here it represents an

irreplaceable part o f the cultural heritage.

A fu n d will be established u n d e r the Act to facilitate acquisition o f objects prohibited from e x p o rt u n d e r the legislation. T his will provide an alternative m arket for the

disposal o f A ustralian protected objects prohibited from export.

Im ported objects form ing part o f the cultural heritage o f a foreign country and so recognised u n d e r the law o f th at country will not be seized unless a form al

request to re tu rn the object has been received from the governm ent o f that country. Proclam ation o f the Act is expected in 1987.

National Information Networks Committee T h e N ational In form ation Netw orks C om m ittee was established by the C ultural

M inisters C ouncil at its m eeting in N ovem ber 1985, in response to the need to m axim ise com patibility betw een the com puter-based inform ation netw orks o f collecting institutions, such as galleries and

m useum s.

T h e C om m ittee was established to:

• p u rsu e the developm ent o f a national m ulti-disciplinary d ata dictionary based on the C anadian m odel; • encourage the developm ent o f

inform ation systems by arts authorities at all levels; and • investigate an d advise the C ultural M inisters Council on the feasibility o f a

N ational A rts In fo rm atio n Data Base.

T h e developm ent o f th e data dictionary, m odelled on data dictionaries developed by the C anadian H eritage Inform ation N etw ork (C H IN ), will seek to facilitate the

m anagem ent o f collections within individual institutions, to pro m o te consistency and accuracy o f data collection an d to facilitate the exchange o f collection inform ation betw een co-operating

institutions.

T h e C om m ittee will also m aintain contact, w here possible, with overseas projects.

Australia/Netherlands Committee on Old Dutch Shipwrecks (ANCODS) T h e C om m ittee was set u p following the 1972 T reaty A greem ent betw een the

N etherlands and A ustralian G overnm ents concerning old D utch shipwrecks off the W estern A ustralian coast. T h e term s of the

treaty are set out in a Schedule to the Historic Shipwrecks Act 1976. M em bership o f the C om m ittee includes two representatives o f th e N etherlands

G overnm ent an d two representatives of the A ustralian G overnm ent. M em bers are listed at A ppendix 12.

T h e C om m ittee decides on the disposition an d subsequent ow nership o f articles recovered from the wrecks o f form er VOC (D utch East India C om pany) vessels which

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fo u n d ered en ro u te from H olland via the C ape o f G ood H ope to Batavia, th e old Dutch colonial capital on Java.

Four wrecks have been identified and investigated by W estern A ustralian M useum m aritim e archaeologists on behalf o f the C om m ittee. T h ey include the Batavia (wrecked in 1629), the Vergulde Draeck o r Gilt Dragon ( 1656), the Zuytdorp

(1712) an d the Zeewyk (1727). All are wrecks declared historic u n d e r the Historic Shipwrecks Act. B rief details a re included with those o f o th er declared wrecks at A ppendix 13.

T he C om m ittee m et for the n in th tim e on 18-20 S eptem ber 1985 in P erth and Frem antle to allocate articles recovered from the wreck sites and conserved at the W estern A ustralia M useum . T h e articles were divided betw een the N etherlands, A ustralian an d W estern A ustralian G overnm ents to com plem ent the previous divisions o f available m aterial. T his ranges

th ro u g h heavy item s such as cannon barrels an d shot to coins, earthenw are, glass an d wood th at have survived u p to th ree an d a h alf centuries beneath the sea.

Historic Shipwrecks Program A total o f $ 187,000 was paid to governm ent authorities in the States to carry out m aritim e archaeological activities

for the C om m onw ealth on wrecksites in waters o ff th eir shores.

T hese activities include survey and identification, protection a n d recovery, conservation an d exhibition, an d police work. Specific exam ples are:-• conservation and identification by the

W estern A ustralia M useum o f articles, including coins, recovered from the old D utch wrecks for allocation by the ANCOD S an d investigation o f a wreck at

Rowley Shoals, probably th at o f the Lively;

11 MS Pandora sinking, as sketched by one o f her crew, Peter Heywood

• archival a n d research w ork by m e Victoria Archaeological Survey on wrecks betw een Port Fairy, W arrnam bool and C ape Otway; • p rep aratio n s by the Q u eensland

M useum for the next expedition to the HMS Pandora site scheduled for O ctober 1986; • co n tin u in g work by the S outh A ustralian

D ep artm en t o f E nvironm ent and P lanning on som e o f the 150 known wrecksites in waters o ff th at State; • co n tin u in g regional survey w ork by the

T asm an ian N ational Parks and Wildlife Service o ff the west coast o f King Island in Bass Strait and o ff Storm Bay at the seaw ard approach to H obart.

Seven wrecks w ere declared historic by the M inister d u rin g the year. T his brings to 105 the total n u m b er in A ustralian waters now protected by the Act. T h e seven wrecks are those o f the City of Edinburgh, Litherland, Cambridgeshire, an d Asterope, all

o ff T asm ania; Clonmel o ff Victoria; and Yarra and Highland Forest o ff W estern Australia.

B rief details o f all declared wrecks and a location m ap are at A ppendix 13.

Section 18 o f the Historic Shipwrecks Act 1976 allows for the rew ard o f the notifiers o f u nknow n wrecks later declared historic. D uring the year the M inister approved the

following rew ard paym ents:

• $ 1000 to M r Ben C ropp, o f Q ueensland, for notifying the location o f the wreck Aarhus', • $ 1000 each to M r J o h n D eeprose an d Mr

John C harles, o f South A ustralia, for notifying the location o f the wreck Geltwood; • $500 each to Mr R udolf K reuzer and Mr

David W etherop, o f W estern Australia, for notifying the location o f th e wreck Highland Forest.', and • $250 to Lt C dr lan Gibson, th en captain

o f H MAS Gawler, w ho notified the finding o f the Yarra.

A m eeting o f C om m onw ealth, State and N o rth e rn T errito ry officials concerned with adm inistration o f the Act and associated funding p ro g ram was held in

L aunceston on 23 S eptem ber 1985.

T h e aim o f the m eeting, now to become an an n u al event, was to establish a forum for the discussion o f com m on problem s associated with th eir m aritim e archaeology activities carried out on b ehalf o f the C om m onw ealth.

A com m em orative issue o f fo u r stam ps was released in O ctober 1985 by the A ustralian Post Office in liaison with the D epartm ent. T h e stam ps featu re articles recovered from old D utch wrecks discovered o ff the coast o f W estern Australia.

T h e 33 cent stam p depicts an astrolabe from the Batavia, the 50 cent stam p a B ellarm in eju g from the Gilt Dragon, and the 90 cent an d $1 stam ps respectively bobbins an d a pair o f scissors, and a silver

a n d brass buckle, from the Zeewyk.

T h e series com plem ents th at released in April 1985 featuring fo u r fam ous early navigators.

Acquisitions for National Institutions D uring th e year the M inister approved several m ajor acquisitions for the N ational Collection o f works o f art an d m ajor eq u ip m en t purchases by the principal collecting institutions. Legislation establishing the A ustralian N ational

Gallery, N ational L ibrary o f A ustralia an d N ational M useum o f A ustralia provides th at they shall not, w ithout the approval o f the M inister, acquire o r dispose o f any

asset, including works in th e ir collections, valued above prescribed limits, ie, the A ustralian N ational Gallery — $450,000, the N ational Library o f A ustralia and the

N ational M useum o f A ustralia — $50,000.

T h e M inister ap p ro v ed the acquisition by the A ustralian N ational Gallery o f the 20th C entury artist Max E rn st’s Collection of Prim itive A rt, the pain tin g Totem Lesson Π a n d five draw ings by Jackson Pollock. T h ese acquisitions are in keeping with the

G allery’s policy o f acquiring international works by artists whose contributions to art m ovem ents have greatly influenced the developm ent of A ustralian art.

W ith the M inister’s approval the N ational Gallery proceeded with arran g em en ts in conjunction with the Q ueensland Art

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Gallery to obtain the T w entieth C entury Masters Exhibition from the M etropolitan M useum o f A rt, New York. T h e exhibition was shown at the N ational Gallery in C anberra d u rin g M arch and A pril 1986 and at the Q ueensland A rt Gallery,

Brisbane from May to July 1986.

T h e National Library o f A ustralia received Ministerial approval to acquire im p o rtan t m aterial relating to C aptain Cook at Sotheby’s auction in L ondon, Ju ly 1985.

Included in the purchase is a letter w ritten to his patro n the Earl o f Sandwich in 1776 by Cook on his th ird a n d last voyage o f discovery in the Pacific.

I he M inister also approved contracts for the Library to acquire additional storage equipm ent to house p art o f its expanding new spaper an d m ap collection.

I he N ational M useum o f A ustralia received M inisterial approval for a film to be p roduced by the A ustralian Film Com m ission th ro u g h Film A ustralia for

use in the M useum ’s Visitor C en tre at Y arram undi Reach, C anberra.

Ken W arby’s Spirit of Australia, the first m ajor acquisition for the A ustralian National M aritim e M useum , was approved by the M inister w ho presented M r W arby with a cheque for $200 000 in A pril 1986. Speedo H oldings Ltd. co ntributed $50 000 towards the purchase cost. T h e record breaking speedboat represents a considerable advance in je t propulsion and

is an object o f living history.

Information Policy Development I he D epartm ent is participating in an interdepartm ental m eeting, u n d e r the auspices o f the D epartm ent o f Science, which seeks to develop a ‘national

inform ation policy’ for Australia, so that inform ation, an essential econom ic and social resource, is developed for th e benefit o f all sections o f the com m unity.

Advisory Committee on National Collections I he D epartm ent provides the Secretariat to the Advisory C om m ittee on N ational Collections (ACNC), a body rep resen tin g

The handing over of the record-breaking power boat, Spirit of Australia, to the Australian National Maritime Museum: (left to right) Mr

Robert Tickner, Federal Member for Hughes; Mr Gary Punch, Federal Member for Barton; designer, builder and driver, Ken Warby MBE; and the Minister, Mr Barry Cohen

the D epartm ent and the principal national collecting institutions fu n d ed by the C om m onw ealth. Established in 1982, ACNC provides the M inister with policy advice and inform ation on the

m anagem ent, co-ordinated developm ent and preservation o f the National Collection, com prising works o f art, archival, historic, library, audio-visual and botanic m aterial. In addition, the C om m ittee facilitates co-operation and the sharing o f resources betw een the principal national collecting institutions and undertakes studies and reports on subjects com m on to the several institutions.

ACNC is chaired by the D eputy Secretary o f the D ep artm en t o f Arts, H eritage and Environm ent an d includes the chief executive officers o f A rtbank, A ustralian Archives, A ustralian N ational Botanic G ardens, A ustralian N ational Gallery, A ustralian N ational M aritim e M useum , A ustralian W ar M emorial, (which is in the portfolio o f the M inister for V eteran ’s Affairs) National Film and Sound Archive,

N ational Library o f A ustralia and the N ational M useum o f A ustralia. T h e D epartm ents o f Prim e M inister and C abinet a n d Finance are also represented.

M ajor activities in 1985— 86 included m eetings a n d sem inars to discuss the im pact o f new institutions on the d evelopm ent o f the N ational Collections, co unter-disaster m an ag em en t plans and

fu rth e r w ork was u n d erta k en on a report, Conservation of the National Collection.

Artbank T h e past year was extrem ely successful for A rtbank. Incom e from the rental program reached reco rd levels.

Fhe increased allocation o f funds for the acquisition o f works o f art enabled A rtbank to assist a larger n u m b er o f young artists an d to o ffer clients a larg er selection of works. T h is activity is consistent with A rt bank’s tasks o f su p p o rtin g and en co u rag in g young a n d em erging artists th ro u g h th e purchase o f th eir work and of stim ulating a wider appreciation of A ustralian art by rental o f these artw orks

for public display.

In both these objectives A rtbank has been outstandingly successful, with m ore than $2 379 000 having been sp en t on works of art by m ore than 1400 individual artists.

In the six years since its creation A rtbank has established itself as a vital com ponent o f g o v ernm ent su p p o rt for the arts.

All acquisitions for the A rtbank collection are considered by the A rtbank B oard, m em bers o f which are listed in

A p pendix 14. Prelim inary selection of work is m ade by the D irector and D eputy D irector d u rin g th eir freq u en t visits to

dealers’ galleries an d artists’ studios aro u n d th e country. W ork for consideration also com es directly from artists.

D uring 1985-86, 865 new works were p u rchased from artists an d art dealers in every state, m aking u p a total A rtbank collection o f 4 321 works.

T h e positive client response to A rtbank was m ost encouraging a n d signalled wide acceptance o f the schem e. W hile dem and

continues at a high level increased funding this year has p erm itted acquisitions to ju st keep pace with ren tal dem and.

At the e n d o f 1985-86, 3 483 works from the A rtbank collection w ere on hire. This rep resen ts about 80% o f the collection. R ental incom e gen erated for the year, and

re tu rn e d to consolidated revenue was $356 235.

In line with G overnm ent policy o f encouraging cultural exchange between A ustralia an d C anada, A rtbank has m oved

to establish closer ties with its C anadian co u n terp art.

T h e C anada C ouncil A rtbank was founded in 1972 to su p p o rt artists an d bring contem porary art into everyday environm ents. T h e C anada Council A rtbank lends extensively to public

galleries within C anada, an d arranges exhibitions for overseas tours.

D uring 1986 A rtbank A ustralia arran g ed a jo in t exhibition with th e C anada Council A rtbank. T h e exhibition, Art from Artbank was show n in Sydney d u rin g C anada

W eek, then M elbourne an d C anberra. In C an b erra the exhibition was officially op en ed by th e M inister, who in thanking the C anadian G overnm ent for its

participation, indicated his hope th at the show w ould be the fo re ru n n e r o f other, an d larger, jo in t exhibitions.

As a n o th er aspect o f the cultural co­ o p eratio n betw een A ustralia and C anada the D eputy D irector o f A rtbank, M r James K enney, spent th ree weeks in Ottawa

w orking at the C anadian A rtbank, investigating com puterization o f their collection and the m arketing program . Details o f overseas visits u n d ertak en by

officers o f the D e p artm en t are listed in A ppendix 15. It is expected th at the D irector o f the C anadian A rtbank will com e to A ustralia next year.

A rtbank has always placed special em phasis on the collection and distribution o f work by A boriginal artists, attem p tin g to bring this uniquely A ustralian art to the

attention o f a wide audience, particularly th ro u g h A ustralia’s overseas posts. T raditional bark painting an d sculpture

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from A rnhem L and an d contem porary canvasses from P apunya an d elsew here have been acquired an d d istributed widely across the country a n d the world. T hese artw orks, accom panied by biographical details o f the artist an d o f the dream tim e

legend depicted in each work, have been enthusiastically received by client organizations.

Secretariats to Councils and Conferences I he C ultural M inisters C ouncil was established by ag reem en t betw een the Prime M inister, the State Prem iers and the ( ihief M inister o f the N o rth e rn T errito ry in 1984. Its role is to provide a forum for die exchange o f views on issues affecting cultural activities in Australia.

I he Council consists o f the C om m onw ealth, State an d T errito ry Ministers responsible for the arts and cultural heritage. New Zealand a n d P apua

New G uinea M inisters with responsibility for the arts attend m eetings as observers. Lists of the m em bers o f the C ouncil and its S tanding C om m ittee are at A ppendixes 16 and 17.'

I he secretariat to the Council, its S tanding ( Committee an d W orking G roups is provided by the D epartm ent.

Council m et twice in 1985-86, on 29 N ovem ber 1985 in B risbane an d on 16 May 1986 in Darwin.

W orking G roups m ay be established to undertake studies into m atters o f relevance to the Council. Five were established in 1985-86:

• Orchestras: m onitors the im plem entation of the recom m endations o f the Study of the Future Development of Orchestras in Australia (the T ribe Report); • Significant Performing Arts Organisations:

carries out studies into the p resen t situation of, and fu tu re strategy for, significant o p era an d ballet com panies, m ajor d ram a com panies in each State and T erritory, m ajor contem porary ballet and dance com panies an d m ajor innovative perfo rm in g arts com panies; • National Information Networks Committee:

pursues the developm ent o f a national

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m ulti-disciplinary data dictionary for collecting institutions, encourages the developm ent o f com patible inform ation systems by arts authorities at all levels and investigates an d advises the Council on the feasibility o f a national arts inform ation data base; • Statistical Advisory Group: liaises with the

A ustralian B ureau o f Statistics on cultural statistics m atters, m onitors the need for collection o f cultural statistics, com m issions studies, and provides advice to the C ouncil on statistical m atters; and • Australian Libraries and Information

Council (ALIC): is review ing A L IC ’s role, functions and m em bership.

M ajor m atters considered by the C ouncil d u rin g 1985— 86 included:

• the T ribe R eport on orchestras • fu n d in g o f the A ustralian O pera • the developm ent o f a prescriptive m odel to define the fu n d in g responsibilities o f

C om m onw ealth, State an d Local G overnm ents vis-a-vis arts organisations (spheres o f interest) • devolution o f arts fu n d in g to n o n ­

governm ent bodies • rep o rt o f the T ask Force on E ducation and the Arts • N ational M useum s Com mission • fu n d in g o f the A ustralian C h ild ren ’s

Television F oundation • cultural relations betw een A ustralia and New Zealand.

T h e Council is rep resen ted on th e Jo in t C om m ittee o f C ultural and E ducation M inisters by the M inister, the H on. Race Mathews, MLA, Victorian M inister for the Arts, an d the H on. B arbara Wiese, MLC, South A ustralian M inister fo r Local G overnm ent, T ourism and Youth Affairs and M inister Assisting the M inister for the Arts.

T h e Council's next m eeting will be held in M elbourne in May 1987.

Conference of Commonwealth Cultural Authorities T h e G overnm ent encourages g re ater co­ operation and co-ordination o f the activities o f federally-funded cultural bodies with regular C onferences of

C om m onw ealth C ultural A uthorities. C onferences have been convened by the M inister each year since 1983.

C onferences are chaired by the Secretary of the D e p artm en t an d are atten d e d by the Minister, C hairpersons an d C hief Executives o f the authorities a n d senior

officers o f th e D epartm ent. W ith the agreem ent o f the M inister for C om m unications, the A ustralian B roadcasting C orporation, the Special

B roadcasting Service an d the A ustralian B roadcasting T rib u n al usually also attend. Similarly, with the approval o f the M inister for V eteran s’ Affairs, the A ustralian W ar

M em orial is also rep resen ted .

T h e C onferences provide an effective m echanism for the sharing o f inform ation and the co-ordination o f th e activities of C om m onw ealth cultural organisations.

T h e C onference held on 27 February 1986 was atten d e d only by representatives o f the C om m onw ealth collecting institutions. A ddressing the C onference, the M inister canvassed im p o rta n t issues facing the collecting institutions. T h ese included:

• the need for the delineation o f roles and functions o f authorities; • the im portance o f the institutions ad opting an en tre p ren e u rial approach to

th eir operations; • the urgency o f draw ing u p co u n ter­ disaster plans; and • co-operation betw een authorities and

portfolio su p p o rt for B icentennial activities.

T h e C onference a p p o in ted a C om m ittee to p rep are a p a p e r on the delineation of collecting functions betw een the institutions.

A fu rth e r C onference will be held later in 1986.

Australian Libraries and Information Council (ALIC) T h e A ustralian Libraries an d Inform ation C ouncil was established in 1981 to:

‘advise M inisters on m eans o f securing co-operation an d co-ordination betw een the C om m onw ealth an d the States and

am ong the States them selves in the developm ent o f library an d inform ation services’.

A LIC is a subsidiary body o f the C ultural M inisters Council. T h e cu rre n t m em bership o f ALIC is at A ppendix 18. D uring 1985— 86 ALIC held fo u r m eetings;

H obart 13 S eptem ber 1985, Sydney 7 D ecem ber 1985, M elbourne 18 February 1986 an d Adelaide 2 -3 J u n e 1986.

A LIC ’s Plan for Library and related information services in Australia was released late in 1985 by the C ultural M inisters Council. Public com m ents on the Plan

w ere invited and an am en d ed Plan is being p re p are d taking into account the com m ents received.

In 1985-86 ALIC received the results of the conservation survey o f A ustralian libraries an d archives. I he survey confirm ed the extent o f the conservation

task to be und ertak en .

ALIC, the C om m onw ealth T ertiary E ducation C om m ission a n d the C om m onw ealth D e p artm en t o f Education are jointly sponsoring the Survey o f the

A ustralian In te r lib ra ry Loans (SAIL) Project. T h e Survey aim s to obtain data on inter-library lending to im prove efficiency in this area.

In M arch 1986, the S tanding C om m ittee o f the C ultural M inisters C ouncil established a W orking G roup to review the role, functions and m em bership o f ALIC, and

to m ake recom m endations to the Council. T h e Council, at its m eeting in May 1986, asked ALIC to exam ine these issues and re p o rt on them to the W orking G roup by

30 S eptem ber 1986.

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Conservation and Environment Assessment

37

Conservation and Environm ent Assessment

T he C onservation an d E nvironm ent Assessment Division provides policy advice; develops, im plem ents and adm inisters proposals, legislation and

program s; carries o u t studies an d assessments a n d generally provides a focus for the G o v ern m en t’s involvem ent in

en vironm ent protection, n a tu re conservation an d environm ental m anagem ent.

T he Division collaborates with o th e r divisions o f th e D e p artm en t an d with the G reat B arrier R eef M arine Park A uthority (GBRMPA), the A ustralian N ational Parks and W ildlife Service (ANPWS) and the A ustralian H eritage C om m ission.

T h e Division consists of:

• C onservation Branch — L and Section — M arine and Coastal Section — N atu ral Resources Section

— N ational d ree P rogram Section • E n vironm ent A ssessm ent B ranch — Industrial Proposals Section — N atural R esource Proposals Section

— C om m onw ealth Proposals Section • B ureau o f Flora and F auna — Flora Section — F auna Section

— D istribution Studies Section — In fo rm atio n M anagem ent Section — A dm inistration Section.

C onservation T h e C onservation B ranch provides policy advice, and develops an d im plem ents

legislation, policies an d program s relating to th e conservation, m an ag em en t and protection o f the environm ent.

T h e B ranch provides D epartm ental su p p o rt for the National Parks and Wildlife Conservation Act 1975, th e Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Act 1975, the Wildlife Protection

(Regulation of Exports and Imports) Act 1982, the State Grants Nature Conservation Act 1974, an d the Environment (Financial Assistance) Act 1977.

Uluru (Ayers Rock — Mount Olga) National Park In A ugust 1985 P arliam ent enacted legislation am ending th e National Parks arid

Wildlife Conservation Act 1975 an d the Aboriginal Land Rights (Northern Territory) Act 1976 to enable tra n sfe r o f the title of U luru N ational Park (which contains Ayres

Rock) to the U luru-K atatjuta Aboriginal F a n d T ru st, an d the subsequent ‘lease back’ o f th e land to the D irector of N ational Parks and W ildlife, for

m anagem ent as a N ational Park.

T h e tran sfer o f title an d ‘lease back’ took place at U luru on 26 O ctober 1985. T he G overnor-G eneral, Sir N inian Stephen AK, GCMG, GCVO, KBE, KStJ handed over the title deeds to M r Yami Fester

rep resen tin g the A boriginal traditional owners. A M em orandum o f A greem ent was signed by the M inister and a representative o f the C entral F and Council

to establish the U luru-K atatjuta B oard of M anagem ent for the Park. T h e B oard is

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responsible for draw ing u p Plans o f M anagem ent (in conjunction with the D irector o f N ational Parks an d Wildlife), m onitoring m anagem ent activities an d providing advice to the M inister on all aspects o f the fu tu re developm ent o f the Park. T h e first form al m eeting o f the Board was on 22— 23 April 1986.

South-West Tasmania T h e D epartm ent plays a leading role in the developm ent o f C om m onw ealth policy relating to the protection an d m anagem ent o f the T asm anian W orld H eritage A rea (WHA).

In 1985— 86, the C om m onw ealth provided $2m to T asm ania for m anagem ent o f the WHA. This effectively tripled th e annual am o u n t previously spent for this purpose, and allowed new staff to be h ired and

im portant infrastructure to be constructed.

T h e T asm anian W orld H eritage A rea C onsultative C om m ittee first m et on 26— 28 February 1986 at Q ueenstow n. T h e m em bership o f the C om m ittee is listed at A ppendix 19. T h e C om m ittee has considered various issues, including

priorities for visitor services, the scope for private developm ent in the W H A and G ordon River erosion.

T h e T asm anian W orld H eritage Area Council, m em bers o f which are listed in A ppendix 20, m et on 18 April 1986. T he Council welcomed the positive approach taken by the Consultative C om m ittee. T he Council stressed the need fo ra

com prehensive M anagem ent Plan for the W HA, noting th at a d raft M anagem ent Plan was expected to be com pleted for

Council consideration in J u n e 1987. T he M anagem ent Plan will provide a long term fram ew ork for the continuing conservation of the W HA, while allowing for increased visitor use consistent with m aintaining the wilderness values o f the Area.

National Tree Program T h e N ational T ree Program (N TP) was established by the C om m onw ealth in 1982,

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in cooperation with the State an d Territory G overnm ents and m any non-governm ent organisations. T h e objectives o f the P rogram are selectively to increase tree cover in rural areas, to prom ote coordinated action by individuals, governm ents an d the com m unity generally to conserve, plant and reg en erate trees and to develop public aw areness o f the value of trees.

A N ational T re e Program C oordination C om m ittee (NCC), which com prises representatives from State and T erritory G overnm ents, local governm ent an d n o n ­ governm ent organisations (including the

N ational F arm ers’ F ederation and G reening A ustralia), advises the M inister on the objectives, priorities an d allocation o f funds for the NTP.

D uring the year the NCC advised on conservation an d m anagem ent o f rem nant vegetation, financial a n d o th er incentives for tree establishm ent, links with the C om m unity E m ploym ent P rogram (CEP), involvem ent o f farm er organisations, developm ent o f policy guidelines, developm ent o f a national tree data base an d N TP planning and evaluation.

W orking G roups were established to:

• exam ine research needs and priorities to enable N T P objectives to be achieved; • consider and re p o rt on m easures which the C om m onw ealth m ight ad o p t for the

conservation and m anagem ent o f re m n a n t vegetation; and • exam ine im plications o f recent am endm ents to the Incom e T ax

Assessm ent Act.

T h e G overnm ent provided $600,000 for the N T P in 1985— 86 for tree projects, a N ational Inform ation P rogram and adm inistrative su p p o rt for G reening Australia and o th er non-governm ent organisations. G rants to the States and

T erritories for tree projects are provided on a dollar for dollar basis, an d are adm inistered by C oordinating Com m ittees in each State an d T erritory.

T h e CEP provided an im p o rtan t source o f resources for tree projects, while m eeting the jo b creation and youth training

objectives o f the CEP. In 1985-86 approxim ately $ 16 million o f CEP funds were sp en t on tree related projects, bringing the total e x p e n d itu re to approxim ately $38 million for the period

1983— 86. As part o f the CEP. the D epartm ent sponsored five m ajor projects involving e x p e n d itu re o f approxim ately $2.5 m illion and em ploym ent o f 200

people. T h e projects w ere at C airns, R ockham pton, the H u n te r Valley, Port Pirie an d L aunceston a n d w ere m anaged

by State G reening A ustralia organisations, with the assistance o f local com m unities. T he Q ueen slan d and NSW projects addressed problem s o f soil erosion and

salinity, provided shade, sh elter an d wildlife habitat an d included trials o f agroforestry, direct seeding a n d natural regeneration. T h e P ort Pirie project

involved tree establishm ent to assist suppression o f lead-contam inated dust, which is a m ajor environm ental problem in that city. T h e Launceston project involved

planting a n d direct seeding trials on sites severely ero d ed by sluice m ining operations.

T h e N ational In fo rm atio n P rogram sponsors th re e aw ards to increase public support for the objectives o f the NTP.

T h e N ational T re e C are A w ard is conducted in association with the ABC TV Countrywide program . T h e 1985 Aw ard for a farm tree plan was w on by M r a n d Mrs

Des Foulis o f W ilm ington (SA). T h e 1986 them e prom otes catchm ent m anagem ent, off-farm values o f trees a n d com m unity

involvem ent in tree projects.

T h e 1985 Jo u rn alism A w ard was won by Mr O w en W ood for an article in the Donald-Birchip Times (Victoria).

T h e in au g u ral Film an d T V P roducers’ Award was presen ted to Ms C. Wilcox o f Yowie Films, T u rra m u rra , NSW fo r the film A Voice fo r the Wilderness.

T h e book, Think Trees, Grow Trees, was launched by the M inister in February 1986. It was p re p are d by the D epartm ent in association with the Institute of

Foresters o f Australia, an d provides m uch valuable inform ation on trees in both rural and urb an environm ents. A pproxim ately

3000 copies o f the book w ere sold in the first th ree m onths.

T h e book, The Last Stand — Managing Australia’s Remnant Forests and Woodlands, was p re p a re d for the N T P by M r R. B reckwoldt, a farm er from C andelo

(NSW). It describes the values o f rem n a n t vegetation an d identifies m anagem ent issues and actions which can be taken to conserve re m n a n t vegetation.

O th e r N T P activities included production o f a film on the P rogram , p roduction o f G reening A ustralia pam phlets on the N T P Strategy, developm ent o f guidelines for large tree grow ing projects, p rin tin g o f an

N T P Inform ation G uide a n d preparation o f a re p o rt on direct seeding trials by the G lenelg Farm T rees G ro u p in w estern Victoria.

A n o th er m ajor activity was the developm ent, in collaboration with CSIRO a n d the Q ueensland D e p artm en t of Forestry, o f a national tree data base

(TRED A T). T his will provide useful inform ation on tree projects to com m unity leaders, project sponsors a n d landholders. T R E D A T will be fully operational in early

1987.

Resources Potential of Kakadu T h e D epartm ent provided a subm ission to the Senate S tanding C om m ittee on N ational Resources Inquiry into the

Resources Potential o f th e Kakadu N ational Park Region. T h e subm ission em phasised th at the natu ral a n d cultural values o f the region, which have justified the W orld H eritage Listing, should be

preserved for fu tu re generations and not be jeo p ard ised by u n controlled exploitative activities. T h e submission no ted th at the C om m onw ealth

G overnm ent has invested considerable resources in the provision o f visitor facilities a n d p ark in fra stru ctu re and intends to increase this investm ent over the

next few years.

D uring the year Stages 1 and 2 of K akaduP ark were am algam ated so that the whole Park could be m anaged as a single entity. T h e G overnm ent gave fu rth e r

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Noah Creek just south of Cape Tribulation. Creeks such as this are common in the rainforests of north Queensland.

consideration to the inclusion into the Park o f the Gim bat an d G oodparla pastoral leases an d to procedures for exten d in g the W orld H eritage listing to include the area o f Stage 2.

Rainforests In Septem ber 1985 the M inister received the R eport o f a widely representative W orking G roup, which was established to advise on the developm ent o f a C om m onw ealth R ainforest C onservation

Policy. T h e R eport recom m ended a com prehensive and flexible package o f m easures that the C om m onw ealth could take, in conjunction with the States a n d the

N orthern T erritory, to prom ote rainforest conservation.

In tabling the R eport in P arliam ent in O ctober 1985, the M inister identified

conservation o f A ustralia’s scarce and valuable rainforest resources as one o f the m ost pressing conservation issues faced by A ustralia. C om m enting on th e com plex n atu re o f the problem , the M inister

describe the re p o rt as a ‘landm ark in collaboration betw een groups holding very diverse opinions on a m ajor environm ental issue’. T h e M inister sought com m ents on the re p o rt from C om m onw ealth, State and T errito ry M inisters, key non-governm ent organisations a n d the public. T h e main recom m endations o f the R eport were widely su p p o rted by the A ustralian com m unity.

T h e R eport an d com m ents form ed the basis o f proposals for a com prehensive approach to rainforest conservation which the M inister b ro u g h t forw ard for consideration by the G overnm ent,

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Commonwealth Rainforest Decision O n 17 J u n e 1986 th e M inister an n o u n ced th at the G overnm ent had agreed in principle to ad o p t a

C om m onw ealth R ainforest C onservation Policy and to provide $22.25 m illion for a N ational R ainforest C onservation P rogram over the next

two financial years, following the conclusion o f ap p ro p ria te agreem ents with the States and the N o rth e rn T errito ry . T h e P rogram will be

im plem ented in co-operation with the States a n d the N o rth ern T errito ry . It will focus on:

• identification, acquisition an d m an ag em en t o f significant u n p ro tec ted rainforest; • plantation establishm ent to reduce

pres ures on rainforests; • su p p o rtin g activities o f research, inform ation an d education; an d • dev d o p m e n t o f alternative uses, in

particular tourism , fo r rainforest areas.

Im m ediately following the decision D ep artm en tal officers com m enced discussions with States an d N o rth ern T errito ry representatives, with a view to

identifying detailed proposals for consideration by M inisters.

Murray-Darling Basin At an historic m eeting in A delaide in N ovem ber 1985, w ater resources, en v iro n m en t and agricultual M inisters

from the C om m onw ealth, New South Wales, Victoria an d S outh A ustralia agreed to ad o p t a cooperative ap p ro ach for better

m an ag em en t o f the Basin.

T h e new arran g em en ts include the establishm ent o f a M inisterial Council su p p o rted by a S tanding C om m ittee o f senior officials. T h e M inister is a m em ber

o f the C ouncil and the Secretary o f the D ep artm en t is a m em ber o f the S tanding C om m ittee.

T h e M inisters established an E nvironm ent W orking G roup, chaired by the D epartm ent, to review the environm ental

resources o f the Basin an d th eir current status an d to p re p are a detailed proposal fo r u n d ertak in g a m ajor benchm ark environm ental resources study. T he

W orking G roup re p o rt was com pleted in May 1986 for consideration by the M inisterial Council.

T h e D ep artm en t was a m em ber o f W orking G ro u p to advise on com m unity participation in the w ork o f the Council. A D epartm ental officer is a m em ber o f the

E nvironm ent C om m ittee o f the River M urray Com m ission.

T h e new arran g em en ts for interg o v ern m en tal collaboration aim to pro m o te an d co-ordinate effective p lan n in g and m an ag em en t for the equitable, efficient a n d sustainable use o f th e w ater, land an d environm ental resources o f the Basin.

National Conservation Strategy for Australia (NCSA) T h e developm ent o f the Strategy is described in the D ep artm en t o f H om e

Affairs an d E nvironm ent A nnual R eport 1983— 84 an d the D e p artm en t o f Arts, H eritage an d E nvironm ent A nnual R eport 1 984- 85.

An NCSA Interim C onsultative C om m ittee was established to advise the M inister on m easures which could be taken to prom ote, endorse, im plem ent, m onitor

an d develop the NCSA. T h e C om m ittee included representatives from the C om m onw ealth, State an d N o rth ern T errito ry G overnm ents, industry,

research, education, conservation and o th e r com m unity groups. T h e C om m ittee p resen ted a final re p o rt to the M inister in A ugust 1985. It was released for public

com m ent d u rin g O ctober an d N ovem ber 1985 an d was tabled in Parliam ent.

T h e recom m endations in the report, to g eth er with the public com m ents, provide a basis for G overnm ent consideration o f fu rth e r im plem entation

o f the NCSA.

T h e D eputy Secretary o f th e D epartm ent atten d e d the W orld C onservation Strategy C onference in O ttaw a, 31 May to 5 June

43

1986, to present a case study on A ustralia’s experience in developing and ■nplementing the NCSA.

Wildlife Protection Act A m endm ents to the Wildlife Protection (Regulation of Exports and Imports) Act 1982 were introduced into P arliam ent in the au tu m n sittings. T h e am endm ents will

make the controls on the ex p o rt and im port o f certain categories o f wildlife m ore a p p ro p riate to the cu rre n t conservation status an d the circum stances

u n d er which they are traded. T h e am endm ents will also simplify an d im prove adm inistrative procedures, clarify and tighten enforcem ent provisions, and

increase protection for individuals who provide inform ation leading to prosecutions u n d e r the Act.

Antarctica The D ep artm en t participated in developing A ustralian and international policies on m easures for A ntarctic environm ent protection and m anagem ent.

I'he D epartm ent was rep resen ted on A ustralian delegations to the T h irte e n th A ntarctic T reaty C onsultative M eeting in Brussels in O ctober 1985 and at m eetings on A ntarctic M ineral Resources held in

Paris in S eptem ber 1985 an d in H obart in April 1986.

T h e A ntarctic T reaty C onsultative Parties m eet every two years to consider a wide range o f policy an d operational m atters including im p o rtan t environm ental

subjects such as protected areas, environm ental im pact assessm ent and waste m anagem ent at A ntarctic stations.

Environm ent protection is also a basic consideration in the cu rren t international developm ent o f a regim e to govern any future A ntarctic m ineral resource activities.

Great Barrier Reef The G reat B arrier R eef M arine Park A uthority has prim ary responsibility for the establishm ent, control, care an d developm ent o f the G reat B arrier R eef

M arine Park. T h e D epartm ent, in

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consultation with o th er C om m onw ealth d epartm ents, contributes to the developm ent o f policies an d legislation for the G reat B arrier R eef Region an d for the M arine Park an d provides su p p o rt for the A uthority as appropriate.

Law of the Sea T h e D ep artm en t contributes to various policy activities relating to the im plem entation o f the UN C onvention on the Law o f the Sea, which was signed by A ustralia in D ecem ber 1982.

Torres Strait Treaty T h e D ep artm en t consulted with o th er interested agencies concerning possible developm ent o f a m arine m onitoring

program for T o rres Strait. T h e program would assist in im plem enting the provisions o f th e T o rres S trait T reaty, which was ratified by A ustralia an d P apua

New G uinea (PNG) in February 1985. PNG officials w ere consulted a n d the D epartm ent received results o f a PNG program for m onitoring pollution in the waters dow nstream from the O k T edi gold an d co p p er m ine in the headw aters o f the

Fly River. At th e invitation o f the PNG G overnm ent an officer o f the D epartm ent visited the OK T ed i m ine in an A ustralian

party led by S enator the H on G areth Evans, M inister for Resources and Energy.

South Pacific Advice an d briefing w ere provided for the A ustralian delegation to th e F ourth E xpert M eeting on a C onvention fo r the Protection and D evelopm ent o f the N atural Resources and E nvironm ent o f the South Pacific Region. T h e m eeting also considered o th er m arine environm ent

protection issues, particularly the South Pacific Regional E nvironm ent Program (SPREP).

Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission T h e D epartm ent participated in developing the A ustralian position for m eetings o f the Intergovernm ental O ceanographic Com m ission (IOC) and the Program G roup for the W estern Pacific.

Coastal Management In May 1985 the A ustralian E nvironm ent Council ag reed to sponsor a conference in 1986 on coastal m an ag em en t and protection, from an environm ental perspective, an d to establish a liaison netw ork o f officers w orking in th e coastal m anagem ent field from the C om m onw ealth, the States and T erritories, New Zealand a n d P apua New

G uinea. T h e D ep artm en t an d the New South Wales State Pollution C ontrol Com m ission are organising the C onference, to be held 7— 9 O ctober 1986 in Coffs H a rb o u r, NSW.

T h e AEC Coastal M anagem ent N etw ork facilitates the exchange o f inform ation on coastal m an ag em en t m atters and consultation on technical issues. Non-AEC

m em ber agencies in each State an d T errito ry with responsibilities relating to coastal m an ag em en t are also involved.

Bushfires T h e D ep artm en t co-ordinated G overnm ent consideration o f the

recom m endations o f the H ouse o f R epresentatives S tanding C om m ittee on E nvironm ent and C onservation report Bushfires and the Australian Environment.

O n 12 F ebruary 1986 the M inister presen ted to P arliam ent the G overnm ent’s response to the recom m endations o f the S tanding C om m ittee a n d those o f the A ustralian Forestry C ouncil S tanding C om m ittee on Forestry re p o rt The 1982— 83 Bushfires. T h e G overnm ent accepted

alm ost all o f the 48 recom m endations, which deal with bushfire prevention, planning, standards, education, training, research, w arning services, statistics, response m anpow er, co-ordination, eq u ip m en t and m itigation. Follow-up action is continuing, in consultation with the States an d T erritories.

International Union for the Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN) T h e prim ary objectives o f IU C N are to encourage and facilitate co-operation

betw een governm ents, national and international organisations a n d persons, to

p ro m o te an d encourage national and international action, scientific research, inform ation dissem ination a n d education an d to p re p are d ra ft international agreem ents and assist governm ents to

im prove th eir legislation.

T h e D epartm ent is A ustralia’s State M em ber o f IU CN . T h e D epartm ent is also a m em ber o f the A ustralian C om m ittee for IU C N , which fu rth e rs th e objectives of

IU C N in A ustralia a n d co-ordinates the views o f m em ber organisations.

E nvironm ent A ssessm ent T h e E nvironm ent A ssessm ent B ranch adm inisters the Environment Protection (Impact of Proposals) Act 1974, which aims to

en su re th at potentially significant im pacts on the en v iro n m en t are taken into account in all the actions an d decisions o f the C om m onw ealth.

A large n u m b e r o f proposed actions is b ro u g h t to the D e p artm en t’s attention each year. In the m ajority o f cases, the D ep artm en t eith er advises th at the

proposed action will have no significant im pact o n the en vironm ent, o r else advises the p ro p o n e n t on ways o f m inim ising the environm ental im pacts.

In a small n u m b er o f cases, w here m ajor environm ental im pacts are expected, the M inister directs the p ro p o n e n t to p re p are an environm ental im pact statem ent (FIS). A d raft FIS is first p re p are d , and public com m ent is invited. A final FIS is then

produced, taking into account the public com m ent. T h e final FIS an d public com m ents are assessed by the B ranch and a re p o rt is p rep ared .

T his provides the basis for D epartm ental advice to the M inister, who th en makes com m ents or recom m endations on the environm ental aspects o f the proposal to

the M inister responsible for the action o r decision.

For proposals w hich involve the C om m onw ealth an d a State or T erritory G overnm ent, th ere are arran g em en ts for co-operative assessm ent by the

environm ental authorities o f both G overnm ents.

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Review of the Impact Act T h e Environment Protection (Impact of Proposals) Amendment Bill 1986 was introduced in the B udget Session o f

Parliam ent following an extensive G overnm ent review o f the Act an d the A dm inistrative Procedures. T h e am endm ents will im prove adm inistration o f the Act and place g reater em phasis on

public participation. T h e am endm ents also will establish a basis for the p re p ara tio n o f a Public E nvironm ent R eport (PER) for

proposals with less com plex o r less im portant environm ental im plications, for which the p reparation o f a full EIS w ould not be w arranted.

( )th er am endm ents will require the M inister to m ake public the reasons for not directing an EIS on a proposal, provide increased consultation with public interest groups and governm ent authorities in draw ing u p EIS guidelines, an d authorise the M inister to direct a ro u n d table discussion on a proposal following public

review o f an EIS.

T h e Action M inister (the M inister responsible for m aking decisions on the proposal) will rem ain responsible for initiating action u n d e r the Act by determ ining w hether a particular proposal

is environm entally significant.

T o assist in initiating the assessm ent process, m em oranda o f u n d erstan d in g between the D epartm ent and o th er

C om m onw ealth departm ents an d authorities are being p repared. T h e m em oranda will identify and agree on categories o f proposals which are environm entally significant an d those

which are not.

I he long standing arrangem ents for cooperation betw een the C om m onw ealth and the States in environm ental assessm ent will be reviewed, to take account o f the am endm ents to the Im pact

Act and A dm inistrative P rocedures and changes which have been m ade in State environm ental assessm ent legislation and procedures in recent years.

Tasmanian Woodchips T h e assessm ent o f a final EIS on the proposal ‘to issue a licence for T asm anian w oodchip exports beyond 1988 and associated forestry o p eratio n s’ was com pleted in O ctober 1985. T h e proposal attracted strong public interest and was the subject o f m ajor letter w riting cam paigns. T h e M inister subsequently presented advice an d recom m endations to the

M inister for Prim ary Industry, em phasising the need for strict conditions on tim ber harvesting, m easures for public re p o rtin g on environm ental safeguards and special controls on logging in N ational Estate areas.

T h e G overnm ent decided in D ecem ber 1985 to renew the T asm anian export licences for 15 years after 1988, an d a M em orandum o f U n d erstanding between the C om m onw ealth and T asm ania on the conditions for w oodchip exports was signed on 12 J u n e 1986.

Environment Conditions for Tasmania Woodchip Exports • No logging in N ational Estate areas before a form al process o f

consultation has been com pleted and the C om m onw ealth is satisfied th at the N ational Estate values will be protected. • An agreed b u ffer zone to p ro tect the

w ilderness o f the South West N ational Park. • T asm anian to supply inform ation to the C om m onw ealth, m onitor

w oodchip operations, com ply with m anagem ent prescriptions, and introduce im proved forest practices. • Provision o f adequate reserves to

protect ra re a n d e n d a n g ere d species. • A program o f environm ental research. • Five yearly reviews o f forest

operations an d regeneration o f C rown an d private land.

T h e environm ental conditions are consistent with th e M inister’s recom m endations to the M inister for

46

P rim ary Industry. C o m m enting on the M em orandum o f U n d erstan d in g , the Prim e M inister stressed th at, in the event o f disagreem ent w ith T asm ania

w here forestry op eratio n s w ould adversely affect N ational E state values, all the C om m onw ealth’s pow ers would be used to protect those values. ■*:- -111! : m il III!! i l l » * III! i t i i I I I ! ! S l i : I I I ! III!!!· ! !

Second Sydney Airport Assessment o f a final EIS on the Identification and Acquisition of a Site fo r a Second Sydney Airport N S W was com pleted. T he M inister m ade recom m endations on the p ro posed developm ent to the M inister

for Aviation in N ovem ber 1985. T h e main th ru st o f th e recom m endations was to:

• reduce th e social disru p tio n to property ow ners a n d occupiers on the selected site;

• ensure th a t consultations took place betw een th e D e p artm en t o f Aviation and NSW authorities on im p o rtan t m atters such as regional an d local planning,

access a n d A boriginal an d heritage issues; • em phasise the im portance o f the early developm ent o f a com prehensive

environm ental m an ag em en t p ro g ram , to include th e period betw een acquisition an d contraction an d to incorporate noise and air quality m onitoring.

NSW Woodchip Exports In J u n e 1986, H arris Daishowa (Australia) Pty Ltd com pleted a d ra ft EIS on the proposed renew al o f w oodchip export

approval beyond 1989 for operations at Eden, NSW. T h e draft EIS was released for public review for eight weeks from 3 J u n e 1986.

Defence Proposals In S eptem ber 1985, the M inister signed new directions for EISs on proposals by the D ep artm en t o f D efence to establish two training areas in NSW for the A rm y T ra in in g Facilities Project. Subsequently

the G overnm ent an n o u n c ed th at it had decided no t to pu rsu e consideration o f the

B ath u rst/O ran g e area for the School of In fan try an d the School o f Artillery com ponents o f the project. O th e r options w ere to be fu rth e r considered.

Final EISs w ere received a n d assessm ent rep o rts w ere com pleted in 1985— 86 for:

• p ro posed m onazite processing plant by Allied E neabba Ltd at N a ru g u lu , WA; • p ro posed establishm ent o f an alum inium sm elter a t K em erton, WA; • extension o f the D efence P ro o f and

E xperim ental Establishm ent, Port W akefield, SA; and • proposed E astern Parkway, ACT.

A sum m ary o f EISs directed an d released for public review d u rin g 1985— 86 is in A ppendix 21.

Overseas Practice D uring the latter p art o f 1985, a senior officer o f the E nvironm ent Assessment B ranch travelled overseas to study the

developm ent and progress of environm ental im pact assessm ent (EIA) in N o rth Am erica, W estern E urope and South East Asia. T h e study to u r was m ade

possible by the aw ard o f a S enior Executive Fellowship by the Public Service Board.

T h e study included discussions with g o v ern m en t officials an d representatives o f industry, academ ia a n d the conservation m ovem ent in ten countries. T h e result provided a valuable com parison between overseas a n d A ustralian practice in EIA, which should lead to im provem ents in C om m ow ealth environm ental assessm ent practices.

Bureau o f Flora and Fauna T h e B u reau is responsible for adm inistering the A ustralian Biological

R esources Study (ABRS). T his Study prom otes the survey an d docum entation o f A ustralia’s flora an d fauna, to provide a scientific basis for conservation and resource m an ag em en t a n d for do cu m en tin g the N atu ral H eritage. T h e B ureau, in collaboration with C om m onw ealth,State an d T erritory agencies, co-ordinates studies on the

47

description, classification a n d distribution of A ustralian plants an d anim als. T h e ABRS Participatory Program is conducted in parallel with the scientific w ork o f the

B ureau. G rants are aw arded to su p p o rt projects req u ired for the ABRS. T h e G overnm ent aw arded $930 000 for the calendar year 1986, an increase o f 7.6% on

1985. See A ppendix 22 for details. Recipients were recom m ended by the ABRS Advisory C om m ittee, which generally advises the M inister on the

planning an d progress o f the ABRS.

T h e Advisory C om m ittee was ex p a n d ed by the ap p o in tm en t o f Professor T . C. C ham bers, M elbourne University, fo r a i hree-year term com m encing on 1 Ja n u a ry

1986. T his ap p o in tm en t increased the b readth o f taxonom ic expertise on the C om m ittee an d im proved the geographic spread o f m em bership. M em bers o f the C om m ittee are listed in A ppendix 23.

T h e Australian Flora and Fauna Series com prises occasional publications designed to make available, as widely as possible, the result o f biogeographical activities and projects u n d ertak en by, o r on b eh a lf of, the B ureau. D uring the year the following were published:

No. 2. Southern Australian Liverworts by G.A.M. Scott, No. 3. Phytogeography of Eucalypts in Australia by A.M. Gill, L. Belbin an d G. C hippendale,

No. 4. Index to Type Specimens of Australian Lichens: 1800-1984 by R. B. Filson and No. 5. A Preliminary Atlas of Mangrove species in Australia com piled by J.R . Busby and

F.B. Bridgew ater.

Volum es 25 an d 46 o f Flora of Australia were published d u rin g the year. Flora describes A ustralia’s plants an d will be

issued in 50 volum es covering the flowering plants, ferns and gym nosperm s and a fu rth e r 10 volum es on the lower plants.

A Guide for Contributors to the Zoological Catalogue of Australia was p re p a re d and published. T h e th ird volum e o f the Zoological Catalogue was published d u rin g

the year. T his is the first volum e on spiders

a n d o th e r arachnids. T h e Zoological Catalogue lists all the species in the A ustralian fauna and gives inform ation on scientific nam es, distribution an d ecology.

W riting was com pleted by the 60 authors for Fauna of Australia, V olum e 1: General Articles and Mammalia an d work com m enced on the m any illustrations required. T h e 70 authors for Volum e 5: Mollusca are p re p arin g m anuscripts and planning has begun for V olum e 2: Amphibians, Reptiles and Birds.

A Guide fo r Illustrators o f Flora o f Australia was published. T his gives guidelines and instructions to artists p re p arin g the illustrations used in Flora.

T h e B iogeography P rogram has, as its m ain them e, the study o f the distribution o f A ustralian plants and anim als. T he

central feature o f the P rogram is the Australian Biogeographic Information System (ABIS), a com puter-based system com prising specim en data from herbarium and m useum collections th ro u g h o u t the country. Initial groups being incorporated include m am m als, birds, reptiles and hig h er plants.

A long-term aim o f the B iogeography Program is to provide inform ation on

An illustration by Kathie Hollis in the chapter on the Natural History of M etatheria in Volume 1 of Fauna of Australia

48

species distributions to scientific an d o th er com m unity groups. A fu rth e r aim is to map A ustralia’s vegetation at a scale o f 1 : 1 000 000 .

An atlas o f front-fanged venom ous snakes was p re p a re d for publication a n d a program utilising v o lunteer contributors th ro u g h o u t A ustralia is collating m aterial

for an atlas o f the plant genus Banksia.

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Environment Contaminants and Co-ordination

Environm ent Contaminants and Co-ordination

T he E n vironm ent C ontam inants an d C oordination Division was form ed d u rin g the year by am algam ation o f the E nvironm ent C ontam inants Division and

the E nvironm ent C oordination B ranch. T he Division im plem ents the G overnm ent’s com m itm ent to p ro p e r m anagem ent o f environm ental

contam inants an d provides a focus for collaboration with the States on environm ental m atters, for links with voluntary conservation organisations, and

for environm ental education activities.

The Division consists of:

• C ontam inants B ranch — C hem icals A ssessm ent Section — C hem ical Systems an d S u p p o rt Section

— Air, Noise and W ater Section — N uclear Section — W aste M anagem ent a n d Recycling Section

• E nvironm ent C oordination B ranch — S ecretariat Section — N ational and In tern atio n al Relations Section — E nvironm ent E ducation Section

Contam inants T h e C ontam inants B ranch is responsible for the evaluation a n d m an ag em en t o f environm entally hazardous chemicals,

protection o f air and w ater quality, control of noise, m an ag em en t o f wastes, and environm ental aspects o f nuclear activities.

T h e functions o f the B ranch include:

— providing policy advice on the m an ag em en t o f environm ental contam inants; — identifying an d evaluating

environm ental problem s and environm ental hazards; — developing codes o f practice, standards an d procedures to control a n d prevent

environm ental contam ination; — developm ent an d adm inistration of relevant legislation; — m onitoring o f contam inants in the

environm ent and analysis o f their environm ental significance; — coordination and liaison with o th er C om m onw ealth authorities, State

agencies an d n o n -g o v ern m en t bodies; an d — participation in activities o f international organisations a n d liaison

w ith c o u n te rp a rt agencies overseas.

Funds are a p p ro p ria te d u n d e r the E nvironm ent Q uality Protection Program in su p p o rt o f several specific activities.

Hazardous Chemicals In 1984 the G overnm ent an n o u n ced its intention to introduce a national chemicals notification an d assessm ent schem e and assigned responsibility for its fu rth e r developm ent to the D epartm ent.

T h e schem e will require m anufacturers a n d im porters to notify new chemicals and selected chemicals already in use which may p resen t hazards. N otifications will be

53

accom panied by sufficient inform ation to assess the potential health and environm ental hazards o f new an d existing chemicals. R ecom m endations will be developed on ap p ro p riate control

m easures for the chemicals assessed.

1 he N ational O ccupational H ealth and Safety C om m ission will adm inister the scheme.

T h e principal focus o f the D e p artm en t’s efforts d u rin g the year was the developm ent o f d raftin g instructions for C om m onw ealth legislation to im plem ent the schem e. T hese instructions were discussed in detail by the Chem icals S tanding C om m ittee o f the N ational O ccupational H ealth and Safety Com m ission, which involves governm ent, industry an d union representatives. T h e S tanding C om m ittee o f the A ustralian

K nvironm ent Council (AEG) en d o rsed the d rafting instructions as a basis for C om m onw ealth legislation. T h e d raftin g instructions were also re ferred to State agricultural, occupational health and

public health agencies th ro u g h relevant national bodies.

At the en d o f the year final decisions on certain aspects o f the proposed schem e, particularly as to w hether the C om m onw ealth legislation should em brace constituents o f those chem ical

products (agricultural chemicals, therapeutic substances, veterinary drugs and food additives) which are subject to an existing clearance schem e, rem ained to be

made.

T h e D epartm ent continued to adm inister the AEC’s Interim Notification Schem e for new industrial chemicals, begun in 1981. 1 w enty-three new chemicals w ere notified

and assessm ents o f potential en v iro n ­ m ental hazards w ere carried o u t to the extent th at technical data provided on the notified chemicals allowed. T h e voluntary interim schem e will continue until the

proposed m andatory notification and assessm ent schem e comes into operation.

Australian Inventory of Chemical Substances T h e Inventory will list all chem ical entities m an u factu red in o r im p o rted by Australia for com m ercial purposes in the period

1977 to 1984. It is an integral p art o f the proposed chemicals notification schem e, providing the m eans o f distinguishing new chemicals (which will be subject autom atically to m andatory notification an d assessm ent requirem ents) from existing chemicals (which will be subject to notification on a selective basis).

T h e second (final) stage fo r nom ination of chemicals for inclusion in th e Inventory com m enced in February 1986. T h e D e p artm en t devoted considerable effort to en su rin g th at all interested parties were fully inform ed o f the activity. G uidelines for nom inating chem ical substances to the Inventory were widely distributed, and advertisem ents were placed in the national press. T ra d e jo u rn als w ere also utilised to en su re th at chemical m an ufacturers and im porters w ere alerted to the im portance o f n o m inating all eligible chem ical substances, and sem inars held in April

1986 in Sydney an d M elbourne were well attended.

Some 5500 chem ical substances had been nom inated by 30 J u n e 1986, ad d in g to the 5000 listed in the A ustralian C ore Inventory o f Chem ical Substances which had been produced from the first ro u n d of nom inations. Many m ore nom inations are expected by the deadline o f 15 A ugust

1986.

Assessment of Chemicals T h e G overnm ent has decided that the D epartm ent will be responsible for the assessm ent o f environm ental hazards o f chemicals which are notified u n d e r the chemicals scheme.

In Ju n e 1986 the AEG endorsed proposals on adm inistrative aspects o f the chemicals notification schem e, including the design o f assessm ents to m eet the specific interests o f environm ental authorities. F u rth e r attention was given to developm ent o f

54

environm ental criteria fo r d eterm in in g the priority o f existing chem icals to be evaluated u n d e r the schem e.

As im plem entation o f the new schem e drew n e a re r the Division focussed particularly on th e developm ent o f a m ethodology for the environm ental

assessm ent o f notified chemicals. Officers o f the US E nvironm ental Protection Agency a n d the W est G erm an E nvironm ental Agency w ere invited to visit

the D epartm ent in May 1986 to advise on techniques ad o p ted in those countries for the environm ental assessm ent of chemicals. T hese senior experts

participated in a two-day technical w orkshop arran g e d by the D epartm ent on b ehalf o f th e AEG, which was atten d e d by

som e fifty representatives o f governm ent, industry, environm ental organisations and tertiary institutions. Previously an officer o f the D e p artm en t re p resen te d A ustralia at an OECD w orkshop, held in V ienna, on assessm ent o f environm ental exposure to chemicals.

In m id-year an officer o f the D ep artm en t was n om inated as the AEG’s representative on the A ustralian A gricultural C ouncil’s

technical com m ittees on agricultural chemicals and veterinary drugs, which are responsible for assessm ents o f these products u n d e r the national clearance

system. D ep artm en tal officers continued as m em bers o f the A gricultural C ouncil’s C oo rd in atin g C om m ittee o n A gricultural Chem icals an d A gricultural Chem icals

C om m ittee.

Biotechnology An officer o f th e D e p artm en t is serving as a m em b er o f the R ecom binant DNA M onitoring C om m ittee, which advises the

M inister fo r Industry, T echnology and C om m erce. D uring the year the D epartm ent took an increasing interest in consideration o f the environm ental

im plications o f the developm ent of novel organism s, plants a n d anim als by genetic alterations using biotechnological techniques.

T h e D ep artm en t co n tin u ed to play an active p art in C om m onw ealth-State activities on the m an ag em en t o f environm entally hazardous chemicals

which are coordinated th ro u g h the AEC. T h e AEC Advisory C om m ittee on Chem icals in the E n vironm ent, the principal consultative forum , was chaired

by an officer o f the D e p artm en t which also provided technical an d policy advice. C onsultations betw een the m em ber authorities o f AEC, an d industry, the

conservation m ovem ent and professional chem ists continued th ro u g h the Chem icals C onsultative C om m ittee, re p o rtin g to the Advisory C om m ittee o n Chem icals in the

E nvironm ent.

International T h e D e p artm en t was actively involved in the O EC D Chem icals P rogram . An officer

served as V ice-chairm an o f the m anaging J o in t B ureaux o f the P rogram , and as a m em ber o f the S teering C om m ittee p re p arin g for the th ird O ECD high-level

m eeting on chem icals to be held in M arch 1987.

T h e D ep artm en t m aintained its interest in activities o f the U nited N ations concerning hazardous chem icals, particularly with respect to the In tern atio n al Register of

Potentially Toxic Chem icals an d the im plem entation o f an international m echanism for inform ation exchange on ban n ed o r severely restricted substances.

In M arch 1985 an in ternational convention on the protection o f the earth's ozone layer (the V ienna C onvention) was adopted. T h e D e p artm en t initiated the

consultative m echanism , which requires, in particular, the involvem ent o f State and T errito ry G overnm ents p rep arato ry to the G overnm ent d eterm in in g w hether

A ustralia should becom e party to the C onvention. As well, the D epartm ent co ntributed to the developm ent o f an im plem enting protocol u n d e r the

C onvention on control of chlorofluorocarbon gases, which th ro u g h th eir use as propellants in aerosol sprays,

C om m onw ealth-S tate C o-operation

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iii refrigeration and in foam blowing are im plicated in dam aging the ozone shield in the atm osphere. A jo in t w orking g ro u p of the AEC and the N ational H ealth and

Medical Research Council was reconvened to review the environm ental im plications o f the use o f chlorofluorocarbons in aerosol sprays; a D epartm ental officer was

nom inated as AEC’s representative.

Unleaded Petrol In A ustralian cities m otor vehicles are alm ost exclusively the source o f carbon m onoxide and they also contribute a m ajor share o f hydrocarbons (50— 60%) and oxides o f nitrogen (60— 70%), w hich react

together to form photochem ical smog. Additionally, the use o f lead com pounds as additives in petrol to raise its octane level has resulted in the em ission o f som e 3000 tonnes o f lead into the atm osphere annually.

Because o f the potential environm ental an d health risks attributable to this pollution the AEC and the A ustralian T ra n sp o rt Advisory C ouncil (whose

m em bers are respectively the C om m onw ealth a n d State M inisters responsible for environm ent a n d tran sp o rt m atters) decided in 1981 th at em ission standards for m otor cars should be

tightened an d th at u n leaded petrol should be m andatory for new cars. T h e decision was based on extensive studies involving

the m otor vehicle an d oil industries as well as organisations rep resen tin g consum ers an d o th er interests. Sufficient lead-tim e was allowed to perm it the sm ooth introduction o f the new fuel an d the developm ent o f cars which could m eet the

new standards.

U nleaded petrol becam e widely available in Australia on schedule in m id -1985. A lthough unleaded petrol costs slightly m ore to produce, the general policy o f C om m onw ealth an d State G overnm ents was th at the new fuel should be retailed for

no m ore than leaded su p er petrol (which will continue to be available so long as dem and justifies), so as to prom ote the use

o f unleaded petrol in suitable existing vehicles a n d to discourage ow ners from m isfuelling new vehicles with leaded petrol.

From the latter p art o f 1985, the D ep artm en t w orked to develop a com m unity education cam paign on the

new fuel. Funds w ere allocated for this purpose in the 1985— 86 B udget.

In F ebruary 1986 it becam e m andatory for new m otor vehicles, ru n n in g on unleaded petrol, to m eet the m ore strin g en t emission standards. As significant n u m bers o f these vehicles began to jo in the national vehicle

fleet th ere w ere n u m erous com plaints of offensive odours — ‘rotten egg gas’ — ap p aren tly caused by the new cars. T h e re w ere particular problem s with the C om m onw ealth G overnm ent’s fleet o f m inisterial vehicles.

T h e issue was im m ediately addressed by concerned State a n d C om m onw ealth G overnm ent agencies, including the D epartm ent. Officers o f the Environm ent C ontam inants and C o-ordination Division

participated in consultations with industry, and ap p eared before the ALP C aucus C om m ittee on C onsum er A ffairs to discuss the m atter. T ow ards m id -1986 prelim inary results o f technical investigations suggested th at the m ain contributory factors to the production o f ‘ro tten egg gas’ o d o u r had been the use in poorly-tuned vehicles o f fuel from several refinery batches which accidently contained an excessive am o u n t o f sulphur. By this time

the nu m b er o f com plaints had d ro p p e d away substantially, although evidently some small pro p o rtio n o f vehicles was still causing problem s.

Air Quality Monitoring T h e principal goal o f the National Air Quality M onitoring Program is to generate air quality inform ation as a basis for

national decisions on environm ental protection m easures. Funds w ere provided front within the E nvironm ent Quality Protection Program . An am o u n t o f $212 000 was sp en t on instrum ents for

56

loan to State a n d T errito ry authorities to au gm ent air pollution m onito rin g capability in capital cities.

In conjunction with State authorities the progress a n d fu tu re directions o f the national air m onitoring p ro g ram were reviewed d u rin g the year. T h e re p o rt arising from the review was endorsed by

the AEG in Ju n e.

U pgrading, o f the N ational Air Quality Data C entre, established w ithin the D e p artm en t to collate A ustralia-w ide air quality data, ap p ro ach ed com pletion

d u rin g the year with the com m issioning o f com puters to facilitate tran sfer o f State/ T errito ry air m onitoring data to th e central data centre.

T h e E n vironm ent Q uality Protection Program co ntinued fu n d in g for the operation o f regional air m onitoring stations, which also pro d u ce data for

archiving an d analysis in the D ata C entre.

N oise The D ep artm en t was closely involved in the developm ent o f environm ental noise control policy th ro u g h its m em bership of

the Advisory C om m ittee on Vehicle Emissions and Noise (ACVEN) an d the E nvironm ental Noise C ontrol C om m ittee (ENCC). ACVEN rep o rts to both AEC

and the A ustralian T ra n sp o rt Advisory Council (ATAC), while ENCC reports to the AEC.) R oad traffic is the m ain cause of

environm ental noise in A ustralia and developm ent o f strategies for the long term control o f m otor vehicle noise is th ere fo re a priority. ACVEN has directed

its atten tio n to control o f noise from vehicles, while ENCC has exam ined extra­ vehicular control options such as the erection o f acoustic barriers and traffic

m anagem ent.

A m ore strin g en t A ustralian Design Rule relating to the control o f noise from new m otorcycles was com pleted by ACVEN and endorsed by AEC a n d ATAC, to come

into effect in 1988.

T h e D ep artm en t w orked closely with State a n d T errito ry environm ental authorities, m ainly th ro u g h the A ustralian E nvironm ental C ouncil, o n the developm ent o f policy advice an d strategies for control o f air pollution and environm ental noise. T h e D epartm ent

provided secretariat services for A EC’s Advisory C om m ittee on Air Quality and A EC ’s E nvironm ental Noise C ontrol C om m ittee.

C om m onw ealth-S tate activities

Control of Dumping of Wastes and other materials at sea T h e D ep artm en t adm inisters the Environment Protection (Sea Dumping) Act

1981, which was proclaim ed in M arch 1984 to im plem ent the obligations which A ustralia w ould assum e as a party to the C onvention on the Prevention o f

M arine Pollution by D um ping o f W astes a n d o th er M a tte r— the L ondon D um ping C onvention.

H aving signed the C onvention in 1973, A ustralia lodged instrum ents o f ratification in A ugust 1985. T h e A ustralian delegation to the ninth consultative m eeting o f contracting

parties was led by the D eputy Secretary. At this m eeting A ustralia’s delegation played a significant p a rt in the adoption o f a resolution indefinitely extending

the c u rre n t m oratorium on d u m p in g at sea o f radioactive waste.

In O ctober 1985 th e M inister an ­ nounced the G o v ern m en t’s decision to legislate to prohibit the d u m p in g of radioactive waste at sea by am en d m en t o f the Sea D um ping Act. By this m eans th e G overnm ent no t only gave practical effect to the position it had m aintained

at the L ondon D um ping C onvention m eeting but also com plied with the ban on sea d u m p in g o f radioactive waste

a n d o th er m aterial in th e S outh Pacific N uclear Free Zone T reaty, signed by the Prim e M inister at R arotonga in A ugust 1985. ^

57

A m ending legislation was introduced in to th e H o u se ul R ep iesen lalix es in May 1986.

T he legislation, as am ended, will also serve to im p le m e n t o b lig atio n s whit li Wish.ill.i w ould assu m e w ere n to becom e party to the proposed i o n v c n tio n lo r th e I’ro iei lion ot th e

N atu ral R eso u rces a n d E n v iro n m e n t < >I the South Pacific Region. T he I ii pat m u in was involved w ith o th e i ag< n< ies in th e d e v e lo p m e n t i il A ustralia’s position in negotiations

leading to finalisation o f the proposed ( «'mention.

D uring the year a num ber o f : applications for permits under the Sea I lu m p in g A i: w ere ie< eived. P erm its issued a re listed in A p p e n d ix 21. I h e re was in< t eased in terest in s r . i d u m p in g as ■ in a v e n u e fo r dispr>sing in ban d e m o litio n m aterials, espet iallv in tlie w aters oil S u llie s.

Marine Quality Assessment Program T h e M arine Q uality A ssessm ent P ro g ram ’s pu rp o se is to fu rth e r the developm ent o f a

national m arine pollution m onitoring system. D uring the year consultant studies were com pleted on techniques for m onitoring trends in concentrations of contam inants in the m arine environm ent.

On-Scene Spill Model (OSSM) OSSM is a com puter-based m odelling program designed to predict m ovem ent of oil spilled at sea. It was developed by the

US N ational Oceanic and A tm ospheric A dm inistration (NOAA) and has been m odified for use in A ustralia as a com ponent o f the N ational Plan to C om bat

Pollution o f the Sea By Oil.

1 he D epartm ent m aintains OSSM on the CSIRO 845 co m p u ter w here it is accessible to operators in State authorities. Possible fu tu re arran g em en ts were review ed late in the year.

T h e D e p artm en t was re p resen te d on the M aritim e Services Advisory C om m ittee — M arine P ollution (MSAC-MP), which provides scientific advice to the C om m onw ealth D ep artm en t o f T ra n sp o rt on pollution o f the sea by oil and o th er ship-sourced substances.

T h e D ep artm en t participated in and provided S ecretariat su p p o rt for the A EC ’s M arine a n d In lan d W aters Advisory

C om m ittee (MIW AC), which reviews and reports u p o n environm ental pressures which may affect m arine, estuarine and inland waters. A rep o rt by MIW AC describing results o f investigations into

n u trie n t rem oval at sewerage treatm en t plants in A ustralia was en dorsed by AEG for publication.

Hazardous Wastes M anagem ent a n d disposal o f hazardous wastes is one o f the most im p o rtan t environm ental policy issues in A ustralia today.

W hen it m et in May 1985, the AEG endorsed the M inister’s proposal for a program o f national consultations on hazardous waste m anagem ent. This initiative reflected an appreciation that public concerns over siting o f disposal facilities an d waste m anagem ent practices generally were an essential factor to be addressed if solutions were to be found.

As part o f this national consultative process, in S eptem ber 1985 the AEC circulated a discussion p ap e r on disposal of intractable organochlorine wastes. W ith cu rren t technology these wastes can be destroyed effectively only by incineration in specialised facilities capable o f o perating at very high tem peratures. T h e absence of such a facility in A ustralia is a critical deficiency in the overall netw ork of facilities for disposal o f hazardous wastes.

Subsequently a national conference on m anaging hazardous wastes was held in M elbourne in N ovem ber 1985 u n d e r the sponsorship o f the D epartm ent, the M elbourne and M etropolitan B oard o f Works and the Victorian E nvironm ent

C om m onw ealth-S tate A ctivities

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Protection A uthority. T h re e h u n d re d representatives o f g o v ern m en t bodies, industry an d conservation groups attended. T h e op en in g address was given by the M inister. T h e conference provided an excellent o p p o rtu n ity for inform ation exchange a n d for identification o f key

issues.

In J u n e 1986, p rep arato ry to the AEG m eeting, th e M inister convened a m eeting of State authorities, industry a n d the conservation m ovem ent to fu rth e r consider national aspects o f hazardous

waste m anagem ent, particulary prospects for establishm ent in A ustralia o f a high- tem p eratu re waste incinerator.

At the m eeting o f the AEG in J u n e 1986, national guidelines for th e m an ag em en t of hazardous wastes w ere endorsed, covering such aspects as a com m on ap p ro ach to classification o f hazardous wastes, a

national m anifest system to track the m ovem ent o f wastes from the point o f generation to disposal, an d controls on m ovem ent o f wastes betw een A ustralia and o th er countries. T hese guidelines were developed by a H azardous Industrial

Wastes W orking G roup (which reports to AEC’s Advisory C om m ittee on Chem icals in the E nvironm ent) com prising

representatives o f C om m onw ealth and State an d T errito ry authorities responsible for environm ental protection an d waste disposal.

T h e D e p artm en t co ntinued to participate in international activities on hazardous waste m anagem ent. T h e D e p artm en t initiated p rocedures for consultation with

State an d T errito ry G overnm ents on the m atter o f A ustralia becom ing party to a 1984 OECD Decision on tran sfro n tier m ovem ent o f hazardous wastes. An officer of the D ep artm en t visited W ashington DC,

USA, in M arch 1986 to atten d a m eeting of the O EC D ’s W aste M anagem ent Policy G roup and to have discussions.

Solid Wastes T h e D ep artm en t chaired an d provided secretariat su p p o rt for the A EC ’s Waste an d R esources Advisory C om m ittee

(WRAC).

T h e resources o f the AEC fu n d allowed studies to be u n d erta k en on:

— the p ro cu rem en t o f p a p e r by governm ent and p a p e r recycling; — the effect o f gov ern m en t policies on recycling in general; and — the use o f waste p a p e r in the

prod u ctio n o f new sprint.

T h ese studies will provide a basis for the fu rth e r developm ent o f policies on waste m anagem ent an d recycling.

Nuclear Codes U n d e r the Environment Protection (Nuclear Codes) Act 1978, the M inister is responsible for developm ent o f u n ifo rm codes of

practice to protect people an d the en vironm ent from possible harm ful effects arising from nuclear activity in Australia. T h e C om m onw ealth/State Consultative

C om m ittee on N uclear Codes o f Practice co-ordinates this work.

T h e th ree Codes which have previously been p ro m u lg ated u n d e r the Act are kept u n d e r review to en su re th at they in corporate cu rren t philosophy and

standards. D uring the year the Code of Practice on Radiation Protection in the M ining and M illing of Radioactive Ores 1980 was reviewed in the light o f recent studies by

the In tern atio n al C om m ission on Radiological Protection an d experience gained in radiological protection practices, an d a d ra ft revised code was p re p are d for

fu rth e r consideration. Sim ultaneously a review o f the Code of Practice for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Substances 1982 was com m enced, taking into account new

regulations published by the International Atom ic E nergy Agency.

D uring 1985— 86 work co ntinued on d raftin g o f guidelines to the Codes covering:­ — decom m issioning an d rehabilitating

uran iu m m ines, mills an d waste disposal sites; — storage an d packaging o f uran iu m ores;

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— design an d operation o f h ea p leach piles; — m an ag em en t o f airborne em issions; — determ ination o f limits fo r radioactive

discharges a n d emissions; — radiation protection a n d waste disposal in the m ineral sands industry; and - in situ leaching (revised guideline).

W ork com m enced in 1985— 86 on d rafting a guideline on com pliance with radiation protection standards.

Environment Protection (Alligator Rivers) Region Act 1978 T h e Division is responsible for the D ep artm en t’s liaison role in relation to the Office o f the Supervising Scientist, established by the Environment Protection (Alligator Rivers Region) Act 1978.

T h e D epartm ent m aintained close links with the Supervising Scientist fo r the A lligator Rivers Region an d was represented on the C oordinating C om m ittee for the A lligator Rivers Region, which m akes recom m endations to the Supervising Scientist reg ard in g research and m onitoring program s, standards and

the im plem entation o f environm ental requirem ents.

Australian Ionising Radiation Advisory Council (AIRAC) A1RAC advises th e G overnm ent on the effects o f the existing and potential sources of ionising radiation exposure on the A ustralian population an d environm ent. T h e m em bership o f AIRAC is

representative o f a range o f disciplines ap p ro p riate to the C ouncil’s term s of reference. M em bers are a p p o in ted on the basis of this professional expertise. T h e Secretariat is provided by the D epartm ent.

D uring the year AIRAC p re p a re d a subm ission to the Royal Com m ission into British nuclear tests in A ustralia and several m em bers gave evidence before the

Royal Com mission.

In April 1986 AIRAC visited the Olym pic Dam (Roxby Downs) m ine. M em bers were briefed on the proposed arran g em en ts for the m ining an d m illing o f the ores and inspected u n d e rg ro u n d w orking

conditions, the ventilation system and o th e r aspects o f the m ine’s operations.

O th e r m atters considered by AIRAC in 1985— 86 included:

— operational arran g em en ts and radiation m onitoring procedures for visits by nuclear pow ered w arships;

— nuclear codes and guidelines; and — assessm ent o f health risk attributable to ionising radiation.

T h e m em bership o f AIRAC in 1985— 86 is listed in A ppendix 25. T h e C hairm an, E m eritus Professor A M Clark, retired from AIRAC on 30 J u n e 1986, having served on the C ouncil since 1974.

E nvironm ent C o-ordination T h e E nvironm ent C o-ordination B ranch provides advice, develops policies and arran g em en ts, provides secretariat support an d generally assists in environm ental collaboration with the States and T erritories, particularly th ro u g h the A ustralian E nvironm ent C ouncil (AEC) an d the Council o f N atu re C onservation

M inisters (CONCOM ). T h e B ranch also provides a link with non-governm ent environm ent organisations and international en vironm ent agencies.

International Environmental Organisations T h e D ep artm en t contributes to international environm ental activities

principally th ro u g h the U nited Nations E nvironm ent C om m ittee (UN EP), the OECD E nvironm ent C om m ittee and the International U nion for C onservation of N atu re an d N atural Resources (IUCN ).

U N EP was established in 1973, after the Stockholm C onference on the H um an E nvironm ent, in response to the need for the im plem entation o f effective international m easures to safeguard and enhance the environm ent. A ustralia held a seat on the G overning C ouncil o f U N EP in

1985— 86. As th ere was no m eeting o f the C ouncil d u rin g the year because o f the new biennial p attern o f Sessions, liaison with U N EP headquarters in N airobi was

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maintained particularly th ro u g h the Australian H igh C om m ission to Kenya. Officers o f th e D ep artm en t also participated in several activities o f the UNEP R egional Office fo r Asia an d the Pacific in Bangkok.

The Secretary o f the D epartm ent, represented A ustralia at the m eeting o f the Environm ent C om m ittee o f the OECD

held in A pril 1986, w hen a new ad hoc group on n atu ra l resources m anagem ent was form ally established. A ustralia had played the central role in the developm ent of this initiative.

Grants to Voluntary Conservation Organisations The D e p artm en t adm inisters this grants program , the m ain p u rpose o f which is to

provide funds to assist voluntary conservation organisations with adm inistrative costs. T h e program recognises conservation organisations’ role

in raising com m unity aw areness of environm ental issues a n d contributing to the developm ent o f effective environm ental policies. In 1985— 86

$945,000 was allocated to the program , representing an increase o f 270% since 1982— 83. O rganisations for which grants were ap p ro v ed in 1985— 86 are listed in A ppendix 26.

Australian Environment Council T he m em bers o f the A ustralian E nvironm ent C ouncil (AEG) are the C om m onw ealth, State an d T errito ry

Ministers responsible fo r th e environm ent. T he C ouncil provides a m echanism for inter-governm ent co-operation and consultation on a wide ran g e of

environm ent m atters. M em bership o f the Council d u rin g 1985— 86 is listed in A ppendix 27.

T h e C ouncil is su p p o rted by a S tanding C om m ittee o f senior C om m onw ealth, State and T errito ry officials, which in tu rn is advised by the following specialist com m ittees:

— Advisory C om m ittee on Air Quality — Advisory C om m ittee on Chem icals in the E nvironm ent

— Advisory C om m ittee on Vehicle Em issions and Noise — Advisory C om m ittee on E nvironm ental Resources — M arine and In lan d W aters Advisory

C om m ittee — E nvironm ental Noise C ontrol C om m ittee — W aste and Resources Advisory

C om m ittee — E nvironm ental Econom ics Network, and — Coastal M anagem ent Liaison Network.

T h e AEC m aintains a tru st fu n d to sup p o rt environm ental research an d o th er special activities relating to th e C ouncil’s work. S ecretariat for the C ouncil an d its S tanding C om m ittee is provided from within

E nvironm ent C o-ordination B ranch.

C ouncil m et in A delaide in J u n e 1986. AEC, C O N C O M an d P lanning Ministers subsequently held a jo in t sem inar on land d egradation an d heritage issues.

Activities o f AEC d u rin g 1985— 86 included:

— publication, in conjunction with the N ational H ealth an d Medical Research Council, o f national guidelines for the m onitoring and control o f emissions o f air pollutants in the environm ent; — distribution o f a discussion p ap e r on

fu tu re noise control strategy, suggesting a progressive an d effective ap p ro ach to efforts to red u ce the environm ental im pacts o f m otor vehicles; — distribution o f a re p o rt on the scope o f

the urb an solid waste problem in A ustralia, identifying possible future directions for the reduction o f waste at source and increased m aterials

recycling; and — establishm ent o f the Advisory C om m ittee on E nvironm ental Resources to advise on bro ad er

environm ental policy an d natural resource and heritage issues.

Council of Nature Conservation Ministers T h e Council o f N ature C onservation M inisters (CONCOM ) com prises the

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C om m onw ealth, State an d Territory M inisters responsible for wildlife conservation an d national parks. M em bers are listed in A ppendix 28.

The C ouncil is su p p o rted by a standing com m ittee o f senior C om m onw ealth, State and T errito ry officials which has established w orking groups on the

following topics:

— m anagem ent o f national parks — kangaroo m anagem ent — staff training and developm ent — international agreem ents relating to

m igratory an d w etland birds — en d a n g ere d fauna — en d a n g ere d flora — com m unity education an d

interp retatio n — bitou bush/boneseed control — fire m anagem ent an d suppression C ouncil m et in A delaide in June 1986.

M ajor m atters considered or ag reed to by CO N CO M d u rin g 1985-86 included:

— legal m eans to control the possession a n d m ovem ent o f protected and m anaged fauna;

— national policies for the reservation and m anagem ent o f wilderness areas; — research into the control o f cane toads in n o rth ern A ustralia; — concession m anagem ent in national

parks;

— principles for the selection and m anagem ent o f m arine a n d estuarine protected areas; — control o f weeds in national parks; — kangaroo m anagem ent issues; — a program o f technical w orkshops on

n atu re conservation topics.

Environmental Education E nvironm ental Education and inform ation activities are conducted by all environm ental elem ents o f the portfolio, but particularly th ro u g h the E nvironm ental Education Section which was established in 1983. O ne o f the prim e functions o f the Section is to develop com m unity aw areness o f an d participation in the preservation o f the environm ent for sustainable developm ent.

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A lthough providing environm ental education a n d inform ation is prim arily a State an d T errito ry concern, the C om m onw ealth has a responsibility for national co-ordination an d international links. T h e Section provides the secretariat for the m ain C om m onw ealth/State co­ o rdinating body, the E nvironm ental Education an d Inform ation C om m ittee established by the AEC. W orld E nvironm ent Dav which is celebrated on 5 June, took the them e ‘W etlands are not ju s t for the birds’.

D uring the year the Section pro d u ced a com m unity service television an n o u n cem en t, a p am p h let a n d posters on w etlands, em phasising th eir value to the com m unity an d the need for their care by­ w etland users. T h e m aterial was developed in consultation with the AEC C om m ittee an d distributed nationally to schools, en vironm ent centres, libraries and governm ent agencies.

U n d e r the W orld E nvironm ent Day Youth A ward Schem e, five aw ards o f $500 were m ade to young people in recognition of the contribution they had m ade towards a b etter environm ent. T hese projects are listed at A ppendix 29.

T h e second national environm ental education sem inar was arran g e d by the Section and held in F ebruary 1986. T h e them e o f the sem inar was ‘Strategies for C om m unity E ducators’. M ore than 100 participants from all States a n d T erritories a n d New Zealand discussed and developed strategies and skills required for successful com m unity environm ental education

program s.

Ecofile, a quarterly new sletter which provides cu rren t inform ation on issues and events an d com plem ents o th er C om m onw ealth environm ental

publications, was produced an d distributed widely to governm ent bodies, m em bers o f Parliam ent, schools and industry and com m unity groups.

T h e Section also produced inform ation m aterials on unleaded petrol for national distribution.

Corporate and Portfolio Support

Corporate and Portfolio Support

T he C o rp o rate and Portfolio S upport Division was created d u rin g the year to better reflect the D e p artm en t’s role in the G overnm ent’s ap p ro ach to portfolio

m anagem ent.

T he Division provides resource analysis and m onitoring capacity fo r the M inister across the portfolio; brings to g eth er the functions o f legal advice and

Parliam entary/M inisterial su p p o rt services; provides m an ag em en t su p p o rt including personnel, financial services an d ADP; oversees staff developm ent and initiatives related to equal em ploym ent opportunity and occupational health and safety;

provides secretariat services to th e newly established D epartm ental C ouncil and o th er consultative bodies; a n d brings together those functions related to

econom ics and statistical research and the activities related to library services and public inform ation.

T h e Division consists of:

• Portfolio S u p p o rt B ranch — R esource B udgeting Section — Legal Services Section — P arliam entary a n d Liaison Section • C o rp o rate Services B ranch

— P ersonnel and M anagem ent Review Section — G eneral Services Section — ADP Section • R esearch an d In fo rm atio n Branch

— Econom ics Section — Statistics Section — Projects Pool — Inform ation Section

— Library Section

P ortfolio Support T h e Portfolio S u p p o rt B ranch was created to m aintain g reater liaison and coordination betw een th e D ep artm en t and agencies w ithin the portfolio while

providing timely a n d accurate inform ation to senior m an ag em en t a n d the G overnm ent.

T h e th ree sections o f th e B ranch an d th eir responsibilies are:

• R esource B udgeting — responsible for the m onitoring an d control o f resources to ensure th at both financial a n d hu m an resources are allocated in the m ost equitable and effective m an n er in accordance with the G ov ern m en t’s objectives across the portfolio.

• Legal Services — responsible for providing advice on th e m any and diverse questions arising o u t o f the D e p artm en t’s adm inistration of

legislation and its legal obligations. • P arliam entary an d Liaison — responsible for en su rin g that the portfolio m eets its obligations to the M inister, C abinet and

the P arliam ent an d for coordination and liaision activities generally at portfolio level.

Financial Management Improvement Program T h e G overnm ent d eterm in e d in its policy p a p e r on B u d g et reform o f April

1984 th a t the Financial M anagem ent Im provem ent P rogram would lx: a key step to en su rin g th at the public gets value fo r its m oney t h ro u g h the services

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provided by G overnm ent agencies. T h e D epartm ent has responded to the G overnm ent's initiative in a variety o f ways including the re stru ctu rin g ,

m entioned elsew here. H ow ever the pu rp o se o f the Financial M anagem ent Im provem ent P rogram requires m uch m ore from the D ep artm en t th an simply a re a rra n g e m e n t o f functions. Program

budgeting is an integral part o f the program .

While th ere have been criticisms o f Program B udgeting, the objective o f m aking tran sp a ren t the aims an d results o f G overnm ent ex p e n d itu re on particular program s can only be applauded.

A m ajor challenge to the D e p artm en t in m oving to program bud g etin g is the existence in th e portfolio o f a n u m b er o f statutory authorities. T h e legislative arran g em en ts u n d e r which these

authorities op erate limit, to som e extent, the draw ing o f com prehensive program boundaries an d the move to satisfactory program budgeting on a functional basis. T h e result will likely be a hybrid o f

functional and institutional arrangem ents. A question for the fu tu re may well be w h eth er G overnm ent

financial p ro g ram in g is to reflect m ore closely, o r lead to changes in, the roles an d functions o f the m any institutions within the portfolio.

T h e D ep artm en t o f Finance an d the Public Service B oard have initiated sem inars and training aim ed at m aking the m anagers m ore cost-conscious and

m anagem ent m ore effective.

T h e D epartm ent, with the assistance of officers from the D ep artm en t o f Finance and the Public Service B oard, bas conducted a n u m b er o f co-operative sem inars with the portfolio agencies aim ed at facilitating both the general

Financial M anagem ent Im provem ent Program and o f having in place Program B udgeting in tim e fo r the Budget o f 1987-88. At present this process is well on target.

Resource Budgeting T h e R esource B udgeting Section is prim arily responsible fo r en su rin g th at the portfolio obtains and properly m anages the financial an d hum an resources necessary to carry out G overnm ent policies an d objectives. D uring the year, the Section co-ordinated the establishm ent o f a

P rogram B udgeting stru ctu re fo r the portfolio.

Details o f the D e p artm en t’s receipts and ex p e n d itu re for 1985— 86 are provided later in this R eport.

Parliamentary and Liaison T h e P arliam entary an d Liaison Section was form ed th ro u g h the am algam ation o f the C oordination an d Projects and P arliam entary Services Sections.

T h e new Section com bines th ree m ain areas o f responsibility:

— C abinet, P arliam entary a n d M inisterial Liaison — M inisterial C orrespondence — Portfolio C oordination an d Liaison

O ne early outcom e has been the introduction o f stream lined procedures for handling M inisterial correspondence.

1985— 86 saw a continuing high level of M inisterial correspondence. A total o f 18 217 letters w ere received. O f these 9204 item s related to ‘w rite-in’ cam paigns. T he m ost com m on topics were:

— R ainforest conservation; — W oodchip industry; — Protection o f native fauna; — Incidental dolphin catch; — W orld H eritage listings; — Proposed toxic waste incinerator; — H azardous chemicals/waste

m anagem ent; — Arts funding; — A pplications for 10BA film certificates.

D uring the year the Section assisted in the processing o f 378 C abinet Submissions, M em oranda an d Decisions. O th e r activities involved processing 143 responses to parliam entary questions on notice, 91 for the H ouse o f R epresentatives and 52 for the Senate.

A feature o f the questions on notice asked during 1985— 86 was the n u m b e r seeking detailed inform ation from all areas o f the portfolio. T h e re w ere 28 such questions and p re p a rin g responses to them becam e an increasing p ro p o rtio n o f the Section’s coordination responsibilities. O th e r coordination activities included

preparation o f portfolio subm issions for parliam entary and o th er com m ittees of inquiry, provision o f advice to the M inister and Secretary w here a portfolio perspective was req u ired a n d a variety o f tasks involving consultation with the statutory a n d o th er bodies in the portfolio.

Legal Services With o th er D epartm ents, particularly the A ttorney-G eneral’s D e p artm en t a n d the Office o f th e Parliam entary C ounsel, this Section plays a vital role in the developm ent an d effective adm inistration of portfolio legislation in conjunction with the policy divisions. In particular, in the developm ent o f legislation, it is responsible

for en su rin g effective liaison betw een policy areas o f the D e p artm en t a n d the Statutory A uthorities within th e portfolio. T h e Section also oversees the legislative program for the D epartm ent. It played a m ajor p art in the developm ent a n d the passage of the Protection of Movable Cultural Heritage Act 1986.

Significant policy concerns in the developm ent o f such legislation are the rights o f the individual in contrast to those o f the state, the effectiveness o f fines as a d e te rre n t to breaches o f th e law, as well as

the general cost to the public purse of adm inistering such legislation.

Freedom of Information T h e Section deals with requests m ade u n d e r the Freedom o f Inform ation Act. 60% o f such requests concerned

environm ental issues such as woodchips, whales a n d dolphins an d 25% concerned arts and heritage m atters, such as films and tax incentives for the arts. Details of

requests received and action taken by the D e p artm en t are at A ppendix 30.

T h e m ain categories o f applicants were individuals 26%, conservation organisations 35%, journalists 14%, M em bers o f P arliam ent 5% an d others

20%.

T h e re w ere no com plaints to the O m b u d sm an concerning the D e p artm en t’s handling o f FO I requests an d no internal reviews o f decisions to refuse access to

docum ents were recorded. Two requests for internal review o f charges im posed by the D ep artm en t were received d u rin g the

year, as was one request for rem ission of charges. O n each occasion the D epartm ent declined to reverse its original decision.

Administrative Appeals Tribunal In re Angel and the Department of Arts, Heritage and Environment, the A A T affirm ed the D e p artm en t’s decision to

refuse access to 27 docum ents that o riginated with the T asm an ian G overnm ent. T h e D e p artm en t had agreed to su p p o rt T asm an ia’s objections to release on the grounds o f dam age to

C om m onw ealth/State relations.

In re Fund for Animals and the Minister of State fo r Arts, Heritage and Environment, the A A T set aside the M inister’s decision to approve the 1985 kangaroo m anagem ent

program u n d e r section 10(i) o f the Wildlife Protection (Regulation of Exports and Imports) Act 1982.

T h e case involved the first review by the A A T o f the C om m onw ealth’s wildlife protection legislation.

Judicial Review Act T h e D epartm ent received five requests for statem ents o f reasons u n d e r section 13 o f th e Administrative Decisions (Judicial Review) Act 1977. T h e requests concerned

decisions m ade on personnel m atters such as non-selection for interview or prom otion to particular positions. T h e average response tim e for these requests

was 14.2 days.

Ombudsman T h e C om m onw ealth O m budsm an investigated one com plaint from a m em ber o f the public, about the cataloguing o f a

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publication.lt was dealt with on an inform al basis.

Corporate Services T h e C orporate Services B ranch brings together those elem ents w hich service the internal operations o f the D e p artm en t —

personnel, review o f m an ag em en t’s personnel m onitoring an d policy initiatives, the supply o f adm inistrative and office services, an d the provision o f ADP

facilities an d services to all areas o f the D epartm ent.

T h e B ranch has com e u n d e r increasing pressure over recent times as the m ajor public service reform s re q u irin g g reater public accountability, the in troduction of reform s in personnel practice, such as equal em ploym ent o p p o rtu n ity an d the grow th o f industrial dem ocracy practices and o th er initiatives in the m anagem ent area, have highlighted the n eed for sound

internal m anagem ent policies a n d practices. T hese are obviously im p o rtan t contem porary issues bu t they require staff to deal with them at least in the im plem entation stage.

Personnel and Management Review This Section has responsibility for providing the full range o f personnel services to the D epartm ent, a n d selected services to the following portfolio bodies and outriders:

• A ustralian H eritage Com m ission • A ustralian N ational Botanic G ardens • A ustralian National Parks an d Wildlife Service

• National Film an d Sound Archive • National M useum o f Australia • Office o f the Supervising Scientist

Management Review 1 he M anagem ent Review Cell is responsible for the preparation o f salary estim ates, m onitoring o f average staffing

levels, and salary ex penditure an d providing advice to senior m anagem ent on the whole range o f hum an resource budgeting m atters.

Records and statistical data are also m aintained o r p re p are d in relation to the

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organisational structure. It is envisaged th at the m ajority o f the above processes will be able to be tran sferre d to an ADP system d u rin g the course o f the next financial year.

D uring the year the M anagem ent Review Cell was engaged in several m ajor projects:

• T h e D epartm ental stru ctu re was reviewed an d a new stru ctu re im plem ented in O ctober 1985. This involved detailed consultation with staff, unions an d co-ordinating agencies. • As a result o f a governm ent decision the

A ustralian N ational M aritim e M useum (NMM) was set u p in Sydney. S taff o f the cell w ere heavily involved in the creation o f positions an d in the provision o f advice to officers o f the NMM. • Staff o f the M anagem ent Review Cell

w ere involved in lengthy negotiations concerning tran sfer o f establishm ent, staff an d assets, following the A dm inistrative A rrangem ents O rd e r o f

13 D ecem ber 1985, which tran sferred responsibility for the A ustralian National Botanic G ardens an d the A C T National Memorials Ordinance 1928 to the

D ep artm en t from the D e p artm en t o f T erritories. T his process was largely com pleted in M arch 1986. • D uring 1985— 86, 57 contracts for the

en g ag em en t o f external consultants to the value o f $467,220 w ere approved. T h ese were m onitored by the Cell an d advice concerning them was given to line areas as required.

Personnel and Recruitment T h e P ersonnel an d R ecruitm ent Sub­ section is responsible for the paym ent of salaries an d allowances, adm inistration o f conditions o f service m atters, and m aintenance o f em ploym ent history records for the D epartm ent an d several Statutory A uthorities within the Portfolio. In addition the sub-section undertakes recruitm ent a n d com pensation activities. D uring the year the nu m b er o f staff serviced by the sub-section increased by over 120 persons including the staff o f the A ustralian N ational Botanic G ardens. As at

3 0 Ju n e 1986, 864 staff an d em ployees were paid by the sub-section including those engaged u n d e r various CEP program s.

A sharp increase in the incidence o f com pensation claims a n d associated m atters, m ainly RSI related, necessitated a

rearran g em en t o f duties within existing staff resources. T h e overall grow th o f the sub-section’s activities, including new and complex conditions o f em ploym ent and procedural m atters arising from legislative changes requires the sub-section to m aintain a high quality o f overall service to staff and m anagem ent. D espite this and the scarcity o f trained personnel staff th ro u g h o u t the service, the D epartm ent has been successful in recruiting and retaining experienced people to carry out this function.

T h e D ep artm en t has engaged a n u m b er of people u n d e r training program s such as the T ra in in g for A boriginals (TAP) and C om m unity E m ploym ent P rogram (CEP). A n u m b er o f staff have participated in the com prehensive training courses conducted

u n d e r the auspices o f the P ersonnel O perations Program . In addition, senior leaders have been provided to conduct courses u n d e r the program .

A d eterm in e d effort has been m ade to reduce the incidence o f officers acting on higher d uties for significant periods. It is expected th a t th ere will be a dram atic

im provem ent in this situation early next financial year.

Working Policies and Development T h e W orking Policies a n d D evelopm ent U nit was set u p following the D epartm ental re-organisation in O ctober

1985. B roadly, the u n it has responsibility for im plem enting APS reform s an d has carriage o f • Staff D evelopm ent an d T ra in in g • In d u strial Democracy • O ccupational H ealth a n d Safety • Equal E m ploym ent o p p o rtu n ity

• W om en’s B udget P rogram

Staff Development and Training T h e D e p artm en t’s S taff D evelopm ent and T ra in in g (SD & T) activities have been

o p eratin g u n d e r considerable resource constraints over the last few years. In mid 1985 the W orking Policies and D evelopm ent (WP & D) U nit developed a

strategy for training an d staff developm ent activities to m eet D epartm ental needs.

T h e D epartm ent has also participated in train in g activities in a co-operative arran g e m e n t with o th e r C anberra-based portfolio bodies.

Industrial Democracy T h e D ep artm en t has for some time fostered the developm ent o f jo in t staff union a n d m anagem ent consultative fora.

A jo in t Staff D evelopm ent and Equal E m ploym ent O p p o rtu n ity (SD & EEO) C om m ittee has been established since May 1984, an d the O ccupational H ealth and Safety C om m ittee since late 1984. It was w ithin this context th at the Industrial

Dem ocracy Plan was form ulated and subm itted to the Public Service B oard on 1 O ctober 1985, as prescribed by legislation. T h e principal aim o f the D e p artm en t’s

industrial dem ocracy plan is to im prove the efficiency and effectiveness o f the organisation and to im prove th e quality o f w orking life th ro u g h consultation betw een

staff and m anagers an d the developm ent o f participative practices in the workplace. T h e plan called for the setting u p o f a D epartm ental Council. T h e Council is

chaired by the D eputy Secretary and com prises equal num bers o f M anagem ent a n d Staff union representatives. It met initially in D ecem ber 1985 an d has m et

twice since th at time. M ajor subjects dealt with by the C ouncil include:

• A M em orandum o f U nderstanding governing the conduct o f Council • S taff B udgeting • FM IP & P rogram B udgeting • G uidelines on form al m echanism s for

consultation • D epartm ental accom m odation • P erm an en t part-tim e work

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T h e C ouncil has set up a sub-com m ittee to address the accom m odation needs o f the D epartm ent.

Occupational Health and Safety (OHS) fh e O ccupational H ealth an d Safety C om m ittee provides a forum for jo in t consultation betw een m anagem ent and staff associations on a wide ran g e o f health and safety m atters relating to work organisation an d the working environm ent.

I he O H S policies and program s developed th ro u g h o u t the year have focused on the recognition an d prevention o f hazards and the prom otion o f health in die workplace.

T his year has seen the developm ent of:

• An O H S Policy • Policy prom oting a sm oke-free work environm ent • Fire Safety an d Fire W arden training • Em ergency evacuation procedures

O th er m atters considered by the C om m ittee include the introduction o f office autom ation an d related health and safety issues, stress m anagem ent, accom m odation including a ir­ conditioning, fu rn itu re and fittings and contact with a ran g e o f O H S agencies.

fh e im plem entation o f the RSI Prevention and R ehabilitation program has proved successful in containing the previously escalating RSI problem .

Table 1 Number of RSI cases reported January 1983 to June 1986

Year Number of RSI cases

1983 3

1984 32

1985 22

1986 (6 months) 5

TOTAL 62

Table 2 Rehabilitation position of Officers with RSI as at June 1986

Rehabilitation position No of RSI

affected Officers

Fully rehabilitated in keyboard/clerical positions 44

O ff work, maternity leave, study leave, LWOP etc ■ 6

O ff work RSI/Compensation Leave 12

TO TA L 62

Inform ation about developm ent and im plem entation o f all O H S policies and program s is circulated to all staff for inform ation an d com m ent th ro u g h the d ep artm en tal circular, Update.

Equal Employment Opportunities T h e D ep artm en t subm itted its EEO Program to the Public Service B oard on 1 O ctober 1985. T h e P rogram m ade

provision for wom en, people with disabilities, A boriginals an d m igrants from non-English speaking backgrounds an d is being im plem ented progressively.

D uring the year, the W P & D Unit conducted a survey o f recru itm en t rates o f males and fem ales in the D epartm ent. T he results o f the Survey showed th at wom en com prised 37% o f applicants for jobs advertised a n d filled in the D ep artm en t betw een A ugust 1984 an d D ecem ber 1985. W om en were sucessful in obtain in g jo b s in 49.7% o f cases. T h e WP & D U nit is continuing to m onitor the recru itm en t rate and this data will be added to inform ation gained th ro u g h the service-wide EEO Survey to be held in A ugust 1986.

Aspects o f the D epartm ents EEO Program relating to education and training have provided the o th e r m ajor focus for EEO activities this year, the EEO C o-ordinator conducted aw areness-raising sessions th ro u g h o u t the D epartm ent and a num ber o f specific courses aim ed at w om en and m em bers o f designated groups have been held.

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The Women’s Unit T h e W om en’s U nit consults with senior m anagem ent in the D ep artm en t and with

other d ep a rtm en tal areas and organisations within the portfolio on the impact on w om en o f all on-going a n d new policy proposals and activities. As o ne o f its

first activities, the U nit organised a com prehensive review o f the D e p artm en t’s program s an d activities in relation to women in conjunction with the

D epartm ent’s SD & EEO.

The U nit m aintains close links with the Office o f the Status o f W om en (OSW) in the D ep artm en t o f the Prim e M inister and Cabinet a n d contributed to the W om en’s Budget P rogram , an assessm ent o f the impact on w om en o f the 1985— 86 B udget com piled by the OSW.

General Services T he G eneral Services Section provides the com m on su p p o rt services o f accounting, purchasing, travel, p roperty/ accom m odation security, office services,

keyboard an d records m an ag em en t to the D epartm ent a n d o th er bodies in the portfolio.

A lthough the Section experienced high workloads d u rin g the year it was able to rem ain responsive partly because o f the introduction o f im proved m ethods and systems with new Office A utom ation equipm ent this year.

ADP T h e ADP Section is responsible for the general developm ent o f com puter-based services within the D e p artm en t except for

the A ustralian Archives a n d the N ational Film an d S ound Archive.

Some ADP personnel are also allocated perm anently to specialist areas within the D epartm ent.

T h e broad objectives a n d strategies for ADP are to: • m aintain existing projects d e p e n d e n t on ADP;

• increase efficiency th ro u g h the ap p ro p riate introduction o f new ADP applications; • im prove the quality an d tim eliness o f the

D e p artm en t’s o u tp u t; • provide technical advice on ADP m atters.

T h e D epartm ental co m puting netw ork encom passes five sites in C anberra (including the M inister’s Office) and three in Sydney. A ‘gatew ay’ also exists, linking the netw ork with the CSIRO national co m puting netw ork (C SIR O N ET). P lanning is also underw ay to link the new ly-installed office autom ation netw ork this year.

C entralised or large ADP systems are accom m odated on both the D ep artm en ts’ AWA Sequel m inicom puter an d on C SIR O N E T . T his year, several

C SIR O N E T -based systems were successfully converted to ru n on o th er com puters, with the w ithdraw al o f the CYBER-76 service on th at netw ork. Use of

the Pick o p eratin g system has proved of great benefit to the D ep artm en t, in conjunction with the fo u rth generation language ‘ALL’ an d the generalised

enquiry language ‘E N G L IS H ’ on the Sequel. C urrently, a n u m b er o f significant systems are now in o peration, developed largely over the last th re e years by

D epartm ental staff an d consultants:

— Public Lending R ight system; — E nvironm ental Library System of A ustralia;

— Register o f N ational Estate System; — D epartm ental R ecruitm ent system; — A M inisterial suite o f program s; — A n u m b er o f general adm inistrative

systems; — N ational Air Q uality Data C entre; — Infoterra; — A ustralian Biological Resources Study

databases — the B IO C LIM m odel for predicting species distributions.

T h e activities o f the ADP Section were exam ined by Staff o f the A ustralian A udit Office d u rin g the year. A lthough a ‘generally satisfactory situation’ was rep o rted , it was no ted th at attention would

need to be given to staffing the Section to a level which would enable full docum entation o f all systems and

procedures, and to give m ore attention to risk m anagem ent, contingency planning an d control functions.

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T hese developm ents and issues are addressed m ore fully in the D e p artm en t’s Λ DP Strategic Plan for 1986-87.

Office Automation

In 1985— 86, th e D e p artm en t set o u t to introduce as quickly as possible the basis for a com prehensive but flexible office autom ation system. T h e re w ere two reasons for taking this initiative; o n e was to capitalise o n productivity gains to be

m ade by developing the ‘electronic office* concept, an d the second reason was to try and contain w hat was becom ing a m ajor problem , the grow ing developm ent o f repetitive strain injury in the D epartm ent. 1985­ 86 was an o p p o rtu n e tim e fo r the

D epartm ent to com m ence this process as th ere was an additional n eed to replace aging word processing equipm ent,

A w orking g ro u p com prising line area m anagers, staff union representatives and ADP staff addressed the com plex issues an d m any options available.

Following acceptance o f th eir recom m endations, a netw ork o f twenty seven NGEN m icrocom puters organised into seven clusters was

installed by Sigma Data. Each cluster is self-contained; ra th e r than allocating printers, storage disks an d softw are to in d ep en d e n t m icrocom puters, these resources are shared in com m on within the cluster. T his ap p ro ach both contains costs an d is an aid to m anagem ent,

including training, security, an d back­ up o f the inform ation.

In the first stage o f the project, the word processing pool becam e a cluster. F u rth er clusters are based in o th er keyboard areas, in particular providing w orkstations fo r steno-secretaries. A local area netw ork allows d ocum ents to be exchanged between all w orkstations, including those in o th er buildings. At this stage, basic w ord processing only

has been provided. F u rth er w'ork stations an d m ore advanced office

au to m atio n softw are are being planned for im plem entation in 1986-87 with particular em phasis on providing access to a m anagem ent inform ation system which will su p p o rt the operations o f FM IP, P rogram and H u m an Resource B udgeting.

R esearch and Inform ation In the re-organisation o f the D epartm ent in late 1985, the E nvironm ental Studies B ranch was ren am ed the R esearch and

Inform ation B ranch. It conducts economic an d statistical studies an d analyses, un d ertak es special projects, prep ares reports an d provides advice in su p p o rt o f the policy developm ent, im plem entation and adm inistrative functions o f the

portfolio. It is required to develop and provide inform ation and library services fo r the D e p artm en t and co-operate in relevant activities with State, C om m onw ealth, T erritory and international agencies as ap p ro p riate.

Government Objectives T h e re p o rt Objectives, achievements and priorities in Environment Conservation and

Heritage was published in N ovem ber 1985 an d tabled in the Parliam ent. It listed the m ajor achievem ents o f the G overnm ent since 1983 in protecting a n d conserving

the n atio n ’s n atu ral an d cultural heritage a n d explained the G overnm ent’s objectives, achievem ents an d priorities for m onitoring and enhancing environm ental quality in Australia.

Environment Economics Following the prep aratio n o f two w ritten subm issions, officers o f the D epartm ent took p art in a public hearing o f the Inquiry into Fiscal M easures and the A chievem ent o f E nvironm ental Objectives before the H ouse o f R epresentatives S tanding C om m ittee on E nvironm ent an d C onservation. T h e D ep artm en t arg u ed th at in particular cases certain fiscal m easures had negative im pacts on the achievem ent o f environm ental objectives

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but th at th ere rem ains considerable potential fo r w ell-planned fiscal m easures to have a positive environm ental im pact. Inform ation exchange an d collaboration with State a n d T errito ry governm ent

colleagues co ntinued th ro u g h the activities of the AEC -C O N C O M Econom ics Network. A consultant’s re p o rt, A Study of the Applicability of Cost-Benefit Analysis to Environmental Impact Assessment with Reference to the Proposed Lake Mejum Storage was com pleted as an inform ation docum ent for AEG. T h e N etw ork has

sought fu rth e r funds to p re p a re guidelines for p ro p o n e n ts and governm ent agencies in the application o f econom ic techniques in the environm ental im pact assessm ent

process.

D uring th e year an officer o f the D epartm ent took p art in a twelve m onth exchange with the New Zealand G overnm ent, u n d e r the N areen

A greem ent, to advise th e newly established Ministry o f E nvironm ent on the use of economic analysis for assessing environm ental issues. T his occurred when

the New Zealand G overnm ent was seeking to m ake g re ater use o f m arket-based instrum ents, such as transferable fisheries perm its a n d allocation o f p ro p erty rights,

for achieving effective an d efficient m anagem ent o f th at n atio n ’s natural resources. At the sam e tim e, a new D ep artm en t o f C onservation is being set

up to pro m o te conservation values in the m an ag em en t o f New Z ealand’s natural resources. R ecent progress m ade in New Zealand to develop innovative

environm ental controls th ro u g h the introduction o f econom ic incentives offers valuable precedents in assisting the resolution o f environm ental issues in

Australia.

Land Degradation T h e environm ental costs o f land d egradation continues to be a focus of interest. T h re e papers addressing this

subject w ere p re p are d d u rin g 1985-86. T h e first was presented to a sem inar on L and D egradation an d Public Policy at the

C entre fo r Resource a n d E nvironm ental

Studies, A ustralian N ational University in S eptem ber 1985. T h e o th e r two were p resen ted at the In tern atio n al Drylands C onference an d dealt with the national

a n d international aspects o f the problem respectively.

International Conference on Economics of Dryland Degradation and Rehabilitation D ryland deg rad atio n is a worldwide problem affecting 500 million people an d 4500 million hectares o f land. T h e

problem is particularly acute in Africa and Asia but also o f en o rm o u s an d yet largely unrecognised significance in A ustralia too.

T h e D epartm ent, in conjunction with the A ustralian D evelopm ent Assistance B ureau, the U nited N ations E nvironm ent P rogram , the East-W est C en ter o f Hawaii a n d the C om m onw ealth Secretariat, sponsored

the International D rylands C onference held in C anberra in M arch 1986. O ver 150 delegates atten d ed , rep resen tin g 30 countries and 12 developm ent/aid agencies.

T h e C onference m arked the beginning o f a two-year project which aims to draw attention to the n eed for better econom ic assessm ent o f dryland degradation an d rehabilitation an d its role in decision-m aking, to place the problem within the context o f overall

developm ent p lan n in g an d to d em onstrate how econom ic analysis can be used to guide th e design and im plem entation o f corrective policies, program s, projects an d land

m anagem ent practices. F u tu re activities include the p re p ara tio n o f an Executive Report on dryland m anagem ent, a Technical Guide an d Case Study Reader.

Regional w orkshops will be held in New Delhi, Beijing an d N airobi betw een A ugust 1986 and Ja n u a ry 1987, to discuss the issues an d d rafts o f the docum ents from a regional perspective.

In addition to adm inistration associated with the C onference a n d follow-up

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activities, the D epartm ent also un d erto o k prep aratio n o f th e basic C onference discussion d o cu m en t and the Problem S tatem ent an d Executive

G uidelines. A n officer was seconded to the U nited N ations E nvironm ent P rogram m e in N airobi for th re e m onths to assist with p re p ara tio n o f case studies from Kenya, M orocco an d S udan for presentation to the C onference.

Executive Director of the United Nations Environment Program, Dr Mostafa Tolba, addressing the International Conference on Dryland Degradation in Canberra

Natural Resources Management An officer o f the D epartm ent was seconded to the OECD E nvironm ent

D irectorate for 1985-86 to assist with the developm ent o f a new OECD p ro g ram on N atural Resources M anagem ent. As a country highly d ep e n d en t on its natural resources, particularly its scarce w ater resources, the first project u n d e r the program , Policies to Im prove Surface and G roundw ater M anagem ent, will be of

particular relevance to Australia.

Mr Pat Galvin (right), Secretary o f the D epartm ent, passing to Mr Xu W enquing, Deputy Director, Bureau of Finance and Banking, State Planning Commission of the People’s Republic of China, a letter offering an arrangem ent for mutual co-operation on environm ent protection between the

Departm ent and the Environm ent Protection Commission o f the People’s Republic of China. Mr W enquing was in Canberra for the International Conference on Dryland Degradation.

AREA Project T h e A ustralian Resources an d E nvironm ental A ssessm ent (AREA)

Project is developing a global environm ent and econom ic m odel to assist the assessm ent o f interactions betw een econom ic activity, resource use and environm ental quality.

T h e w ork is being conducted in collaboration with the Global M odels and the Policy Process (G-MAPP) Project a t the University o f Hawaii an d the W orld Model Project (WMP) at the U niversity o f G roningen in the N etherlands, as well as with researchers in the U nited Kingdom .

D uring the past year work has concentrated on the following issues:­ — incorporating a treatm en t o f military ex p en d itu re in the AREA Model.

Increasing concern has been expressed about the econom ic an d environm ental im pacts o f such expenditures. Most recently, on W orld E nvironm ent Day (5 Ju n e), the Prim e M inister em phasised

the relationship between the goals o f environm ental protection an d o f the

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International Y ear o f Peace. T h e issues are also being addressed by the U nited N ations E n vironm ent P rogram in its Arms Race and the Environment Project

and by the W orld C om m ission on E nvironm ent and D evelopm ent. T h e extensions to the AREA M odel enable A ustralia to m ake an analytical contribution to the international exam ination o f these com plex

problem s; — developing a specification for the trea tm e n t o f land deg rad atio n in the m odel. T his aims to provide new

estim ates o f the global dam age costs of desertification an d to d em o n strate the application o f these m odelling techniques to the analysis o f a global

environm ental problem . A prelim inary account o f this work was presented at the In tern atio n al Drylands C onference. Subsequently, a w orkshop

with W M P an d G-M APP participation was h eld in May to build on the com m ents received at the C onference and to finalise the specification. T h e

results o f the work will a p p e a r in the final C onference publications an d may form p a rt o f an A ustralian contribution to the W orld Com m ission on

E nvironm ent an d D evelopm ent; and — the com pletion o f a revised version of the H andbook providing a user guide, full m athem atical description, and

co m p u ter code for the AREA Model.

State of the Environment T h e State of the Environment in Australia 1985, th e first com prehensive re p o rt from a national perspective on the state o f the A ustralian environm ent, was published in

N ovem ber 1985 an d tabled in the Parliam ent. T h e re p o rt notes past achievem ents and initiatives an d identifies environm ental concerns which n eed to be addressed by governm ents and the public. It should establish a benchm ark with which fu tu re environm ental changes can be com pared.

A colour illustrated edition o f the rep o rt to g eth er with a com panion Source Book containing additional technical

inform ation an d d ata will be on sale to the public early in 1986-87. T h e Forew ord an d Overview o f the re p o rt are being translated into five o f the ethnic languages in use in Australia.

T h ese reports, besides providing valuable inform ation for adm inistrators in all spheres o f G overnm ent, for land m anagers, and fo r educational program s,

should be o f great interest th ro u g h o u t the A ustralian com m unity, particularly in rural areas.

Following the com m itm ent o f the M inister to the p re p ara tio n o f an n u al state o f the en v iro n m en t reports, work has begun on

th e p rep aratio n o f a re p o rt for 1986. T his will be in the form o f a year book which will address significant events an d changes recorded since the 1985 re p o rt and several

issues not covered in th at report. T h e next com prehensive re p o rt on the state o f the en vironm ent in A ustralia is plan n ed for 1990.

Public Participation in Environment Protection and Resource Conservation A survey o f public participation in en vironm ent protection an d resource conservation was conducted by the A ustralian B ureau o f Statistics (ABS) for

the D epartm ent. T his is the first ABS national survey o f com m unity actions in the environm ental field in A ustralia and will provide a basis for fu tu re com parison an d evaluation o f the effectiveness of en vironm ent education an d inform ation program s which m ay be available late in

1986.

T h e survey was a p p e n d e d to the ABS m onthly labour m arket survey in April 1986 which sam pled 35 000 households Australia-wide. T h e questions were action orien ted an d sought to d eterm in e the

actual level o f com m unity participation in action to preserve, p ro tect o r interact with the environm ent, ra th e r th an seeking opinions on environm ental issues. Q uestion topics ra n g ed th ro u g h com m unity involvem ent with recycling program s, m aking form al com plaints about environm ental pollution and

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degradation a n d use o f N ational Parks and W orld H eritage Areas. T h e results o f the survey will provide inform ation to guide the fu tu re developm ent o f policies and program s in en vironm ent education and inform ation.

An Environmental Information Network A C om m onw ealth/State W orkshop in 1983 agreed that access to selected existing environm ental data bases, should be facilitated by the creation o f an integrated,

decentralised national inform ation network. E nvironm ental data to be covered includes that related to land, water, m arine a n d atm ospheric characteristics, land m anagem ent, flora and fauna, to g eth er with data on

pollutants o f land, w ater an d air. T h e project, known as the E nvironm ental Survey o f A ustralia, should ultim ately

provide access to a wide range o f environm ental data for policy analysis purposes, including re p o rtin g on the state o f the en vironm ent locally, regionally and

nationally.

The first step in establishing the E nvironm ental Survey o f A ustralia, com pleted in 1985, was the com pilation o f a pilot directory containing details o f 1 13 existing environm ent data sets in the

portfolio. T h e next steps are to add details o f data sets held by o th er C om m onw ealth organisations a n d to conduct on-line dem onstrations in State capital cities.

Details about these en vironm ent data sets have also been provided to the A ustralian Survey Office for incorporation into a C om m onw ealth Land-R elated Data Directory called Landsearch. T his is p a rt o f the D epartm ent’s involvem ent in collaborative work to im prove co­ ordination o f C om m onw ealth G overnm ent collections o f land-related inform ation.

T h e E nvironm ental Survey o f A ustralia has the potential to be a focal point for international co-operation on

environm ental data.

At the request o f the U nited N ations E nvironm ent P rogram (UNEP), the D epartm ent arran g e d a visit to A ustralia

by Dr Michael Gwynne, D irector o f

U N E P ’s Global E nvironm ental M onitoring System (GEMS), which incorporates the Global Resources Inform ation Database (GRID), in late July 1985. Dr Gwynne described the developm ent o f GRID and investigated the potential for A ustralian participation.

Information and Public Relations T h e diverse n atu re o f the activities o f the D e p artm en t are o f direct interest to a wide section o f the A ustralian com m unity. It is the responsibility o f the In fo rm atio n Sub­ section to com m unicate the content and n atu re o f G overnm ent policies and program s to as wide an audience as possible.

T o achieve this objective, inform ation was dissem inated th ro u g h a variety o f m eans including m edia releases, publications, audio-visual m aterial, posters, m edia liaison a n d public participation prom otions. M edia releases issued by the M inister are listed in A ppendix 31. Publications p roduced by the D ep artm en t are listed in A ppendix 32.

T h e quarterly new sletters Ecofile (environm ental m atters) an d Images (arts, film a n d heritage m atters) continued to p resen t news an d views from the portfolio to a grow ing readership.

T h e Sub-section also took over production o f the D e p artm en t’s in-house new sletter, Update, an d edits the A nnual R eport.

P rom otion o f the N ational T re e Program th ro u g h its Family T ree Jigsaw Races con tin u ed with the co-operation o f o th er agencies — mainly G reening Australia.

H ighly successful events were held in M aryborough (Q ueensland), M elbourne, Q ueanbeyan (NSW) and Townsville

(Q ueensland).

W ith the production and distribution o f a new catalogue, the D ep artm en t’s film and video library was m ore widely used d u rin g the year with borrow ings totalling 150. T h e library covers mainly environm ental subjects an d is used prim arily by educational institutions. Item s are free.

A photographic collection is being established which will eventually collate

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and catalogue all p h o to g rap h s and transparencies held within the D epartm ent.

Library Services In 1985-86 the Library provided reference and technical services to the D epartm ent (including the Sydney based sections), A ustralian N ational Parks and Wildlife Service an d the A ustralian N ational

Botanic G ardens (ANBG). It has a substantial collection in the areas adm inistered by the portfolio an d its environm ent collection, in particular, is an im portant national special library resource.

T he o p eratio n of the on-line cataloguing and inquiry system is co n tin u in g to provide an efficient an d effective service. T h e system is easily accessible to all officers via

the D epartm ental c o m p u ter netw ork. T h e union catalogue covering a n u m b er of environm ent libraries continues to operative effectively.

Library staff carried o u t the tran sfer of m aterial for the ANBG collection following the tran sfer o f the G ardens to the D epartm ent.

T h e Library u ndertakes cu rre n t aw areness, inform ation an d press clipping services to keep D epartm ental officers up-to-date with new spapers, m agazines, jo u rn als a n d books.

INFOTERRA T h e D e p artm en t continues to be the A ustralian N ational Focal Point (ANFP) for IN FO TER R A , the international

referral system for sources o f environm ental inform ation co-ordinated by U N EP. Since becom ing the IN F O T E R R A R egional Service C entre for

South-East Asia an d the South Pacific, the A N FP has dealt with an increased num ber o f requests for inform ation on environm ent-related problem s. T h e

D e p artm en t answ ered thirty enquiries, mostly fro m overseas. A n u m b e r o f these received additional assistance th ro u g h the provision o f relevant literatu re searches. T h e D e p artm en t is assisting in the

establishm ent o f N ational Focal Points in S outh Pacific countries. It has assisted in

the com puterisation o f the N ational Focal Point for T h ailan d a n d provided training for staff.

Internal Audit In tern al A udit is a m anagerial control which m easures an d evaluates the effectiveness o f o th e r controls. T h e

In tern al A udit U nit provides an in d ep en d e n t and objective appraisal o f the adequacy an d effectiveness o f the

D e p artm en t’s o p eratin g systems and the quality o f perform ance o f assigned responsibilities.

Besides its in d ep en d e n t reviews o f the D e p artm en t’s functions, the In tern al A udit U nit currently provides financial audit services to two Statutory A uthorities within the portfolio. T h e U nit is responsible to the D eputy Secretary.

T his financial year m uch o f the U n it’s resources w ere com m itted to reviewing various aspects o f the operations o f the m anagem ent cycle w ithin functional areas o f the D epartm ent. In addition, the U nit con tin u ed to assist in the provision of

general financial an d p ro ced u ral advice. An exam ination is being u n d erta k en o f the internal audit services available to auditable areas w ithin th e portfolio with a view to im proving the effectiveness o f this

particular m an ag em en t control.

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Other Organisations within the Department

O ther Organisations within the D epartm ent

Statutory authorities a n d o th e r organisations w ithin the portfolio providing separate A n n u al R eports for 1985-86 to the M inister fo r Arts, H eritage and E nvironm ent include:

— Advisory C ouncil on A ustralian Archives — A ustralia Council — A ustralian Archives

— A ustralian Biological R esources Study — A ustralian Film, Television an d Radio School — A ustralian Film Com m ission — A ustralian H eritage Com m ission

— A ustralian N ational Gallery — A ustralian N ational Parks an d Wildlife Service — G reat B arrier R eef M arine Park

A uthority — N ational M useum o f A ustralia — N ational Fibrary o f A ustralia — Office o f the Supervising Scientist

Details o f the activities o f the N ational Film an d S ound Archive, the N ational M aritim e M useum o f A ustralia, a n d the A ustralian N ational Botanic G ardens are provided in

the following C hapter.

N ational Film and Sound A rchive T h e N ational Film an d S ound Archive was established in 1984 to continue to acquire,

preserve a n d m ake available m oving im ages a n d recorded sounds as p a rt o f A ustralia’s tw entieth century cultural heritage. T h e A rchive’s h u g e collections

re p resen t every m anifestation o f these m edia in A ustralian life, an d its activities a n d services are correspondingly diverse.

P ending G overnm ent consideration o f the policy, developm ental a n d o th er recom m endations o f the R eport o f the

N ational Film and S ound Archive Advisory C om m ittee, Time in Our Hands, the Archive co n tin u ed to develop priorities to guide its cu rre n t activities. O p eratio n al priorities co n tin u ed to be preservation, easing o f access restrictions a n d collection

m anagem ent.

T h e m axim um possible resources were devoted to these objectives an d significant progress was m ade.

Committees C o n cu rren t with the establishm ent o f the Archive, the N ational Film a n d Sound Archive Advisory C om m ittee was

ap p o in ted by the G overnm ent to advise it on the fu tu re developm ent o f the Archive. In N ovem ber 1985, the C om m ittee’s C hairperson, noted film m aker, Jo an F ong,

presen ted the C om m ittee’s R eport, Time In Our Hands to the M inister.

T h e R ep o rt presents a strategy for the developm ent o f the Archive as a m ajor cultural institution for th e acquisition, preservation an d celebration o f A ustralia’s

screen a n d sound heritage. It recom m ends an $ 11.4 m illion building extension and re fu rb ish m en t p ro g ram for the A rchive’s

head q u arters an d a five year plan for the developm ent o f staff an d resources.

O th e r im p o rtan t recom m endations include:

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Jazz legend, Graeme Bell, giving an im prom ptu perform ance at the National Film and Sound Archive for (left to right) Barry Finkelde, NFSA, Margaret Moriarity, C anberra Jazz Club, and Bruce Skilton, NFSA.

• developm ent o f the Archive as the national preservation centre for m oving images an d recorded sound; • creation by the Archive o f the

authoritative national record o f A ustralian m oving im age a n d recorded sound production; • legislative m easures including establishm ent o f the N ational Film and Sound Archive as a statutory authority with a governing council; • a ch a rter an d operational policies defining the A rchive’s role, an d philosophies; and • establishm ent o f an Archive office in every State capital.

The In terd ep artm e n ta l C om m ittee (IDC) on the C om m onw ealth’s Film an d Sound

Collections, which had been established by the G overnm ent at the sam e tim e as the Advisory C om m ittee, re p o rte d to the M inister in A pril 1986. T h e re p o rt is being considered by the G overnm ent in conjunction with the R ep o rt o f the Advisory C om m ittee.

Accommodation T h e A rchive’s H eadquarters is the form er Institute o f A natom y building, one o f the earliest o f C an b erra’s public buildings. R efurbishm ent com m enced in 1984 and Stages 1 an d 2 have been com pleted. Stage 3 is in progress.

Collection storage arran g em en ts for the m ost part rem ain unsatisfactory. T h e M arch 1985 fire at the N ational Library accelerated th e rem oval o f sound an d film collections from th at building, although

som e colour film rem ains there. T h e bulk o f the collections are still held in tem porary storage which lacks tem p eratu re or

hum idity control.

As space occupied by the N ational M useum o f A ustralia in the basem ent area o f the H eadquarters building is progressively released it allows for local storage o f high-use collection items a n d for the creation o f specialist laboratory space.

A new building in the C an b erra suburb o f Mitchell, n e a r the A rchive’s n itrate film vaults, has been secured for developm ent as the A rchive’s m ain collection storage centre. It is plan n ed to contain a variety o f hum idity an d tem p eratu re controlled environm ents for specialised collection storage. D uring the year the building was b ro u g h t to lock-up stage an d plan n in g for the fitout o f this facility has reached a detailed stage. C om pletion o f fitout and transfer o f collections are expected over the next 12 m onths.

T h e u p g ra d in g and extension o f the A rchive’s n itrate film vaults building, m ore than doubling its effective capacity and im proving its environm ental controls, is expected to be u n d ertak en by the National Capital D evelopm ent Com m ission in

1986-87.

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Acquisition The wide ra n g e o f m aterial which the Archive collects includes m oving images and sound recordings in all form ats, relevant publicity m aterials, scripts, still photographs, related artefacts, such as vintage eq u ip m en t a n d costum es, literature a n d o th er types o f w ritten or printed m aterials.

Selection policy em braces bo th A ustralian and overseas m aterial, a n d c u rre n t as well as retrospective items. T h e re is an em phasis o n acquisition by donation and deposit ra th e r than purchase, so that funds can be conserved for preservation work. T h ere is an urgency to the task, as m any works o r item s are d isap p earin g o r deteriorating. As in previous years, intake

has been insufficient b oth in quantity and range.

D uring the year some 20 000 discs, audio tapes an d o th e r sound carriers (representing 100 000 titles) w ere added to the collections. An intake o f som e 1600

piano rolls included, besides retrospective m aterial, th e c u rre n t o u tp u t o f the M astertouch C om pany o f Sydney.

T h e reco rd ed perform ances o f A ustralian m usicians, again figured largely. Acquisition highlights included a consignm ent o f m ore th a n 1000 LP discs of

highlights o f the BBC (UK) radio sound archive, th e archive o f SDN A delaide and audio tapes o f the M elbourne Sun Aria com petition from 1954—1974 which

include th e d eb u t o f a h o peful young Kiri T e Kanawa.

An estim ated 2000 films a n d 560 videos have been added to the collection.

Sustained attention to im proving television intake b ro u g h t about the deposit of selected program s an d a large collection o f newsfilm. T h ro u g h a voluntary arra n g e m e n t with the V ideo Industry

D istributors’ Association (VIDA), h u n d re d s o f featu re films released on video in A ustralia have been d o nated by VIDA m em bers.

T h e Last Film Search co ntinued and d u rin g the year new m aterial from the feature films When the Kellys Were Out

(1923) an d Those Who Love (1926), came to light.

Special m aterials acquired d u rin g the year included about 1800 film stills an d lobby cards, 1115 posters a n d press sheets, 2040 film an d television scripts an d 2500 radio scripts including a long ru n o f episodes

from The Lawsons an d Blue Hills. Stills, publicity m aterial an d clippings on the 1918 featu re film The Woman Suffers, a discovery o f the Last Film Search, currently being resto red by the Archive,

w ere a notable and welcom e acquisition.

Collection Management C ollection m anagem ent, in so far as the tasks o f accessioning a n d cataloguing are concerned, is a m ajor function o f the Archive.

C u rre n t collection holdings are as follows:

P h o n o g rap h C ylinders 16 000

Piano rolls 10 000

A udio T apes 27 000

Discs 644 000

Film (cans) 120 000

V ideotapes (reels/cassettes) 7 500

P hotographic p roduction & personality stills 303 000

N ew spaper clippings 60 000

Posters 56 000

In addition there are m any thousands of additional items such as record covers, concert program s, sheet music, publicity item s, personal papers, com pany papers,

vintage sound eq u ip m en t, transparencies, glass slides, costum es an d scrapbooks.

T h e im m ense collection m an ag em en t task confronting the Archive has been most recently described in th e Advisory C om m ittee’s R eport Time in Our Hands. T h e g reat m ajority o f th e A rchive’s

holdings have yet to be accessioned; alm ost none o f them is adequately catalogued.

A gainst this background the Archive has achieved a m odest increase in activity and has given substantial attention to p lanning a n d systems developm ent.

D uring the year cataloguing staff was augm ented and som e work u n d ertak en on

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the backlog in th e national film ography, Australian Films. A ttention was also given to the cataloguing o f a variety o f sound recordings a n d associated m aterials. A

fu rth e r 2000 film and television titles (m aking a total o f 7000 titles currently in the data base) were accessioned into the au to m ated Film Location a n d Inform ation

C ontrol System (FLICS). A start was m ade on the accessioning and cataloguing o f the p rin ted m aterial collections (books an d periodicals).

In January 1986 a new version o f FLICS was installed an d this has particularly im proved retrieval capability. FLICS has been developed specifically fo r the Archive an d is am ong the m ost sophisticated film archive control systems in the world.

T h e re is as yet no sim ilar autom ated facility for collection control o f m aterial o th e r than films and videotapes. C onsiderable w ork was done d u rin g the

year in developing p aram eters tow ards this end, in the context o f devising the A rchive’s first ADP Strategic Plan which has been en dorsed by the M inister. T h e re was a substantial investm ent in the

purchase o f co m p u ter hardw are and in ADP training for staff.

Preservation Preservation work is at the h ea rt o f the Archive because it d eterm ines the survival and accessibility o f the collection. All screen and sound m edia are, to varying degrees, subject to decay and degeneration. T o the problem s o f the decom position o f nitrate film a n d the distintegration o f wax p h o n o g rap h cylinders an d acetate discs are now being added the breakdow n o f new er m edia such as audio an d video tape. A ustralia has already lost the g re ater p a rt o f its screen and sound heritage from the earlier decades o f the century. T h e present situation gives no cause for com placency.

W ithin the limits o f resources som e progress was m ade. An increase in sound preservation staff led to a significant increase in productivity.

Sound Preservation Officer, Ian Gilmour, dubbing tape copies of early historic recordings

M any pre-1950 films have com e to the Archive as scratched, dirty an d unstable cellulose n itrate projection prints or negatives. T o be able to obtain safety preservation copies w ithout tran sfer o f all these blem ishes, the Archive is building a unique film rejuvenation laboratory in the basem ent of H eadquarters. T h e laboratory will be eq u ip p ed with a developer (for rew ashing), buffer-type a n d ultrasonic cleaning m achines, a film base polisher and a film coating m achine.

Some 180 000 feet o f film preservation copies were m ade, and 131 000 feet o f d u p in g copies. O n average these figures re p resen t an overall decrease o f 12.5% on w hat was achieved last year, ow ing to the diversionary effects on staff o f developm ental work an d th e relocation of collections an d facilities. It is im portant to

note, how ever, that film preservation copies o f 138 000 feet o f cellulose nitrate film were m ade, rep resen tin g an increase o f 25% on the previous year’s figure.

A start has been m ade on th e assembly o f a video laboratory with the purchase and installation o f two Sony BVH -2180 1-inch

units. T his newly developed equipm ent, with associated VHS, Beta an d U-matic

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units, has b een ad ded to th e 2-inch quadruplex m achine already held. With the fu rth e r addition o f a telecine (film-to- tape transfer) m achine th e aim is to have a fully developed facility o p eratin g in the

NFSA h e a d q u arters later in 1986.

Access Services M ention was m ade in the last A nnual R eport th a t access restrictions w ere still in force because o f resource lim itations, but that they w ould be progressively eased as

staff resources perm itted. T h is has proved to be the case an d som e significant restrictions have been lifted.

Some 1530 enquiries relatin g to film and television m aterial to g eth er with som e 730 enquiries fo r film related docum entation were han d led , while a ro u n d 1200

enquiries relating to radio a n d sound recording w ere received a n d 150 requests for d ocu m en tatio n in this area w ere handled. Fees for service w ere introduced

in 1986 a n d these have been generally accepted by the A rchive’s clientele.

Access assistance was provided for m any program s in the d evelopm ental stage. In addition stills, posters and transparencies plus vintage sound eq u ip m en t, sheet m usic, an d records were

provided.

P roduction o f 2 7 1 viewing copies o f films (totalling 158 000 feet) fu rth e r im proved access to th e collection. 25 ho u rs o f duping/view ing video tapes w ere also

m ade. T h e introduction o f the telecine facility will accelerate the pro d u ctio n o f viewing a n d d u p in g copies a n d im prove access potential. Staff arran g e d $20 000 w orth o f p rin tin g an d copying work for clients a n d retrieved 540 cans for depositors d u rin g the year.

Public Program Since its establishm ent the Archive has been aw are o f the n eed to m ake its work known a n d accessible to the public and to

respond to the general com m unity interest in A ustralia’s screen a n d sound heritage.

W ithin necessary lim itations, an energetic public activities p ro g ram has been

im plem ented. M ajor activities d u rin g 1985— 86 are no ted below:

— T h e On Air exhibition w hich highlights the golden years o f A ustralian radio, 1936 to 1956. M ore th a n 40 000 people visited this exhibition to th e en d o f Ju n e . — T h e exhibition Stills Alive (run

concurrently with O n Air from 5 May — 8 Ju n e). Selected by p h o to g rap h e r Joyce Agee, m ost o f the stills cam e from the Archive. O ver 5700 people saw this

exhibition. — T h e A rchive’s official new sletter, published quarterly with a circulation o f over 2500. — O ver 230 schools took p a rt in the

education program , which includes a teachers an d students kit, a to u r o f the exhibition and, w here possible, ap p ro p ria te screenings. — A m odest start has been m ade on the

p roduction an d sale o f item s th ro u g h a visitors’ shop in the exhibition hall. A lim ited range o f posters, postcards, badges, books an d records is being

progressively extended. — P reparation work was u n d ertak en on the publication o f th e forthcom ing book Australian Films an n u al, a

discography o f Australian Jazz on Record an d A Guide to Recorded Australian Wildlife Sounds — Birds.

Regional Offices T h e A rchive’s M elbourne office op en ed in O ctober 1984. It is located in the A ustralian Film Institute building in Little

La T ro b e Street, in the h eart o f M elbourne. Its m an ag e r is M r Ken B errym an.

D uring its first full year o f operation, the office provided som e o f the client services available in C anberra. It is able to respond rapidly a n d efficiently to M elbourne-based

needs, o p p o rtu n ities a n d pressures.

It has also begun to initiate its own public activities. A ustralian silent feature films restored by the Archive were screened in conjunction with the A ustralian Film

Institute an d a w eekend sem inar devoted to the issues o f archival research in film,

85

television and recorded so und was organised.

By the end o f the year the A rchive’s Sydney office h ad been physically established a n d a m anager, M r Jam es M cCarthy, ap pointed. S ituated at 24

M arket Street, th e office was set u p with the generous co-operation o f A ustralian Archives.

Sponsorship S ponsorship has been a characteristic part o f the Archive fo r some years. T h e best known exam ple is, perhaps, The Last Film Search which com m enced in 1981 an d was

m ade possible by co rporate su p p o rt in excess o f $ 130 000. T his ap p ro ach has continued an d developed.

W ith the assistance o f a professional consultant the Archive em barked on a strategy o f building aw areness am o n g

potential sponsors, reaching som e 1000 co rporate representatives at special presentations a t the S heraton-W entw orth Hotel (Sydney) an d H ilton H otel

(M elbourne) in A ugust 1985 a n d February 1986 respectively. T h e cost o f the events was largely covered by sponsor su p p o rt and the level o f attendance and expressed goodwill was excellent. Potential sponsorship projects were presented at these events a n d follow u p o f responses is

proceeding.

Corporate Services A lthough the D epartm ent is still providing personnel recording and accounts processing services, the Archive m aintains its own su p p o rtin g corporate services.

T h e Archive has continued d u rin g 1985— 86 to develop an d do cu m en t its adm inistrative systems an d procedures.

Financial Matters I he A rchive’s total budget for 1985— 86 was $3.4 million, an increase o f $0.8 million (about 31%) on the previous year. T h e m ajor areas o f ex p en d itu re were:

$

Acquisition 338 144

Preservation 467 876

Plant an d E quipm ent 415 374

A dm inistrative expenses 764 490

Salaries a n d Allowances 1 475 463

In accordance w ith the G o v ern m en t’s directive, fees for service w ere introduced d u rin g the year for users o f the film and television collections. R evenue o f approxim ately $26 000 was raised through these a n d o th e r activities, including shop sales.

Staffing and Establishment G raham G ilm our was ap p o in ted D irector o f the NFSA in Ja n u a ry 1986. M r G ilm our was form erly A ssistant Secretary, C o­ ordination an d M anagem ent Services in the D epartm ent. H e had been A cting D irector since J u n e 1985. T h e Archive averaged a staffing level o f 52 d u rin g the past year. T h irty nine positions are now p erm anently filled and recru itm en t/ ap p o in tm en t to o th er positions is proceeding.

In May 1985 the D ep artm en t o f E m ploym ent and Industrial Relations form ally endorsed a $204 000 project u n d e r the C om m unity Em ploym ent Program (CEP) which will involve 13 unem ployed people for n ine m onths. This project will provide for a program o f stability testing o f the n itrate film collection to allow precise o rd e rin g o f copying priorities an d thus im prove m anagem ent o f the collection.

National and International Activities T h e Archive is a m em ber o f the In tern atio n al Federation o f Film Archives (FIAF) an d the International Association o f Sound Archives (IASA). NFSA staff are active in both organisations.

D uring April 1986 the A rchive hosted the 42nd C ongress o f FIAF. O ver 100 participants, including 67 overseas delegates rep resen tin g 32 countries attended.

Tw o symposia, on Film Restoration and Computer Applications in Film Archives, were

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Delegates to the International Federation of Film Archives (FIAF) Congress in Canberra (left to right): Wolfgang Klaue, Director Staatliches Filmarchive, German Democratic Republic (Vice President FIAF); Dr H enning Schou, NFSA (Chairman, FIAF Preservation Commission); Anna-Lena Wibom, Director of International Relations, Swedish Film Institute (President FIAF); and Ray Edm ondson, Deputy Director, NFSA

ru n in conjunction with the Congress. Both w ere organised an d chaired by Archive officers an d dealt with m atters o f professional concern.

T h e historic n atu re o f the C ongress was recognised in a sim ple cerem ony on 17 April in which the P resident (Ms A nna- Lena W ibom ) and Secretary-G eneral (Mr G uido Cincotti) o f FIAF joined in planting a tree in the A rchive’s grounds. A special certificate to m ark the occasion was also

presented.

T h e D irector, M r G raham G ilm our, officially op en ed the 7th A nnual C onference o f the A ustralian B ranch of the In tern atio n al Association o f Sound

Archives, in M elbourne from 16-19 May

1986. Archive representatives attended, p resen ted papers an d also recorded the proceedings.

In S eptem ber 1985, at the I ASA C onference held in B erlin, M r Peter Burgis, Acting H ead, the Sound and Radio

R esearch an d A cquisitions B ranch, was elected C hairm an o f the IASA D iscography C om m ittee.

In O ctober 1985, D r H e n n in g Schou, A cting H ead, Film a n d Television P reservation B ranch, atten d ed a m eeting o f the FIAF Executive C om m ittee in

L ondon. H e also chaired a m eeting o f the FIAF Preservation Com m ission and participated in a film restoration sym posium at the N ational Film T h ea tre,

87

after which he visited archives in Brussels, Stockholm , C openhagen, Moscow and Bangkok. The G overnm ent o f the K ingdom o f T h ailan d p re sen ted the N ang (m eaning cinem a) M edal to th e NFSA (through D r Schou) as a token o f appreciation for its co-operation in

preserving valuable films o f King Prajadhipok (R am m a VII).

General D uring 1985— 86 the Archive u n d erto o k a n u m b er o f studies an d special projects. T h e feasibility study for a B icentennial T ravelling Film R etrospective was com pleted by NFSA Special Projects Officer, Mike Lynskey in S eptem ber 1985.

T h e A ustralian B icentennial A uthority funded the study. A lthough th e re p o rt was well received, it was a m atter o f re g ret that ihe A uthority, faced with b u d g et cuts, decided not to proceed with im plem enting

the project.

T h e fu tu re o f the M astertouch Piano Roll C om pany was the subject o f recom m endations in the Advisory

C om m ittee R eport, Time in Our Hands. The com pany represents processes, skills and a heritage now alm ost unique in the world. In the light o f the C om m ittee’s recom m endation, and at th e request o f the M inister, the Archive com m enced a fact finding study on this m atter in M ay/June

1986.1 T h e Archive assisted Film A ustralia with the provision o f footage from A ustralian feature films for use in a special

presentation at the A ustralian Exhibition at Expo ’86 in Vancouver.

A feasibility study and proposal for an Encyclopaedia of Australian Music, Radio and Recorded Sound was com m issioned by the Archive and com pleted by consultant Dr Ja n e O ’B rien in May 1986. T h e Archive is

currently assessing the R eport which recom m ends the p rep aratio n and publication o f such a work over a 4 year period.

Fhe Archive is also assisting th e Sound H eritage Association to produce Australia’s

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Heritage in Sound — a set o f u p to 50 LP discs o f A ustralian m usic an d spoken word.

A ustralian N ational Maritime M useum In J u n e 1985 the C om m onw ealth G overnm ent a n n o u n ced plans to establish a N ational M aritim e M useum and, u n d er the initial auspices o f the C ouncil o f the N ational M useum o f A ustralia, form ed a M useum Advisory C om m ittee to p re p are a plan for its developm ent.

In N ovem ber 1985, the G overnm ent com m itted $30 million for the construction o f a m useum building. T h e Advisory C om m ittee was restru ctu red and becam e the Interim C ouncil o f the National M aritim e M useum . T his Interim Council was separated from the C ouncil o f the

N ational M useum o f A ustralia, though Mr Alex Dix, AO, C hairm an o f the Council of the N ational M useum o f A ustralia rem ained as C hairm an o f the Interim C ouncil o f the M aritim e M useum . M r Sergio Sergi, an officer o f the D epartm ent, was ap p o in ted as interim Director.

T h e G overnm ent decided th at the A ustralian N ational M aritim e M useum should be located in Sydney an d its principal facilities should be built on a site at D arling H a rb o u r by the New D arling H a rb o u r A uthority, u n d e r an agreem ent betw een the C om m onw ealth and New South Wales G overnm ents. This agreem ent, called the M em orandum of

U nderstanding, was negotiated by both parties an d signed by the respective M inisters in M arch 1986.

A functional b rief for the design o f the building was approved by the M inister and by the M inister for H ousing and C onstruction and was subm itted to the New D arling H a rb o u r A uthority, the construction agent for the C om m onw ealth. T h e building concept was designed by Philip Cox an d P artners and consists o f a close inter relation between the soaring sails o f the ro o f with the sea which contains the site on two sides. T h e 2

hectares site, ju s t n o rth o f P yrm ont B ridge

A model of the Australian National Maritime Museum now under construction

is at the very m outh o f D arling H a rb o u r and is a fitting location fo r the display of floating exhibits. Legislation introduced into P arliam ent in May 1986 will provide

for the establishm ent o f th e A ustralian N ational M aritim e M useum as a Statutory A uthority.

National Maritime Collections T h e M useum will collect a n d display m aterial which reflects all aspects o f the m aritim e history o f A ustralia including

facets o f prehistory. It is in ten d ed th at the acquisition p ro g ram for the initial exhibition will develop aro u n d the following them es:

— the discovery o f A ustralia, including prehistory, — im m igration by ship, from convicts to refugees such as the ‘boat people’. — the m aritim e industries, com m erce,

tra n sp o rt o f passengers a n d cargo, fishing, safety at sea, light houses

— the Navy, including life an d training o f the m en a n d w om en o f the Navy, ashore an d afloat; an d — leisure a n d recreation, ‘a S um m er

Sunday at the sea side’, varying from surfing to pow er boating and life saving.

As the M useum develops, these them es will be ex p an d ed an d refined.

T h e C om m onw ealth G overnm ent already owns a large n u m b er o f objects dealing with A ustralia’s m aritim e history. T he Navy and the D epartm ents o f T ran sp o rt,

Industry, T echnology a n d C om m erce (Custom s), H ealth (Q uarantine), Foreign Affairs (Law o f the Sea m atters) and various statutory authorities have collections o f these objects. C ook’s cannon from the Endeavour is at the N ational Library. Some po rtraits o f naval m en o f historical significance are in Parliam ent H ouse, an d so on. Efforts are being m ade to enable the assembly o f aspects o f this

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m aterial fo r display in the M useum . T h e M useum will develop it into a series of cohesive exhibitions which will show visitors the history o f a co n tin en t su rro u n d e d by water.

F u n n e r objects to r the C ollection will be purchased o r d o n ated to th e M useum by m em bers o f the public a n d private collectors, o r lent to the M useum by State collecting institutions o r by individuals.

A ctivities Early priorities have included the prep aratio n o f a functional b rie f for the fitting o u t o f the M useum building, the

recruitm ent o f key staff an d necessary developm ent leading to th e o p en in g in 1988 as well as a collections policy. U nder the term s o f the M em orandum of U n d erstan d in g betw een the C om m onw ealth a n d the New South Wales G overnm ents, the New D arling H a rb o u r A uthority is agent for the C om m onw ealth to construct the building, while the C om m onw ealth D epartm ent o f H ousing and C onstruction is the technical adviser.

R ecruitm ent o f p erm a n en t staff with em phasis on setting u p an adm inistrative base, began in earnest in D ecem ber 1985. Staff including som e technical an d mostly adm inistrative personnel, n u m b ere d 30 at the en d o f J u n e 1986. R ecruitm ent will continue d u rin g th e 1986-87 financial

year with m ajor em phasis on the engagem ent o f conservation, design and exhibition staff to work on assem bling the National M aritim e Collection an d on the

interpretation o f this m aterial into a series o f exhibitions.

The M useum ’s First acquisition represented a particularly significant part of A ustralia’s boating history. Ken W arby’s I he Spirit of Australia, which holds the world w ater speed record o f 5 1 1.11 kph, was purchased by the M useum on 2 April

1985, assisted by a $50 000 donation by Speedo A ustralia, a m ajor sponsor o f M r W arby’s record attem pts.

O th e r significant acquisitions fo r the M useum ’s collection include a fine exam ple o f an International Snipe Class racing dinghy, the Britannia, an early

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18-footer, d o n ated by M r M ichael Baker an d a set o f 1817 paintings o f Aboriginals fishing.

N egotiations w ere conducted with the Sydney M aritim e M useum , a private, com m unity-based organisation, about the fu tu re relationships betw een the two bodies. It was agreed th at the two institutions would retain th eir separate identities an d develop independently but would co-operate to ensure th at the public h ad access to the best possible exhibitions o f m aritim e heritage artefacts.

A fter an initial period in tem porary prem ises, the M useum has m oved to 189 K ent Street, w here it will rem ain until the final move to D arling H arb o u r.

M anagem ent T h e A ustralian N ational M aritim e M useum Interim Council, which advises the M inister on acquisitions and exhibitions, is chaired by M r Alex Dix, AO, a n d com prises the following m em bers:

A ndrew R obertson, AO, DSC, Rear A dm iral (Ret) (Deputy Chairman) M r B ruce S tannard C aptain Jo h n Evans, AM

Mrs Kristine K lugm an Professor G eoffrey Bolton, AO Mr Ken W reidt, MLA T h e Interim D irector, M r Sergio Sergi is an ex officio m em ber o f the Interim Council.

Australian N ational Botanic Gardens T h e functions o f the A ustralian National Botanic G ardens are to collect, study and display a national collection o f living and h erbarium specim ens o f A ustralian native plants an d related species for scientific research, education, conservation and public enjoym ent.

T h e G ardens occupy 90 ha on the slopes o f Black M ountain in C anberra, with an 80 ha annexe in the Jervis Bay T errito ry on A ustralia’s eastern coast. T h e G ardens were officially op en ed in 1970 an d now contain about 6500 species o f living plants.

T here w ere 400 800 visitors to the G ardens in C an b erra in 1985-86 a n d 20 000 to the Jervis Bay A nnexe (400 500 an d 11 500 respectively in 1984— 85).

Administration and Policy Advisory Committee An advisory com m ittee to advise the M inister on any m atters concerning the

roles an d functions o f the A ustralian National B otanic G ardens in C an b erra and at the Jervis Bay A nnexe is being established and ap p o in tm en ts for the

C om m ittee are being finalised.

Finance T he G ardens was allocated $786 000 for on-going operational e x p e n d itu re

excluding wages an d salaries an d $103 000 for the purchase o f p lan t an d equipm ent.

Employment T h e G ardens has an AST allocation o f 82.75 . At 30 J u n e 1986 this consisted o f 14 professional staff, 21 technical staff, 7

adm inistrative — clerical a n d keyboard operators, an d 40 exem pt em ployees in the gardening and o th er trades area.

D uring th e year 37 apprentices w orked at the G ardens for periods o f one o r two m onths as p a rt o f the L and M anagem ent

B ranch, D e p artm en t o f T erritories, A pprenticeship Scheme.

Community Employment Program T h e G ard en s’ C om m unity E m ploym ent Program projects em ployed 17 people for varying periods.

F our CEP projects w ere ap p ro v ed for the G ardens in 1985-86, two o f these were for the Jervis Bay A nnexe. T h re e projects con tin u ed from 1984— 85.

National Collections T h e N ational Collections Section consists o f th ree subsections. T h e Living Collections Subsection is responsible for

m aintenance, collection an d storage o f plants held in the nursery, in op en ground in C an b erra and at the Jervis Bay A nnexe,

a n d for the seed store. T h e H erbarium Subsection is responsible for m aintenance, collection an d storage o f d ried plant specim ens held in the H erb ariu m . T he

D evelopm ent Subsection is responsible for co-ordination o f p lan n in g and construction o f m ajor new works and redevelopm ents o f p lan tin g areas in the

G ardens. T his Subsection is also responsible for ADP.

Living Collections T h e living collection consists o f about 73 000 plants o f about 6500 species in C an b erra an d at the Jervis Bay Annexe.

Plants are grow n u n d e r a n u m b er of d iffe ren t conditions.

O p e n G ro u n d

No of

Specim ens

No o f

taxa

C anberra 55 000 3 450

Jervis Bay 11 500 1 800

U n d e r Glass 4 600 1 700

P erm an en t Pots 2 200 1 150

O f the 4600 plants grow n u n d e r glass about 1900 are epiphytic and lithophytic orchids.

T h e living collection also includes 59 species o f en d a n g ere d A ustralian native plants.

D uring the year, p lan t m aterial has been d o n ated to a n u m b er o f organizations including: the N ational M useum o f

A ustralia, the In tern atio n al Federation o f Film Archivists, the A ustralian National U niversity, B ruce College o f TA PE, and

W oden College o f TA FE, and the CSIRO Division o f Entom ology Advice was given to the landscape consultants to the P arliam ent H ouse

C onstruction A uthority.

Jervis Bay Annexe T h e A nnexe o f the G ardens in the Jervis Bay T errito ry , is ab o u t 80 ha in area and has a staff o f six. It was established to enable the cultivation o f frost-tender

plants u n d e r m ore favourable climatic conditions than those which prevail in C anberra.

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Herbarium T h e h erb ariu m now contains about 176 000 specim ens, o f which 119 000 are vascular, and 57 000 are non-vascular (cryptogam ic) plants. A bout 1650 vascular specim ens w ere obtained by exchange with or as donations from o th er overseas

herbaria and about 1570 replicate specim ens w ere sent to kindred botanical institutions. Similarly about 3500 non- vascular specim ens were received and

10 000 replicate specim ens w ere sent out. Professional visitors from th e local area, interstate and overseas m ade use o f the collections d u rin g the year. In addition 71

loans, com prising 5077 specim ens were sent to kindred institutions for use by specialists eith er p re p arin g m anuscripts

for floras o r revising groups.

W ork is progressing tow ard the publication o f the Catalogue of the Mosses of Australia and its External Territories in collaboration with the B ureau o f Flora and

Fauna.

National Collections Fieldwork Staff in the non-vascular herbarium u ndertook two short trips to East G ippsland in collaboration with D r J Elix, o f the A ustralian N ational University.

In Ju ly 1985, with Dr Elix, staff collected in the Townsville — Mt Isa — Mackay area in Q ueensland. T his area is poorly collected for cryptogam s.

Developments fh e A ustralian National B otanic G ardens D evelopm ent Plan, to guide the developm ent o f the existing G ardens over the next ten years, was com pleted and accepted by the N ational Capital

D evelopm ent Com m ission (NCDC), the D epartm ent an d the G ardens. Design work on the so u th ern extension has been suspended pen d in g adequate staffing and

funding.

Prelim inary h ard landscaping was carried out aro u n d the Visitor Inform ation C entre and the area was partially planted in M arch 1986. Stage 1 o f the carpark extension was also com pleted in N ovem ber 1985.

W ork on Stage 1 o f u p g ra d in g the water supply was com pleted.

Design and im plem entation o f projects in the D evelopm ent Plan are carried o u t by the NCDC. T h re e projects were com m enced this year:

— design for im provem ents to the internal fire access road — an eastern boundary ro ad to reduce the am ount o f internal traffic within the

G ardens — design work on an extension to the rainforest plantings.

M ajor works at the Jervis Bay A nnexe are carried ou t by the D epartm ent o f H ousing an d C onstruction. A Visitor C entre was designed to provide inform ation facilities for the public and for office accom m odation. C onstruction was postponed p en d in g fu rth e r discussions with the D epartm ent o f D efence.

Prelim inary work was carried ou t on a developm ent plan for the A nnexe.

D uring the year the D evelopm ent staff advised the NCDC on Jerrab o m b erra W etlands Project planning; the G in n in d erra C om m unity C ouncil on plantings for G inninderra Creek; the CEP Project Revegetation ofYass River Valley, the Riyadh Botanic G ardens, Saudi Arabia; an d the Botanic G ardens in Zimbabwe.

Data Collection F u rth er developm ent o f the co m puter system occurred and all data for the Living Collections are now on the system. T his data base includes records o f plantings for C anberra an d Jervis Bay and records of nursery holdings in C anberra. T erm inals have been provided to all m ain buildings and the nursery.

Public Programs Education Education program s in plant sciences and related topics were presented to student groups from prim ary to tertiary level, education professionals, departm ental officers and the general public.

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The n um bers o f visiting students an d other participants increased as did participants in program s linked to English as a Second L anguage at secondary and adult levels.

Two additional teaching positions in the C om m onw ealth T each in g Service were created at th e G ardens in April, 1985 and approval was given to recru it to one of these positions.

In S eptem ber, 1985 th ere was a pleasing response to a public education program entitled Springtime is Wattle Time which covered th e botany, h o rticu ltu re and folklore aspects o f A ustralian wattles.

In-service program s fo r teachers included one related to the display Floral Emblems of Australia an d th ree series o f plant propagation w orkshops also available to

school-based ancillary staff.

W ork experience placem ents o f secondary students w ere m ade in the Banksia C entre, H erbarium , N ursery, Public Program s and both h orticultural m aintenance depots.

Therapeutic Horticulture T h e past year has seen a consolidation of services a n d proven the need for the Banksia C entre in the A ustralian

com m unity. T he C en tre is a special facility for disabled and elderly people. It offers a variety o f services which include individually plan n ed rehabilitation and assessm ent program s, g ro u p recreation an d rehabilitation sessions, an d in-service

w ork-shops for therapists, teachers and health professionals.

A bout 1800 disabled people atten d ed specific program s and utilized services d u rin g th e year. O ver 500 non-disabled people sought training, advice and visited

the C entre.

V olunteers continued to play an im portant role assisting disabled people with tran sp o rt, g ard en activities and socialization skills. Fifteen volunteers

w orked at the C entre a n d som e m ade hom e visits to help disabled people gain confidence in gardening at hom e.

Visitor Services T h e first four m onths o f the year were involved with the in tern al fitting o u t o f the display areas o f the Visitor Inform ation C entre.

Tw o m ajor exhibitions w ere produced d u rin g the year. Floral Emblems of Australia covered the history a n d selection o f national, state and territo ry floral em blem s

a n d how they have been used in po p u lar culture.

T he second exhibition, ‘Kakadu’, displayed the diversity o f plant associations which co n trib u ted to the inclusion o f this N ational Park on the List o f W orld

H eritage Properties.

T h e video presentation introducing visitors to the G ardens was rescripted and u p d ated jointly with Film A ustralia to include the Banksia C en tre an d education

facilities. T his video is shown to small groups in the In form ation C entre and larger groups in the th eatrette. It is sold com m ercially by Film A ustralia.

O ptions fo r o p eratin g the G ardens B ookshop by contract are being investigated. A total o f 4,530 G ardens’ publications were sold from the enquiry co u n ter in the In form ation C entre d u rin g

the year.

T h e Public Access H erb ariu m in the In fo rm atio n C entre was available for use by visitors d u rin g 1986. It was com m enced u n d e r a CEP project d u rin g 1984— 85 and concentrates on the flora o f south-eastern A ustralia.

T h e location o f the H o rticultural Adviser in the Inform ation C entre, to g eth er with the Public Access H e rb ariu m an d a co m p u ter term inal providing up-to-date

inform ation on plants in the living collection, enabled m ore assistance to be given to m em bers o f the public. O ver 2500 enquiries were answ ered by the

H orticultural A dviser d u rin g the year and a fu rth e r 300 requests for horticultural inform ation o r plant identification were han d led by mail.

T h ro u g h o u t the year, 200 guided tours o f the G ardens were conducted by the two R angers for a total o f 3850 visitors on

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The Minister, Mr Barry Cohen, and the NSW M anager of Australia Post’s Country Services, Mr Kevin Duncan, at the launch at the Australian National Botanic Gardens on 12 March o f a new series o f postage stamps for the Australian Bicentennial Collection. The set of six stamps honours Cook's voyage and the plants collected by Sir Joseph Banks and illustrated by his artist, Sydney

Parkinson.

Sunday an d weekday tours booked by clubs, societies an d schools.

O n 23 January the G ardens hosted the fourth S enior Citizens’ A ustralia Day C oncert organised by the A ustralia Day C ouncil an d the C anberra P erm an en t

B uilding Society with the aid o f several business an d com m unity organisations. More than 1 000 people attended.

The first volunteer in the Visitor Services Subsection, Mrs Joyce E ngland, provided valuable service by p roducing a regular inform ation sheet, In Flower This Week. It was distributed to the public from the Visitor Inform ation C entre.

Photographic Collection T h e C ardens has a collection o f 15 500 35m m colour slides, o f which 7400 are close-up photos o f A ustralian native plants and 4000 are field records o f those plants.

D uring the year 900 slides w ere ad ded to th e collection by G ardens’ staff and donations from private ph o tg rap h ers.

A total o f 95 slides was m ade available for use in g o v ern m en t an d n o n -governm ent publications in 1985— 86 an d the collection was also used extensively for educational

purposes.

Research Following the re-structuring in 1984— 85, the Section has focused on botanical, horticultural an d biological research. Biological research has enabled the G ardens to address the problem o f gene conservation o f A ustralia’s en d an g ered

plant species. Basic biological inform ation on the b re ed in g m echanism s an d genetic diversity o f plant populations is essential in form ulating conservation strategies.

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A generous g ran t o f c o m p u ter eq u ip m en t from the Nell & H erm o n Slade 't rust and the A ustralian O rchid F oundation enabled the Research Section to efficiently produce research m anuscripts, elim inate m anual sorting o f research data files and stream line com m unications an d data exchange betw een kindred research institutions. T h e G ardens is indebted to these organisations an d expresses appreciation for th eir support.

T he first o f two glasshouses p lanned for the R esearch Section was built in 1986. It provides an insect-free en v iro n m en t to facilitate pollination a n d b reeding biology studies.

Botanical Research T he B otanical Research Subsection is concerned with the system atic classification

of the A ustralian an d related floras.

C u rren t botanical research program s and projects are listed in A ppendix 33.

Horticultural Research T he H o rticultural R esearch Subsection conducts research on the h o rticu ltu re of

A ustralian flora, using both nursery and laboratory based m ethods.

C u rre n t h o rticultural research program s and projects are listed in A ppendix 33.

Biological Research T he Biological Research Subsection was established to develop an advanced, laboratory-based o peration for studying

the biology o f A ustralasian plants. Work d u rin g 1985— 86 focused on developing histochem ical an d m icroscopy techniques

essential to the study o f the b reeding systems a n d pollination biology o f A ustralasian plants, especially rare and en d a n g ere d species.

C u rre n t long-term program s, each encom passing a n u m b er o f short-term projects, are listed in A ppendix 33.

Research Fieldwork M elbourne, A delaide an d Sydney herbaria w ere visited to study orchid types and collect d ata for the forthcom ing edition of

the Checklist of Australian Orchids. Following

A growing twig from a new and extremely rare Eucalyptus species, as yet unnam ed, discovered in the Braidwood area, NSW, during the year. Only five of the plants have so far been

identified. T he new species was brought to the attention of the Australian National Botanic Gardens when a visitor sought help with its identity.

the rediscovery o f the eastern A ustralian u n d e rg ro u n d orchid Rhizanthella slateri in N ovem ber 1985 a trip was u n d ertaken to B ulahdelah, NSW, to study the biology o f

this species.

Plant Sciences Library T h e P lant Sciences Library at the G ardens has a collection o f approxim ately 2000 m onographs, 450 serial titles an d 4700

m aps. T ra n sfer of the m onographs and serials com m enced w hen the library was m oved to new accom m odation in the Botany Building.

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Following the transfer o f th e G ardens to the D epartm ent the library staff re tu rn ed to the D ep artm en t o f T errito ries C entral

Library.

Australian Cultivar Registration Authority T h e A ustralian C ultivar R egistration A uthority (ACRA) was established in 1963

to register cultivars arising from the A ustralian flora. It has b een based at the G ardens since 1973. ACRA has m em bers rep resen tin g botanical gardens, the

horticultural industry an d special interest groups. M em bers are listed in A ppendix 34. T h e S ecretary/R egistrar o f the A uthority is a m em ber o f the G ardens staff. T h e G ardens also has one

representative on the m em bership o f the A uthority.

Five cultivars were registered d u rin g the year with a fu rth e r 10 p en d in g registration. T h e cultivars are listed in A ppendix 35. Fifteen new applications for cultivar registration w ere received d u rin g

1985-86.

Posters T h e Floral Emblems of Australia poster was produced d u rin g the year in association with Kodak (Australasia) Pty Ltd. It shows the flowers chosen for each State and T errito ry as th eir em blem , an d was distributed, to g eth er with associated educational m aterials, to schools th ro u g h o u t Australia.

Publications Growing Native Plants Growing Native Plants No. 13 was issued d u rin g the year. T h e lead article for this

p o p u lar publication is on clim bing plants, with fourteen additional articles on various native plants suitable for horticulture. All articles were p re p are d by staff at the G ardens.

Due to public d em and, work is progressing on revised editions o f Growing Native Plants Nos. 1,3 and 5, presently ou t o f print.

Occasional Publications The A ustralian National Botanic G ardens Occasional Publication No. 7, Gardening For All by Erica Smith was published in

N ovem ber 1985. T h e booklet presents inform ation to help m ake gard en in g accessible to all people, regardless o f age or

physical limitations.

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STRUCTURE OF THE ARTS, HERITAGE AND ENVIRONMENT PORTFOLIO

Statutory Authorities Australia Council

Australian Film, Television & Radio School Australian Film Commission Australian Heritage Commission Australian National Gallery Australian National Parks & W ildlife Service

Great Barrier Reef Marine Park A uthority National Library of Australia National Museum of Australia

Supervising Scientist for the A llig ato r Rivers Region

Other Organisations and Advisory Bodies Advisory Committee on National Collections Advisory Council on Australian Archives A rtbank Board Australian Biological Resources Study Advisory Committee Australia/Netherlands Committee on Old Dutch Shipwrecks

Australian Ionising Radiation Advisory Council Australian Libraries and Inform ation Council Canberra National Memorials Committee Committee on Taxation Incentives for the Arts Co-ordinating Committee for the A lligator Rivers Region Great Barrier Reef Consultative Committee H istoric Memorials Committee National Tree Program Co-ordinating Committee Public Lending Right Committee

June 1986

Receipts and Expenditure

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■

Receipts and Expenditure

The ap p ro p riatio n s for the D e p artm en t of Arts, H eritage and E nv iro n m en t include funds a p p ro p ria te d to the D epartm ent itself an d th e various S tatutory A uthorities within the M inister’s portfolio.

E xpenditure u n d e r th e control o f the D epartm ent is provided fo r in Special A ppropriations, A p p ro p riatio n Bills and final charges fro m the A dvance to the

Minister fo r Finance. E x p en d itu re in 1985— 86 o n all ap p ro p riatio n s am o u n ted to $205.5 million com pared with $175.2 million in 1984— 85, an increase o f $30.3

million o r 17 p e rc e n t.

T he portfolio’s key areas o f increased expenditure included:

— M useum o f A ustralia ( + $1.8 million) — reflecting the first stage in a gradual build u p to the plan n ed o p en in g o f a fully operational m useum .

— N ational Film an d S ound Archive ( + $0.9 million) d u e largely to the u p g ra d in g a n d expansion o f the A rchive’s preservation, conservation an d accessioning activities an d the related increase in staffing levels. — S outh W est T asm ania W orld H eritage

A rea — the e x p e n d itu re o f $2 million reflects the im plem entation o f the G o v ern m en t’s decision o f O ctober 1984 to provide $4 m illion over two years

(1985-86 and 1986-87) to cover m an ag em en t costs for the protection of the W orld H eritage Area. — A ustralian N ational Parks an d Wildlife Service (+ $3.3 million) — reflecting an increase in the provision o f capital works for U luru an d K akadu National

Parks.

— A ustralian Film, Television an d Radio School ( + $1.9 m illion) — largely attributable to the com m encem ent o f construction o f p erm a n en t prem ises

for the school and increased o perating expenses. — G reat B arrier R eef M arine Park A uthority ( + $2 m illion) — reflecting

the com m encem ent o f a m ajor research p ro g ram into th e C row n o f T h o rn s starfish and the C om m onw ealth contribution to the day-to-day m anagem ent o f the Park. — N ational M aritim e M useum — the

ex p en d itu re o f $2.9 m illion represents the C om m onw ealth’s contribution to the establishm ent a n d first stage o f construction o f the new ly-founded m useum . — A ustralian N ational Botanic G ardens

— d u e to changes in adm inistrative arran g em en ts in D ecem ber 1985 the D ep artm en t now takes responsibility for the ANBG, previously p a rt o f the

M inister for T errito ries’ portfolio.

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P ortfolio E xpenditure

1984-85 1985-86

S('000) $(’000)

CULTURE AND ARTS Australia Council 44 482 48 746

Ai thank 476 696

Payment in respect of damages to Picasso painting ‘Three Skulls’ 82

Public Lending Right Scheme 1 727 1 847

Institute for the Conservation of Cultural Material — Grant 2 3

Contribution towards research and other projects initiated by the Cultural Ministers’ Council and its subordinate body, the Australian Library and Inform ation Council (for payment to the Cultural Ministers’ T rust Account) 16 35

Subtotal 46 703 51 409

NATIONAL HERITAGE Australian National Botanic Gardens 1 664

Museum of Australia 1 777 3 600

Grants-in-Aid — National T rust Bodies 480 505

— O ther 8 8

Southern Cross Museum T rust 200

United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organisation — Convention for the protection of World Cultural and National Heritage 31 39

National Film and Sound Archive 2 547 3 460

National Library of Australia 25 135 30 483

Australian Archives 14 871 lo 653

Historic Memorials Committee 19 23

Commemoration of historic events and persons 90 83

Control of historic shipwrecks 160 199

Australian Heritage Commission 1 399 1 592

Australian National Gallery 13 900 14 875

Restoration, preservation and improvement of landscapes and buildings of special significance For expenditure under the Urban Regional Development (Financial Assistance) Act 1974 — — Port A rthur Conservation Program 600 500

— National Estate Program — payments to states 2 625 2 750

National Estate Program — Expenditure in the N.T. 210 220

Expenditure in the ACT 73 77

National Maritime Museum 2 905

Canberra National Memorials Committee 24

Subtotal 64 125 78 660

102

1984-85 1985-86

$(’000) $(’000)

FILM AND TELEVISION SUPPORT National Institute of Dramatic Art 2 200 1 500

Australian C hildren’s Television Foundation — Contribution 500 500

Australian Film, Television and Radio School 6 782 8 663

Australian Film Commission 19 700 20 204

Subtotal 29 182 30 867

ENVIRONM ENT AND CONSERVATION Australian Biological Resources Study 1 176 1 232

Environmental Quality Protection Programs 475 491

Australian Environm ent Council (for payment to the Australian Environm ent Council Fund T rust Account) 63 69

Coastal Surveillance — Expenses 408 401

Grants-in-Aid Conservation organizations 850 945

World Wildlife Fund Australia 50 50

International Union for the Conservation of N ature and Natural Resources — Membership 33 59

Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority 4 379 6 384

Australian National Parks and Wildlife Service 10 650 14 000

The Supervising Scientist and the Alligator Rivers Region Research Institute 4 822 5 535

Payments to or for the States and the N orthern Territory — For Expenditure under the States Grants (Nature Conservation) Act 1974 —

— For the purposes of the Environm ent (Financial Assistance) Act 1977 —

Nature Conservation South-West Tasmania — World Heritage Area — Provision of assistance for m anagem ent 498 2 000

Captains Elat (Abatement of Pollution) Agreement Act 1975 120 174

National T ree Program 518 598

National Community Education Program on Unleaded Petrol — 52

Subtotal 24 042 31 990

103

1984-85 1985-86

$(’000) $(’000)

CORPORATE SERVICES ITEM S Remuneration Tribunals Act 1973 (SA) — Secretary of D epartm ent 90 98

Salaries and Payments in the nature of Salary 8 535 9 556

Administrative Expenses 2416 2 833

Compensation and Legal Expenses 69 82

Payments pursuant to Section 34A (1) o f the Audit Act 1901 — —

Plant and Equipm ent — Departm ental 78 —

Subtotal 11 188 12 569

TOTAL 175 240 205 495

Note: Figures for the Australian National Botanic Gardens and the Canberra National Memorial Committee only include expenditure from December 1985 pursuant to changes in Administrative Arrangements.

Distribution of funds 1985— 86

Culture and Arts 25% _ $51.4M

Environment and Conservation 15.6% $32M

National Heritage 38.3 % $78.7M

Corporate Services 6.1% $12.6M

Total Expenditure $205.5M

Film and Television 15% $30.9M

104

R evenue R eceipts

1984-85 1985-86

Artbank H ire Charges 276 051 356 235

Australian Archives 92 961 88 178

Captains Flat (Abatement of Pollution) Agreement — Interest and Repayments 47 306 49 214

National Film and Sound Archive 10 264 26 046

Perth F.ntertainment Centre — Interest 268 500 327 000

Wildlife Protection (Regulation of Exports and Imports) Act 1982 — Fees 37 798 34 808

Miscellaneous 90 380 169 907

TOTAL 823 260 1 051 388

A dm inistrative Expenditure*

1984-85 1985-86

Salaries and Allowances Salaries 8 488 540 9 507 744

Overtime 46 196 48 108

Sub Total 8 534 736 9 555 852

Administrative Expenses Travelling and subsistence 423 224 513 029

Office Requisites and equipm ent, stationary and printing 262 326 274 1 18

Postage, telegrams and telephone services 402 558 487 557

Consultants and Advisory Councils — Fees and Expenses 346 092 362 723

Inform ation services 291 044 281 120

Com puter services 381 132 498 379

Furniture and fittings 113 751 105 138

Incidental and other expenditure 195 572 311 237

Subtotal 2 415 699 2 833 301

TOTAL 10 950 435 12 389 153

* This table details the administrative expenses of the Department only. Breakdown of administrative figures for non-departmental agencies can be found in either their respective annual reports, or in the Department’s Explanatory Notes for Estimates of Receipts and Expenditure.

105

Trust A ccount O perations T h e D ep artm en t o p erated seven T ru st Accounts d u rin g 1985— 86. Listed below are th eir respective functions an d operational details.

Australian Film Industry Trust Fund P u rp o ses— for paym ents to an account authorised to receive m oneys deposited into a film account as defined in sub­

section 124ZAA (1) on the Income Tax Assessment Act 1936.

Transactions Balance at 1 Ju ly 1985 Receipts E xpenditure Balance at 30 J u n e 1986 Investm ents

Other Trust Moneys Purposes — fo r the receipt o f m oneys tem porarily held in tru st for o th e r persons.

Transactions $

Balance at 1 Ju ly 1985 9 646

Receipts 42 3 4 1

E xpenditure 44 627

Balance 7 360

Investm ents Nil

The Last Film Search Trust Account Purposes — for the receipt, investm ent and ex p en d itu re o f donations received for the acquisition, restoration an d

preservation o f A ustralia’s early silent and sound films.

Transactions $

Balance at 1 Ju ly 1985 57 445

Receipts 1 000

E xpenditure 25 204

Balance 33 146

Investm ents Nil

Arts, Heritage and Environment — Services for Other Governments and Non-Departmental Bodies Purposes — for the paym ent o f costs in connection with services p erfo rm ed on

behalf o f o th er governm ents a n d non- departm ental bodies.

Transactions $

Balance at 1 Ju ly 1985 2 539

Receipts 5 723 264

E x p en d itu re 5 668 519

Balance 58 284

Investm ents Nil

National Film and Sound Archive Fund Purposes — for the receipt, investm ent a n d ex p e n d itu re o f donations received in connection with the activities o f the

N ational Film and S ound Archive.

Transactions $

B alance at 1 July 1985 1 487

Receipts 11 876

E x p en d itu re 10 474

Balance at 30 J u n e 1986 2 889

Investm ents Nil

Australian Environment Council Fund Trust Account Purposes — for e x p en d itu re to su p p o rt environm ental research a n d special activities ap p ro v ed by the A ustralian

E nvironm ent C ouncil o r a C om m ittee ap p o in ted by the C ouncil for that purpose.

Transactions $

Balance at 1 Ju ly 1985 59 768

Receipts 141 252

E x p en d itu re 140 016

Balance at 30 Ju n e 1986 61 004

Investm ents Nil

Cultural Ministers’ Council Trust Account Purposes — fo r e x p en d itu re on research an d o th e r projects initiated by the C ultural

M inisters’ Council and its subordinate body, the A ustralian Libraries and Inform ation Council, the cost o f which will be m et jointly by the C om m onw ealth and the States.

Transactions $

Balance at 1 Ju ly 1985 25 376

Receipts 74 039

E xpenditure 27 898

Balance at 30 J u n e 1986 71 716

Investm ents Nil

$

20 904 291 179 183 694 178 190 985 21 897 001

Nil

106

Appendixes

Appendix 1 Contact Addresses for Senior Officers

Central O ffice Tasm an H ouse, M arcus C larke S treet C anberra City A C T 2601 GPO Box 1252, C an b erra A C T 2601

Tel. (062) 467211; T elex 62960; Facsimile (062) 467597 Secretary P.J. Galvin Tel. (062) 467563

Deputy Secretary A.G. K err Tel. (062) 467561

Artbank Unit C. 50 R oseberry A venue Sydney NSW 2018 GPO Box 3652, Sydney NSW 2001 Tel. (02)298351 Director G. S turgeon Tel. (02) 6628011

Arts, Film and H eritage D ivision T asm an H ouse, M arcus C larke Street, C an b erra City A C T 2601 GPO Box 1252, C an b erra A C T 2601 Tel. (062) 467211; T elex 62960; Facsimile (062) 467597 First Assistant Secretary Assistant Secretaries

Arts B ranch Film B ranch H eritage B ranch

C. Santam aria (acting)

K. M cKenry (acting) L. Nielson (acting) R J M cA rthur

Tel. (062) 467359

Tel. (062)467273 Tel. (062) 467349 Tel. (062) 467699

Bureau o f Flora and Fauna Block D A cton H ouse, C n r M arcus C larke S treet and E dinburgh A venue, Acton A C T 2601 GPO Box 1383 C an b erra A C T 2601 Tel. (062) 467211; T elex 62 960; Facsimile (062) 467419 Director D r P.B. B ridgew ater Tel. (062) 467500

111

C onservation and E nvironm ent A ssessm ent D ivision CML B uilding, University A venue C anberra City A C T 2601 GPO Box 1252, C an b erra A C T 2601 Tel. (062) 467211; T elex 62960; Facsimile (062) 46 7597 First Assistant Secretary K.E. T hom pson Tel. (062) 46 7390

Assistant Secretaries C onservation B ranch D r A. M cCusker Tel. (062) 46 7425

E nvironm ent A ssessm ent Branch E.M. A nderson Tel. (062) 46 7277

Corporate and P ortfolio Support D ivision T asm an H ouse, M arcus C larke Street, C anberra City A C T 2601 GPO Box 1252, C an b erra A C T 2601 Tel. (062) 46 7211, T elex 62960; Facsimile (062) 46 7597 First Assistant Secretary Assistant Secretaries

C o rp o rate Service B ranch Portfolio S u p p o rt B ranch Research an d Inform ation Branch

M. B ourke

C. Pitson B. Z anetti (Acting)

D r D. MacRae

Tel. (062) 46 7452

Tel. (062) 46 7648 Tel. (062) 46 7574

Tel. (062) 46 7392

E nvironm ent C ontam inants and C o-ordination D ivision CME B uilding, University A venue, C anberra City A C T 2601 GPO Box 1252, C anberra A C T 2601 Tel. (062) 46 7211; T elex 62960; Facsimile (062) 46 7597 First Assistant Secretary D. Gascoine Assistant Secretaries

C ontam inants B ranch I. C arru th ers

E nvironm ent C o-ordination B ranch J. Sands

Public L ending R ight 3rd Floor, N orthside G ardens, 168 W alker Street, N orth Sydney NSW 2060 PO Box 812, N orth Sydney NSW 2060 T el (02) 9233379 Administrator A.N. Jo h n so n Tel. (02) 923 3378

Tel. (062) 46 7288

Tel. (062) 46 7413

Tel. (062) 46 7244

A ssociated Statutory A uthorities and other organisations Australian Archives M ining In d u stry House, 216 N o rth b o u rn e A venue B raddon, A C T 2600 PO Box 34, Dickson A C T 2602 Tel. (062) 433633 Director General B. Cox OBE MVO Tel. (062) 43 3670

112

Australia Council N orthside G ardens, 186 W alker Street, N orth Sydney NSW 2060 PO Box 302, N orth Sydney NSW 2060

Tel. (02) 923 3333; T elex 26023; Facsimile (02) 922 7560 General Manager Prof. D. Y erbury AM Tel. (02) 923 3366

Australian Childrens Television Foundation 2 2-24 Blackwood Street, N o rth M elbourne VIC 3051 Tel. (03) 320 4555 Director D r P.M. E dgar AM Tel. (03) 320 4555

Australian Film, Television and Radio School 13—15 Lyon Park Road, N orth Ryde NSW 2113 PO Box 126, N orth Ryde NSW 2113 T el (02) 887 1666 Director M sA D ev eso n A M Tel. (02) 887 1666

Australian Film Commission 8 West Street, N orth Sydney NSW 2060 GPO Box 3984, Sydney NSW 2001

T el (02) 922 6855; T elex 25157 Chief Executive K. Williams Tel. (02) 922 6855

Australian Heritage Commission Casey H ouse, Y arralum la A C T 2600 PO Box 1567, C an b erra A C T 2601 T el (062) 72 3966

Director D.C. G riffiths Tel. (062) 72 3966

Australian National Botanic Gardens GPO Box 1777, C an b erra A C T 2601 Tel. (062) 67 1811 Director Dr. R.W. B oden Tel. (062) 47 7953

Australian National Gallery Parkes Place, Parkes A C T 2600 PO Box 1150 C anberra A C T 2601

Tel. (062)71 2411; T elex A A 61500 Director J. Mollison AM Tel. (062) 71 2411

Australian National Maritime Museum ADC H ouse, 189 K ent Street, Sydney NSW 2000 GPO Box 5131, Sydney NSW 2001

Tel. (02) 27 9111; Facsimile (02) 27 3846 Director (Interim) S. Sergi Tel. (02) 27 3760

Australian National Parks and Wildlife Service 2nd a n d 3rd Floors C onstruction H ouse, 217 N o rth b o u rn e A venue, T u rn e r A C T 2601 GPO Box 636, C an b erra A C T 2601 Tel. (026) 46 6211; T elex AA 62971; Facsimile (062) 47 3528 Director P rof J.D . O vington Tel. (062) 46 6008

113

Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority 67-71 D enham Street, Townsville QLD 4810 1*0 Box 1379, Townsville Q LD 4810 Tel. (077) 81 8811; T elex 47332; Facsimile (007) 72 6093 Chairman G.C. K elleher Tel. (077) 81 8821

International Cultural Corporation of Australia Ltd 1st Floor S carborough H ouse, 12 Playfair Street, T h e Rocks, Sydney NSW 2000 1*0 Box N222, G rosvenor Street, T h e Rocks, Sydney NSW 2000 Tel (02)241 1071; T elex A A 7 1214 Executive Director A.S. W alton AM Tel. (02)241 1071

National Film and Sound Archive Institute o f A natom y B uilding, McCoy Circuit, Acton A C T 2601 GPO Box 2002, C anberra City A C T 2601

Tel. (062) 67 1711 Director G. G ilm our Tel. (062) 67 1703

National Institute of Dramatic Art University o f NSW, G a te d , H igh Street, K ensington NSW 2033 Po Box 1, K ensington NSW 2033 Tel. (02)663 3815 Director J.R. C lark AM Tel. (02) 663 3815

National Library of Australia N ational Library, C anberra A C T 2600 Tel. (062) 62 1111; T elex 62100 Director General W.M. H o rto n Tel. (062) 62 1262

National Museum of Australia Lady D enm an Drive, Y arram undi, C anberra A C T 2601 GPO Box 1901, C anberra A C T 2601 Tel (062) 56 1111 Facsimile (062) 56 1233 Director Dr. D.F. McMichael CBE Tel. (062) 561118

Office of the Supervising Scientist Levels 23 & 24, T riple M T ow er, 500 O xford Street, Bondi Ju n ctio n NSW 2022 PO Box 387, Bondi Ju n ctio n NSW 2022 Lei. (02) 387 0666; T elex ARRIS 23984; Facsimile (02) 389 0681 Supervising Scientist R.M. Fry Tel. (02) 387 0611

114

Appendix 2 Members of the Public Lending Right Commitee

Chairman M r H. B ryan AO Ms B. Jefferis

Members Mr R. M cDonald Ms C. M attingley Mr B. C louston

Mrs J. La Scala

) R epresenting ) A uthors

R epresenting Publishers R epresenting Librarians

Acting Chairperson from 6 July to 30 N ovem ber

until 31 D ecem ber 1985

U ntil 30 Ju n e 1986

*Mr I. Govey R epresenting the A ttorney-G eneral’s D ep artm en t

*Mr A. Ketley R epresenting the National Library o f A ustralia

T h e A ustralian B ureau o f Statistics provides a consultant for the PLR Schem e. * Government Members

115

Appendix 3 Analysis of Public Lending Right Payments 1985— 86

Range $

A uthors Publishers

1 — 25 166 90

2 6 — 50 542 47

5 1 — 75 580 26

7 6 — 100 454 10

101 — 250 1337 29

251 — 500 600 32

501 — 750 210 13

751 — 1000 120 6

1001 — 2000 167 14

2001 — 3000 55 10

3 0 0 1 — 4000 17 2

4001 — 6000 15 5

6000 + 12 14

Paym ents to authors Paym ents to publishers A djusting paym ents

$1 344 866.24 $ 330 115.53

$ 1 833.26

116

Appendix 4 Directors of the Board of the International Cultural Corporation of Australia Ltd

Chairman M rJ.B . Leslie AO, MC Members M r N.K. Baker

Dr J.A . B attersby M r F. B elgiorno-N ettis CBE, AM Mr M.G. D arling Mr E.G. C apon

Mr R. Edw ards Mrs M.A. Lewis T h e H on M r Justice J.S. Lockhart M r A.P. M cCaughey

Mr A.G. M cG regor Executive Director M r A.S. W alton AM

117

Appendix 5 Board of Directors of the National Institute of Dramatic Art

Chairman Prof. Malcolm Chaikin, O B E Members Mr Ross Boot h o m e

Ms Judy Davis Dr Jessica M ilner Davis Prof. Dam e Leonie K ram er, OBE Ms Jacqueline Kott Mr Lloyd M artin Mr Len M anger Mr R ichard T hom as Mr Jim T h y n n e Dr Bill W instear Director

J.R. Clark AM

118

Appendix 6 Interim Steering Committee for the Festival of Pacific Arts 1988

Chairman Mr Chicka Dixon, C h airm an o f the Aboriginal Arts B oard, A ustralia Council.

Members A lderm an Mike Reynolds, (Deputy Chairman), M ayor o f Townsville.

T he Secretary o f the D e p artm en t o f Aboriginal Affairs (or his nom inee) t he Secretary o f the D ep artm en t o f Arts, H eritage and E n vironm ent (or his

nom inee) Professor Eric W ilm m ot AM, Professor of Education, James Cook University.

Ms Shireen M alam oo, A boriginal Liaison Officer, D e p artm en t o f Social Security.

Ms Leila Rankine, C hairperson, C entre for Aboriginal Studies, U niversity o f Adelaide.

119

Appendix 7 Taxation Provisions for Films Scheme: Statistical Analysis June 1981— June 1986 1981-82 1982-83 1983-84 1984-85 1985-86 TOTAL

Pro­

visional Final Pro­ visional Final Pro­

visional Final Pro­ visional Final Pro­

visional Final Pro­ visional Final

Applications for Certificates

Feature Films Films of a like nature to feature films 213 18 159 43 135 21 124 15 161 45 792 142

produced for exhibition by way of television 30 5 70 9 73 9 76 10 56 17 305 50

Documentaries 276 18 361 94 319 102 283 97 237 54 1 476 365

Mini series of television drama 22 — 32 7 46 5 42 5 65 12 207 29

541 41 622 153 573 137 525 127 519 128 2 780 586

Certificates Issued

Features Films Films of a like nature to feature Films 142 15 138 30 138 27 121 15 139 20 678 107

produced for exhibition by way of television 18 1 42 6 67 14 72 6 45 19 244 46

Documentaries 186 15 256 64 318 104 280 87 193 74 1 233 344

Mini series of television drama 10 — 21 5 39 6 48 5 48 14 166 30

356 31 457 105 562 151 521 113 425 127 2 321 527

Overall Position

Certificates issued 356 31 457 105 562 151 5 2 1 113 425 127 2 3 2 1 527

Applications rejected 20 — 14 8 13 4 — — — — 47 1 1

Applications withdrawn or lapsed 31 — 120 — 1 1 1 5 36 4 1 — 299 4

TO TA L PROCESSED 407 31 591 1 13 (»8(i 160 557 1 17 4 2 6 127 2 6 6 7

54 2

Appendix 9 Members of the Committee on Taxation Incentives for the Arts

C u rre n t T erm o f A p p o in tm en t Expires

Chairman Mr F J Kendall Board M em ber C ouncil o f A dult E ducation

256 Flinders Street M ELB O U R N E VIC 3000 31 D ecem ber 1986

Deputy Chairman Dr A B artholom ai Director Q u eensland M useum

PO Box 300 S O U T H BRISBANE QLD 4101 31 D ecem ber 1986

Members Mrs M B etteridge Adviser, Fine Arts a n d Gifts D ep artm en t o f the Prim e M inister and C abinet CANBERRA A C T 2600

Ms M M acK innon D irector, Inform ation Services State Library o f Victoria 328 Swanston Street

M ELB O U R N E VIC 3000 Mr N J F lanagan, AO 16 B rinsm ead S treet PEARCE A C T 2607

Mr D T hom as D irector C arrick Hill

SPR IN G FIELD SA 5062 Contact officer: M r R ] H Deane (062)467372

31 D ecem ber 1986

31 D ecem ber 1986

31 D ecem ber 1986

31 D ecem ber 1986

131

Appendix 10 Members of the Historic Memorials Committee

Chairman I'he Prim e M inister T h e H on. R.J.L. Hawke, AC, MP Members

President o f the Senate S enator the H on. D. M cClelland Speaker o f the H ouse o f R epresentatives T h e H on. J. Child, MP Vice President o f the Executive Council

T h e H on. L.F. Bowen, MP Leader o f the O pposition in the Senate S enator the H on. F.M. C haney Leader o f the O pposition

T h e H on. J.W . H ow ard, MP

Secretary Mr R J H D eane (062) 467372

132

Appendix 11 Members of Canberra National Memorials Committee

Chairman T he Prim e M inister, T h e H on. R.J.L. H awke AC MP Members

T he L eader o f the O pposition, T h e H o n .J.W . H ow ard MP T he L eader o f the G overnm ent in the Senate, S enator the H o n .J.N . B utton T he L eader o f the O pposition in the Senate,

S enator the H on. F.M. C haney T h e M inister for Arts, H eritage an d E nvironm ent, T h e H on. B. C ohen MP Secretary, D ep artm en t o f Arts, H eritage an d E nvironm ent,

M r P.J. Galvin An O fficer o f the D e p artm en t o f Arts, H eritage an d E nvironm ent, (Vacant — position a p p o in ted by the M inister) Two residents o f the A ustralian Capital T errito ry ap p o in ted by the G overnor-G eneral. Only one position is occupied: Sir H arold W hite CBE

133

Appendix 12 Members of Australia — Netherlands Committee on Old Dutch Shipwrecks

Dr J.P.S. Bach, D e p artm en t o f History, University o f Newcastle, NSW Prof. G.C. B olton AO, D e p artm en t o f History, M urdoch University, W.A.

Mr L.P. R am ondt, C ounsellor, Royal N etherlands Embassy, C anberra, A C T Mr G.D. van d e r H eide, C om m ittee on U nderw ater A rchaeology, T h e H ague, N etherlands Secretary: M r K.E. C urry, D e p artm en t o f Arts, H eritage an d E nvironm ent, C anberra A CT.

134

Appendix 13 Historic Shipwrecks Act 1976 — Declared Wrecks to 30 June 1986

N ew South W ales S. S. BALL1NA’ (N .l) Iro n -h u lled paddle steam er, 253 tons. W recked 1879. Gazetted 11.4.79. 31°25'30"S 152°54'55"E, P ort M acquarie h a rb o u r entrance.

Built 1865; ow ned by the C larence and R ichm ond Rivers Steam N avigation Com pany; ran a g ro u n d w hen leaving the h arb o u r with a cargo o f maize, wood, cedar and general items; rem ains include the paddle wheels an d engines as exam ples o f late 19th century m aritim e technology.

T . S.S. ‘J O H N P E N N ’ (N.2) Iron twin screw steam ship, 250 tons. W recked 1879. G azetted 29.10.82. 35°51.1'S 150°11.3Έ , B roulee Bay, n o rth o f M oruya. Built 1867 at Blackwall, L ondon; struck B arrew arra Point in thick fog whilst en route

from T a th ra to Sydney; all passengers were able to scram ble ashore.

P.S. ‘M IM OSA’ (N.3) Paddle stearper, 153 tons. W recked 1863. G azetted 29.10.84. 36°34'55"S 150°03'40"E, T anja, 10km east o f Bega. Built 1854 at Renfrew , Scotland, and based at H obart; used on east coast runs including Sydney-Clyde River; w recked on rocks off T a th ra writh the loss o f two lives.

NOBBY’S HEAD W RECK (N.4) Paddlesteam tug. W recked 1931? G azetted 29.10.84. 32°55'24"S 1 5 Γ 5 2 Ί 6 Έ , Newcastle. W reck o f unidentified vessel, probably th at o f the P.S. ‘C om m odore’ scuttled in the area in 1931.

V ictoria C H IL D R E N ’ (V .l) W ooden sailing barque, 224 tons. W recked 1839. G azetted 11.3.82. 38°29.5'S 142°40.4'E, C hilders Cove, 30 km south-east o f W arrnam bool. W recked on a re e f in ro u g h w eather whilst on a voyage from L aunceston with 24

passengers and 14 crew an d a large assignm ent o f sheep and cattle; 16 lives lost.

‘M O N U M EN TA L C IT Y ’ (V.2) Single screw w ooden steam ship, 737 tons. W recked 1853. G azetted 11.3.82. 37°33.5'S 149°50.7'E, Mallacoota. Built 1850 at B altim ore, M aryland; in 1853 becam e the first steam ship to cross the Pacific

an d carried prospective gold diggers b ound for A ustralia; ran ashore on T ullaberga Island w hen en ro u te from Port Phillip to Sydney with 45 crew an d 28 passengers, m ost o f w hom lost th eir lives.

135

SC H O M B E R G ’ (V.3) W ooden clipper, 2284 tons. W recked 1855. G azetted 11.3.82. 38°37'S 142°53.3'E, P eterborough, 50km south-east o f W arrnam bool. Built at Liverpool and was expected to set new sailing records on the A ustralia ru n ; slid on to a re e f o ff C u rd ie’s Inlet whilst tacking against h ead winds; no loss o f life.

LO C H A R D ’ (V.4) Iro n -h u lled clipper, 1693 tons. W recked 1878. G azetted 11.3.82. 38°39.1'S 143°03.5'E, P o rt C am pbell, 70 km south-east o f W arrnam bool. Built 1873 at Glasgow fo r th e Loch Line fleet; w recked on rocks o ff the V ictorian coast whilst on a voyage from L ondon; o f the 37 crew an d 17 passengers only 2 survived.

‘LA BELLA’ (V.5) Iron-hulled barquentine, 406 tons. W recked 1905. G azetted 23.4.82. 38°24'22"S 142°29'14"E, W arrnam bool. Built at T u ed estrad , Norw ay in 1893; hit a re e f o ff W arrnam bool whilst carrying tim ber from New Zealand; only 5 o f the 12 crew were rescued.

‘T H IS T L E ’ (V.6) W ooden schooner, 58 tons. W recked 1837. G azetted 16.11.84. 38°23'08.3"S 142°14'31.7"E, Port Fairy. Built 1825 at F ort Gloster, B engal; purchased by Jam es an d S tephen H enty in 1831; carried the first p erm a n en t E u ro p ean settlers to Victoria in 1834; w recked while anchored at P ort Fairy with a cargo o f bark.

‘C LO N M EL’ (V.7) Tw o-m asted, wooden, schooner-rigged paddle steam er, 524 tons. W recked 1841. G azetted 26.9.85. 38°44'44"S 146°40'37"E, P ort A lbert. Built 1836 at B irkenhead; w recked on second jo u rn e y from Sydney to P ort Phillip o ff the entrance to Port Albert, an event which led to the settlem ent o f the fertile G ippsland region; the oldest known steam ship wreck in A ustralian waters.

Q ueensland H.M.S. ‘PA N D O RA ’ (Q. 1*) 24 g u n frigate. W recked 1791. G azetted 18.11.77. 11°22'S 143°58'E, o ff C ape York Peninsula. W recked on the G reat B arrier R eef 125 km east o f the tip o f C ape York whilst re tu rn in g from T ahiti an d the S outh Pacific after searching for the ‘B ounty’ m utineers; 35 lives lost

including 4 prisoners; 99 survived by sailing the ship’s boats th ro u g h the T o rres Strait an d on to T im or.

Y ON GALA’ (Q.2*) Iro n -h u lled steam ship, 3664 tons. W recked 1911. G azetted 5.6.81. 19°18'16"S 147°37'19"E, o ff Ayr. Built in N ew castle-on-Tyne in 1902, this A delaide Steam ship C om pany liner was used to carry passengers and cargo along the Q ueensland coast before the com pletion o f the

railway; the vessel was w recked in a cyclone with the loss o f 120 passengers an d crew.

A A R H U S’ (Q.3*) Iro n -h u lled barque, 640 tons. W recked 1894. G azetted 22.10.81. 26°59'42"S 153°28'42"E, M oreton Island. This G erm an-built, D anish-registered vessel was b o u n d for Brisbane from New York with general m erchandise, agricultural im plem ents, m anufactured goods an d light m achinery w hen she struck a subm erged rock pinnacle at the entrance to the shipping channel to M oreton Bay.

G O T H E N B U R G ’ (Q.4) B arque-rigged steam er, 700 tons. W recked 1875. G azetted 22.10.81. 19°21'12"S 148°2'30"E, o ff Ayr. First large steam er to service th e east coast route betw een Darwin and A delaide u n d e r ch arter to the South A ustralian G overnm ent; struck a re e f o ff Flinders E ntrance at full speed in heavy seas and sank w ith 102 aboard.

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M ORNING STAR' (Q.5) Brig, 140 tons. W recked 1814. G azetted 22.10.81. 12°25'50"S 143°25'18"E, C ape W eym outh on C ape York Peninsula. Built and registered at C alcutta; one o f Q u e en slan d ’s earliest wrecks.

‘MERMAID’ (Q.6) T eak-built schooner, 84 tons. W recked 1829. G azetted 22.10.81. 17°05'50"S 146°11 '30"E, o ff Cairns. Arrived in Sydney 1817; p urchased by G overnor M acquarie; used in survey expeditions in M oreton Bay an d a ro u n d n o rth e rn A ustralia an d to convey troops, prisoners and

stores betw een the early settlem ents; w recked on the G reat B arrier R eef w ithout loss of life alth o u g h the crew was unable to reach land for a m o n th after b eing w recked again in a rescue ship in the T o rres Strait.

‘QL’E T T A ’ (Q.7) B arquentine-rigged steam ship, 3302 tons. W recked 1890. G azetted 22.10.81. 10°39'54"S 142°37'42"E, Som erset, C ape York. O perated by the British India Steam N avigation C om pany as a passenger ship; bound for Asian a n d E u ro p ean ports from B risbane; hit an u n ch arted pinnacle o ff the tip o f Cape York and sank in 3 m inutes, taking 173 with her, including th e en g in ee r who ran below to release the steam in the boilers before they exploded, thereby saving m any lives.

‘FOAM’ (Q.8*) T w o-m asted w ooden schooner. W recked 1893. G azetted 14.1.83. 18° 16'20"S 147°23' 10"E, o ff Townsville. Built at Cowes, Isle o f W ight; struck M yrm idon R eef in the G reat B arrier R eef 120km north-east o f Townsville with no loss of life while carrying over 80 Kanakas back to the Solomon Islands after com pletion o f their in d e n tu re d labour in the Q ueensland cane fields.

W estern A ustralia ‘B A TA V IA ’ (W .l) T h ree-m asted D utch East Indiam an. W recked 1629. D eclared historic 15.12.76. 28°29'S 1 13°49Έ, B eacon Island, Wallabi G roup, H o u tm an A brolhos Islands.

Built 1628 at A m sterdam , this R etourschip o f ab o u t 600 tons was one o f the Dutch East India C om pany (VOC) fleet which linked Texel in H olland via the C ape o f G ood H ope with Batavia in the D utch East Indies; with 316 passengers, crew and soldiers on board she ran a g ro u n d on M orning Reef, an event which led to a m utiny, m assacre and

retrib u tio n which cost a total o f 125 lives.

‘VERGULDE DRAECK’ (‘G IL T DRAGO N’) (W.2) D utch East India C om pany (VOC) ‘Jacht’,2 6 0 tons. W recked 1656. D eclared historic 15.12.76. 31°07'S 115°22'E, Ledge Point, 160 km N N W o f Perth. Purchased 1653; wrecked on a voyage from T exel in H olland to Batavia; cargo included

stonew are, elep h an t tusks, brass candlesticks, clay pipes, ballast bricks an d a large quantity o f coins; only 75 o f the 193 passengers an d crew survived.

‘ZU Y TD O R P’ (W.3) T h ree-m asted D utch East India C om pany (VOC) vessel, 400 tons. W recked 1712. D eclared historic 15.12.76. 27°10' 54"S 113°56' 15Έ , 70 km n o rth o f Kalbarri. Built ab o u t 1700 at Zeeland, this R etourschip left Flushing 1711 on h e r th ird voyage to

the East Indies with passengers an d a general cargo including a large quantity o f silver coins; 112 o f the 286 people who left H olland died, m ainly from scurvy, before the ship reached the C ape o f G ood H ope, and 22 m ore sick w ere left there. T h e re were no survivors w hen the vessel ra n into the foot o f high cliffs in treacherous seas.

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ZEEW IJK’ (‘ZEEVVYK’) (W.4) D utch East India C om pany (VOC) vessel. W recked 1727. D eclared historic 15.12.76. 28°54'S 113°52'E, Pelsaert G roup, H outm an A brolhos Islands. Built 1725 at Zeeland, this 400 ton R etourschip left that p o rt late 1726 with 208 aboard and arm am en t including 36 cannon. A fter she struck H alf Moon R eef in the A brolhos

Islands a n u m b er o f the survivors m anaged to reach nearby G un Island w here they stayed some m onths. T h ey m anaged to get on to the m ainland after building a boat from the tim bers but none survived to be rescued.

T R IA L ’ (‘TR Y A L’ O R ‘TR Y A LL’) (W.5) English vessel. W recked 1622. G azetted 8.9.77. 20°17.5'S 115°21.5'E, n ear M ontebello Islands, 130 km W NW o f D am pier. I he earliest known shipw reck in A ustralian waters, the ‘T ria l’ fo u n d ered as a result o f navigational e rro r on subm erged rocks, since called Trial Rocks, n o rth o f the M ontebello

Islands. T h e vessel belonged to the English East India C om pany and was en ro u te betw een Plym outh and Java. 10 people got o ff in the skiff, and a n o th er 36 in the longboat, leaving 93 to perish on the wreck.

JA M E S ’ (W.6) W ooden brig, 195 tons. W recked 1830. G azetted 8.9.77. 32°05.9'S 115°45.3'E, Frem antle. A m erican-built; wrecked a fte r a difficult voyage from Liverpool, via K ingston an d Bahia; conditions on vessel had been very poor and resulted in at least 5 deaths en route.

T A N G IE R ’ (W.7) W ooden barque, 285 tons. W recked 1839. G azetted 8.9.77. 32°04.6'S 115°38.1Έ , R ottnest Island. Built in the Seychelles in 1834; wrecked en ro u te from M auritius to the colonies with an assorted cargo including sugar, ru m , soap and sundry w haling stores an d equipm ent; no lives were lost.

‘EL IZ A B E T H ’ (W.8) W ooden barque, 195 tons. W recked 1839. G azetted 8.9.77. 32°00.8'S 115°44.9'E, n o rth o f Frem antle. Built 1830 at S ingapore; w recked in a gale after a voyage from M anila w hen attem pting to leave Frem antle.

O C E A N Q U E E N ’ (W.9) T h ree-m asted wooden barque, 268 tons. W recked 1842. G azetted 8.9.77. 28°56.5' S 113°51.7' E, H a lf Moon Reef, H outm an A brolhos Islands.

Built 1831 at W hitby, Yorkshire; wrecked on a voyage from Launceston to Bali in ballast.

JA M ES M A TTH E W S’ (W.10) Snow brig, 107 tons. W recked 1841. G azetted 8.9.77. 32°08.0' S 115°44.5' E, Frem antle. Probably French-built; at one tim e a P ortuguese slave tra d e r nam ed ‘Don Francisco’ and the only known relatively intact rem ains o f a vessel thus em ployed; w recked carrying a general cargo, 7000 roofing slates, farm im plem ents, 15 crew and 3 passengers; only a

fisherm an tem porarily on b o ard for shelter was lost.

‘C ER V A N TES’ (W .l 1) W haling barque, 217 tons. W recked 1844. G azetted 8.9.77. 30°30.7' S 115°02.0' E, o ff N am bung National park, 200 km n o rth o f Perth. Am erican vessel built 1836; newly fitted ou t for voyage to A ustralia; w recked w ithout loss of life w hen leaving Ju rie n Bay; one crew m em ber died on trek to Frem antle.

‘A R PE N T E U R ’ (W .l2) Brig, 95 tons. W recked 1849. G azetted 8.9.77. 34°50.0' S 118°24.0' E, Albany. Built in the Seychelles; w recked while taking on oil, an d o th er general cargo including flour, w heat and sugar.

E G L IN T O N ’ (W.13) W ooden barque, 462 tons. W recked 1852. G azetted 8.9.77. 31°39.0' S 115°40.0' E, Y anchep, 50 km north o f Perth. Built 1842 in Q uebec; wrecked n ear Q uinns Rocks with the loss o f 2 lives, on a voyage from L ondon to F rem antle with 30 passengers an d general cargo for the m erchants of the colony.

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LADY L Y T T L E T O N ’ (W. 14) W ooden barque, 178 tons. W recked 1867. G azetted 8.9.77. 34°59.9' S 117°56.8' E, Albany. British-built; engaged in w haling and sealing; p u t into King G eorge Sound in a leaking condition en ro u te from A delaide to F rem antle; while being careened for repairs at Em u Point she slipped into d e e p e r w ater an d sank.

‘BEN LEDE (W. 15) T h re e-m asted iron-hulled sailing ship, 1107 tons. W recked 1879. Gazetted 8.9.77. 28°55.5' S 113°59.6' E, Pelsaert G roup, H o u tm an A brolhos Islands. Built 1868 at Glasgow; wrecked on voyage from Sydney to C alcutta in ballast w ithout loss

of life.

‘C E N T A U R ’ (W.16) Iro n -h u lled brig, 188 tons. W recked 1870. G azetted 8.9.77. 31°51.7'S 115°42.8' E, n o rth o f Frem antle. Built in Scotland; w recked on a voyage from C ham pion Bay to F rem antle with a cargo o f galena o re from G eraldton; no lives lost.

‘C HALM ERS’ (W.17) W ooden sailing ship, 606 tons. W recked 1874. G azetted 8.9.77. 32°22.0' S 115°41.2' E, P enguin Island. Built 1851 at S underland; ran ag ro u n d on Sisters R eef whilst carrying sugar from M auritius to Frem antle.

‘FAIRY Q U E E N ’ (W. 18) B rigantine, 115 tons. W recked 1875. G azette 8.9.77. 21°49.2'S 113° 11.5Έ , N orth West Cape. Built in S ingapore a n d b o u n d from th ere on a pearling cruise with a crew o f 37 and one stowaway.

‘ZEDORA’ (W. 19) T h ree-m asted w ooden barque, 257 tons. W recked 1875. Gazetted 8.9.77. 32°04.T S 1 15°37.7' E, Frem antle. Built 1869 in B ritain; w recked on a voyage from M auritius to A delaide in sand ballast

when a su dden squall shifted the ballast and the ship struck a re e f on the edge o f Huge! Passage.

‘GEM’ (W .20) C utter, 52 tons. W recked 1876. G azetted 8.9.77. 3 Γ 5 9 .6 ' S 115°33.5' E, R ottnest Island. Built 1835 at Cowes, Isle o f W ight; sank m ysteriously off F rem antle with cargo of wheat;

4 passengers and 6 crew, presum ed drow ned.

H ERO OF T H E N IL E ’ (W.21) W ooden barque, 356 tons. W recked 1876. G azetted 8.9.77. 32°23.3' S 1 15°43.5' E, L ong Point, W arnbro Sound. Built 1852 at Cowes, Isle o f W ight; wrecked while b ound in sand ballast from M elbourne to the L acepede Islands, n o rth o f B room e, to collect a cargo o f guano.

‘G E O R G E T T E ’ (W.22) Iron-hulled single screw steam er, 212 tons. W recked 1876. G azetted 8.9.77. 34°02.0'S 1 14°59.4'E, C aljadup, south of M argaret River. Built in Scotland; beached in a sinking condition with passengers, varied cargo and ballast; several passengers drow ned but a grazier’s d a u g h te r an d an A boriginal stockm an rode th eir horses into the su rf to save others.

‘LADY E L IZ A B E T H ’ (W.23) C om posite barque, 658 tons. W recked 1878. Gazetted 8.9.77. ’ ‘

32°01. T S, 115°32.8' E, R ottnest Island. Built 1869 in England; w recked after leaving F rem antle for S hanghai with a cargo o f sandalw ood.

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'JAMES SERV ICE’ (W .24) T h ree-m asted iron-hulled barque, 441 tons. W recked 1878. G azetted 8.9.77. 32°27.5' S 115°39.5' E, M andurah. Built 1860 in Scotland; w recked on M urray Reefs d u rin g a voyage from C alcutta to

M elbourne with 7 known passengers and a cargo o f ju te sacks and castor oil; no survivors.

‘M A R TEN ’ (W.25) Tw o-m asted w ooden schooner, 28 tons. W recked 1878. Gazetted 8.9.77. 28°55.5' S 113°59.6' E, Pelsaert G roup, H o u tm an A brolhos Islands. O w ned by the Browse Island G uano C om pany at the tim e o f h er loss; wrecked on a voyage in ballast from A delaide to Browse Island on the site subsequently also to claim the ‘Ben L edi’ (see W. 15).

‘D IA N A ’ (W.26) T h ree-m asted schooner, 223 tons. W recked 1878. G azetted 8.9.77. 32°05.9'S 115°45.3'E, F rem antle. Built 1860 in England; w recked after p arting h er m ooring cables d u rin g a storm .

‘STA R ’ (W.27) Tw o-m asted w ooden schooner, 70 tons. W recked 1880. G azetted 8.9.77. 32°22.2'S 115°41.2'E, R ockingham . Built 1876 in F rem antle; w recked while re tu rn in g from an unsuccessful w haling voyage to G eographe Bay.

‘A G IN C O U R T ’ (W.28) W ooden barque, 443 tons. W recked 1882. G azetted 8.9.77. 34°12.1 'S 115°01.18'E, o ff H am elin Bay N ational Park. Built 1863 in England; lost with a cargo o f tim ber while at anchor.

‘M ACEDON’ (W.29) Iro n -h u lled screw steam er, 562 tons. W recked 1883. Gazetted 8.9.77. 31°59.3'S 115°33.3'E, R ottnest Island. Built 1870 in Liverpool; w recked on T ransit R eef carrying 30 passengers, horses, mail, specie, general cargo an d a survey party including A lexander and Jo h n Forrest.

‘C H A U D IE R E ’ (W.30) W ooden barque, 410 tons. W recked 1883. G azetted 8.9.77. 34°12.2'S 1 15°01.7'E, o ff H am elin Bay National Park. Built 1883 in E ngland; lost with a cargo o f tim ber while at anchor.

‘M IRA FLORES’ (W.31) Iro n -h u lle d barque, 500 tons. W recked 1886. G azetted 8.9.77. 32°00.3'S 115°27.9'E, R ottnest Island. G erm an-ow ned vessel built in E ngland in 1867; b o u n d for F rem antle from L ondon when wrecked w ithout loss o f life on H orseshoe Reef, with a varied cargo including books, spirits, m achinery, fu rn itu re , assorted hardw are, farm equipm ent an d over 80 cases o f cartridges.

‘BELLE O F BU N B U R Y ’ (W.32) Fore-and-aft schooner, 42 tons. W recked 1886. G azetted 8.9.77. 32°18.7'S 115°41.4'E, Rockingham . Built 1877 at B unbury; w recked in T u b Passage with a cargo o f wool an d potatoes on a voyage from B unbury to Frem antle.

‘JA N E T ’ (W.33) T h ree-m asted w ooden schooner, 211 tons. W recked 1887. G azetted 8.9.77. 31°59.3'S 115°33.3'E, R ottnest Island. Built 1878 at F rem antle; w recked o ff T ransit R eef whilst en route from C olom bo with a cargo o f grain an d C eylon-m ade furniture.

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DEN TO N H O L M E ’ (W .34) Iro n -h u lled barque, 998 tons. W recked 1890. G azetted 8.9.77. 31°59.3'S 115°33.3'E, R ottnest Island. Built 1863 at F rem antle; w recked on T ran sit R eef on a voyage from Glasgow heavily laden with w ater pipes a n d general cargo.

‘DAY DA W N ’ (W.35) W ooden barque, w haler converted to storage hulk, 355 tons. Wrecked 1890. G azetted 8.9.77. 32°13.9'S 1 15°41.2'E, F rem antle. Built 1851 at F airhaven, M assachusetts, as th e w haling ship ‘T hom as N ye’; b o u g h t by a Sydney concern an d ap p e are d in 1864 as ‘Day D aw n’; cut dow n to b arq u e rig and sold to

a South A ustralian; w recked at Q u in d alu p while loading sleepers a n d towed to C areening Bay, probably for use as a hulk; beached a n d partly b u rn t at p resen t location.

‘RAVEN’ (W.36) T h ree-m asted w ooden barque, 343 tons. W recked 1891. G azetted 8.9.77. 32°01.3'S 115°33.3'E, R ottnest Island. Built 1864 in B ritain; w recked o ff Dyer Island w ithout loss of life on a voyage from

F rem antle to B unbury in ballast.

D A TO ’ (W.37) W ooden brig, 418 tons. W recked 1893. G azetted 8.9.77. 3 2 T 4 .3 'S 115°41.4Έ , G arden Island, n ear Kwinana. Built 1879 in Finland; originally wrecked at Q u in d alu p , later tow ed to F rem antle w here it was co n d em n ed an d sold; hulk apparently capsized and sank in its p resen t location.

‘U L ID IA ’ (W.38) T h ree-m asted , iron-hulled barque, 2378 tons. W recked 1893. G azetted 8.9.77. 32°03.3'S 115°37.7'E, Frem antle. Built 1889 in B ritain; w recked on Straggler R eef while heading o u t o f F rem antle in ballast.

Ό Μ Ε Ο ’ (W.39) B arque-rigged iron screw steam er, 605 tons. W recked 1894. G azetted 8.9.77. 32°06.4'S 115°45.6'E, Frem antle. Built 1858 at N ew castle-on-Tyne; used for carrying telegraph poles an d cargo for the

overland telegraph line from Darwin to P ort A ugusta; m odified to becom e a three-m asted jackass barque trad in g in the Pacific an d Indian O ceans; finally used as a hulk at F rem antle until she w ent ashore in O w en A nchorage in 1905.

‘SEPIA’ (WTO) T hree-m asted iron-hulled barque, 725 tons. W recked 1898. G azetted 8.9.77. 32°08.0'S 115°38.4'E, C arnac Island, south-w est o f Frem antle. Built 1864 in B ritain, o n e o f the best-know n vessels trading to F rem antle; she was

carrying a cargo including spirits, fancy goods, hardw are, glassware an d cem ent w hen she ran into C hallenger Rock an d sank w ithout loss o f life.

‘C ITY O F YORK’ (W.41) Iron-hulled barque, 1194 tons. W recked 1899. G azetted 8.9.77. 3 1°59.7'S 1 15°29. T E , R ottnest Island. Built 1861 at Glasgow; b o u n d from San Francisco with a cargo o f tim ber a n d 5000 doors

w hen w recked with the loss o f 11 lives as a result o f an incorrect signal from the R ottnest Light.

‘CARLISLE C A STLE’ (W.42) Sailing ship, 1545 tons. W recked 1899. G azetted 8.9.77. 32°20.0'S 1 15°37.9'E, G arden Island, south-w est o f Frem antle. Built 1868 at Blackwall, L ondon; this fam ous ‘Blackwall F rigate’ struck C oventry R eef in a gale a n d was lost with all hands; h e r cargo from Glasgow included iron railway lines, bricks a n d locating bars for the goldfields w ater schem e pipeline.

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‘R A PID ’ (W.43) T h ree-m asted w ooden trading vessel, 366 tons. W recked 1811. Gazetted 15.12.78. 22°44'S 113°41 Έ , N ingaloo R eef off Point Cloates, lOOkms south o f Exm outh. Previously know n as the P oint Cloates wreck, the rem ains have been identified recently as those o f the ‘R apid’, a w ell-arm ed A m erican C hina tra d e r built 1807 with two decks and a square stern, which was carrying a cargo including a large quantity o f coins from

B oston to C anton.

‘EU R O PA ’ (W.44). Iron-hulled barque, 756 tons. W recked 1897. G azetted 13.6.79. 30°24.9'S 114°59.5'E, J u rie n , 100km n o rth o f Perth. Built 1869 at N ew castle-on-Tvne as the ‘H aidee’; b o u g h t bv an Italian; wrecked on a voyage from Glasgow to F rem antle, the Italian crew abandoning h er a day later.

EYRE W RECK (W.45) U nidentified vessel o f substantial size. W recked c. 1800-1830. G azetted 27.7.81 32° 18'S 126°51Έ , 44 km east o f Eyre. T h e thickness o f the concretion on the site tends to su p p o rt the theory th at the vessel was wrecked p rio r to 1842. T h e actual date is unknow n but local A boriginal legend claims that the ship cam e ashore ‘two lifetim es o f a m an before Eyre and B axter cam e th ro u g h ’.

SU N SET BEACH W RECK (W.46) U nidentified vessel, 300— 400 tons. W recked c. 1870. G azetted 21.7.81. 28°43.4'S 114°37'E, G eraldton.

‘M ANFRED’ (W.47) W ooden barque, 587 tons. W recked 1879. G azetted 21.7.81. 16°51.4'S 122°07.7'E, L acepede Islands, 100km n o rth o f Broom e. Built 1864 at S underland; w recked in a cyclone while loading guano.

BROWSE ISLAND W R EC K ’ (W.48) U nidentified vessel. W recked c. 1870-1890. G azetted 21.7.81. 14°07'S 123°33.6'E, Browse Island, 350 km n o rth o f Derby. O ne o f lo u r large vessels wrecked in connection with the g u an o trade on the island in the period 1870-90.

‘P E R T H ’ (W.49) Iro n -h u lled steam er, 499 tons. W recked 1887. G azetted 21.7.81. 22°41.4'S 113°38.5'E, P oint Cloates, 100 km south o f Exm outh. Built 1863 in Scotland as the ‘P enola’; bought by the A delaide Steam ship C om pany and renam ed after refitting with new engines and boilers in 1885; subsequently serviced W estern A ustralian coastal trad e; w recked at night w ithout loss o f life.

‘ZVIR’ (W.50) Iron-hulled steam er, 3355 tons. W recked 1902. G azetted 21.7.81. 22°36'06"S 113°37'05"E, Point Cloates, 100km south o f Exm outh. Built 1900 at S underland, C roatian-ow ned; b o und for A delaide from Jav a with a cargo of sugar w hen she ran ashore.

‘ED D Y STO N E’ (W.51) B rigantine-rigged iron screw steam er, 2040 tons. W recked 1894. G azetted 21.7.81. 20°36.4'S 117°44.0'E, R oebourne.

Built 1886 at Stockton-on-Tees; stranded on an u n ch arted sandbank at the entrance to D epuch Island anchorage while on a coastal ru n from F rem antle to W yndham with passengers an d m ining m achinery; no lives lost.

V ILLA LTA ’ (W.52) Steel-hulled barque, 866 tons. W recked 1897. G azetted 21.7.81. 31°19'S 115°27'02"E, C ape L eschenault, 90 km n o rth o f Perth. Built 1883 at Glasgow; b o u n d for Frem antle from T acom a with 15 crew an d a cargo of tim ber w hen w recked on the reef; the captain and an apprentice were drow ned after their lifeboat overturned.

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KATIN K A ’ (W.53) Iron-hulled barque, 805 tons. W recked 1900. G azetted 21.7.81. 34°T2'S 115° 0 2 Έ , C ape H am elin, n ea r A ugusta. Built 1874 in Scotland, G erm an-ow ned; w recked with fo u r o th er vessels d u rin g a storm in H am elin Bay, a m ajor tim ber port. T h e overall loss o f life was a significant factor in the decline o f the port.

‘K A RRAKA TTA’ (W.54) Schooner-rigged iron-hulled coastal steam er, 1217 tons. W recked 1901. G azetted 21.7.81. 16°21.4'S 123°02T'E, Swan Point, 120 km north-w est o f Derby. Built 1897 at K inghorn, Scotland; b ound for S ingapore from F rem antle via coastal ports with 80 crew, 59 passengers an d mail; wrecked on the B room e-D erby leg at the entrance

to King S ound w ithout loss o f life.

‘CROW N O F E N G FA N D ’ (W.55) Iron-hulled sailing ship, 1847 tons. W recked 1912. Gazetted 21.7.81. 20°37.1 'S 117°43.9'E, D epuch Island, 70km east o f R oebourne. Built 1883 at W orkington; N orw egian-ow ned; broke u p whilst loading ore at anchor

during a cyclone; only 12 o f the 20 crew survived.

‘FIN ’ (W.56) Iron-hulled steam er, 93 tons. W recked 1923. G azetted 21.7.81. 22°39'S, 113°38.0'E, F raser Island, n ear Point Cloates, 100km south o f Exm outh. W haler built at Kristiania, Norway; sold to an A ustralian com pany in 1921; wrecked

d u rin g a cyclone.

W IN D SO R ’ (W.57) Iro n -h u lled steam er, 2892 tons. W recked 1908. G azetted 21.7.81. 29°0.0'S 113°56.3'E, Pelsaert G roup, H o u tm an A brolhos Islands. Built 1890 at H artlepool; w recked en route from F rem antle to H o n g K ong with a cargo of sandalw ood; 3 lives lost.

M A Y H ILF’ (W.58) F our-m asted steel-hulled barque, 2121 tons. W recked 1895. G azetted 21.7.81. 28°45.9'S 114°34.2'E, G erald ton. Built 1890 at D undee, S cotland; wrecked w ithout loss o f life in the en tran ce to G eraldton

H a rb o u r at the end o f a voyage from E ngland with a cargo o f railway lines for the M ullewa-Cue railway.

R IN G B O LT BAY W RECK (W.59) Small vessel, possibly a coastal trad e r. W recked c. 1880. G azetted 21.7.81. 34°21.3'S 1 15°09.2'E, n e a r A ugusta.

‘H A D D A ’ (W.60) B arque, 334 tons. W recked 1877. G azetted 12.3.82. 28°28'24"S 113°47'30"E, W allabi G roup, H o u tm an A brolhos Islands. Built 1860 at S undahaven, G erm any; sailed from M elbourne to L acepede Islands to ship guano, b u t h er papers w ere not in o rd e r on arrival; wrecked on the way to F rem antle to

rectify the m atter; no lives lost.

M AYFLOW ER’ (W.61) Brig, 227 tons. W recked 1880. G azetted 12.3.82. 34°20'S 115°10'30"E, C ape Leeuwin. Built 1867 at S u n d erlan d ; w recked w ithout loss o f life on a voyage from C ape T ow n to G uam in ballast.

‘U R IB ES’ (W.62) S chooner-rigged iron vessel, 118 tons. W recked 1942. G azetted 12.3.82. 32°00'03"S 115°33'21"E, R ottnest Island. Built 1868 at Stockton-on-Tees; used by the A ustralian Army from 1940 as a lighter; w recked n ear Phillip Rock w hen h er engines failed in p o o r w eather conditions; laden with 150 6” shells, stores an d two m otor vehicles; no lives lost a n d vehicles an d some

stores salvaged, but no t the shells.

143

ROWLEY SHOALS W RECK (‘LIV ELY’) (W.63) A rm ed whaler, 2 0 0 -2 5 0 tons. Wrecked c. 1800. G azetted 12.3.82. 17°05'24"S 119°35'30"E, Rowley Shoals, ab o u t 350 km n o rth o f Port H edland. N either tne nationality n o r the date o f the wreck is known for certain, bu t evidence suggests th at the wreck could be th at o f a B ritish vessel, the ‘Lively’.

‘PRIESTM A N D R ED G E’ (W.64) G rab-crane dredge. W recked 1893. G azetted 14.1.83. 32°03'32"S 1 15°44'08"E, Frem antle. A Priestm an dred g e capsized an d sank d u rin g the construction o f F rem antle H arbour; the crane, p um ps an d boiler were then recovered an d the crane was probably m ounted on a n o th er floating platform ; thus there were two vessels in succession known as the ‘Priestm an D redge’.

‘G O N T E ST ’ (W.65) W ooden barque, 322 tons. W recked 1874. G azetted 14.1.83. 32°16'32"S 115°42'48"E, R ockingham . Built at W ilmot, Nova Scotia in 1860; the vessel was to take railway sleepers to Lacepede Bay (S.A.) w hen she d rag g ed h er anchors an d drifted ashore at R ockingham after discharging h e r ballast.

K O O M BA N A ’ (W.66) Screw steam ship, 3668 tons. W recked 1912. G azetted 14.1.83. 19°05'S 118°52'E, about 100km n o rth o f Port H edland. Built 1908 at Glasgow; ow ned by th e A delaide Steam ship C om pany; lost with 76 crew and about 63 passengers in a cyclone after d ep artin g P ort H edland for B room e and

Derby; no survivors found. T h e incident h ap p e n ed alm ost exactly a year after the ‘Y ongala’ (Q.2), ow ned by th e sam e com pany, was lost o ff Q ueensland.

‘B A TO E BASSE (W.67) W ooden D utch colonial barque, 400 tons. W recked 1880. G azetted 14.1.83. 33°54'36"S 122°50'12"E, 100km east o f Esperance.

Probably built in the D utch East Indies and crewed m ainly by Malays; the vessel sprang a leak an d was beached d u rin g a voyage from Java to M elbourne with a cargo o f sugar and coconuts; no lives lost.

‘C U M B ERLA N D ’ (W.68) T eak-built British m erchantm an, 444 tons. W recked 1830. G azetted 26.5.83. 34°17'33"S 115°02'20"E, C ape H am elin, near Augusta.

Built 1827 at Bom bay; w recked on voyage from Newcastle N.S.W. to W estern Australia w ithout loss o f life; the 54 people on board escaped in boats bu t 3 o f the 20 who came ashore n ear C ape N aturaliste died before they were found.

LUBRA’ (W.69) Iron-hulled screw steam er, 321 tons. W recked 1898. G azetted 19.12.83. 30°18'19"S 114°59'44"E, J u rie n , 100km no rth o f Perth. Built 1860 at Glasgow, specifically fo r A ustralian coastal use carrying passengers and goods; beached after striking an un ch arted re e f over 8km from land.

YARRA’ (W.70) Iron-hulled barque, 482 tons. W recked 1884. G azetted 20.5.86. 14°02'18"S 121°46'00"E, Scott Reef, 350 km n o rth o f Broom e. B ritish-built; w recked d u rin g a cyclone while bound for Falm outh with a cargo o f guano; no lives lost.

‘H IG H LA N D FO R EST’ (W.71) T hree-m asted iron-hulled barque, 998 tons. W recked 1901. G azetted 20.5.86. 32°23'S 115°4 l'E , M urray Reefs, south o f Frem antle. Built 1884 at Leith, Scotland; wrecked in fine w eather whilst en route from New York to Frem antle fully laden with general cargo; all 18 crew survived.

144

South A ustralia LOCH V E N N A C H A R ’ (S .l) T h ree-m asted iron-hulled sailing ship, 155 tons. W recked 1905. G azetted 12.3.82. 35°53'00"S 136°31'57"E, K angaroo Island.

Built 1875 in Glasgow; o n e o f the fastest ships o f the Loch Line fleet, once sailing to Australia in 74 days; w recked o ff the w estern tip o f K angaroo Island while b o und for Port A delaide with a general cargo and 25 crew; th ere were no survivors. ‘M O N TEB ELLO ’ (S.2) T h ree-m asted iron-hulled barque, 2284 tons. W recked 1906. Gazetted 12.3.82. 36°01'20"S 137°00'15"E, K angaroo Island.

Built 1900 in France; u n d e r ch a rter to the S outh A ustralian F arm ers U nion when wrecked w ithout loss o f life in a storm on the rocky south coast o f K angaroo Island whilst sailing from H obart to Port Pirie.

‘CLAN R A NALD’ (S.3) Single screw, tu rre t deck steam ship, 3596 tons. W recked 1909. G azetted 12.3.82. 35°10'05"S 137°37'30"E, o ff T ro u b rid g e Hill, Yorke Peninsula. Built 1900 at S underland; loaded at Port A delaide with wheat, flour an d sufficient coal

for a voyage to D urban; developed a list while at po rt which was co u n tered by re-distribution o f th e coal; the day the ship d e p a rte d she developed a severe list to starboard an d sank with the loss o f 44 o f the 63 crew.

G E L T W O O D ’ (S.4) T h ree-m asted iron-hulled barque, 1056 tons. W recked 1876. G azetted 25.2.83. 37°38'40"S 140° 11 '3 5 Έ , 20 km south o f B eachport. W recked on an offshore re e f d u rin g a violent storm whilst on h er m aiden voyage from

Liverpool to M elbourne; all 27 passengers a n d crew drow ned.

ADM ELLA’ (S.5) Iro n -h u lled single screw steam ship, 392 tons. W recked 1859. G azetted 13.7.83. 37°52'40"S 140°2T00"E, C ape Banks, n ea r Millicent. Built 1857 in Glasgow a n d used mainly on the A delaide-M elbourne ru n ; wrecked in strong ocean cu rren ts an d swells with 82 passengers, 31 crew, co p p er, 7 racehorses an d general cargo; only 21 people survived.

‘M ARGARET B RO CK ’ (S.6) T h ree-m asted w ooden barque, 245 tons. W recked 1852. G azetted 13.7.83. 36°57'00"S 139°35'40"E, o ff Kingston SE. Built 1848 at H o b art T o w n ; wrecked on a re e f whilst on a voyage from A delaide to

M elbourne with a cargo o f bricks, flour and general m erchandise; all passengers and crew survived.

Tasm ania ‘SYDNEY C OVE’ (T. 1) M erchant vessel. W recked 1797. G azetted 16.3.84. 40°29' 37"S 148°04' 3 9 Έ , n ea r C ape B arren Island. W hilst en route from C alcutta with speculative cargo intended for P ort Jackson NSW, storm s a n d leaks forced the ship ashore on Preservation Island west o f C ape B arren

Island.

‘C ITY O F E D IN B U R G H ’ (T.2) W ooden barque, 367 tons. W recked 1840. Gazetted 26.9.85 40°01'20"S 147°53'40"E, Flinders Island. Built 1813 at C oringa, India; from 1828 she carried convicts and general cargo from

B ritain to New South Wales; wrecked on rocks after being partially dism asted; no lives lost.

145

‘L IT H E R L A N D ’ (T.3) T h ree-m asted square-rigged m erch an t ship, 305 tons. W recked 1853. G azetted 26.9.85. 40°33'00"S 148°04'00"E, C ape B arren Island. Built 1834 at N orth B irkenhead; plied betw een B ritain, the West Indies, S ingapore and C hina before becom ing a H obart whaler; re-fitted as cargo vessel in 1852 and struck a subm erged rock d u rin g a gale whilst laden with coal an d o th er cargo; no loss o f life. ‘C A M B R ID G ESH IR E’ (T.4) Iron-hulled clipper, 1766 tons. W recked 1875. G azetted 26.9.85. 40°28'35"S 148°01'45"E, C ape B arren Island.

Built 1873 at N ew castle-on-Tyne; dism asted on first voyage to A ustralia; w recked on a re e f d u rin g the second, w ithout loss oflife.

‘A STER O PE’ (T.5) T h ree-m asted w ooden barque, 602 tons. W recked 1883. G azetted 26.9.85. 41°02'53"S 146°44Ί 1Έ , G eorgetow n. Built 1855 at A berdeen; w recked on H ebe R eef near the com pletion o f a voyage from

L ondon to L aunceston. T h e ill-fated voyage began badly with the vessel twice having to re tu rn to p o rt before leaving E ngland.

N orthern Territory ‘JA PA N ESE SU B M A R IN E’ 1-124 (N T .l*). W recked 1942. G azetted 19.12.78. 12°06.92' S I30°06.77' E, n e a r B athurst Island, 30km north-w est o f Darwin. Sunk on 20 Ja n u a ry 1942 afte r having laid 27 m ines o ff Darwin.

External Territories ‘EM D EN ’ (E T .l*) G erm an light cruiser, 3600 tons. W recked 1914. G azetted 12.3.82. 11°50' 30"S 96°49' 2 2 Έ , Cocos (Keeling) Islands. Active against Allied sh ip p in g in the Indian O cean at the outset o f the First W orld War; engaged and o u t-g u n n ed by HM AS ‘Sydney’; w hen attacking the Cocos Islands

telegraph station on 9 N ovem ber a n d eventually ran a g ro u n d on N orth Keeling Island.

HMS ‘SIR IU S’ (ET.2) B ritish warship, 540 tons. W recked 1790. G azetted 29.10.84. 29°03' 40"S 167°57' 0 5 Έ , K ingston, N orfolk Island. Built as a cargo vessel, the ‘Berwick’, in the T ham es in 1780 and badly b u rn t; the hull was bought by the Navy in 1781 for shipping stores; subsequently re-fitted as a w arship and becam e flagship o f the First Fleet in 1788; sent with HMS ‘Supply’ by G overnor Phillip, d u rin g shortages from P o rt Jackson to N orfolk Island with 275 convicts an d m arines; a com bination o f wind an d tide d u rin g offloading o f provisions ran the ship onto the reef.

146

Appendix 14 Members of Artbank Board

Chairperson Ms. Sue W alker, AM Members Mr. H endrik K olenberg

Ms. H e ath er Ellyard Prof. R oger Layton Mr. G raem e S turgeon (Director, Ex-Officio)

148

Appendix 15 Overseas visits by Departmental Officers 1985-86

Date Officer Country visited Purpose! Conference

July 1985 Ms E. Sm ith

(A ustralian N ational Botanic G ardens)

USA N ational C ouncil for

T h erap y and R ehabilitation through Elorticulture C onference

Aug 1985 M r A.B C ourt

(A ustralian N ational Botanic G ardens)

N etherlands/U K / West G erm any In tern atio n al Sym posium on the T axonom y of

C ultivated Plants

Aug-Nov M r E. A nderson UK/W est G erm any/ Senior Executive

1985 (E nvironm ent

Assessm ent B ranch) Holland/U SA / C anada/France India/T hailand/

Indonesia/ Malaysia

Fellowship

Sept-O ct M r I. Sm ith A sia/K enya/Europe/ P reparation for

1985 (Research and

Inform ation B ranch) N orth Am erica international Drylands

C onference.

Sept-O ct 1985

M r A.G. K err (D eputy Secretary) UK N inth C onsultative

m eeting o f L ondon D um ping C onvention

Sept-Oct 1985

Dr J. G ordon-Sm ith (C ontam inants B ranch)

UK N inth C onsultative

m eeting o f L ondon D um ping C onvention

Sept-O ct 1985

Ms J. Jo h n so n (C onservation B ranch)

France, Belgium A ntarctic M ineral

Resources M eeting and A ntarctic T reaty C onsultative M eeting

Nov 1985 M r K.E. T h o m p so n (C onservation and E nvironm ent A ssessm ent Division)

Saudi A rabia/ Switzerland/ France AOPC/M EPA Project Review M eeting IUCN,

and OECD G ro u p of Econom ic Experts.

Nov 1985 Ms A. G reenall

(E nvironm ent Co­ ordination B ranch)

T hailand U N E P M eeting on

E nvironm ental E ducation an d T ra in in g in Asia and Pacific Region.

149

Nov 1985 M r L. Neilson

(Film B ranch)

C anada/USA /L'K T o exam ine governm ent assistance program s for the film and television industries, developm ents in com m unications including Pay TV , netw orking and local content rules, film co­ productions an d o ther related film m atters.

Nov 1985- M r G. Upstill K enya/Sudan/E gypt/ S econdm ent to U N EP to

Jan 1986 (Research a n d

Inform ation B ranch Morocco p re p are A frican case

studies fo r International Drylands C onference.

Nov 1985 D r J. G ordon-Sm ith (E nvironm ent Co­ ordination B ranch)

N oum ea SPREP C onvention

N egotiations.

Nov 1985 D r R.W. B oden

(A ustralian N ational Botanic G ardens)

Sw itzerland/Spain/ UK/W est G erm any IU C N Plant Advisory G ro u p m eeting an d the

W orld C onservation Stategy C onference.

Nov-Dec M r M. B ourke Indonesia/ H eritage and T ourism

1985 (C orporate a n d

Portfolio S u p p o rt Division)

Singapore/W est G erm any/F ranee/ India

C onference, ICO M O S and W orld H eritage C om m ittee m eeting

Nov-Dec 1985

M r D. Gascoine (E nvironm ent C ontam inants and C o-ordination

Division)

France OECD Chem icals G roup

M eeting

Dec 1985 D r D. MacRae

(Research and Inform ation B ranch)

U SA /C anada/France/ Belgium /U K /Spain/ Mexico

OECD E nvironm ent C om m ittee M eeting and In tern atio n al Drylands

Project consultations

M arch 1986

M r P. Pollard (C ontam inants Branch)

USA OECD W aste

M anagem ent Policy G roup M eeting

A pr 1986 D r J. H olland

(C ontam inants B ranch)

Austria OECD W orkshop on

E xposure Assessm ent

Apr-M ay M r P.J. Galvin Singapore/K enya/ ASEAN E xpert G roup

1986 (Secretary) France/UK/USA M eeting/C onsulation with

UNEP/OECD E nvironm ent C om m ittee/ Portfolio C onsultation.

May 1986 M r I.R. T elfo rd

(A ustralian N ational Botanic G ardens)

USA C ucurbitaceae Research at

invitation o f Bishop M useum , Hawaii

M ay-June 1986 M r J. Kenney (Artbank)

C anada A ttachm ent to A rtbank

C anada

150

M ay-June M r A.G. K err Y ugoslavia/H ungary/ A ccom pany M inister on

1986 (D eputy Secretary) Israel/U K /Ireland/

C anada

official visit to advance arts, cultural and en v iro n m en t m atters. Present A ustralian

N ational C onservation Strategy re p o rt to IUCN W orld C onservation Strategy m eeting in

Ottowa.

Ju n e 1986 M r D. Gascoine (E nvironm ent C ontam inants and C oordination

Division)

France O ECD Chem icals G roup

m eeting

Ju n e 1986 D r M.D. Crisp

(A ustralian N ational Botanic G ardens)

USA 2nd International Legum e

C onference

June-July Dr D. MacRae T h ailand/India/ In tern atio n al Drylands

1986" (Research and

Inform ation Branch) France/B elgium / N etherlands/U K / USA

Project fu n d in g and p rep aratio n s for regional w orkshops

151

Appendix 16 Members of Cultural Ministers Council

Commonwealth M inister for Arts, H eritage an d E nvironm ent H on. B arry C ohen, MP New South Wales

Prem ier and M inister for the Arts H on. Neville W ran, QC, MLA Victoria M inister for the Arts

Hon. Race M athews, MLA Queensland M inister for T ourism , N ational Parks, Sport an d the Arts H on. P eter M cKechnie, MLA Western Australia M inister for the Arts

Hon. David Parker, MLA South Australia Prem ier and M inister for the Arts H on. J.C . B annon, M HA Tasmania M inister for Education an d the Arts H on. P eter Rae, MHA Northern Territory

M inister for Y outh, Sport, R ecreation and Ethnic Affairs H on. Don Dale, MLA Australian Capital Territory M inister for T erritories

H on. G.G.D. Scholes, MP New Zealand M inister for In tern al Affairs H on. P. Tapsell, MBE, MP Papua New Guinea

M inister for C ulture an d T ourism H on. N. Rooney, MP

Secretary M r M.D.G. Coley D e p artm en t o f Arts, H eritage an d E nvironm ent

152

Appendix 17 Standing Committee of the Cultural Ministers’ Council

Members Commonwealth Mr P.J. Galvin New South Wales

Mr F.E. Williams Victoria Mr P. C larkson Qxieensland

Mr S. Wilcox Western Australia Ms C. R obinson South Australia

M r L.L. A m adio, AM Tasmania Mrs Lee Prince Northern Territory

M r R.J. N orm an Australian Capital Territory M rJ.D . Enfield New Zealand

M r E. Babe

Papua New Guinea M r A. Jaw odim bari

Secretary M r M.D.G. Coley D epartm ent o f Arts, H eritage and E nvironm ent

153

Appendix 18 Members of Australian Libraries and Information Council 1985— 86

Chairman Mr W.L. Brown (1/7/85-3/6/86) M r W.M. H orton

(3 /6 /8 6 -) Deputy Chairman Mrs M. T rask, AM (1/7/85-9/12/85)

Mr R.C. S harm an (9/12/85-) Members Mr H. B ryan, AO

(1/7/85-28/7/85) Mr D. B arron (2 /6 /8 6 - ) Mr P. C am eron Mr B.F. Cox, OBE, MVO Mr R. Davis Mr R.F. Doust Mr P.J. J u d g e Ms J. La Scala Mr E.M. Miller

Ms D.G. Peake (9/12/85-) Mr S.L. Ryan Mr N. Stockdale Secretary

Mr M.D.G. Coley

State Library o f T asm ania

N ational Library o f A ustralia

Libraries B oard o f W estern A ustralia

N ational Library o f A ustralia

C anberra Public Library Services

N om inee o f the C om m onw ealth M inister for Education A ustralian Archives N o rth ern T errito ry Library Services State Library o f NSW N om inee o f the M inister for Science State Library o f Victoria State Library o f S outh Australia

N om inee o f the C om m onw ealth M inister for E ducation

State Library o f Q ueensland N om inee o f the C om m onw ealth M inister for Education

D epartm ent o f Arts, H eritage and E nvironm ent

154

Appendix 19 Members of the Tasmanian World Heritage Area Consultative

Committee

Chairman Mr D oug Doyle, ISO Members Mr G ar B anfield

Mr B ruce Dilger, AM Mr M ichael Hill

Mr David Jen n in g s

Dr Rhys Jo n es

Dr R ichard Jo n es

Ms Ros L angford

Mr Jo h n Luscom be Mr T im M acartney-Snape Mr Bryce M cNair

Mr Ewan M oore Mr G eorge Smith, OAM

Mr R obert Tyson

F orm er D irector G eneral o f Lands, T asm ania

W arden o f S trahan W arden o f Q ueenstow n

Assistant D irector, A ustralian N ational Parks and Wildlife Service Resource D evelopm ent Officer, S enior Geologist, T asm anian D e p artm en t o f Mines Senior Fellow, D ep artm en t o f Prehistory, Research

School o f Pacific Studies, A ustralian N ational University Director, C en tre for E nvironm ent Studies, University o f T asm ania (deceased 19/311986)

T asm anian A rea M anager, A boriginal D evelopm ent Commission P roprietor, B icheno Holiday Village Director, W ilderness Expeditions

Executive D irector, Forest Industries Association of T asm ania President, F ederation o f T asm anian Bushw alking Clubs C hairm an, Local Advisory C om m ittee, W est Coast

Pioneers M em orial M useum Regional M anager, South-W est T asm ania, T asm anian N ational Parks an d Wildlife Service

155

Appendix 20 Members of the Tasmanian World Heritage Area Council

Commonwealth H on B. C ohen, MP H on J. Brown, MP Tasmania

H on R.T. Gray, M HA {Chairman) H on G.A. Pearsell, M HA

M inister for Arts, H eritage and E nvironm ent M inister for Sport, R ecreation and T ourism

Prem ier, T re asu re r, M inister for State D evelopm ent and Small Business, M inister for Energy D eputy P rem ier, M inister for T ourism , M inister for Licensing, M inister for Police an d Em ergency

Services, M inister for Road Safety an d M inister for G am ing

156

Appendix 21 Environmental Impact Statements 1985-86

Directed:

— 19 Ju ly 1985 Proposed M aster Plan for T ullam arine A irport, M elbourne, VIC — 22 Ju ly 1985 RAN A rm am ents D epot, Jervis Bay, NSW

— 29 Ju ly 1985 W oodchip exports by M cLean Sawmills, Albany, WA — 6 S eptem ber 1985 A rm y T rain in g Facilities Project, NSW

• Schools C om plex (re-directed) • M anoeuvre an d Field Firing A rea (re-directed) — 1 M arch 1986 G unghalin E xternal T ra n sp o rt C onnections, A C T

Released fo r Public Review — 17 J u n e 1985 to 26 A ugust 1985 Identification an d acquisition o f a site for Second Sydney A irport, NSW — 25 J u n e 1985 to 23 S eptem ber 1985

Extension to P roof an d E xperim ental Establishm ent, Port W akefield, SA — 10 D ecem ber 1985 to 7 M arch 1986 Proposed E astern Parkway, A C T — 25 M arch 1986 to 24 A pril 1986

Vickery Coal Project, n ea r Boggabri, NSW

— 3 J u n e 1986 to 31 Ju ly 1986 Renewal o f w oodchips ex p o rt approval beyond 1989 for H arris Daishowa at E den, NSW. '

157

Appendix 23 Members of the ABRS Advisory Committee 1985— 86

Chairman Em eritus Prof. G B S harm an, FAA, Evandale, Tas.

Members Miss M C am eron, V ice-President, Royal A ustralian O rnithologists U nion an d Editor G eelong N aturalist Prof. T C C ham bers, B otany D epartm ent, M elbourne University (from 1.1.1986) Dr B Y Main, Zoology D ep artm en t, University o f W estern A ustralia E m eritus Prof. M G P itm an, OBE, FAA, D irector, Institute o f Biological Resources, CSIRO

Dr I) J G G riffin, D irector, T h e A ustralian M useum , Sydney Dr R W Jo h n so n , D irector, Botany B ranch, Q ueensland D ep artm en t o f Prim ary Industries Em eritus Prof. J D O vington, Director, A ustralian N ational Parks and Wildlife Service (ex-officio) Dr P B B ridgew ater, D irector, B ureau o f Flora and F auna (ex-officio) Secretary Mr C, V W B ran d t (Tel. (062) 467504)

160

Appendix 24 Permits granted during 1985— 86 under the Environment Protection (Sea Dumping) Act 1981

Substances Permit Type

and origin Quantity Period Location

dredge spoil. 300 000 G eneral Perm it o f dum p-site half a

G roote Eylandt N.T. tonnes 1.8.85 to 31. 10.85 nautical mile west of

Alyangula.

dred g e spoil — V ariation to G eneral o u ter d u m p site

Port H edland Perm it o f (6.5.85 to

30.9.86)5.5.86

enlarged

dred g e spoil, 150 000 Special Perm it area 7 nautical miles

D arling H a rb o u r (PortJackson) tonnes 27.9.85 to 31.8.87 ESE o f Port Jackson.

dred g e spoil, 490 000 variation o f G eneral as above

G roote Eylandt N.T. tonnes Perm it above.

27.9.85

dred g e spoil, 17 m illion G eneral Perm it two areas 6.5 nautical

P orter D am pier tonnes 1.1.86 t o 3 1 .12.87 miles n o rth o f Port

D am pier.

dred g e spoil, 22 m illion variation of as above

Port D am pier tonnes G eneral Perm it

above. 1.3.86

d red g e spoil, 750 tonnes G eneral Perm it 2.8 nautical miles

P aram atta River 21.11.85 to 21.5.86 east o f C url C url H ead.

d red g e spoil, 40 000 Special Perm it area 2 nautical m

Port Kem bla tonnes 16.12.85 to 16.12.86 miles east o f P ort Kembla.

d red g e spoil, 315 000 G eneral Perm it site 2.5 nautical

Newcastle H a rb o u r

tonnes 30.12.85 to 30.3.86 miles SE O f N obby’s

H ead

process liquor 30 000 G eneral Perm it (i) betw een 150 & 250

(paperm aking) tonnes 13.1.86 to

31.12.86

nautical miles o ff east coast, n o rth o f 38° S

an d south o f 29° 30's and

161

(ii) betw een 150 & 250 nautical miles o ff South coast, west o f 140°35'E and east o f 135°40'E.

d red g e spoil 6000 G eneral Perm it about 1 nautical mile

Ulladulla H a rb o u r

tonnes 20.2.86 to 20.2.87 east o f W arden H ead

d red g e spoil 1200 G eneral Perm it 2.8 nautical miles

D rum oyne Bay (Port Jackson) tonnes 13.3.86 to 13.9.86 east o f C url C url

Head.

dred g e spoil, 20 000 G eneral Perm it area 0.5 nautical

Koolan Island tonnes 9.4.86 to 9.10.86 miles NE o f T a rra n t

Island.

dred g e spoil, balance o f G eneral Perm it site nautical mile

G roote Eylandt 10 000 tonnes

no t d u m p ed u n d e r previous p erm it

23.3.86 to 23.9.86 from G roote Eylandt

west o f Alyangula.

jarosite 240 000 Special Perm it area centred on

(M etallurgical process waste)

tonnes 1.7.86 to 30.6.87 43°36.5'S 148°14.5'E.

(60 nautical miles south o f H obart).

162

Appendix 25 Members of the Australian Ionising Radiation Advisory Council

Chairman E m eritus Prof. A M Clark, AM Pro-C hancellor Flinders University, SA Deputy Chairman

Prof. R W Parsons Professor o f E xperim ental Physics University o f Q ueensland, QLD Members Mr D R Davy C hief,E nvironm ental Science Division

A ustralian Atomic E nergy Com m ission, NSW Dr J A M Graves Senior L ecturer D ep artm en t o f G enetics an d Hum aA Variation

La T ro b e University, VIC Dr B Kynaston Acting D irector Q ueensland R adium Institute, QLD

Prof. A O L anglands D irector o f R adiation O ncology W estm ead C entre, NSW Dr K H Lokan

D irector A ustralian R adiation L aboratory, VIC.

Prof. J 1) Mathews D irector M enzies School o f H ealth R esearch Darwin N T Dr R J Petty Senior Physicist D ep artm en t o f Radiological Sciences A lfred Hospital, VIC.

Prof. B M Spicer Professor o f Physics University o f M elbourne, VIC.

163

Departmental Observer:

Mr D F Gascoine First Assistant Secretary E nvironm ent C ontam inants an d C o-ordination Division Secretary:

M r M G M athews (Tel: (062) 467356)

164

Appendix 26 Grants to Voluntary Conservation Organisations 1985— 86

National

Administrative Grant

Special Purpose Grant Total

$ $ $

A ustralian C onservation F oundation 140 000 140 000

Keep A ustralia B eautiful C ouncil — National 55 000 55 000

Friends o f the E arth A ustralia 12 000 12 000

A ustralian N ational Parks C ouncil 2 200 2 200

A ustralian C om m ittee for IU C N 6 600 6 600

T he W ilderness Society 40 000 40 000

Project Jo n a h 3 000 3 000

Royal A ustralian O rnithologists U nion 5 000 5 000

N SW N ature C onservation C ouncil o f NSW 79 000 4 000 83 000

N ational Parks Association o f NSW 17 600 17 600

T otal E n vironm ent C entre 8 800 3 000 11 800

N orth C oast E nvironm ent Council 4 400 4 400

South C oast C onservation Society Coop Ltd. 4 000 4 000

Victoria C onservation C ouncil o f Victoria 66 000 66 000

Victorian N ational Parks Association 15 400 15 400

Queensland Q ueensland C onservation C ouncil Inc 82 500 3 000 85 500

N ational Parks Association o f Q ueensland 4 500 4 500

C airns a n d Far N orth E nvironm ent C entre 9 500 9 500

N orth Q u eensland C onservation Council Inc 14 000 14 000

W ide Bay B u rn ett C onservation Council 2 000 2 000

C apricorn C onservation C ouncil 6 000 6 000

S unshine C oast E nvironm ent Council 3 500 3 500

W ildlife Preservation Society o f Q ld Inc 8 500 6 000 14 500

R ainforest C onservation Soc. o f Qld 7 000 3 900 10 900

Western Australia T h e E nvironm ent C en tre o f WA (Inc) 38 500 38 500

C onservation C ouncil o f WA Inc 36 000 10 500 46 500

WA N ational Parks an d Reserves Assoc. (Inc) 3 500 3 500

165

S o u th A u stra lia

C onservation C ouncil o f South Australia Inc 52 000 52 000

T h e N ature C onservation Soc. o f SA Inc 10 000 10 000

Tasmania T asm ania C onservation T ru st Inc 23 000 23 000

T asm ania E nvironm ent C entre Inc 35 200 35 200

Launceston E n vironm ent C entre Inc 8 000 8 000

Northern Territory The E nvironm ent C en tre (NT) Inc 38 500 5 000 43 500

A C T C anberra & S-E Reg. E nvironm ent C entre Inc 19 800 19 800

C onservation Council o f S-E Reg. & C anberra 6 600 6 600

Special Grants M urray Valley League for Dev. & C onservation 15 000 15 000

A ustralian T ru st for C onservation V olunteers 4 000 4 000

Far South C oast E nvironm ent G roup 8 000 8 000

RSPCA A ustralia Inc 10 000 10 000

D enm ark E nvironm ent G roup 5 000 5 000

Totals 886 600 58 400 945 000

166

Appendix 27 Members of the Australian Environment Council

C om m onw ealth H on. B. C ohen, MP

M inister for Arts, H eritage a n d E nvironm ent

New South Wales H on. R. C arr MLA,

M inister for P lanning an d E nvironm ent

Victoria H on. J.H . K ennan, MLC

M inister for P lanning and E nvironm ent

Q ueensland H on. Sir J o h B jelke-Petersen, KCMG, MLA

P rem ier an d T re a su re r of Q ueensland

W estern Australia H on. B.J. H odge, MLA

M inister for the E nvironm ent

South A ustralia H on. D.J. H opgood, MLA

D eputy P rem ier an d M inister for E nvironm ent and P lanning

T asm ania H on. P.C.L. H odgem an, M HA

M inister for E nvironm ent

A ustralian Capital T errito ry H on. G.G.D. Scholes MP M inister for T erritories

N o rth e rn T errito ry H on. T . M cCarthy MHA

M inister for Prim ary P roduction an d C onservation

New Z ealand (Observer) H on. P.B. Goff, MP

M inister for E nvironm ent

P apua New G uinea (Observer) H on. T . M uliap, MP M inister for E nvironm ent and C onservation

Secretary to C ouncil M r G .T. H ore

(Tel: (062)467436)

167

Appendix 28 Members of the Council of Nature Conservation Ministers

C om m onw ealth H on B. C ohen, MP

M inister for Arts, H eritage a n d E nvironm ent

H on B.O. Jones, MP M inister for Science

New S outh Wales H on R. C arr, MLA

M inister for P lanning and E nvironm ent

Victoria H on J. K irner, MLC

M inister for C onservation Forests an d Lands

Q ueensland H on P.R. M cKechnie, MLA

M inister for T ourism , N ational Parks, Sport and the Arts

South A ustralia H on D J . H opgood, MLA

D eputy P rem ier an d M inister for E nvironm ent and P lanning

W estern Australia H on B J . H odge, MLA

M inister for C onservation and L and M anagem ent

T asm ania H on J.M . B ennett, M HA

M inister for N ational Parks

A ustralian Capital T errito ry H on G.G.D. Scholes, MP M inister for T erritories

N o rth ern T errito ry H on T . M cCarthy, M HA

M inister for Prim ary Production an d C onservation

New Zealand (Observer) H on R. M arshall, MP

M inister for C onservation

Papua-N ew G uinea (O bserver) H on T. M uliap, MP M inister for E nvironm ent an d C onservation

Secretary Mr G .T. H ore (Tel. 062-467436)

168

Appendix 29 World Environment Day Youth Awards 1986

Title W arrane H igh School, native p lan t project

D evelopm ent o f an indigenous wildlife refu g e

‘Free R ange’ radio program

R estoration and landscaping o f Pebbly Beach Blue W ater environm ental

project

Type developed m eans to germ inate an d propagate native plants for hom es

an d schools wildlife refuge

h alf h o u r radio p rogram dealing with environm ental issues

restoration o f seaside d unes and vegetation

propagation an d planting o u t o f seeds, trail construction an d provision o f area to ‘h e a r’ the bush

Group W arrane H igh School senior students, Tas.

five students o f the Good S heperd College, H am ilton, Vic.

23 year old person on public broadcasting station (6UVS- FM), Perth.

students and staff o f F orster H igh School, NSW.

Girl G uides Assoc. (Qld) Blue W ater C om m ittee

169

Appendix 31 Media Releases by Minister 1985— 86

1985 4 Ju l 21 Ju l 22 Ju l 22 ju l 24 Ju l 25 Ju l

1 A ug 8 Aug 8 A ug 13 Aug 1 4 A ug 23 Aug 26 Aug 26 Aug 29 Aug 30 Aug 30 A ug

3 Sep 3 Sep 4 Sep 4 Sep 4 Sep 6 Sep 9 Sep 19 Sep 23 Sep 23 Sep 25 Sep 27 Sep

1 Oct 1 Oct 3 Oct

172

C om m onw ealth C ontribution to A lpine N ational Park Q ueensland refusal to participate in the Festival o f Pacific Arts A p p o in tm en t o f C hairm an o f the A ustralian Film and Television School

H ellfire Pass M em orial to A ustralian POWS In tern atio n al R ecognition for A ustralian C onservationist New Publication — Folklife an d the A ustralian G overnm ent A p p o in tm en t to the Council o f the N ational Library o f A ustralia T o u rin g C urtin/C hifley exhibition W ilderness Areas T h e Facts on U luru A ppointm ents to A ustralian H eritage Commission A ustralia Ratifies the L ondon D um ping C onvention Mobil A rts Awards M ore M oney for V oluntary C onservation G roups C om m onw ealth B udget F unding Enhances Starfish Research

International G arden Festival P arram atta Road No increase in Q ueensland K angaroo Q uota F unding for th e Arts A ppointm ents to B oards o f the A ustralia Council A ppointm ents to the A ustralian Film Commission Q u e en slan d ’s M ism anagem ent o f K angaroo Q uota C om m onw ealth to F und N ational Education Program on U nleaded Petrol A ppointm ents to C ouncil o f A ustralian N ational Gallery Assistance to th e Film Industry G overnm ent S u p p o rt for the A rts an d C ultural O rganisations

1988 Festival o f Pacific Arts T ailage Spillings at R anger The Dunera Boys F u rth e r Protection for the Foam Victorian W reck D eclared Historic G reat B arrier R eef Consultative C om m ittee

8 Oct 8 Oct 8 Oct 9 Oct 10 Oct 13 Oct 15 Oct 18 Oct 18 Oct 22 Oct 22 Oct 24 Oct 29 Oct

1 Nov 13 Nov 14 Nov 15 Nov 19 Nov 24 Nov 29 Nov

5 Dec 30 Dec

1986 15 Ja n 15 Ja n 17 Ja n 22 Ja n 22 Ja n 29 Ja n 29 Ja n 30 Ja n 31 Ja n

31 Ja n 6 Feb 6 Feb 6 Feb 11 Feb 11 Feb 11 Feb 12 Feb

14 Feb

E n v iro n m en t Y outh Awards R ainforest C onservation in A ustralia C onservation an d D evelopm ent in H arm ony N ational T re e C are Award w inners nam ed

A ustralia to Ban D um ping o f Radioactive Waste N ational T re e P rogram (N .T.P.) Journalism A ward W inner $930 000 for Biological Research P arliam entary/C onstitutional M useum

Festival o f A ustralian Folklife News is m ore th a n ‘B ang B ang’ A C T N ational Estate G rants P rogram for 1985-86 Koala C onservation Program G rants

G reat B arrier R eef M inisterial C ouncil M eeting

Rosewood for the New P arliam ent H ouse S helburne Bay Zoning In tern atio n al C o-Productions for A ustralian Film an d Television

N ational Estate Review In tern atio n al Dim ension o f H azardous Wastes G rants to V oluntary C onservation O rganisations B uvelot Gift o f N ational Gallery C hristm as T ravel A rrangem ents A ppointm ents to Council o f N ational M useum o f A ustralia

T h ird N ational T re e Planting Project N ational Estate G rants Program N o rth e rn T erritory M inister A pproves Purchase o f Six Pollocks 1986 K angaroo Q uotas A boriginal M useum for R ockham pton

Far N o rth e rn R eef Zone Plan Q ueensland K angaroo Cull Q uota T h e A ustralian O p era

C om m onw ealth G rant Aided Cave Discovery Oceanic Island N ational Parks N ational Estate G rants Program Inventory o f Chem icals in A ustralia to be C om pleted

N ational Estate G rants P rogram T asm ania Sara Lee Gift to the A ustralian N ational Gallery A p p o in tm en t to A ustralian B icentennial A uthority Q u een slan d ’s K angaroo Q uota

W ildlife Protection A m endm ents Crocodiles

173

14 Feb 2 Mar 3 M ar 3 M ar 11 Mar 12 M ar 12 Mar 26 M ar 26 M ar 27 M ar 30 M ar

1 A pr 1 A pr 2 A pr 16 A pr 21 A pr 22 A pr 23 A pr 23 A pr 23 A pr 24 A pr 29 A pr

2 May 4 May 7 May

8 May 9 May 9 May 10 May 14 May

15 May 16 May 20 May 20 May

28 May 29 May 30 May 5 J u n

5 J u n

N ational E state G rants P rogram New South Wales Federal O p p o stio n A bandons E nvironm ent No E xport o f Native Birds L indem an Island Official Visit o f C hinese M inister for C ulture New B icentennial Stam p Issue D epicting Flora Discovered by Jo sep h Banks Visit to L indem an Island H eron Island Inform ation C entre C om m ittee o f Inquiry into Folklife in A ustralia Koala E xport Ban Lifted First A cquisition for N ational IVfaritime M useum W orld H eritage A rea F un d in g

1986 N ational T re e P rogram G ran t to T asm ania C om m onw ealth F und in g for the T asm anian W orld H eritage A ustralian Film Industry Breaks Records at C annes Film Festival U luru N ational Park Board

Federal State C o-operation on E nvironm ent is Essential G overnm ent S u p p o rt for H istorical Park Plans for R ainforests In tern atio n al Y ear o f Peace: A ustralia C ouncil G rants C hipp A m en d m en ts would fuel conflict for no purpose Agnes M artin Painting The Last Stand N ational Estates G rants Program Victoria P roposed ap p o in tm en t o f his Excellency, T h e H on. Edw ard G ough W hitlam , AC, QC, as C hairm an o f the C ouncil o f the A ustralian N ational Gallery Port A rth u r New A nim al fo u n d in W estern A ustralia A ppointm ents to the A ustralia Council

N ational Estate G rants P rogram S outh A ustralia E nvironm ent A ssessm ent o f Chem icals — E xpert Discussions Yugoslavia to P articipate in B icentennial H ungary to P articipate in Bicentennial Tw o W estern A ustralian Shipwrecks declared Historic E xportation o f L ithographic Stones (Joint S tatem ent with the M inister for Industry, T echnology and C om m erce) B ritain, Irelan d to Participate in B icentenary

Prohibition o f D um ping o f Radioactive waste and o th er radioactive m aterial C h ief M inisters Scare Talk A Day for the W etlands Y oung peoples concern for the en vironm ent rew arded

174

5 Ju n CEP Funds Film Project (Joint S tatem ent with the M inister for E m ploym ent and Industrial Relations) 5 Ju n N ational B icentennial Arts Program

16 Ju n C ape York Peninsula is m ore th a n rainforest

17Jun R ainforest C onservation

18 J u n K angaroo P roduct Exports

20 Ju n Philip Island Rabbit Eradication

27 J u n C ongratulations to Arts Alliance

175

Appendix 32 Publications by Department 1985-86

(a) R eports D ep artm en t o f A rts, H eritag e an d E nvironm ent, U nited nations E nvironm ent P rogram m e a n d East West C enter, The Economics o f Dryland Degradation and Rehabilitation: Problem Statement and Executive Guidelines (C onference draft), C an b erra, M arch

1986.

D e p artm en t o f Arts, H eritag e an d E nvironm ent, State o f the Environment 1985. ACPS, C an b erra 1985.

D ep artm en t o f Arts, H eritag e an d E nvironm ent, Annual Report, AGPS, C anberra 1985.

D epartm ent o f Arts, H eritag e and E nvironm ent, Statement o f Objectives, priorities and achievements in Environment, Conservation and Heritage, AGPS, C anberra

1985.

D epartm ent o f Arts, H eritage an d E nvironm ent, Third Meeting of the OECD Environment Committee at Ministerial Level, R eport by th e A ustralian D elegation,

AGPS, C anberra 1986.

D ep artm en t o f Arts, H eritage an d E nvironm ent, Folklife and the Australian Government. A Guide to Commonwealth Activities and Resources, AGPS, C anberra

1985.

(b) Books A ustralian B roadcasting Com m ission in collaboration with D epartm ent o f Arts, H eritage an d E nvironm ent, Trees. Why We Need Them, ABC E nterprises 1986.

176

D e p artm en t o f Arts, H eritage an d E n vironm ent a n d the Institute o f Foresters o f A ustralia, Think Trees, Grow Trees, AGPS 1985.

D e p artm en t o f Arts, H eritage an d E nvironm ent, National Tree Program Information Guide 1985, DAHE, C anberra 1985.

Roland Breckwoldt, The Last Stand — Managing Australia’s Remnant Forests and Woodlands, AGPS 1986.

(c) Pam phlets and N ew sletters D e p artm en t o f Arts, H eritage and E nvironm ent, Ecofile, quarterly new sletter on the environm ent, D A H E, C anberra

1985-86.

D e p artm en t o f Arts, H eritage and E nvironm ent, Images, q uarterly new sletter on cultural m atters, D A H E, C anberra 1985-86.

D e p artm en t o f Arts, H eritage and E nvironm ent, Guide to Taxation Incentives fo r the Arts and List of Approved Valuers, October 1985, AGPS, C an b erra 1985.

D e p artm en t o f Arts, H eritage and E nvironm ent, National Estate Grants Program, Fourth Edition, November 1985, C anberra 1985.

D epartm ent o f Arts, H eritage an d E nvironm ent, National Tree Program, DAHE, C anberra 1986.

D ep artm en t o f Arts, H eritage and E nvironm ent, National Tree Program Reporter, 2nd Edition, D AH E, C anberra 1985.

D epartm ent o f Arts, H eritage an d Environm ent, Guidelines fo r Large Tree Growing Projects, DAH E, C an b erra 1985.

A ustralian Biological R esources Study, Biologue, biannual new sletter, No. 4 S eptem ber 1985, No. 5 F ebruary 1986.

(d) General D epartm ent o f Arts, H eritage and E nvironm ent, Information Kit fo r Inquiry into Folklife in Australia, DAHE, 1986.

177

Appendix 33 Research Projects at Australian National Botanic Gardens 1985— 86

(1) Botanical — C ucurbitaceae Revisionary studies on the A ustralian g en era continued. Following an

invitation from the B ishop M usuem , M r T elfo rd travelled to H onolulu to p re p are an account o f the family for Flora of Hawaii.

— Fabaceae In collaboration with Dr. P. H. W eston o f the Royal Botanic G ardens, Sydney, a m ajor p a p e r on L egum e systematics was w ritten for th e 2nd International

Legum e C onference.

An assistant em ployed u n d e r a grant aw arded by the A ustralian Biological Resources Study com piled a data-base o f specim ens and distribution m aps for

the g en era Brachysema, Daviesia and Leptosema as p art o f a revisionary study.

W ork continued tow ards a revision of Chorizema and a revision o f the family for Flora of Central Australia.

— M yrtaceae T h e highlight o f the year was the discovery o f a rem arkable new species o f Eucalyptus near B raidw ood, NSW, by a local landholder. It is extrem ely rare, consisting of only five know n plants.

Initial studies suggest th at it is most closely related to the T asm anian endem ic, E. vernicosa.

— O rchidaceae Revisionary studies in Pterostylis, Dipodium, Calochilus a n d Chile glottis continued in p rep aratio n for the

accounts o f each in a forthcom ing

volum e o f Flora of Australia. This research is being d o n e in conjunction with D. L. Jo n es o f C u rru m b in in Q ueensland. W ork on a revision of the Preliminary Checklist of Australian

Orchidaceae was com m enced.

— Proteaceae W ork continued on a revision o f the W aratahs fo r Flora of Australia, in collaboration with P. H. W eston.

— R utaceae W ork continued on the evolution and classification o f the tribe Boronieae. M anuscripts w ere com pleted on Circumscription of the Rutaceae, Phytogeography of the Rutaceae and

Cytoevolutionary patterns in the family Rutaceae.

Island T erritories Flora C om pilation o f a trea tm e n t o f the Cocos (Keeling) an d o th er tropical island groups for Flora of Australia continued, with technical assistance provided by a grant from the A ustralian Biological Resources Study.

(2) H orticultural — In Vitro Studies T h e in vitro propagation program deals with the production o f herbaceous and

woody plants th ro u g h tissue em bryos, haploid cells and seed culture. It was established to introduce and develop laboratory-based m ethods of propagation particularly relevant to research on rare an d en d an g ered species.

178

— Propagation/C ultivation Studies A n u m b er o f projects in this program w ere com pleted d u rin g the year. O ne that has produced results potentially significant to the horticultural trade is the graftin g o f Ereviophila (scion) onto Myoporum (stock).

(3) B iological — R are and E n d an g ered Plant Studies Investigation o f the conservation biology o f the e n d a n g e re d species

Hibiscus insularis, which began in 1985, is th e first o f a series o f projects aim ed at establishing the n atu re o f the breeding system, pollination biology

and genetic m akeup o f A ustralia’s rare and en d a n g ere d plant species.

— B reeding System s/Pollination Biology Studies. W ork this year has concentrated on investigating floral m imeses in the sun-orchid Thelymitra pauciflora. Research has shown that

Thelymitra flowers mimic those o f the com m on bluebell, Wahlenbergia stricta.

— Phytochem ical/Isoenzym e Studies D evelopm ent o f gel-electrophoresis for the study o f plant isoenzym es was given high priority this year. T h e genetic characterization o f plants afforded by

this technique is invaluable to conservation biology studies and to taxonom ic an d phyletic studies.

— Collaborative studies on the phytochem istry o f the tribe Boronieae (Rutaceae) w ere com m enced in collaboration with Dr. P. G. W aterm an,

University o f Strathclyde, Scotland. Phytochem ical studies o f the genus Zieria (Rutaceae) con tin u ed in collaboration with Dr. I. A. Southwell o f the A gricultural Research C entre,

W ollingbar, NSW — Biology o f M ycorrhizal Fungi Initial studies w ere com m enced on the investigation o f fungal associations in

Pterostyl.is sect. Filiformae (Orchidaceae).

179

Appendix 34 Members of the Australian Cultivar Registration Authority 1985— 86

Chairperson Mr P eter Lum ley C u rato r o f H o rticu ltu ral Collections Royal Botanic G ardens

Birdwood Ave S O U T H YARRA VIC 3141 Members Mr G eoff B utler (Secretary/R egistrar)

A ustralian N ational B otanic G ardens G PO Box 1777 CANBERRA A C T 2601 Mrs Iren e Bowden (R epresenting the A ustralian N urserym ens Association) 62 T hom as St, JA N D A K O T WA 6164

M r G eorge Brown Darwin Botanic G ardens PO Box 4341, DARW IN N T 5794 Mr A.B. C ourt A ustralian N ational B otanic G ardens, G PO Box 1777 CANBERRA A C T 2601

Dr Laurie H aegi H orticultural Botanist The Botanic G ardens o f A delaide N orth T errace ADELAIDE SA 5000

Mr David H ockings (R epresenting the Society for G row ing A ustralian Plants) 41 O xford St

W AVELL H E IG H T S QLD 4012 Dr R.W. Jo h n so n D irector Q ueensland H erbarium Meiers Rd 1NDO OROOPILLY Q LD 4068

180

M r A.P. May S u p erin ten d e n t Royal T asm anian B otanical G ardens Dom ain H O B A R T TAS 7000

M r R.D. M cK innon C u rato r Mt C oot-tha B otanical G ardens Mt C oot-tha Rd T O O W O N G Q LD 4066

M r W Payne (Editor, Australian Plants) 860 H enry Lawson D r PIC N IC P O IN T NSW 2213 D r Ben Wallace Royal Botanic G ardens Mrs M acquaries Rd SYDNEY NSW 2000 D r Jim Willis (Private M em ber)

102 Male Street B R IG H T O N VIC 3186 M r J o h n W W rigley AM (Private M em ber) PO Box 1639 COFFS H A R B O U R NSW 2450 D r Paul W ycherley OBE D irector Kings Park and Botanic G ardens W EST PE R T H WA 6005

Appendix 35 Culti Cultivars registered with the Australian Cultivar Registration Authority for 1985— 86

Banksia spinulosa var cunninghamii ‘Lem on Glow’ Eriostemon ‘P oorinda’ Grevillea ‘A ustraflora Ju b ile e ’ Helichrysum bracteatum ‘Princess o f W ales’ Melaleuca hypericifolia ‘U lladulla B eacon’

181