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Department of Communications - Report - Year - 1983-84


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The Parliament of the Commonwealth of Australia

D E P A R T M E N T OF C O M M U N IC A T IO N S

Annual Report

1983-84

Presented 20 March 1985 Ordered to be printed 28 March 1985

Parliamentary Paper No. 102/1985

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DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNICATIONS ANNUAL REPORT

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D epartm ent of Com m unications

A nnual Report 1983-84

A ustralian G overnm ent Publishing Service Canberra 1985

tc C o m m o n w e a lth o f A u stra lia 1985 ISSN 0727-6818

DOC 505

COVER ILLUSTRATION : A sp e cifica tio n fo r te le v is io n receivers know n as the Reference T ele vision R eceiving S ystem S p e cifica tio n , w h ich w ill be used fo r planning purposes, is under d e v e lo p m e n t by th e D e p a rtm e n t o f C o m m u n ica tio n s in c o n s u lta tio n w ith th e te le visio n m a n u fa c tu rin g in d u stry.

Part o f th is s p e cifica tio n concerns aerial system s and to th is end DOC has been in v o lv e d in the range te stin g o f a selection o f c o m m e rc ia lly available d o m e stic te le v is io n antennas co ve rin g both the VHP and UHF bands.

The co ve r illu s tra tio n show s tw o d e p artm en ta l o ffic e rs in sta llin g and a d justing a UHF antenna p rio r to te stin g at a te m p o ra ry a ntenna range near B ungendore, NSW.

Printed by Canberra Publishing & Printing Co., Fyshwick, A.C.T.

D epartm ent o f C om m unications

Hon. M ichael Duffy, MR M inister fo r C om m unications Parliam ent House CANBERRA ACT 2600

Dear M inister

I have pleasure in presenting the Annual Report o f the Departm ent of C om m unications, covering its activities fo r the year ended 30 June 1984.

Yours sincerely

R B Lansdown (Secretary)

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C ontents

G lossary o f acronym s, titles, abbreviations 1

DOC calendar of notable events 1983-84 2

The organisatio n and the people w ho serve it 5

Finance and accounts 16

C orporate planning 26

C om puter developm ents in DOC 29

B roadcasting: w h a t's new? 31

Space, T elecom m unications and Postal Policy 45

R adiocom m unications in the m odern w o rld 48

A u stra lia 's satellite system 62

C om m unicating w ith the public 68

W orld C om m unications Year 1983 76

DOC legislation 84

International activities 86

A ppendices 92

Glossary of acronyms, titles, abbreviations

The fo llo w in g is a list in alphabetical order of acronym s, titles, and abbreviations either used in this report, or w hich are com m only used in relation to the C om m unications Portfolio.

ABC ABT ACC ADR AEIA AM FAR APT ATFA ATO A

A U S S A T (Pty Ltd)

AP (A ustralia Post) BPTF C A A M A CB CBRS CCIR CCITT

CDD CICCP

CISPR CPPD CSIRO CTV DEIR DOC DRI EEO FACTS FARE FOI G ATT GHz HF HACBSS IFRB INTELSAT IN M AR SA T IRAM ISO ITU I & PR

kHz LAGE MCES MDS MHz MTV N AS A

OECD OTC(A) PSB RFM

RATV RSTV SBS S M T SPEC SPS STRS TELECOM UHF

UNDP UNESCO

VHF WARC WCY W IA

A u stra lia n B roadcasting C orporation A u stra lia n B roadcasting T ribunal A u stra lia n C aption Centre A u to m a tic Data Processing A u stra lia n E lectronics Industry A sso cia tio n A u stra lia n M aster Frequency Register Asia Pacific T e le co m m u n ity A u stra lia n Table of Frequency A llo ca tio n s A u stra lia n Telephone and P honogram O p erators' A sso ci­ ation The co m p a n y fo rm e d to ow n and operate A u s tra lia 's satellite system A ustralian Postal C om m ission

B roadcasting P lanning Task Force Central A u stra lia n A b o rig in a l M edia A ssociation Citizen Band (Radio) Citizen Band Radio Service In te rn a tio n al Radio C onsultative C o m m itte e In te rn a tio n al T elegraph and Telephone C onsultative C om ­ m ittee C o m m u n ica tio n s D evelopm ent D ivision C o m m itte e fo r In fo rm a tio n , C o m pu te r and C o m m u n ica tio n s Policy In te rn a tio n al Special C om m ittee on Radio Interference C orporate Planning and Projects D ivision C o m m o n w e a lth S cie n tific and Research O rganisation Cable T elevision D ep a rtm e n t o f E m p lo ym e n t and In d ustria l Relations D ep a rtm e n t o f C o m m u n ica tio n s D istrict Radio Inspector Equal E m p lo ym e n t O p p o rtu n ity (program ) Federation o f A u stra lia n C om m ercial Television S tations Federation o f A u stra lia n Radio B roadcasters Freedom o f In fo rm a tion (Act) General A g re e m e n t o f T ariffs and Trade G igahertz High Frequency H om estead and C o m m u n ity B roadcasting S atellite Service In te rn a tio n al Frequency R egistration Board In te rn a tio n al T ele co m m u n ica tio n s S atellite O rganisation In te rn a tio n al M a ritim e S atellite O rganisation In fo rm a tio n Retrieval and M apping (C om puter System ) In te rn a tio n al Standards O rganisation In te rn a tio n al T ele co m m u n ica tio n U nion In fo rm a tio n and Public Relations K ilohertz Location o f A u stra lia n G o ve rn m e nt E m ployees (program ) M ajor City Earth S tations M u ltip o in t D is trib u tio n Services M egahertz M u ltic u ltu ra l Television N ational A e ro n au tics and Space A d m in is tra tio n (U nited States) O rganisation fo r E conom ic C o-operation and D evelopm ent Overseas T ele co m m u n ica tio n s C o m m issio n (A ustralia)

P ublic S ervice Board Radio Frequency M anagem ent D ivision Rem ote Area Television Program Radiated S u b scrip tio n Television Special B roadcasting Service S u p p le m en ta ry M o n o p h o n ic T ransm issions South Pacific Bureau of E conom ic C o-operation S atellite P rogram Services S elf-help T elevision Reception Schem e A u stra lia n T ele co m m u n ica tio n s C om m ission

U ltra High Frequency U nited N ations D eve lo p m e n t Program U nited N ations E ducational, S c ie n tific and C ultural O rga n is­ ation Very High Frequency W o rld A d m in is tra tiv e Radio C onference W o rld C o m m m u n ic a tio n s Year W ireless In stitu te of A ustralia

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DOC calendar of notable events 1983-84

JULY 1 Australian Broadcasting C orporation takes over fro m the Com ­ m ission.

13 AUSSAT project gets Cabinet go-ahead.

18 ITU CCIR in Geneva.

27 STBS — M in iste r invites first batch of 25 applications fo r Self-help Television Scheme during 1983-84. OTC gets G overnm ent approval in principle to take part in three new international subm arine cable projects.

AUGUST 9 Bradley Report — M inister announces that the basic functions and duties of A ustralia Post w ill remain unchanged.

11 G overnm ent announces Task Force to begin planning fo r a

second ABC regional network.

23 RUCS — ABC radio services to be extended to 12 currently

underserved areas by means o f the Remote or Underserved C om m unity Scheme and ABC television to another 42 co m m u n i­ ties. DOC launches its largest-ever public education cam paign

concerning the introduction of UHF television to Canberra and surrounding regions.

28 A t the m eeting of the South Pacific Forum in Canberra, Pleads of G overnm ent endorsed the establishm ent of a $100 m illion

cooperative program fo r the developm ent of telecom m unications in the South Pacific.

SEPTEMBER 13 M inister announces acceptance of the ABT's report on Foster, recom m ending that the signals of m etropolitan television sta­ tions should not be extended into regional areas.

OCTOBER 14 Special Broadcasting Service begins transm issions in Canberra. 17 Telecom given approval to establish a national videotex service.

20 Davidson Report — G overnm ent endorses Telecom 's m onopoly position as the national telecom m unications com m on carrier by rejecting the m ajor th rust o f the Davidson Inquiry Report.

31 WCY w o rld art com petition w inners announced, including six Australian students, in Geneva.

NOVEMBER 15 AUSSAT to stay w h o lly C om m onw ealth owned — Telecom offered up to 25 per cent equity.

15 M inister co n firm s G overnm ent's intention not to proceed w ith cable television and announces that proposals w ill be invited fo r the provision o f RSTV services.

1 6 -DOC Conference in Canberra: WCY award won by M r Allen 17 Deegan.

18 SBS services extended to G oulburn, Cooma.

29 M inister directs ABT to conduct an in quiry into the regulation of Satellite Program Services.

DECEMBER 1 S upplem entary licence scheme begins.

6 C om m ittee of Review of SBS announced.

22 7MHz spacing decision announced.

22 R adiocom m unications Act receives Royal Assent.

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23 M inister announces review of the policy of localism in Australian broadcasting. M inister announces the Standard fo r dual-sound television.

JANUARY 17 Proposal to establish the first A boriginal radio station in Australia progressed a step fu rth e r when the M inister called fo r applica­ tions fo r a public broadcasting licence, togethe r w ith translator

licences, to serve Alice Springs and the three surrounding

Aboriginal communities of Santa Teresa, Warrabri and Hermanns- burg.

FEBRUARY 7 HACBSS standard issued.

27 Interim RSTV guidelines issued.

MARCH 2 Task Force on A borigina l Broadcasting and C om m unications announced.

5 A ustralia Post announces introduction of electronic m ail services.

12 SBS transm ission in M elbourne im proved.

26 Stereo television introduced.

APRIL 26 Satellite com m unication s legislation package receives Royal Assent.

26 Telecom m unications Act am ended to a llow Telecom to form subsidiaries and enter into jo in t ventures.

MAY 1 M inister announces proposed clearance of Television services fro m Band II to make room fo r FM radio.

17 Contract signed w ith NEC Australia Pty Ltd to supply equipm ent fo r satellite-receive stations at 105 NBTS sites. N ew h igh-pow e r shortw ave transm itter fo r Radio Australia begins operation in Carnarvon, W estern Australia.

22 DOC staff relocation program announced.

31 DOC concludes tests on AM stereo transm ission equipm ent.

JUNE 1 RFM receives part of m illio n -d o lla r update o f spectrum m o n ito r­ ing and surveillance equipm ent.

8 M inister approves first final service area determ ination under new G uidelines fo r Defining Service Areas.

14 G overnm ent approves a Telecom contract proposal fo r a videotex system based on Prestel technology.

15 Telecom announces a m ajor project fo r the use of fibre-optic cable between M elbourne and Sydney. DOC and Film Australia com plete the production o f a videotape fo r public d istrib u tio n explaining the HACBSS scheme fo r rem ote dw ellers.

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The Communications Portfolio

Minister for Communications

Department of Communications

Australian Broadcasting Corporation

Australian Broadcasting Tribunal

Special

Broadcasting Service

Australian Telecommunications Commission

Overseas Telecommunications Commission (Australia)

AUSSAT Pty Ltd

Australian Postal Commission j

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Postal

The O rganisation and the People

Who Serve It

Successor to P&T The D epartm ent o f C om m unications is the successor to the Postal Departm ent and T elecom m unicatio ns D epartm ent w hich was established on 22 Decem ber 1975. That D epartm ent took over the responsibilities of the fo rm e r Postm aster-G eneral's D epartm ent fo llo w in g the creation of

Telecom A ustralia and A ustralia Post and also acted as a policy adviser to the M inister on the activities of those authorities and of the Overseas T elecom m unicatio ns C om m ission (Australia). S im ul­

taneously, the D epartm ent was given additional responsibilities fo r broadcasting policy w hen the fo rm e r D epartm ent of the Media was abolished. Later the D epartm ent was given additional responsibilities fo r the technical and planning m atters associated w ith radio and television

services w hich had previously been the responsibility o f the A ust­ ralian Broadcasting Control Board.

The D epartm ent was renam ed the Departm ent o f C om m unications in N ovem ber 1980. The A d m in istra tive Arrangem ents Order states principal m atters dealt w ith by the Departm ent as being 'Postal,

telegraphic, telepho nic and other like services including television and radio'.

Five Divisions The D epartm ent is in te rn a lly organised in five Divisions. The

Secretary to the D epartm ent is assisted by a Deputy Secretary in the a d m in istra tio n of the Departm ent. A t 30 June 1984, the staffing of the D epartm ent com prised one officer (Deputy Secretary) at Level 5 of the Second D ivision of the A ustralian Public Service, five officers (D ivisional Heads) at Level 3 o f the Second Division and 13 officers occupying positions at Level 1 (Assistant Secretary) of the Second D ivision. In Public Service term s, the D epartm ent has a 'Level 5, 3, T structure in contrast to som e Departm ents where the senior execu­ tive structure is basically on a 'Level 6, 4, 2' arrangem ent.

A part fro m officers appointed to the Second D ivision, there are

officers occupying clerical, engineering and technical positions in various ranges of the Third D ivision o f the Public Service and officers occupying positions classified in the Fourth Division of the Service. The D epartm ent has a presence outside Canberra. During the

1983-84 year som e Central Office functions continued to be p e rfo rm ­ ed at the D epartm ent's offices in M elbourne. There are three principal Branches of the D epartm ent operating in M elbourne: the Station E stablishm ent and O perations Branch, and the Station Planning

Branch, both of w hich are concerned w ith the developm ent of

te levision and radio broadcasting services th ro u g h o u t Australia, and the O perations Branch of the Radio Frequency M anagem ent Division. The D epartm ent also has a sm all laboratory located in M elbourne w hich has an establishm ent of nine officers, fo u r of w hom hold

positions described as engineering positions w ith five occupying technical o fficer positions. The w ork of the Laboratory is referred to later in th is report.

A State Broadcasting Engineer's Office operates in every State capital and other elem ents o f the Departm ent concerned w ith the a d m in istra tio n o f the radio spectrum also operate out of offices in State capital cities, D arwin, and some regional centres. A com plete

list o f departm ental and p o rtfo lio addresses is in A ppendix C ot this report.

5

Department of Communications organisation structure, 30 June 1984

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Secretary

Deputy Secretary

Communications Development Division

Corporate Policy and Projects Division

Broadcasting Division

Radio Frequency Management Division

Space, T elecommunications and Postal Policy Division

Broadcasting Planning Task Force

Communications Applications Branch

Communications Systems Branch

Parliamentary Section Information and Public

Relations Section

Planning and Development Branch

External Relations Branch

Services and Standards Branch

Station Planning Branch

Divisional Support and Engineering Policy

Section

Station Establishment and Operations Branch

Policy Analysis and Co-ordination Branch

Finance and Regulatory Branch

Broadcasting Policy Branch

State Broadcasting Engineers

Management Services Branch

Operations Branch

State Managers

Legislation Section

NSW Old. SA Vic. NSW Old. SA WA Tas. WA Tas.

(Technical Officer)

Broadcasting Division

Communications Development Division

The D ivisions o f the D epartm ent This D ivision is the prim a ry source o f advice to the M inister on

m atters concerning policies fo r the a d m inistration and developm ent of radio and television broadcasting services. It is concerned

p a rticu la rly w ith policies fo r the a d m inistration o f broadcasting and te levision services as set o u t in the B roadcasting and Television A c t 1942, in clu d in g the statutory pow ers o f the M inister fo r C om m unica­ tions under th a t Act.

A series o f G overnm ent policy initiatives over the past five years w hich have been designed to increase the range of radio and

television services available to the general public, have placed considerable strains on the resources of the Broadcasting Division fo r som e years. This situation continued during 1984 and eventually caused the D epartm ent to take some rem edial steps by transferring som e o f the technical aspects o f radio and television services

develop m e nt to another area o f the D epartm ent. This involved the Station E stablishm ent and O perations Branch being transferred to the C orporate Policy and Projects D ivision. The Broadcasting Plan­ ning Task Force, w hich is described later, was located w ith the

Broadcasting D ivision to relate better w ith that Division on policy issues w hich are involved in the w orking of the Task Force. At 30 June 1984, the D ivision com prised eighty-five officers of w hom th irty are engaged on m ainly engineering/technical tasks, w ith the rem ain­ der w o rkin g in a range of broadcasting policy issues or supplying service support.

This m u ltid is c ip lin a ry D ivision was form ed in 1982 in response to a g ro w in g need fo r the D epartm ent to be able to respond to the

co m plexities of new com m unication s developm ents. Technological advances have created opp o rtu n itie s fo r new and enhanced co m ­ m unications services w hich bring w ith them a variety o f social,

econom ic, re g u la to ry and technical im plications.

M any o f the products o f the 'com m un ications re vo lu tio n ' originate in the U nited States, Japan and Europe w hich lead the w orld in the d e velop m e nt o f com m unication s services and electronic equipm ent. A ustralia needs to be conversant w ith these international develop­

m ents if new services are to evolve in a way th a t meets A ustralia's needs and is com patible w ith the rest of the w orld.

The w o rk o f the D ivision is at present directed m ainly tow ards

fin a lisin g technical policies and standards fo r developm ents that are already pressing in the broadcasting and consum er electronics industries. These include satellite broadcasting and program

d istrib u tio n system s, signal encoding systems, the rationalisation of television and radio receiver standards, and issues associated w ith the in tro d u ctio n of sm all earth stations.

The D ivision has also m onitored com m unication s developm ents in A ustralia and overseas and has undertaken specific studies of

m u ltip o in t d is trib u tio n services, videotex, spread spectrum te ch n i­ ques, in d u stry and econom ic aspects of RSTV, high definition

television, and im p lica tio n s o f international com m unications de­ velopm ents. The D ivision is progressively building up intelligence on the industrial, econom ic and w id e r social aspects of com m unications developm ents generally and has been w atching closely the regula­ to ry response to new developm ents in the com m unications field,

p a rticu la rly in North A m erica and the United Kingdom .

The D ivision represents the Departm ent at scientific and technical fo ru m s such as the A ustralian Science and Technology Council (ASTEC), Starlab and other space activities, and on specialist tasks

such as the m ajor consultancy study into Inform ation Technology sponsored by the D epartm ent o f Science and Technology. It has also been responsible fo r the carriage o f A ustralia's role in the develop-7

Corporate Policy and Projects Division

Radio Frequency Managem ent Division

m ent o f telecom m unica tions in the South Pacific and assisted the education c o m m u n ity in exploring opp o rtu n itie s fo r educational uses o f the satellite.

The D ivision consists of tw o branches and the D epartm ent's en­ gineering research laboratory in M elbourne. At the end of the

financial year, m ore than 80 per cent o f the D ivision's staff consisted o f professional engineers and technical officers. Other disciplines represented included physics, econom ics, com m erce and arts.

This D ivision was created to carry out tw o prim ary tasks:

- to manage m a jo r projects where the functional interests of more than one D ivision of the Departm ent was involved - to plan m anagem ent of the financial and hum an resources of the D epartm ent and to m o n ito r departm ental perform ance against the

objectives and p rio ritie s determ ined fo r the Departm ent. The D ivision also includes fo u r service areas:

- the Parliam entary Section w hich provides the m ajor link between the M inister's O ffice and the Departm ent - the Legislation Section w hich is the principal source of internal departm ental advice on legislation w ith in the M inister's Portfolio

responsibilities - the Inform ation and Public Relations Section whose m ajor activity is to d istribute in fo rm a tio n on departm ental activities w hich are regarded as in vo lvin g m atters o f public interest - ADP Section w hich is responsible fo r the planning o f the Depart­

m ent's use o f com puters and com puting systems.

One o f the m ajor projects o f the Division during the 1983-84 financial year has been developing the basis of a corporate plan fo r the

D epartm ent. C orporate planning is seen as a vehicle fo r im proving the efficiency o f the Departm ent in the m anagem ent and use of

resources. This concept is sym pathetic to the objectives of the

G overnm ent in im p ro vin g the financial m anagem ent w ith in public a dm inistration . The progress made in developing the corporate plan is described separately in this report.

The D ivision com prises 172 officers of w hom fo u r occupy positions in the Second D ivision w ith the balance made up of 84 officers in the Third D ivision and 84 officers w ho hold positions in the Fourth

Division.

The principal fu n ctio n s o f the Division are to arrange fo r the orderly and m ost efficient use o f the radio frequency spectrum in Australia and overseas te rrito rie s and to investigate unlicensed uses of the radio spectrum and com plaints of interference to services w hich rely on radiated transm issions.

The D ivision has a substantial international com m itm ent. It provides the principal representation fo r A ustralia's m em bership o f the

International Telecom m unication U nion. In the 1983-84 financial year eight officers o f this Division attended m eetings of the ITU or of organs o f the ITU at a total of eighteen m eetings requiring total

absences from A ustralia of 269 days. The Wireless Telegraphy A ct 1905 and regulations under that Act is the current legislation

determ ining the arrangem ents fo r licensing the use o f the radio spectrum . That A ct w ill be repealed w hen the R adiocom m unications A c t 1983 is proclaim ed to come into operation. This is expected to occur later in the 1984 calendar year when the necessary Regulations

under the R adiocom m unications Act have been made.

The D ivision is the largest in term s o f officers em ployed. A t 30 June 1984, 434 officers w ere em ployed w ith in the D ivision o f w hom 220 held qualificatio ns in engineering or other appropriate technical

qualifications. The D ivision has officers located in each State capital and in nineteen regional or d istrict offices.

STAPP Division The Space, Telecom m unications and Postal Policy D ivision advises the M inister on the exercise of his pow ers and responsibilities under the legislation establishing the Australian T elecom m unications C om ­ m ission, the A ustralian Postal C om m ission, the Overseas Telecom ­

m unications C om m ission (Australia) and AUSSAT Pty Ltd.

The M in iste r's responsibilities include approval fo r charges fo r basic telecom m unica tions, postal and satellite services, consideration of the estim ates of revenue and expenditure of the respective A u th o ri­ ties, a uthorisatio n of larger contracts and the giving of such

directions to the respective A u th o ritie s as are deem ed necessary in the p u blic interest.

The D ivision provides policy advice to the M inister on the im pact of postal and telecom m unica tions services on Australia, both socially and econom ically. This advice relates to the application of G overn­ m ent policy to the operation of services, the effect on com m erce and industry, industrial relations, technological change, international agreem ents, review and am endm ent of legislation and activities of interest to parliam enta ry com m ittees and com m ittees of inquiry. The D ivision is also involved in the preparation o f policy advice fo r the Secretary, in his role as a C om m issioner of Telecom and Australia

Post, and the D eputy Secretary w ho is a C om m issioner of OTC(A) and a D irector of AUSSAT.

In its role as a policy advising group on T elecom m unications, Space and Postal Policy, STAPP D ivision is sm all, to ta llin g tw e n ty-fo u r officers including secretarial staff. The Division has considerable

interaction w ith other D epartm ents in Canberra, as the activities o f the fo u r m ajor authorities referred to above involve also the

functiona l interests of a range of other M inisters and th e ir Depart­ ments.

Staffing At 30 June 1983 the D epartm ent's staff ceiling was 729. Early in

resources 1983-84 a new system o f average staffing was introduced to replace the fo rm e r control o f staffing by staff ceilings.

The D epartm ent's average staffing level fo r 1983-84 was set in itia lly at 744 staff years but this was subsequently adjusted a num ber of tim es th ro u g h o u t the year to reach 757 at 30 June 1984. The

adjustm ents w ere due to G overnm ent decisions requiring additional staff resources fo r the fo llo w in g : - clearance o f a backlog o f station planning proposals

- initial planning fo r the ABC's Second Regional Radio N etw ork - the establishm ent of the C om m ittee of Review into the Special Broadcasting Service.

Late in 1983-84 the D epartm ent negotiated an agreem ent to extend the ADP Data C ollection Task Force. This involved a fu rth e r five staff years o f effort.

Table 1 show s the organisational and geographical d istrib u tio n of departm ental staffing at the end o f June 1984.

Table 2 gives a breakdown of technical and engineering staff by designation and location at the end of June 1984.

Table 3 show s the d istrib u tio n o f w om en in the D epartm ent by

designation and location at 30 June 1984. During 1984-85 DOC w ill be developing plans to im plem ent a program to provide Equal

E m ploym ent O p portunity (EEO) fo r w om en. In future years the success o f the EEO program w ill be m easurable against the base data in Table 3.

Organisational changes A m in o r restructuring of the D epartm ent was necessary during 1983-84 in order to rationalise the adm inistration o f Broadcasting

9

functions. The S tation Establishm ent and Operations Branch was transferred from the Broadcasting D ivision to the Corporate Policy and Projects D ivision, and the D epartm ent's broadcasting planning

functions were regrouped under Broadcasting Division by the

transfer of the Broadcasting Planning Task Force from the Corporate Policy and Projects Division.

Table 1 — Department of Communications Staffing summary — June 1984

CO CO

Total ACT Vic /vsw Vic OLD SA NT 1444 Tas

Executive c) 5 — 4 — ___ _

CPPD 81’ 41 16 9 6 6 4 — 4 1

MSB 86 67 19 — — — — ___

STAFF 241 24 — — — — —

CDD 31 23 8 — — — — ____

BD 8EI 51 27 7 — — — — — —

RFM 442I 32 50 97 76 75 46 4 44 18

SBS Review 1E

Total 779I 243 120 117 82 81 50 4 48 19

Table 2 — Technical and engineering officers by designation -- Actual Designation ACT NSW Melb WA Vic SAINT OLD TAS Total

Eng 1 5 1 5 11

2 7 3 1 2 13

3 8 1 3 1 1 1 15

4 8 4 12

5 4 1 5

Man 3 1 2 1 1 5

2 1 1 2

1 1 1

PTO 1 1 5 2 1 10

Controller RIS 1 1

STO 3 3 7 5 3 2 4 5 29

2 3 9 7 3 10 8 9 3 52

1 3 5 12 4 3 2 2 2 33

TO 2 2 14 5 4 12 6 13 2 58

1 1 9 1 3 9 6 5 2 36

TA 2 3 2 4 1 1 4 2 17

1 1 1

TTO 1 1 1 3

Table 3 — Female officers by designation — Actual

Designation ACT iMelb NSW WA Vic SAINT OLD Tas Total

Clerk 11 2 1 3

9 3 3

8 7 1 8

7 3 3

6 6 2 8

5 6 1 1 8

4 5 2 1 2 10

2/3 7 2 2 2 2 2 3 20

1 5 1 1 2 1 10

CA 5 1 2 1 1 1 6

4 2 2 3 1 1 2 2 13

3 7 4 11 2 7 2 8 41

2 3 1 1 4 4 13

1 1 1 1 1 3 1 8

10

Designation ACT Melb NSW WA Vic SAINT QLD Tas Total

ARO 4 4

Motor Driver 1 1

Typist Sup 1 1 1

PS 1 1 1

PS 2 1 1

SS 1 9 3 12

SS 2 8 8

Typist 1 2 4 1 1 8

Typist 2 1 1 2 2 2 8

WPT 1 7 2 9

WPT 2 1 1

WP Sup 1 1 1 2

WP Sup 2 1 1

DPO 2 1 1

Librarian 1 1 1

Eng 1 1 1

Eng 2 1 1

TA 2 1 1

Note: E n g : M an: PTO: STO: TO: TA: TTO:

O ther organisato nal developm ents included: - the upgradin g o f the positions o f Director (Finance) and Director (Personnel M anagem ent) fro m Class 10 to Class 11 because of increased responsibilities - establishm en t of a secretariat of fourteen positions fo r the

C om m ittee o f Review o f the Special Broadcasting Service - creation o f fo u r additional engineer positions in the State Planning Branch (Engineer 5, Engineer 2, tw o Engineer 1) to assist w ith the backlog o f station planning proposals and m anagem ent of the

RUCS program - the B roadcasting Planning Task Force was expanded by nine

p o sitions (engineering and clerical) in order to undertake initial planning w o rk fo r the Second Regional Radio Network - a Clerk Class 9 position was established to co-ordinate the

D epartm ent's relocation program , involving Central Office staff in Sydney and M elbourne - a ddition al positions w ere added to the Internal Consultancy and Personnel D evelopm ent areas of M anagem ent Services Branch to

m eet g ro w in g w orkloads that have developed in these areas - a Station M anagem ent Section was created, com prising five

positions (Class 11, tw o Class 9, Class 7 and CA 5) in Station

E stablishm ent and O perations Branch to undertake responsibility fo r all non-engineering m atters associated w ith the Branch's re sp o n sib ilitie s fo r N ational T ransm itter Stations - O ther review s in staffing resources resulted in additional clerical

and ad m in istra tive resources being provided to the Station

E stablishm ent and O perations Branch, the Station Planning Branch and the Executive S upport Section of the Radio Frequency

M anagem ent Division.

E n g ineer CA:

M a n a g e r ARO:

P rincipal T echnical O ffic e r PS:

S e n io r Technical O ffice r SS:

T echnical O ffice r W PT:

T echnical A ssista n t WP Sup:

T rainee Technical O ffice r DPO:

C lerical A ssista n t A ssista n t Research O fficer Personal Secretary S teno-secretary T ypist W o rd Processing T ypist W o rd Processing S u p e rviso r

Data Processing O p erator

Repetition strain injuries Fifteen cases o f repetition strain injuries w ere reported in the

Canberra office of DOC during 1983-84. None were reported from DOC offices outside Canberra.

11

Keyboard staff take part in regular exercise sessions aimed at preventing the onset of repetition strain injuries.

The cases reported com prised one clerk, nine stenographic staff and five w ord-processing operators. A t 30 June, six of these officers were on sick leave.

On the basis of m edical reports, one stenographer was redeployed to clerical duties; the clerical officer was to be redeployed to clerical duties on resum ption of duty.

R em edial action Changes to fu rn itu re layout and design were begun w ith the

purchase and d istrib u tio n to all keyboard staff o f fo rty ergonom ically designed chairs. Desks were also being evaluated w ith a likelihood of replacem ent w ith m ore suitable designs early in the 1984-85

financial year.

Adjustable docum ent holders were also acquired and issued. Foot­ stools were also issued to all keyboard operators w ho wanted one. Desk lamps were also being acquired fo r any areas w ith insufficient lighting.

At 30 June DOC was w aiting on the results of an ergonom ic study being undertaken by the Departm ent of Em ploym ent and Industrial Relations. It is expected that this report m ight lead to even further changes concerning layout, design and lighting of w ork areas.

Rest breaks A part from changes to furniture and fittings, ten-m inute rest breaks after fifty m inutes o f typing have been introduced as w ell as exercise

breaks. A d ifficu lty has emerged in ensuring that staff com ply w ith these breaks and take part in exercise groups. It was anticipated that w hen the position o f Supervisor Typing and W ord Processing was fille d that the D epartm ent w ould be in a better position to police this. Typew riters were being progressively distributed to Divisions to enable staff to type th e ir own drafts, and six personal com puters have been acquired w ith w ord processing packages also to enable staff to undertake th e ir own docum ent processing.

C ounselling All repetition strain in jury sufferers on extended leave and w ho are expected to require tem porary or perm anent redeploym ent are required to visit the Departm ent regularly to discuss any problem s or concerns they m ig h t have w ith M anagem ent Services Branch staff.

12

Accommodation

Relocation

Contact has also been established w ith a num ber of agencies and a u th o ritie s to provide counselling services as required. Examples are the S enior O ccupational Psychologist, D epartm ent of Em ploym ent and Industrial Relations, concerning vocational counselling; Coun­ selling Services, Canberra College o f Advanced Education (educa­ tional co unsellin g); and Capital T e rritory Health C om m ission (sup­

portive counselling).

The D epartm ent m oved into the Benjam in com plex in A pril 1982. In Decem ber 1983 the Broadcasting Planning Task Force was relocated out o f the Benjam in com plex to office space at Oatley

Court, Belconnen. This was necessary to avoid overcrow ding , as the D epartm ent had increased its Canberra establishm ent.

W ith the im pending LAGE transfer program (Location o f Australian G overnm ent Em ployees), see below, the D epartm ent has been allocated a fu rth e r three flo o rs w ith in the Benjam in com plex.

However, this w ill not be su fficient to accom m odate all positions tra n sfe rrin g fro m M elbourne and Sydney and it w ill be necessary to retain office space at O atley Court.

The D epartm ent is also in the final stages of establishing its Central Laboratory fa c ility in Canberra at a site yet to be determ ined

som ew here in Belconnen. The Laboratory is expected to be oper­ ational to w a rd s the end o f 1985. The Canberra fa c ility w ill replace the Laboratory w hich is cu rrently located in M elbourne.

F ollow ing a recom m endation by the LAGE C om m ittee the M inister Assisting the Prime M inister approved the D epartm ent's Relocation Program late in M ay 1984. The Program involves the transfer to Canberra of the rem aining Central Office elem ents in M elbourne and Sydney.

On 1 June 1984 som e 124 staff in Sydney and in M elbourne received th e ir Notices o f Relocation. They have until 1 December 1984 to decide w h e th e r or not to accept transfer to Canberra. Those

electing to transfer w ith th e ir positions have until 1 June 1985 to

m ove to Canberra although the date of transfer m ay be extended fo r a fu rth e r six m onths in special circum stances.

The D epartm ent has appointed an officer to w ork fu ll-tim e on

relocation m atters. His principal role is to provide inform ation on Canberra and to facilitate pre-transfer visits. He w ill be joined later in the year by anothe r fu ll-tim e officer to w ork on redeploym ent.

M eetings of the M elbourne based S taff C onsultative C om m ittee are being held m o n th ly to discuss a variety of relocation m atters w ith the staff involved.

W hile it is be hoped that a large num ber o f staff w ill elect to come to Canberra it appears that m any w ill elect to rem ain behind.

Those staff w h o elect to rem ain w ill become unattached and th e ir fo rm e r p o sitions w ill, in m ost cases, transfer to the Canberra

establishm ent im m ediately. Every e ffort w ill be made to facilitate the redeploym e nt o f those rem aining bearing in m ind that the Federal G overnm ent w ork base in M elbourne and Sydney has dim inished in size in recent years. N otw ithstand ing this the D epartm ent proposes v ig o ro u s ly to pursue redeploym ent o pportun ities w ith other orga­

nisations w ith in the M inister's P ortfolio as w ell as G overnm ent

Departm ents. R edeploym ent action may extend fo r several years even though the D epartm ent is co m m itte d to redeploying staff as quickly as possible. S taff rem aining in Sydney and M elbourne in m ost cases continue to perform the duties of th e ir fo rm e r position pending the staffing of that position in Canberra. A t this point it may be necessary to transfer staff to o ther w o rk areas to m aintain the in tegrity o f the organisation.

13

In the longer term it w ill be necessary to identify suitable project w ork fo r those rem aining. Action is already in hand to id entify suitable projects.

N aturally there are a num ber of short-term adm inistrative problem s associated w ith an exercise of this nature, particularly in relation to ceiling, fu nding and accom m odation. In addition the actual transfer o f functions w ill not be done w ith o u t som e difficulty. However, it is w ell recognised and accepted that the long-term advantages w ill far outw eigh the short-term problem s.

Departmental M r Robert Lord, a senior officer w ith w ide experience in the

retirement broadcasting industry, retired on 12 A ugust 1983.

M r Lord held the position of First A ssistant Secretary, C om m unica­ tions D evelopm ent Division.

The M inister com m ented at the tim e of M r Lord's retirem ent that during his career M r Lord had been extensively involved in the

broadcasting industry, in itia lly w ith the private sector, and then from 1973 w ith various C om m onw ealth Departm ents concerned w ith broadcasting policy and developm ent.

One o f M r Lord's m ost notable achievem ents was his co ntribution to the Green Report, tabled in Parliam ent in 1976. This report led to a reshaping o f broadcasting adm inistration in Australia.

In 1980-81, a Task Force headed by M r Lord was established w ithin w hat is now the D epartm ent o f C om m unications to undertake a m ajor reassessment o f policy and operational issues concerned w ith the developm ent o f the Australian broadcasting system.

M r Lord also headed the new ly form ed C om m unications Develop­ m ent D ivision u n til his retirem ent.

Australia Day Thursday 26 January 1984 was celebrated enthusiastically by the Award Departm ent and its staff.

Follow ing a suggestion from the chairm an of the National Australia Day C om m ittee, a special Australia Day Happy Hour was held and an achievem ent award was presented in recognition of an outstanding co n trib u tio n to the w ork of the Departm ent.

N om inations fo r this A ustralia Day Aw ard were invited fo r a person or group w ith responsibility fo r one or m ore projects in the

Departm ent during 1983, w hich required special effort and devotion, the use of particular skills and expertise and a co ntribution of both tim e and e ffo rt above and beyond the norm al requirem ents of

officers in the Public Service. Officers from either the Third or Fourth D ivisions and fro m Central or State offices were eligible. A num ber of high quality n o m ination s were received, highligh ting some excellent co n tribution s fro m m em bers of the Department.

A C om m ittee o f three Second Division Officers exam ined the

nom inations and recom m ended that the award be presented to the HACBSS (Homestead and C om m unity Broadcasting Satellite Service) field team.

The C om m ittee considered that the contribution made to the

Departm ent by the six m em bers o f the team during 1983 was

m eritorious fo r the fo llo w in g reasons — - the HACBSS fie ld tests are of national im portance - the developm ent o f the project required the use of a high order of technical skills and an innovative approach to the solving of

technical problem s - the successful im plem entation of the testing program required a high degree o f personal initiative and responsibility and required m em bers o f the testing team to spend lengthy periods in isolated

areas, often in uncom fortable physical circumstances.

On behalf o f the HACBSS team , M r Ian W aters received the awards — specially-m inted boxed m edallions provided by the National A ustra­ lia Day C om m ittee. The special Happy Hour was organised w ith assistance fro m the D epartm ent's Social Club.

The A ustralia Day achievem ent award was generally agreed to be a w o rth w h ile concept and the D epartm ent is exploring the possibility of holding an annual event o f this nature.

15

Finance and A ccounts

Division 220 — Administration

Total expenditure by the D epartm ent in 1983-84, including paym ents to statutory a u thorities was $425.6 m illio n . This com pared w ith $422.6 m illio n in 1982-83, an increase o f 0.7 per cent.

The m ain reason fo r this relatively sm all increase was that there were no fu rth e r calls on the G overnm ent's shareholdings in AUSSAT Pty Ltd in 1982-83; in the previous year $43.5 m illio n was paid fo r this purpose.

Of the total expenditure in 1983-84, $392.4 m illio n was in relation to the National Broadcasting and Television Service. This included $301.3 m illio n fo r the Australian Broadcasting C orporation fo r

operational and capital expenses — an increase o f $31.3 m illio n (10.4 per cent) over 1982-83, and $34.4 m illion fo r the Special Broadcast­ ing Service, an increase of $5.6 m illio n (19.4 per cent) on the 1982-83 financial year.

The D epartm ent also incurred expenditure to ta llin g $23.9 m illio n (5.5 per cent of total D epartm ent outlays) on salary and adm inistrative expenses associated w ith the operation of its Head Office elem ents in Canberra, Sydney and M elbourne and its offices in each o f the State capitals and in nineteen district centres.

The balance o f the D epartm ent's expenditure was made up of the fo llo w in g :

$M

C ontributions to the International Telecom m unication Union and the Asia-Pacific T elecom m unity 2.1

Grants to Public Broadcasters 0.3

D epartm ental Technical Equipm ent Program 2.054

C om m ittee of Review into the Special Broadcasting Service 0.19

M oney paid into consolidated revenue in 1983-84 w ith in the

D epartm ent's area o f responsibility am ounted to $711.17 m illio n , an increase of $150.4 m illio n (26.8 per cent) over 1982-83.

The main areas o f increase were: - higher paym ents received fro m the Australian T elecom m unica­ tions C om m ission ($117.1 m illion) as a result of a G overnm ent Budget decision to increase the interest payable on som e of the

earlier advances fro m the C om m onw ealth to Telecom - increased dividend paym ents fro m the Overseas T elecom m unica­ tions C om m ission ($19.0 m illion) - Regulation o f Broadcasting and Television ($8.0 m illio n ) m ainly

resulting fro m higher station licence fees - a large boost in radiocom m unica tions licence fees ($3.4 m illion). A com ponent o f the receipts relates to a share of the cost o f National Broadcasting sites and facilities operated by Telecom on behalf of the

D epartm ent w hich are recovered fro m com m ercial television oper­ ators and others w h o use these facilities. Fees are also collected fo r licences issued under the W ireless Telegraphy Act and fo r co m m er­ cial broadcasting licences.

S ub-division 1 The purpose o f this sub-division is to provide fo r the paym ent of

salaries to perm anent officers and wages to tem porary and casual

Department of Communications Expenditure 1983-84

($426.424m)

Department of Communications Salaries and Administrative Expenses $23.852m (5.5%)

Department of Communications Other Services $2.3 (0.7%)

Department of Communications Technical Equipment $2.054m (0.5%)

Australian Broadcasting Commission $301,3m (70.8%)

National Broadcasting and Television Service

$56.67m (13.3%)

Special Broadcasting Service $34.4m (8 .1% )

Australian Broadcasting Tribunal $4.65m (1.1% )

em ployees o f the D epartm ent, fo r paym ent o f allowances such as higher duties, paym ent in lieu of fu rlough and also provides fo r

overtim e paym ents.

S ub-division 2 This sub-division provides fo r expenditure in relation to: - Travelling and subsistence — paym ent to staff fo r travelling

allowances, transfer expenses and allowances, and allowances fo r use o f officers' ow n vehicles and fo r paym ent of air, rail and other fares - Office requisites — provides fo r the purchase o f office machines

and equipm en t general office requisites and stationery, fo r printing of fo rm s and fo r library services - Postage, telegram s and telephone services — provides fo r cost o f postage, private box fees, telegram s, teleprinter and facsim ile

services and telephone rental and calls

17

- M o to r vehicles — provides fo r casual and perm anent hire of m otor vehicles and also running costs, repairs and m aintenance o f m otor vehicles operated by the Departm ent - C om puter services — provides fo r hire of com puter tim e, ancillary

services and consum able stores in relation to com puter services.

- C onsultant fees — provides fo r fees payable to consultants and/or advisory boards engaged by the Departm ent. - Incidenta l a n d o th e r expenditure — this item provides fo r m iscel­ laneous expend iture such as lig h t and power, cleaning, study

assistance, repairs to technical equipm ent, consum able technical item s, fre ig h t and cartage, fu rn itu re and fittin g s and other expendi­ ture not ap p ro p ria te ly chargeable to other items.

S ub-division 3 — O ther services This item provides fo r paym ents w hich w ill arise from the Depart­ m ent's responsibilities, but w hich are distinct from its running costs. In the D epartm ent o f C om m unications' case these paym ents include A ustralia's c o n trib u tio n tow ards the budgets o f the International T elecom m unicatio n U nion (ITU) and the A sia-P acific T elecom m unity

(APT), purchase and d istrib u tio n o f ITU publications, grants in

su p p o rt o f Public Broadcasting and adm inistrative support o f the inquiries into T elecom m unications and Postal Services.

Expenditure and revenue 1981-82, 1982-83, 1983-84

Expenditure Expenditure Appropriation Expenditure

Expenditure 1981-82 1982-83 1983-84 1983-84

$ $ $ $

Division 220 — Administration Sub-division 1 S a la rie s and p a y m e n t in th e

n a tu re o f s a la ry

Ite m 01 S a la rie s a n d a llo w a n c e s 14 770 980 16 793 793 18 464 000 18 459 836

02 O v e rtim e 199 957 264 446 300 000 298 407

S u b -to ta l 14 970 937 17 058 239 18 764 000 18 758 243

Sub-division 2 A d m in is tra tiv e e x p e n s e s Ite m 01 T ra v e llin g a n d s u b s is te n c e 729 425 835 019 1 016 000 1 000 795

02 O ffic e re q u is ite s and

e q u ip m e n t, s ta tio n e ry and p rin tin g 551 942 640 030 776 000 775 973

03 P ostage, te le g ra m s and

te le p h o n e s e rv ic e s 8 9 9 9 0 4 1 024 625 1 260 000 1 259 447

04 M o to r v e h ic le s e rv ic e s 4 5 8 871 520 381 513 000 505 858

05 C o m p u te r s e rv ic e s 255 803 328 886 382 000 381 851

06 C o n s u lta n ts — fees 99 469 50 538 152 000 151 048

07 F u rn itu re a n d fittin g s 84 977 98 480 — —

08 In c id e n ta l and o th e r

e x p e n d itu re 624 078 687 436 1 019 000 1 018 936

S u b -to ta l 3 704 469 4 185 396 5 118 000 5 093 908

Sub-division 3 O th e r s e rv ic e s Ite m 01 In te rn a tio n a l T e le ­

c o m m u n ic a tio n U n io n —

c o n trib u tio n 1 425 830 1 561 703 2 000 000 1 999 372

02 A s ia -P a c ific T e le ­ c o m m u n ity — c o n trib u tio n 78 017 87 287 104 000 104 000

03 P urch a se and d is trib ­

u tio n o f In te rn a tio n a l

T e le c o m m u n ic a tio n U n io n p u b lic a tio n s (m o n ie s re c o v e re d m a y be

c re d ite d to th is ite m ) (CR) 12 983 3 239 (CR)2 087

18

Expenditure

Expenditure 1981-82 $

Expenditure Appropriation 1982-83 1983-84

$ $

Expenditure 1983-84 $

04 A u s tra lia n C a p tio n C e n tre

— g ra n t to e s ta b lis h

fa c ilitie s to c a p tio n

te le v is io n p ro g ra m s fo r

th e b e n e fit o f th e

h e a rin g im p a ire d 627 000 131 000

05 In q u irie s in to te le ­

c o m m u n ic a tio n s and p o s ta l s e rv ic e s 812 014 499 481 4 000 3 892

06 C o m m itte e o f In q u iry

in to th e A u s tra lia n

B ro a d c a s tin g C o m m is s io n 85 899 8 938

07 G ra n ts in s u p p o rt o f

P u b lic B ro a d c a s tin g 138 7 3 0 153 000 3 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0

— p a y m e n t in s p e c ia l

c ir c u m s ta n c e s to th e

w id o w o f A u s tr a lia n

B r o a d c a s tin g C o m m is s io n

e m p lo y e e k ille d in th e

c o u rs e o f d u ty 10 0 0 0 n il

— C o m m itte e o f In q u ir y in to

th e S p e c ia l B r o a d c a s tin g

S e rv ic e 207 000 192 4 7 5

S u b -to ta l 3 164 507 2 4 4 4 648 2 6 1 5 000 2 597 6 5 2

T o ta l D iv is io n 220 21 8 2 9 9 1 3 23 6 8 8 283 2 6 4 9 7 000 26 4 4 9 8 0 3

Division 222 Broadcasting, Television Services

S ub-division 7 — For paym ent to the Australian Broadcasting C orporation.

This sub-division provides fo r operational expenditure under the A ustralian Broadcasting C orporation Act by the Corporation fo r general activities associated w ith the dom estic service and Radio Australia.

S ub-division 2 — For paym ent to the Special Broadcasting Service fo r m ulticultural broadcasting.

This sub-division provides fo r operational expenditure by the Special Broadcasting Service under the Broadcasting and Television A ct 1942.

S ub-division 3 — For paym ents in respect of technical services provided pursuant to Part VII o f the A ustralian B roadcasting C orporation A c t 1983 or in respect o f sim ila r associated services.

This item provides fo r paym ent to the Australian Telecom m unica­ tions C om m ission in respect of services provided fo r the National Broadcasting and Television Services.

Division 224 — Regulation of Broadcasting and Television.

S ub-division 1 — For paym ent to the Australian Broadcasting Tribunal.

This Division provides fo r operational expenditure by the Australian Broadcasting T ribunal under the B roadcasting and Television A c t 1942.

19

Expenditure Expenditure A ppropriation Expenditure

Expenditure 1981-82 1982-83 1983-84 1983-84

$ $ $ $

Division 222 — Broadcasting and television services Sub-division 7 F or p a y m e n t to th e A u s tra lia n

B ro a d c a s tin g C o m m is s io n Ite m 01 G e n era l a c tiv itie s —

d o m e s tic s e rv ic e s 214 177 339 246 406 000 274 356 000 274 356 000

02 G e n era l a c tiv itie s —

R adio A u s tra lia 8 080 661 8 317 000 8 715 000 8 715 000

03 H o st b ro a d c a s te r a c tiv itie s — C o m m o n w e a lth G a m e s, B ris b a n e 1982 1 361 000 4 132 000

Sub-division 2 F or p a y m e n t to th e S p e cia l

B ro a d c a s tin g S e rv ic e fo r m u ltic u ltu ra l b ro a d c a s tin g 26 141 000 28 451 000 33 837 000 33 837 000

Sub-division 3 F or p a y m e n ts in re s p e c t o f

te c h n ic a l s e rv ic e s p ro v id e d p u rs u a n t to S e c tio n s 73 and

74 o f th e Broadcasting and Television A ct 1942 33 885 000 37 480 000 44 321 000 44 321 000

T o ta l D iv is io n 222 283 645 000 324 786 000 361 229 000 361 229 000

Division 224 — Regulation of broadcasting and television

Sub-division 1 For p a y m e n t to th e A u s tra lia n

B ro a d c a s tin g T rib u n a l 4 022 000 3 906 000 4 650 000 4 650 000

Division 841 — Capital works and services S u b -d ivisio n 1 P la n t and e q u ip m e n t Ite m 01 T e c h n ic a l e q u ip m e n t

Sub-division 2

860 943 1 378 735 2 064 000 2 054 000

E q u ity , a d v a n c e s a n d lo a n s Ite m 01 A U S S A T Pty Ltd — P a y m e n t o f

e q u ity c a p ita l 6 000 000 43 500 000 — —

T o ta l D iv is io n 841 6 860 943 44 878 735 2 064 000 2 054 000

Division 842 — Capital Works, Services — Broadcasting,

Television

S ub-division 7 — For paym ent to the Australian Broadcasting C orporation These item s provide fo r expenditure under the Australian Broadcast­ ing C orporation A ct in relation to general activities fo r dom estic services and Radio Australia. Expenditure includes acquisition of sites and buildings, construction o f buildings and the purchase of paint and other e q uipm en t of a capital nature.

S ub-division 2 — For paym ent to the Special Broadcasting Service fo r M ulticultural Broadcasting.

This sub-division provides fo r expenditure by the Special Broadcast­ ing Service on capital w orks and services. Expenditure is incurred on item s such as e q uipm en t fo r production, com pilation and present­

ation o f program s.

S ub-division 3 — Provision and installation o f radio and television transm itters and ancillary buildings, w orks and technical equipm ent.

Item 7 The A ustralian Broadcasting C orporation — Dom estic Ser­ vices.

20

Item 2 The A ustralian Broadcasting C orporation — Radio Australia.

E xpenditure incurred under these item s is fo r the purchase and installation of tra n sm itte r equipm ent, acquisition o f sites and the construction o f building s to provide fo r tra n sm ittin g facilities re q u ir­ ed by the national services o f the ABC w hich encom pass the

dom estic services and Radio Australia.

Item 3 The Special Broadcasting Service This item provides fo r tra n sm ittin g facilities required to provide the services o f the Special Broadcasting Service. Expenditure is incurred under th is item fo r the purchase and installation o f tra n sm itte r

equipm ent, acquisition o f sites, and the construction of buildings.

Expenditure Expenditure Appropriation Expenditure

Expenditure 1981-82 1982-83 1983-84 1983-84

S $ $ $

Division 842 — Broadcasting and television — capital and services Sub-division 1 F or p a y m e n t to th e A u s tra lia n

B ro a d c a s tin g C o m m is s io n in re s p e c t o f —

Item 01 G e n e ra l a c tiv itie s —

d o m e s tic s e rv ic e s 8 738 218 14 380 000 18 061 000 18 061 000

02 G e n e ra l a c tiv itie s —

R adio A u s tra lia 5 411 782 9 4 0 000 2 0 0 000 2 0 0 0 0 0

03 H o st b ro a d c a s te r a c tiv itie s —

C o m m o n w e a lth G am es, B ris b a n e 1982 9 270 0 0 0 —

Sub-division 2 F or p a y m e n t to th e S p e c ia l

B ro a d c a s tin g S e rv ic e fo r

m u ltic u ltu r a l b ro a d c a s tin g 249 000 406 000 611 000 611 000

Sub-division 3 P ro v is io n a n d in s ta lla tio n

o f ra d io a n d te le v is io n

tr a n s m it t e r s a n d a n c illa r y

b u ild in g s , w o r k s a n d

te c h n ic a l e q u ip m e n t f o r th e

u s e o f —

Ite m 01 A u s tr a lia n B r o a d c a s tin g

C o m m is s io n — d o m e s tic

s e rv ic e s 6 140 0 0 0 6 0 9 0 000 4 0 0 0 000 4 0 0 0 0 0 0

02 A u s tr a lia n B r o a d c a s tin g

C o m m is s io n — R a d io

A u s tr a lia 3 260 0 0 0 3 2 0 0 000 7 175 000 7 175 0 0 0

03 S p e c ia l B ro a d c a s tin a

1 170 0 0 0 S e rv ic e s n il 3 5 0 000 1 170 000

T o ta l D iv is io n 842 33 069 0 0 0 25 3 6 6 0 0 0 31 217 000 31 217 0 0 0

Division 843 — Other services G ra n ts fo r e s ta b lis h m e n t o f

ra d io s e rv ic e s fo r th e

p rin t h a n d ic a p p e d 249 662

_ — —

Division 844 — Com m ittee of Review into the Special

Broadcasting Service

This item provides fo r expenses directly related to the C om m ittee of Review into the Special Broadcasting Service. M ore general a d m in is­ trative expenses w ere included under the relevant D epartm ent a ppropria tion item.

The M inister fo r C om m unications announced on 6 December 1983 that the G overnm ent w ould be appointing a C om m ittee of Review to exam ine the role o f the m u lticu ltu ra l/m u ltilin g u a l broadcaster, the

21

Special Broadcasting Service (SBS), and recom m end a b lu eprint fo r future develop m e nt of ethnic broadcasting.

The term s o f reference fo r the Review were contained w ith in the M inister's press release o f 6 Decem ber 1983.

The C om m ittee was to report to the M inister by 30 June 1984, but this has subsequently been changed to 30 N ovem ber 1984.

Expenditure Expenditure A ppropriation Expenditure

Expenditure 1981-82 1982-83 1983-84 1983-84

$ $ S S

Division 844 — Committee of Review of the Special Broadcasting Service 207 000 192 475

T o ta l A p p ro p ria tio n A c t fu n d in g 349 686 518 422 625 027 425 657 000 425 599 803

R e m u n e ra tio n T rib u n a ls A c t — F irst D iv is io n O ffic e r 67 743 70 870 77 000 72 059

Department of Communications Revenue 1983-84 ($711.17m)

Overseas Telecom munications Commission $31,2m (4.4%)

Regulation of Broadcasting and Television $48.4m (6.8% )

Radio Frequency Management $22.9m (3.2%)

Other $0.09m (0.01%)

National Broadcasting and Television Service $2.06m (0.29%)

Australian Postal Commission $6.36m (0.9%)

Purchase of Commonwealth Games Equipment $2.36m (0.3%)|

Australian Telecommunications Commission $597.8m (84.1%)

22

DOC revenue A u stra lia n P ostal C om m ission Sub-head 30-04 — Postal C om m ission interest.

Revenue collected under th is sub-head consists o f interest payable by the A ustralian Postal C om m ission in accordance w ith Sections 74 and 75 o f the Postal Services A c t 1975.

Sub-head 30-12 — U nclaim ed moneys.

Section 107 o f the Postal Services A c t 1975 requires the Com m ission to pay into 'U nclaim ed M oneys Fund' all m oneys received fo r

delivery th ro u g h the postal services w hich have rem ained unclaim ed fo r a period o f one year after receipt by the C om m ission. W here the m oneys have rem ained in the 'U nclaim ed M oneys Fund' fo r a period o f five years, th e y are paid into Consolidated Revenue.

A u stra lia n T elecom m unications C om m ission Sub-head 30-14 — T elecom m unications Com m ission interest. Revenue collected under th is sub-head consists o f interest payable by the A ustralian T elecom m unications C om m ission in accordance w ith Sections 71 and 72 o f the Telecom m unications A c t 1975.

S ub-head 3 0 -1 5 — International T elecom m unication U nion c o n trib u ­ tion Revenue collected under this sub-head is the C om m ission's share o f A u stralia's c o n trib u tio n to the budget o f the ITU.

Sub-head 30-16 — Asia-Pacific Telecom m unity: contribution.

Revenue collected under th is sub-head is Telecom 's share of

A u stralia's c o n trib u tio n to the budget of the APT.

N a tio n a l Broadcasting and Television Services — Recoveries Sub-head 30-17 — Technical facilities and services provided to com m ercial television operators.

Revenue collected under this sub-head consists o f contribution s made by com m ercial television operators w here sharing arrange­ m ents ap p ly between com m ercial and national operators at national tra n s m ittin g sites.

S ub-head 30-18 — O ther Revenue collected under th is sub-head includes rental payable by technical officers living in C om m onw ealth houses, proceeds from sale o f spare parts, and other m iscellaneous revenue.

Sub-head 30-19 — Overseas T elecom m unications C om m ission pay­ ment.

Revenue collected under this sub-head consists o f paym ents by the Overseas Telecom m unications Com m ission by w ay o f dividend on capital em ployed.

S ub-head 30-21 — Asia-Pacific Telecom m unity contribution . Revenue collected under this sub-head is the C om m ission's share o f A ustralia's co n trib u tio n to the budget of the APT.

Radio Frequency M anagem ent Sub-head 30-25 — Technical services.

Revenue collected under this sub-head is fo r m arine surveys

perform ed on behalf o f both State and C om m onw ealth Departm ents o f Transport.

Sub-head 30-30 — W ireless Telegraphy Act — non-C om m onw ealth users and sta tutory authorities.

Sub-head 30-35 — W ireless Telegraphy Act C om m onw ealth users — departm ental charges and other.

23

Revenue collected under these sub-heads includes ra d iocom m unic­ ation licence fees and exam ination fees fo r w ireless operator

licences.

R egulation o f B roadcasting and Television Sub-head 30-49 — Broadcasting station licence fees.

This sub-head covers revenue under the Broadcasting Stations Licence Fees A c t 1964.

Sub-head 30-45 — Television station licence fees.

This sub-head covers revenue under the Television S tations Licence Fees A ct 1964.

S ub-head 30-60 — Purchase of C om m onw ealth Games equipm ent.

This sub-head covers revenue collected as paym ent o f an instalm ent o f $2.7 m illio n by the ABC in 1983-84 in respect of the 'bu y back' by the ABC of som e o f the additional equipm ent acquired especially fo r the 1982 C om m onw ealth Games w hich the ABC w ishes to retain for its use in norm al operations in future.

Sub-head 30-65 — AUSSAT equity sales to Telecom.

The capital o f AU SSAT Pty Ltd com prises 75 m illio n shares each o f $1 w hich have been partly paid up to 66 cents. The subscribed capital of the com pany at 30 June 1983 was $49.5 m illion.

No fu rth e r call on shares is expected to be required during 1983-84. In the Econom ic Statem ent to Parliam ent in May 1983 the G overn­ m ent announced its intention to perm it the private sector to acquire up to 49 per cent o f the equity capital of AUSSAT subject to an

appropriate spread o f shareholdings and the developm ent o f satis­ factory arrangem ents to protect the public interest. The decision to proceed w ith the sale o f shares to the public was subsequently

changed and the sale to Telecom o f up to 25 per cent of AUSSAT equity capital is cu rre n tly G overnm ent policy.

S ub-head 30-70 — ABC co n trib u tio n — International T elecom m unic­ ation Union.

Revenue collected under this sub-head is the ABC's share of

A ustralia's co n trib u tio n to the budget o f the ITU.

M iscellaneous Sub-head 30-97 This sub-head provides fo r m iscellaneous receipts w hich do not fall w ith in the fo re g o in g categories.

R e c e i p t s

R e c e i p t s

1 9 8 1 - 8 2

$

R e c e i p t s

1 9 8 2 - 8 3

$

E s t i m a t e d

r e c e i p t s

1 9 8 3 - 8 4

$

R e c e i p t s

1 9 8 3 - 8 4

$

— A u s t r a l i a n Postal C o m m i s s i o n 3 090 848 4 260 150 6 663 000 6 363 299

— A u s t r a l i a n T e l e c o m m u n i c a t i o n s C o m m i s s i o n 394 749 919 4 80 685 863 597 806 000 597 801 005

— N a t i o n a l B r o a d c a s t i n g a n d

T e l e v i s i o n S e r v ic e 1 4 37 979 2 240 902 1 724 000 2 060 168

— O v e rs e a s T e l e c o m m u n i c a t i o n s C o m m i s s i o n 20 211 364 11 731 961 30 732 000 31 169 604

— R a d io F r e q u e n c y M a n a g e m e n t 1 5 9 5 0 127 18 683 443 22 083 300 22 951 020

— R e g u l a t i o n o f b r o a d c a s t i n g

a n d t e l e v i s i o n 30 932 805 40 395 151 52 100 000 48 367 674

— P u r c h a s e o f C o m m o n w e a l t h

G a m e s e q u i p m e n t — 2 7 0 0 0 0 0 2 3 6 0 0 0 0 2 3 6 0 0 0 0

— M i s c e l l a n e o u s 3 6 3 4 9 4 2 531 9 0 0 0 0 57 6 53

— A U S S A T e q u i t y : s a l e t o T e l e c o m — — 14 8 5 0 0 0 0 —

T o t a l r e v e n u e 4 6 6 4 0 9 391 5 6 0 7 4 0 001 7 2 8 4 0 8 3 0 0 711 130 4 2 3

24

Internal Audit The D epartm ent's 1982-83 A nnual Report referred to the establish­ m ent of an internal audit activity w ith in DOC consistent w ith

G overnm ent policy and recent professional developm ents.

During 1983-84, DOC's internal audit area has consolidated and strengthened its place in the organisation. Positive executive m an­ agem ent support has been provided w ith the D epartm ent's A u d it C om m ittee m eeting on eight occasions to review audit plans, reports and overall im pact. The co m m itte e 's interaction w ith audit has

ensured that audit services are provided to to p -p rio rity areas w ith in DOC.

The strengthening o f internal audit has ocurred th rough a reorganis­ ation. The creation o f a position o f D irector (Internal A udit) has raised the status of the audit fu nction w ith in DOC and is consistent w ith G overnm ent policy in this area.

The creation o f an ADR audit position w ill allow audit to acquire skills and experience w hich w ill assist the activities and m anagem ent o f the organisation.

The tim in g o f this reorganisation fits w ell w ith the D epartm ent's

recent co m p u tin g resources acquisitions.

To assist w ith the in tro d u ctio n o f ADR audit and w ith the develop­ m ent o f ADR system s the D epartm ent has engaged a consultant to undertake a system s developm ent life-cycle audit o f the on-line licensing system . The consultant w ill provide professional input to the D epartm ent's operations and assist in im p ro vin g m anagem ent control, efficiency and econom y.

The pressures o f increasing responsibilities in all areas of the

D epartm ent, p a rticu la rly in broadcasting m atters, has taken its toll on staffing resources available to audit. However, it is expected that the staffing situation w ill im prove. A u d it com m ittee concern has been expressed on several occasions and support has been given to proposed recruitm ent plans.

Executive m anagem ent appreciation of the DOC internal audit services was enhanced th rough the com pletion and review of an Internal A u d it Q uality Assurance Program. This appreciation w ill ensure fu tu re developm ent o f this im portant resource.

25

Corporate Planning

The D epartm ent has introduced a corporate planning system as a means o f achieving a disciplined approach to the allocation of

priorities and resources in its policy developm ent and operations.

C orporate planning is seen as an effective m anagem ent response to the enviro n m e n t in w hich the Departm ent operates. W ith rapid technological change, the D epartm ent m ust consider increased options fo r the provision o f com m unications services, despite

financial and m anpow er resource constraints.

Basic elements The general principles of corporate planning m ust be applied to any given organisation in ways that w ill m eet its particular requirem ents.

The corporate planning system adopted in the Departm ent w ill consist of fo u r basic elem ents:

- an annual assessm ent o f environm ental factors likely to im pinge on the D epartm ent's areas of responsibility. The tim e scale fo r the assessment w ill be up to ten years. Political, technological, social and econom ic factors w ill be considered - a set o f long-term goals fo r the Departm ent; these are listed at

A ppendix E - a three-year program o f objectives w ith specified priorities; this w ill be review ed annually and the objectives revised as necessary - an annual operating plan (AOP) detailing all significant activities

and resources required to w ork tow ards the achievem ent o f each objective d u rin g the current financial year.

These elem ents m ust, of course, be m utually consistent. The full im plem entatio n o f the corporate planning approach is proceeding in stages. O wing to resource constraints, an environm ental assessment was not undertaken during this financial year.

In general, corporate planning in this D epartm ent consists o f tw o m ajor phases. The firs t phase is strategic planning, a process which determ ines, in term s o f goals and objectives, the future direction in w hich the D epartm ent should move. The second phase is operational p la n n in g and budgeting, in w hich allocation o f resources according

to priorities and program s specifies how the Departm ent can achieve its goals and objectives.

STRATEGIC PLANNING PROCESS

CORPORATE STRATEGY

DIVISIONAL OBJECTIVES

PROGRAM EVALUATION

CONSISTENCY REVIEW

DEPARTMENTAL GOALS

FUTURE

DEVELOPMENTS

OPPORTUNITIES

CONSTRAINTS

CURRENT DEPARTMENTAL SITUATIONS

CURRENT INDUSTRY SITUATION

OPERATING IMPLICATIONS FOR THE DEPARTMENT

26

The process o f strategic planning as it w ill be used in the Departm ent is illustrated in the accom panying diagram . The objectives set by each D ivision (box H) w ill be derived from :

- an assessm ent o f the Departm ent's environm ent (boxes A and B), and the opp o rtu n itie s and constraints the environm ent is likely to present (box E) - an assessm ent of the strengths and weaknesses of the Departm ent

(box F) and an evaluation of current program s (box G) - som e in p u t of 'in itia tive s' — ad hoc, direct perceptions of w hat the D epartm ent should do. Such ideas originate from tim e to tim e in the D epartm ent from senior officers, task forces etc.

D ivisional objectives are reviewed by the D epartm ent's Executive group to ensure consistency (box J) w ith the long-term goals of the D epartm ent (box I). In this process, Divisional objectives are ranked according to departm ental priority.

It is intended that corporate planning w ill assist the Departm ent w ith preparation of its rolling three-year program of estim ates (of required staffing and financial resources) fo r the D epartm ent of Finance.

A llocation of resources through the annual budget cycle and the estim ates is done on a 'lin e ' basis, that is, by item (for example,

overtim e or travel) rather than on a program basis. To ensure that resource allocation is consistent w ith the priorities set by the

D epartm ent fo r its objectives, it is necesssary to estim ate the man years and fun d in g required to fu lfil each objective.

These quantitie s are specified each year in the annual operating plan. By su m m ing 'lin e ' item s across all program s, this 'program budget­ ing' can then be converted back to a 'lin e ' budget fo r negotiations w ith the D epartm ent of Finance.

Progress during The D epartm ent's m ove to a corporate planning approach has 1983-84 proved o pportun e in view of the publication by the G overnm ent in February 1984 o f a report on a Financial M anagem ent Im provem ent Program (FMIP) diagnostic study. That study was part of a general

th ru st fo r reform of the Public Service and im provem ent in the

efficiency and effectiveness o f the delivery of services.

M any o f the proposals incorporated in the study report had been recognised by the Departm ent as a vital part of its corporate planning activities. In view of the progress made w ith these concepts, the

D epartm ent was invited to be a m em ber of the Interdepartm ental A d viso ry and D evelopm ent C om m ittee (IADC) w hich has been established to assist w ith the im plem entation o f FMIP fo r the public sector.

D uring the past year steps have been taken to arrange fo r the

integration o f corporate planning w ith the annual estim ates cycle. For the first tim e, in the preparation of draft estim ates fo r 1984-85, the Executive of the Departm ent made use of m aterial prepared by the Corporate Planning Unit. The m aterial was used also in the prepar­

ation of briefs fo r discussions w ith the Departm ent of Finance.

Through the identification of resource requirem ents on a 'pro gram ' basis, it has been possible to align proposals fo r the allocation of resources against priorities determ ined through the corporate plan­ ning process. Interesting features dem onstrated in this process include: - activities o f a routine and ongoing nature use approxim ately 80 per

cent o f the D epartm ent's staffing resources - activities w hich are, at least to some extent, discretionary, account fo r about 60 per cent of planned expenditure. This reflects the D epartm ent's response to the rapid rate of technolo gy change - new technical equipm ent proposals are generally associated w ith

initiatives.

27

During 1984-85 it is expected that the integration o f corporate

planning processes w ith the estim ates cycle w ill be achieved fully. It is intended also that the present manual system fo r corporate

planning w ill be converted fo r ADR processes. A start is being made on assessing the external environm en t affecting the developm ent of com m unication s policy and, in conjunction w ith the FMIP program , the D epartm ent w ill be studying m ethods of perform ance m easure­

ment.

C om puter D evelopm ents in DOC

Expanding role of The D epartm ent has an expanding and very dem anding role in the ADR fo rm u la tio n o f com m unication s policy and therefore needs to adopt the m ost effective m ethods available in the m anagem ent o f its

business and organisation.

The need to apply the m ost m odern com puter technologies to

departm ental a d m inistrative functions is now apparent and the in tro d u ctio n of advanced m anagem ent in fo rm a tio n systems, w ith th e ir associated changes to office m ethods and procedures, w ill take place over the next few years.

This technological change w ill see the in troduction into the office e n viro n m e n t o f visual display units and 'in te llig e n t w ork stations' w ith com pact high-speed printers capable o f perform ing w ord

processing, in fo rm a tio n retrieval and analysis, and electronic m ail functions.

In fact, DOC has been using basic com puter processing system s since early 1970, m ainly fo r engineering and accounting purposes in the radio frequency m anagem ent area. Over the past few years there has

been a gradual progression from a m u ltitu d e of incom patible

system s to ju st three related system s operating from Canberra to serve all State offices. This has brought w ith it a vast im provem ent in a u d ita b ility, data in te g rity and cost-effectiveness.

This integration precedes the m ove tow ards an integrated on-line system to im prove fu rth e r the quality, efficiency and effectiveness of radio frequency m anagem ent.

The d e velop m e nt of an autom ated broadcasting planning system has been in itia te d in response to an am endm ent to the Broadcasting and Television Act and steps have been taken to address in form ation requirem ents in other areas o f the Departm ent.

In accordance w ith G overnm ent policy and the related Public Service Board guidelines, DOC is required to form alise the actions already described, and furnish to the FSB, Departm ent o f Finance, Depart­ m ent o f A d m in istra tive Services, and the J o in t S tatutory Public A ccounts C om m ittee an ADP Strategic Plan covering the ensuing three financial years.

In m easuring perform ance against the planned projects, DOC has been able to achieve all objectives fo r 1983-84 except contract fin a lisa tio n and actual installation o f the new departm ental co m ­ puter.

Projects The m a jo r projects undertaken and finished during 1983-84 are as completed fo llo w s: - tenders were called fo r the supply o f a m edium -scale com puting system to replace the bureau services (Departm ent of Health and

Control Data Australia) and eventually to provide DOC w ith all m anagem ent and adm inistrative systems. Follow ing evaluation w ith the help of an outside consultant, the Departm ent in

Decem ber 1983 recom m ended to the D epartm ent of A d m in istra ­ tive Services the acquisition of an IBM System/38. Contract

negotiation is under w ay and the system is expected to be installed in Ju ly/A u g u st 1984 - the com m u n ica tio n link between the D epartm ent's existing Re­ m ote Job Entry facilities and the D epartm ent o f Health's com puter

was reconfigured to include a Tim e Sharing O ption. This allow s the use o f D epartm ent o f H ealth's Personnel System by this Depart­ m ent, and w ill help achieve a sm ooth transition from the current m ode o f operation to the new departm ental com puter

29

- changes to the Broadcasting and Television Act, w hich called for the rapid in tro d u ctio n of supplem entary television licences,

necessitated the developm ent o f an autom ated broadcasting station planning system. A Hewlett-Packard HP-1000 com puter was purchased and com m issioned in July 1983 fo r this purpose. The com puter is now located in Oatley Court in Canberra w ith co m m unication links to Benjam in Office and M elbourne Central

Office. In the longer term , the Η P-1000 system w ill also cater fo r the engineering/technical com puting requirem ents of the Departm ent. The data analysis and design fo r the broadcasting planning data base have been com pleted and autom ation o f the routine en­ gineering analyses aspect of station planning is in progress - the Australian M aster Frequency A ssignm ent Register (AMFAR)

was successfully converted from Control Data A ustralia to the D epartm ent o f Health's com puter. The conversion resulted in a saving o f running cost o f $6500 a m onth. A t the same tim e, the system was th o ro u g h ly m odified to a llow efficient data collection, verification and the eventual integration of this system w ith the

A utom atic Licensing System and the A utom atic Frequency A ssign­ m ent System . An extensive data collection/ve rifica tion project was im plem ented in all States to com pletely overhaul the data quality - the analysis phase of the A utom atic Licensing System was

com pleted. This system w ill a llo w licensing officers in State Offices to issue and renew com m unication licences on-line and thus greatly im prove the tim eliness of services and speed up the

collection o f revenues - a Personnel M anagem ent System , developed by the Departm ent of Health, was im plem ented fo r use in DOC - the D epartm ent im plem ented access to A ttorney-G eneral's SCALE

legal data base fo r use in the Legislation Section and DIALOG international technical data base fo r use in the library - an Asset Register System was im plem ented and is now operation­ al on the D epartm ent of Health's com puter - personal com puters to function as m ulti-purpose w orkstations

were acquired fo r evaluation by user staff. More than 100 staff m em bers have been given basic training on the equipm ent and evaluation reports w ill be obtained after an appropriate period of practical use - the Public Service Board approved a departm ental organisation

proposal to increase the ADP staffing level to thirteen. This level is necessary to support a Departm ental com puter installation, to operate existing system s and develop m ajor on-line systems fundam ental to the D epartm ent's functions of spectrum m anage­ m ent and broadcasting station planning. A ll ADP positions have been filled.

Broadcasting: W hat's New?

Policy

formulation

Planning ABC and SBS services

A ustralia has a unique broadcasting system com prising

G overnm ent-funded, com m ercial and public sectors.

G overnm ent-funded broadcasters include the A ustralian Broadcast­ ing C orporation (ABC) and the Special Broadcasting Service (SBS). Both organisatio ns are independent statutory authorities responsible fo r th e ir ow n program m ing decisions. C om m ercial radio and te le vi­ sion stations are operated by private com panies under regulations w hich lim it ow nership or control to no m ore than tw o television

stations and eight radio stations. Public radio stations are operated by local co m m u n ity organisations on a n o n -p ro fit basis.

The licensing o f com m ercial and public stations is the responsibility of the A ustralian Broadcasting Tribunal, an independent statutory a u th o rity. The T ribunal is also responsible fo r setting program

standards fo r these stations.

The size of the Australian broadcasting system is:

A B C T r a n s m i t t e r s

T e l e v i s i o n 2 7 3

A M r a d i o 95

F M r a d i o 25

I n l a n d s h o r t w a v e 11

O v e r s e a s s h o r t w a v e 13

4 1 7

SBS T e l e v i s i o n 10

A M r a d io 4

14

Commercial T e l e v i s i o n 180

A M r a d io 142

FM r a d io 7

3 29

Public A M r a d io 5

FM r a d io 33

38

This com prises a total of about 800 tra n sm itte rs in daily operation th ro u g h o u t Australia.

The D epartm ent provides advice to the G overnm ent on overall broadcasting policy issues. This includes decisions on questions relating to the adequacy o f existing broadcasting services; the

in tro d u ctio n of additional or new kinds o f services; the introduction of new technological developm ents; the use o f broadcasting fre ­ quencies fo r services and the adm inistration o f broadcasting legis­ lation.

The im petus fo r extensions to the national netw orks comes m ainly through initiatives of the G overnm ent, subm issions by the ABC and SBS, and representations fro m the com m unity.

Extension of ABC and SBS tra n sm ittin g facilities are evaluated by the tw o Planning C om m ittees: the National Broadcasting Service (ABC) Planning C om m ittee (ABC services), and the Special Broadcasting

Service (SBS) Planning Com m ittee.

31

Growth in ABC national services 1920-1985

80 -

70 -

ABC TV

I

ABC FM

ABC MF

60 -

50 -

40 -

30 -

20 -

O) (7) 0 ) 0 ) 0 ) 0 ) 0 )

□ Projected

P rojected

P rojected

UO m O)

o CD O)

m CD O)

o h­ O)

in h­ O)

o co O)

The NBSRC and SBSPC were established to advise the M inister on the exercise o f his statutory responsibility fo r the planning of ABC and SBS services respectively. In the case o f the NBSRC, m em bership includes the ABC, DOC and Telecom. The SBSPC com prises repre­ sentatives from the SBS, DOC and Telecom.

The C om m onw ealth is responsible fo r the establishm ent, operation and m aintenance of National tra n sm ittin g facilities fo r ABC and SBS services.

Commercial and W ithin overall policy set by the G overnm ent, initiatives fo r the public services establishm ent o f new com m ercial and public services largely arise from potential operators w ho feel that a particular tow n could

support a new service. The Departm ent of C om m unications, on behalf o f the M inister, keeps such requests under constant review and makes p re lim in a ry evaluations of such matters as:

- level of dem and

- adequacy of present services in the area - audience potential - a va ilability o f frequencies - econom ic considerations - effect of new services on existing services.

Planning proposals are prepared in consultation w ith interested parties and subm itted to the M inister fo r consideration. Approved

1985

Broadcasting initiatives

Satellite Program Services inquiry

planning proposals result in a call by the M inister fo r applications fo r a licence. A p plication s are referred to the Australian Broadcasting Tribunal fo r public in q u iry and decision on the m ost suitable

applicant to be granted the licence. A com plete list o f licences fo r w hich the M inister invited applications during 1983-84 is at the end of this chapter.

In 1983-84 the D epartm ent was involved in a va rie ty o f broadcasting in itia tive s designed to:

- make effective use of the satellite to destribute program s and to bring television and radio to Australians w h o at present have no broadcasting services

- extend the range of services available to all A ustralians particularly those living outside m ainland m etropolitan areas - expedite the provision of services, im prove the quality o f dom estic reception and enhance the services cu rrently available.

Up till now the terrestrial bearer system has placed lim ita tio n s on the extension of television services to rem ote areas and the d istrib u tio n of program s between stations. These lim ita tio n s w ill largely be

overcom e w ith the launch of the Australian C om m unications Satellite System in 1985. Satellite broadcasting technolo gy w ill make it

possible to provide ABC television and radio services to all A ustra­ lians. It w ill also a llow the extension of com m ercial broadcasting services to these areas. A t present even co m m unities situated reasonably close to urban centres are fre q u e n tly unable to receive adequate broadcasting services because o f topographical obstruc­ tions.

To benefit these co m m u n itie s and those in regional areas w hich only have access to a lim ited range o f services, the D epartm ent has been engaged in a va rie ty of program s designed to redress the im balance in the pro visio n o f television and radio services between urban and rural co m m unities. These initiatives relate to satellite broadcasting, the su p plem en tary licence scheme and the Self-help Television

Reception Schem e (STRS) w hich involves com m unities co-operating to establish th e ir ow n retransm ission facilities.

The s p irit of co-operation that em erged during 1983-84 between com m ercial and national broadcasters in order to bring coverage of the 1984 Los Angeles O lym pics to all Australians was an exam ple of the efforts by broadcasters to ensure better services. This involved a concerted e ffo rt on the part o f everyone to overcom e the lim ita tio n s o f the terrestrial bearer system on the national d istrib u tio n of

television program s in real tim e. Viewers all over Australia including those in rem ote areas presently served by the ABC's Remote Area Television Service w ill receive real-tim e television coverage of the O lym pic Games via the Pacific ocean INTELSAT satellite.

In 1983-84 the planning of new broadcasting services began to m ove into the co m p u te r era w ith the D epartm ent's initiatives in developing autom ated planning procedures designed to reduce the num ber of m an-hours required fo r planning new services. A t the same tim e, the new procedures w ill bring a greater degree of accuracy into

engineering predictions and ensure the provision of services w hich reduce the potential fo r interference.

DEVELOPMENTS IN BROADCASTING:

SATELLITE-RELATED INITIATIVES

In late 1983, the G overnm ent decided to give all suppliers of

com m ercial television and radio program s equal opportunities to d istrib u te th e ir program s via the dom estic satellite to com m ercial stations th ro u g h o u t Australia. The M inister directed the Australian

33

Broadcasting Tribunal to conduct a public in q u iry into the extent of regulation o f persons providing Satellite Program Services. The ABT finalised its report on 13 July 1984.

Commercial television for remote areas

HACBSS

HACBSS information campaign

Satellite conversion program

In a M inisterial Statem ent on the D evelopm ent of Satellite-related Broadcasting Services and O w nership o f the Satellite System , on 15 N ovem ber 1983, the M inister noted that the G overnm ent expected every A ustralian w ould have at least one com m ercial television service po te n tia lly available as a result of current or fu tu re initiatives. As part of its Inquiry into the Use o f Satellite Program Services by

Broadcasters, the Australian Broadcasting Tribunal was asked to consider w h a t measures were required to prom ote provision of com m ercial services to rem ote areas.

The M inister subsequently authorised the Departm ent to make a subm ission to that Inquiry. DOC put forw ard five conceptual m odels fo r providing com m ercial television to rem ote areas. A G overnm ent decision on the extension of com m ercial television to such areas by means of the satellite is expected in 1984.

O ptions to be considered by G overnm ent w ill include those involving the provision o f regional com m ercial television services by means of high-pow ered transponders in spot beams capable of being received

by individual hom esteads using small satellite receiving dishes.

On 7 February 1984, the M inister announced that the PAL tra n sm is­ sion system , used fo r terrestrial television broadcasting in Australia, had been chosen as the standard fo r extending ABC services to rem ote and underserved areas via the dom estic satellite system, AUSSAT. This service is known as the Homestead and C om m unity

Broadcasting Satellite Service (HACBSS).

The M inister also announced that the w ay w ould be left open fo r future m o difications to the standard to a llow fo r im proved systems now being developed overseas w hich w ill provide a higher quality television picture and additional radio services.

HACBSS is scheduled to start operation tow ards the end of 1985 fo llo w in g the launch of the Australian satellites.

The G overnm ent acknowledged that im proved transm ission tech­ nologies such as, fo r exam ple, some variant o f the w id e ly publicised M ultiplexed A nalogue C om ponent (MAC) system is likely to offer technical advantages over PAL.

The G overnm ent is keeping its options open in this regard.

The Hom estead and C om m unity Broadcasting Satellite Service w ill be publicised by the Departm ent. The inform ation cam paign w ill incorporate printed, audio and video m aterial to be made available to individuals and groups in rem ote and underserved areas. C urrently ’ available printed m aterial consists of the first three issues of a

new sletter entitled HACBSS News, w ith fu rth e r issues to be issued every three m onths. The first three issues covered a general

description o f HACBSS, the equipm ent required to receive the service and answers to typical questions about HACBSS. There is also a poster available covering m ore general inform ation.

Video m aterial currently available consists of a 30-m inute docu- dram a incorporatin g a general description of HACBSS and the installation of a HACBSS earth station. A fo llo w -u p video, other printed and audio m aterial are being planned.

A ction is being taken to convert National broadcasting and television stations to take ABC program s o ff satellite once AUSSAT is launched in 1985.

Self-help Television Reception Scheme

RUCS

Supplementary Licence Scheme

On 17 M ay 1984, a contract was signed w ith NEC Australia Pty Ltd fo r the su p p ly o f equipm en t fo r satellite receiving stations at 105

National sites. ABC radio and television signals, cu rrently distributed to regional tra n sm itte rs te rre stria lly w ill in fu tu re predom ina ntly be d istrib u te d via the dom estic satellite.

The new satellite te chnolo gy offers several advantages over conven­ tional means o f d istrib u tio n , including low er costs, operational

convenience and high technical perform ance standards.

This schem e, w hich was introduced in 1982, is designed to allow co m m u n itie s in rem ote areas or those unable to receive television adequately because of topograp hical barriers such as hills, to fund and arrange fo r the extension of an existing ABC or com m ercial service to th e ir areas. Planning, licensing and technical requirem ents have been s im p lifie d fo r STRS to encourage and facilitate its use by c o m m u n ity groups.

In 1983-84 the A ustralian Broadcasting Tribunal granted tw enty-six licences fo r television tra n sla to r stations under the STRS scheme. M any o f these stations w ill bring satellite-fed ABC television services to rem ote co m m u n itie s in Q ueensland and the Northern Territory, including a sig n ifica n t num ber of isolated A borigina l com m unities. The D epartm ent anticipates that dem and fo r STRS services w ill accelerate in the next few years w ith the in troduction of A ustralia's dom estic satellite.

Conscious of the needs of residents o f rem ote and underserved areas fo r im p ro ve d radio and television services, in the 1983-84 Budget, the G overnm ent approved the Remote or Underserved C om m unities

Scheme (RUCS). RUCS is a three-year program w hich w ill bring im proved ABC radio services to tw elve com m unities in north-w est Tasm ania, southern New South W ales and northern Victoria, and w ill bring im proved ABC television services to another fo rty-tw o

underserved co m m u n itie s th ro u g h o u t A ustralia, at a total cost of $6.2 m illio n .

The tw e lve co m m unities to receive an im proved ABC radio service w ill be: Bom bala, C ootam undra, Corowa district, M oruya, Naroom a, N owra (NSW ); W angaratta (Vic); Rosebery, Savage River, Strahan, W aratah and Zeehan (Tas). The fo rty -tw o co m m unities to receive ABC te le visio n , either by terrrestrial retransm ission or by AUSSAT w hen it is launched in 1985, have not yet been determ ined. Detailed field surveys w ill be necessary in som e cases to determ ine the

adequacy of current signal levels w ith in the areas under consider­ ation.

ADDITIONAL SERVICES

The Scheme began on 1 Decem ber 1983. It is designed to provide a d ive rsity o f program choice fo r people living in non-m etropolitan areas w hich cannot sustain additional, w h o lly com petitive co m m er­

cial radio or television stations w ith o u t threatening the com m ercial v ia b ility o f existing services in the area. The scheme involves

supplem en tary licences fo r existing regional com m ercial radio and television operators and w ill provide fo r an additional com m ercial television service and additional com m ercial FM radio services in regional areas. In all cases, a supplem entary licence w ill only be

granted after an A ustralian Broadcasting Tribunal in quiry has shown that an extra independent com m ercial service is not com m ercially viable. The G overnm ent is concerned that the S upplem entary Licence

Scheme should not exacerbate the concentration of media o w ner­ ship in regional areas. A cco rd in g ly it has announced that it w ill

am end the B roadcasting and Television A ct 1942 to make explicit the

35

New licence for Perth

Second ABC Regional Radio Network

Broadcasting planning project

need fo r the A ustralian Broadcasting Tribunal to take media ow n e r­ ship into account w hen deciding w hether to grant a supplem entary licence or to recom m end to the M inister that he invite applications for a new independent com m ercial licence.

On 1 Decem ber 1983, the M inister fo r C om m unications invited expressions of interest from eligible licensees. By 1 March 1984, eighty-six o f 101 eligible radio stations and all th irty-six eligible

television stations had lodged an expression of interest in a

supplem entary licence. Licensees have until 20 Septem ber 1984 to lodge a form al application.

On 19 April 1984 the M inister announced the calling o f applications fo r a licence fo r a th ird com m ercial television station in Perth,

W estern Australia. In reaching its decision the G overnm ent was conscious o f the disadvantage o f Perth viewers and advertisers com pared to other m ainland capitals w hich each have three com m er­ cial television stations. A pplications fo r the licence m ust be lodged w ith the A ustralian Broadcasting Tribunal by 28 Septem ber 1984, fo llo w in g w hich the ABT w ill conduct a full public in quiry into the grant o f the licence.

Due to the im m ediate unavailability of a suitable VHP channel in the Perth region, the new licensee w ill be given the option of either

beginning on UHF channel 31, or, if appropriate, arrangem ents can be made to com m ence at a later date on VHP channel 10. The delay in introducing a service on channel 10 results from the tim e required to shift other television services in surrounding regions to suitable alternative frequencies.

In A ugust 1983 the G overnm ent announced that a VHP Task Force was to be established w ith in the D epartm ent to begin detailed

planning of a Second Regional Radio Network fo r the ABC. The netw ork w ill provide a second ABC radio service to the estim ated fo u r m illio n A ustralians living outside the capital cities w ho presently receive only one ABC radio service. One o f the first tasks to be

undertaken by the ABC, and the new VHP Task Force, w ill be the preparation o f a Green Paper setting out proposals regarding the second network. The Green Paper should be ready fo r release by the M inister fo r C om m unications fo r public com m ent late in 1984.

ENGINEERING AND PLANNING DEVELOPMENTS

G overnm ent initiatives designed to increase the diversity o f choice of radio and television services in regional areas are resulting in

increasing dem and fo r new services. The radio frequency spectrum available fo r radio and television is lim ited and as each new service is added the potential fo r interference between services increases. This dem ands m ore com prehensive and m ore com plex engineering analysis of proposals at the planning stage.

The m ethods tra d itio n a lly used w ith in the Departm ent have involved considerable engineering effort, m uch o f w hich was expended in relatively routine analysis. In July 1983, the Broadcasting Planning Task Force com m enced a project aim ed at autom ating the many com plex engineering tasks involved in broadcasting planning. The prim ary aim s o f this w ork are to im prove the quality and speed of the engineering analysis undertaken, by quickly identifying and focusing the engineer's attention on the potential problem s, and when these problem s are resolved, autom atically producing graphically illu stra t­ ed reports that are easily understood by non-specialists.

The system is being developed by departm ental specialists, initially draw ing on US and UK experience but extending and adapting that experience to em brace the specific requirem ents of the Australian broadcasting system.

F ield o f f i c e r s e r e c t a

U H F t r a n s m i t t i n g

m a s t n e a r

B u n g e n d o r e in

N S W as p a r t o f

t e s t i n g o f v a r i o u s

t y p e s o f U H F

a n t e n n a s .

Band II clearance

Developm ent of UHF television

The system w ill produce detailed theoretical coverage maps w hich are re latively accurate predictions o f the coverage expected from stations. They w ill indicate the com m unities served, and the com ­ m unities likely to suffer fro m any pockets of poor reception w ith in the m ain coverage area. Under the present m anual planning arrange­ ments, the predictions based on office studies m ust be supported by

considerable fie ld w ork. This is both tim e consum ing and expensive. This new approach to planning w ill a llo w the D epartm ent to fu lfill m ore e ffe ctive ly its role in planning new radio and television services in line w ith co m m u n ity needs. For the public and prospective

operators there should be few er delays in the departm ental response to proposals fo r new or changed services, and few er unanticipated problem s in term s o f inadequate coverage or interference.

On 1 M ay 1984 the M inister announced that a m ajor task to be carried out by the VHF Task Force w o u ld be a review o f the use o f the Very High Frequency (VHF) Band.

This review is necessary to a llow fo r the expansion or extension of FM radio services. The fu ll developm ent of FM services has been ham pered because television stations now use the required frequen­ cies. As a result o f this review , m ost ABC and com m ercial television stations using VHF channels 3, 4 and 5 w ill be m oved to other

channels to make room fo r new FM radio services. A tim etable fo r the clearance of these channels w ill be announced during 1984-85.

In m ost o f the populated areas of Australia it is not possible to

introduce fu rth e r VHF television services w ith o u t seriously disrupting the reception o f existing services. To perm it fu rth e r expansion of FM radio services, clearance o f television services from that portion of the VHF spectrum in te rn a tio n a lly allocated to FM radio, is necessary. This w ill place fu rth e r strains on the a va ila b ility of VHF television channels. For these reasons, A ustralia w ill need increasingly to use

UHF channels fo r the fu rth e r expansion of television services. UHF te levision has been operating overseas fo r m ore than tw enty years; in A ustralia UHF channels are already used by the SBS

m u lticu ltu ra l television service and by num erous television translator services. The D epartm ent has taken several im p o rta n t initiatives to facilitate the successful expansion o f UHF television services in Australia.

37

The Broadcasting Planning Task Force was established in 1982-83 to develop plans w hich w ould make efficient and productive use of the strictly lim ited UHF spectrum . It has developed a national plan for UHF frequency assignm ents, in order to ensure that long-term national develop m e nt needs are considered during the detailed planning o f individua l UHF services. This National UHF Plan is cu rrently being considered by industry representative bodies and is expected to be subm itted to the M inister fo r his consideration in Septem ber 1984.

The Broadcasting Planning Task Force and the D epartm ent's In fo rm ­ ation and Public Relations Section have also undertaken an active role in public education on the reception of UHF-TV services. Based on overseas experience, the D epartm ent believes that view er edu­ cation is an extrem ely im portant factor in ensuring the successful

in troduction o f UHF television services. A transportable display stand to dem onstrate firs t hand the UHF facilities required by viewers has visited shopping centres and other venues in localities where UHF services are being introduced. For the introduction of the SBS

m u lticu ltu ra l television service in Canberra, inform ation brochures, articles and posters were produced, distributed and published in the press. During this cam paign Task Force officers participated in radio 'phone-ins' and the Departm ent operated a telephone inform ation service.

Service areas The M inister fo r C om m unications is em pow ered under the B road­ casting and Television A ct 1942 to specify 'the area served in

pursuance o f the licence' fo r radio and television stations. This area is referred to as the 'service area' of the station.

Under guidelines developed in consultation w ith the industry and approved by the M inister fo r C om m unications, service areas are to be defined in term s o f Population Census Boundaries (usually Local G overnm ent Areas and Census Collection Districts). T heir purpose is to define the co m m u n ity or com m unities served by a particular

station.

Radio and television station licensees are obliged to provide an adequate and com prehensive service to all com m unities w ith in their service area and are entitled to protection from interference caused by any other station, provided th e ir signals are at an adequate level.

Service areas w ill be determ ined fo r all radio and television services in Australia. This is essential if the planning and developm ent of broadcasting services is to proceed on a rational basis.

In June 1983, the Australian Broadcasting Tribunal adjourned its hearing into applications fo r com m ercial television translator li­ cences fo r three sites in the G osford-W yong area pending the form al determ inatio n o f service areas fo r the Sydney and Newcastle

com m ercial television stations. A ll three Sydney com m ercial te le vi­ sion stations and the Newcastle station were applicants fo r translator licences.

F ollow ing assessm ent of service area proposals subm itted by each of the stations, and after negotiations w ith the licensees, licensees of neighb ouring stations and relevant industry bodies, the M inister fo rm a lly determ ined the service areas of the Sydney and Newcastle stations in June 1984.

Foster decision The A ustralian Broadcasting Tribunal, at the direction o f the then M inister fo r C om m unications, held an Inquiry on 7 Septem ber 1982 to determ ine w h e th e r applications should be invited fo r com m ercial television tra n sla to r stations w hich w ould extend the signals of the

M elbourne m e tropolitan com m ercial television stations to the re­ gional area o f Foster. The ABT reported to the present M inister for C om m unications in A pril 1983. On 13 October 1983, the M inister

Receiver standards

Supplementary Monophonic Transmission (SMT)

AM stereo

Stereo television

made a statem ent announcing his decision not to invite applications fo r these television tra n sla to r station licences. The M inister accepted the AST's recom m endation that the reception of distant, or 'frin g e area' signals, that is, signals from a station in another service area, should be regarded as fo rtu ito u s. In other w ords, reception of such signals does not constitute an historic view ing right entitled to

protection if there is a change in circum stances affecting the

reception of these signals, such as the in troduction of a new service. The decision on Foster was a m ajor policy decision relevant to the o rderly and planned developm ent of broadcasting services in

Australia.

The D epartm ent has reached agreem ent w ith the industry on the content o f a perform ance specification fo r television receivers and antennas. The issue o f this specification is expected shortly. The specification w ill a llo w fo r efficient planning o f television services and w ill also provide an in p u t to any preparation of a television

receiver standard by the Standards Association.

NEW DIRECTIONS IN BROADCASTING

S upplem entary M o n opho nic Transm ission (SMT) is the technical term used to describe the transm ission of pictures, text, voice or digital in fo rm a tio n additional to the prim ary signal on an FM radio or television channel. This has considerable econom ic potential. Possi­

ble uses o f this system include education, m usic and paging. It may also o ffe r a new source o f incom e to FM licensees. A specially

designed receiver w ill access and separate services on the one channel. Tests are being carried out to rem ove any technical

problem s w ith a vie w to ensuring good reception of FM stereo sound transm ission using this sub-carrier technique.

The D epartm ent has been involved in steps related to the in tro ­ duction o f stereo sound fo r A M radio services. During the first half o f 1984 the D epartm ent, in conjunctio n w ith the Federation of A u st­ ralian Radio Broadcasters (FARB) conducted a series o f tests, in cluding on-air tests, on fo u r different AM stereo system s: Kahn,

M otorola, Harris and M agnavox. An engineering report containing recom m endatio ns based on the results of the tests is expected to be available in m id -Ju ly 1984. Initial indications are that: - AM stereo transm issions are feasible in Australia - no one system is technically superior to any other

- available m ulti-system receivers are only partially effective in the autom atic decoding of received stereo transm issions.

Before a decision can be made on the introduction of AM stereo into A ustralia a num ber o f policy issues w ill need to be resolved. These relate m a in ly to the question of w hether all fo u r system s should be perm itted or w h e th e r the balance of public interest dictates that one system o n ly should be introduced. It is anticipated that a decision on this w ill be announced later in 1984.

On 23 Decem ber 1983 the M inister announced the introduction of stereo sound television into A ustralia. This announcem ent follow ed a program o f tests undertaken by the Departm ent w ith the cooperation of a n u m ber of com m ercial television stations. As a result of these tests, and other in fo rm a tio n obtained by the D epartm ent, the German dual-carrier system was selected as the standard in Australia. One of the advantages o f this system is the excellent separation of the tw o sound channels, allow ing diffe re n t sound program s to be transm itted on the tw o sound channels. This is particularly useful fo r services such as the Special Broadcasting Service, w hich m ay use the

dual-sound fa c ility in the fu tu re to tra n sm it sim ultaneously program s spoken in tw o d ifferent languages.

39

A num ber o f com m ercial stations have been granted approval to tra n sm it in stereo, and an increase in the a va ilability of stereo

receivers is occurring.

Cable Television and RSTV

M ultipoint Distribution Services

Aboriginal broadcasting

Public

Broadcasting

A public in q u iry was conducted in 1982 by the Australian Broadcast­ ing Tribunal into cable and radiated subscription television (RSTV). RSTV is a television service, typ ica lly broadcasting m ovies and special sporting and cultural events w hich are transm itted in

encrypted fo rm and w hich can only be view ed by subscribers w ho have the necessary decoding equipm ent.

In N ovem ber 1983 the G overnm ent announced that it w ould not proceed w ith cable television. Proposals w ould be invited from private enterprise and the ABC fo r the provision of RSTV services on the basis o f guidelines to be issued by the M inister. These guidelines were issued as draft guidelines in February 1984. M ore than fo rty subm issions have been received and are presently being evaluated.

M u ltip o in t D istribution Services (MDS) overseas com prise a central tra n sm ittin g p o in t radiating a broadband signal at m icrow ave or higher frequencies to receiving points over a radius o f about 30 km. The signal m ay carry video, audio, data, or a com bination of these.

Reception o f MDS requires a receiving antenna and special electronic equipm ent separate fro m that required fo r norm al broadcast recep­ tion. S im ilar services could be distributed by cable or by conventional broadcasting systems.

The D epartm ent w ill be advising the G overnm ent on an appropriate regulatory structure fo r systems fo r m u ltip o in t d istrib u tio n by one or other m ethods, and w ill need to take account of the hybrid

(broadcast/non broadcast) nature o f this new com m unications tech­ nique w hich allow s distributors to provide an optim um service to the m arket segm ent they w ish to serve.

The D epartm ent is represented on a Task Force established in March 1984 to advise the G overnm ent on A boriginal broadcasting and telecom m unica tions policies. The Task Force, headed by M r Eric W illm o t AM , Principal o f the Australian Institute o f A boriginal

Studies, is expected to report early in 1984-85. The Task Force is exam ining w ays o f bringing basic telephone, radio and television services to A b origina l com m unities currently w ith o u t access to such services. It is also exam ining new com m unications technology to determ ine how A b o rig in a ls can best utilise these new developm ents.

In the 1983-84 Budget the G overnm ent provided some funds

tow ards the establishm ent of a Public Broadcasting Foundation. The Public Broadcasting Foundation was officially launched on 26 February 1984. The Foundation, a non-governm ent, non-profit organisation, was established as a result o f an initiative by the Public Broadcasting A ssociation of Australia to raise and disburse funds fo r licensed and prospective public broadcasters.

O ther developm ents in the area of public broadcasting included pre lim in a ry planning fo r a num ber of low -pow er public broadcasting stations in the M elbourne region, s im ila rto those already im plem ent­ ed in Sydney, and the calling fo r licence applications fo r a public FM station and associated translators in Alice Springs and surrounding settlem ents. The Central Australian A boriginal Media Association (CAAMA) has subm itted detailed planning proposals relating to the new services, and is proposing to provide special interest program s fo r A borigina ls including broadcasts in A boriginal languages.

Public

Broadcasting Guidelines

Television for the hearing impaired

Radio for the print

handicapped

Localism Review

Future of the SBS

The D epartm ent is cu rrently review ing the G uidelines covering the developm ent o f public broadcasting, in consultation w ith the Public Broadcasting A ssociation o f A ustralia and the A ustralian Broadcast­ ing T ribunal. D evelopm ent w ith in the Public Broadcasting sector over the past six years has been based on a M inisterial Statem ent and

G uidelines tabled in Parliam ent in A pril 1978 by the then M inister fo r Post and Telecom m unications, the Hon. A.A. Staley.

The sig n ifica n t expansion in the num ber and range o f public stations since 1978 attests to the value of the G uidelines; however, the

passage o f tim e and the level of developm ent in the sector have

made it necessary to review the nature and purpose of the existing G uidelines, som e o f w hich are now redundant or inappropriate.

The A ustralian Caption Centre (ACC) was established w ith C om m on­ w ealth G overnm ent funds in 1982-83 to provide a centralised

captionin g service fo r both ABC and com m ercial television stations.

In 1983-84 the ACC, w hich is an independent n o n -p ro fit organisation, achieved its aim to be self-supporting. Program s captioned by the ACC are colour-coded to enable view ers to id e n tify w hich character is

speaking a particular line, and to distinguish between dialogue and sound effects.

The ABC tra n sm its seven hours of captioned m aterial a week in Sydney, M elbourne and Canberra involving program s covering a w ide range of subjects. Som e com m ercial channels have begun a lim ite d captioned service and are expected to increase the num ber of captioned program s to a sim ila r level as that of the ABC.

During 1983-84, 4RPH in Brisbane became the fo u rth station to begin services designed specifically fo r print-handicapped people. A fifth station, 1 RPH in Canberra, is expected to begin operations by the end of 1984.

In response to d ifficu ltie s being experienced by RPH stations a review is being undertaken to advise on the developm ent and consolidation of RPH services th ro u g h o u t Australia. M ajor issues being considered include licensing, transm ission pow er and long-term funding.

P rint-handicapped services include readings fro m local and interna­ tional new spapers and magazines and book serialisations.

A Review is also cu rrently being conducted by the Departm ent into the policy o f localism in A ustralian broadcasting. Localism relates to locally o riginated program s, local advertising or local ow nership and control o f stations. The Review has had regard to recent G overnm ent

decisions on AUSSAT Pty Ltd, satellite broadcasting services, and supplem en tary licences. The Review has proceeded by the issuing of an in fo rm a tio n paper and a call fo r w ritte n subm issions. M ore than 800 subm issions have been received. The Review w ill be finalised early in 1984-85.

ABC AN D SBS MATTERS Planning fo r new Special Broadcasting Service (SBS) m ulticultural television services in Adelaide, Brisbane, Newcastle and W ollongong continued to proceed th ro u g h o u t 1983-84. In A ugust 1983 the

M inister announced that the G overnm ent had approved the purchase of tra n sm itte rs fo r each of the fo u r m ain services to begin in m id

1985, w h ile in June 1984 the Departm ent com pleted technical

specifications fo r the stations and subm itted them fo r M inisterial approval. The new stations w ill tra n sm it solely in the UHF band, w ith the A delaide and Brisbane m ain services operating on channel 28, w hich is already used by the SBS in Sydney, M elbourne and

Canberra. The station at Newcastle w ill use channel 45, w h ile

W ollo n g o n g w ill be on channel 59. Fill-in translator services are

41

No. of services

SBS Review

Appointments of SBS members

Appointments of ABT members

SBS MF

SBS TV

SBS TV P ro je cte d services

proposed at A delaide and W ollongong. Program s w ill continue to be produced in, and d istributed nationally by satellite from Sydney, and w ill be broadcast at correct local tim e in Brisbane and Adelaide by means o f tim e-delay equipm ent.

Further extension of the service to Darwin, Perth and Hobart is

expected by m id 1986.

On 6 December 1983, the M inister fo r C om m unications announced the establishm ent o f a C om m ittee o f Review of the Special Broad­ casting Service to exam ine the role of the SBS as a m ultilin g u a l/ m u lticu ltu ra l broadcaster and to propose a blueprint fo r the future developm ent o f ethnic and m ulticultural broadcasting.

The G overnm ent appointed, on 22 December 1983, the Hon F X Connor QC as Chairm an and Ms Clare Dunne and M r W alter Lippman MBE as M em bers of the Com m ittee.

The C om m ittee was o rig in a lly asked to report by 30 June 1984, but the reporting date was later extended to 30 N ovem ber 1984.

The C om m ittee has received m ore than 800 subm issions and has conducted fo rm a l public hearings in all capital cities and a num ber of m ajor regional centres.

In M ay 1984, the G overnor-General in Council appointed three m em bers o f the SBS. The appointm ents of Sir Nicholas Shehadie QBE, Chairm an, and M r A nthony Bonnici were to take effect from the expiry o f th e ir current term s, fo r one year from 1 July 1984. The third vacancy was created by the resignation of M r Frank G albally MBE, as

Board M em ber. M r G albally continues in his position as Chairman of the SBS A dvisory Council.

M r George Zangalis, a Victorian union official and editor/m anager of the Greek A ustralian Review, was appointed as a M em ber o f the SBS Board to replace M r Galbally.

In 1983-84, fo u r new full-tim e m em bers were appointed to the

Australian Broadcasting Tribunal. They are M r M A rm strong, M r R. W atterson, Ms J. Jam es Bailey and Dr R.J. Perry.

42

Reorganisation of the ABC

Legislative review of B&T Act

The new Board o f the A ustralian Broadcasting C orporation, a ppoin t­ ed as o f 9 June 1983, fo rm a lly assum ed responsibility fo r the ABC on 1 Ju ly 1983. The Board has m oved quickly to institute m ajor changes

w ith in the ABC. A m ajor reorganisation was announced by the

Chairm an, M r Kenneth M yer AC, DSC, on 4 May 1984. M r M yer indicated that the new structure w ould enable the ABC to meet the challenges o f the late 1980s and early 1990s.

The D epartm ent is conducting a 'service-based' review of the

Broadcasting and Television A c t 1942. The existing Act is based on the licensing o f various classes o f radio and television services. Service-based am endm ents w o u ld convert the Act to a legislative fra m e w o rk w hich provides fo r the licensing of broadcasting services,

in each case defined by reference to the nature o f the service and its service area. It is anticipated that this w o u ld m odernise and

stream line the Act, w o u ld rem ove unintended im pedim ents to the planning o f existing services and w o u ld facilitate the introduction of necessary provisions fo r new services arising from satellite techn­

ology.

Services for which applications for licences were called in 1983-84

C l a s s L o c a t i o n N o

D a t e

g a z e t t e d

N a t i o n a l S T B S T u m b a r u m b a , N S W 1 2 6 .7 .8 3

t r a n s l a t o r L o c k h a r t B i v e r , Q l d 1 3 0 .8 .8 3

E d w a r d B i v e r , Q ld 1 3 0 .8 .8 3

K o w a n y a m a , Q ld 1 3 0 .8 .8 3

B o l l o n , Q l d 1 3 0 .8 .8 3

S t o n e h e n g e , Q ld 1 3 0 . 8 . 8 3

J u n d a h , Q l d 1 3 0 . 8 . 8 3

W i n d o r a h , Q l d 1 3 0 . 8 . 8 3

E u l o , Q ld 1 2 1 .2 .8 4

T h a r g o m i n d a h , Q ld 1 2 1 . 2 . 8 4

W y a n d r a , Q l d 1 2 1 .2 .8 4

C o o r o w , W A 1 2 0 .8 .8 4

T i e r i , Q ld 1 2 0 .8 .8 4

N u m b u l w a r , N T 1 2 0 .8 .8 4

N g u k u r r , N T 1 2 0 .8 .8 4

G a r d e n P o i n t / P u l e r u m p i , N T 1 2 0 .8 .8 4

P o r t K e a t s , N T 1 2 0 . 8 . 8 4

W u j a l W u j a l , Q ld 1 2 0 . 5 . 8 4

H o p e V a l e , Q l d 1 2 0 . 5 . 8 4

C o m m e r c i a l S T B S T u m b a r u m b a , N S W 1 2 6 .7 .8 3

t r a n s l a t o r C o n d o b l i n , N S W 1 2 6 .7 .8 3

B o y n e I s l a n d / T o m m o n S a n d s , 1 2 0 .8 .8 3

Q ld

C l o n c u r r y , Q l d 1 2 1 . 2 . 8 4

S t u a r t , Q l d 1 2 1 . 2 . 8 4

N y n g a n , N S W 1 2 0 . 8 . 8 4

C o m m e r c i a l A M T u l l y , Q l d 1 3 0 . 8 . 8 4

t r a n s l a t o r H u g h e n d e n , Q ld 1 2 0 .1 2 . 8 4

C l o n c u r r y , Q l d 1 2 0 .1 2 . 8 4

N a t i o n a l T V G l e n d o n , Q l d 1 13.9.83

t r a n s l a t o r

C o m m e r c i a l T V G l e n d o n , Q l d 1 13.9.83

t r a n s l a t o r S e y m o u r / P u c k a p u n y a l , 1 1 3 .12 .8 3

Y e a , V i c

M a n s f i e l d , V i c 1 13 .12 .8 3

B o n n i e D o o n , V ic 1 13 .12 .8 3

J i n d a b y n e , N S W 1 1 3 .12 .8 3

S h e r b r o o k e S h i r e , V i c 9 1 2 .1.8 4

B o m b a l a , N S W 1 2 4 . 1 . 8 4

K e i t h , S A 1 2 4 . 1 . 8 4

B o r d e r t o w n , S A 1 2 4 . 1 . 8 4

T h e G a p , S A 1 2 4 .1 .8 4

43

C l a s s L o c a t i o n N o

D a t e

g a z e t t e d

P u b l i c FM C a i r n s , Q ld 1 1 1 .1 0 .8 3

s t a t i o n C a n b e r r a , A C T 1 1 5 .1 1 .8 3

L a u n c e s t o n , T a s 2 6 .1 2 .8 3

A l i c e S p r i n g s , N T 1 1 7 .1.8 4

W o o m e r a , S A 1 1 7 .1.8 4

P u b l i c FM M a n l y , N S W 1 2 7 . 7 . 8 4

t r a n s l a t o r O r a n g e , N S W 1 1 7 .1.8 4

S a n t a T e r e s a , N T 1 1 7 .1.8 4

W a r r a b r i , N T 1 1 7 .1.8 4

H e r m a n n s b u r g , N T 1 1 7 .1 .8 4

C o m m e r c i a l T V P e r t h , W A 1 1 5 .5.8 4

s t a t i o n

Space, Telecom m unications and

Postal Policy

Im portant policy decisions

Varied interests of public importance

During the year the G overnm ent made several significant announce­ m ents in the areas of telecom m unica tions, postal and satellite policy.

F ollow ing its consideration o f the Report o f the Bradley Inquiry into the M o n o p o ly Position o f A ustralia Post, the G overnm ent announced in A ugust 1983 that it had decided to leave the basic functions and duties o f the A ustralian Postal C om m ission untouched. However a

recom m endation that the Postal Services Act be am ended to a llo w private couriers to provide special letter delivery services at charges set w e ll in excess of the basic letter rate was accepted. The

G overnm ent also endorsed Bradley C om m ittee recom m endations to a llow the provision o f new and extended postal services such as A ustralia Post Express C ourier and electronic m ail, and use of post offices fo r addition al agency business. Legislation has been passed to put these decisions into effect.

In O ctober 1983 the G overnm ent endorsed the m on o p o ly position of Telecom as the national telecom m unica tions com m on carrier by rejecting the m ajor th rust o f recom m endations made by the D avid­ son C om m ittee o f Inquiry into T elecom m unications Services in A ustralia fo r a m uch larger role fo r private enterprise in the provision o f telecom m mu nications services. The G overnm ent also noted that the M in iste r fo r C om m unications w o u ld consider w ith Telecom ways to ensure th a t telecom m unica tions services continue to be provided

in a tim e ly and responsive fashion.

It was announced by the G overnm ent in N ovem ber 1983 that

AU SSAT Pty Ltd w ould be retained as a separate C om m onw ealth- ow ned com pany to run and manage the nation's com m unication satellite system as a fu lly self-contained tax-paying operation, w ith

Telecom to be invited to buy up to 25 per cent o f the G overnm ent's 100 per cent shareholding in the com pany. This decision revoked a previous decision that AUSSAT w ould be converted to a public com pany, w ith 49 per cent o f the C om m onw ealth 's shareholding offered fo r sale. These new arrangem ents were entrenched in

legislation in A p ril 1984. The legislation and associated a d m in istra ­ tive arrangem ents also id e n tify AUSSAT's service functions, design­ ed to ensure co-ordination of the national com m unications satellite system w ith the terrestrial system.

In consequential changes to the T elecom m unications Act, Telecom was given pow er to participate in governm en t ventures, and create subsidiaries. The G overnm ent hopes that this in itiative w ill serve to

assist the A ustralian telecom m unica tions m anufacturing and service industries. These decisions w ill set the direction of the operations o f three of A ustralia's postal, telecom m unica tions and satellite A uthorities in the years to come. N ot only w ill they have direct im pact on the daily lives of all A ustralians, but they w ill affect the efficiency of Australian

business. The Space, T elecom m unications and Postal Policy Division played the m ajor role in the decision-m aking process through its fu n ctio n of p ro viding advice to the M inister.

The D epartm ent is involved in a w ide variety of m atters involving other organisations. In som e cases these are related to w ider issues of pu b lic policy facing the G overnm ent, and in others they are a result of activities directly affecting the interests o f A uthorities in the

45

C om m unications p o rtfo lio . For exam ple, during 1983-84 the Space, Telecom m unications and Postal Policy D ivision was involved in activities generated by other organisations that included:

- INTELSAT co m p e tito rs: Several Am erican com panies have filed applications w ith the US Federal C om m unications C om m ission to provide internation al satellite services that could com pete w ith those of the International Satellite organisation (INTELSAT) over the A tlantic Ocean. The D epartm ent has been involved in an

evaluation o f the potential effects of such private services on

INTELSAT, including flo w -th ro u g h to services provided by the Overseas T elecom m unications C om m ission (Australia).

- In fo rm a tio n Technology: Through its participation in the OECD's C om m ittee on Inform ation, C om puter and C om m unications Policy and th rough the policy im plications of the use o f the public

te lecom m unica tions netw ork fo r inform ation transfer, the Depart­ m ent has becom e involved in policy aspects of inform ation

technology. M r V J Kane, First Assistant Secretary, Space,

Telecom m unications and Postal Policy D ivision, is a m em ber of the National Library's Inform ation Industry A dvisory C om m ittee, and the D epartm ent participated during the year on an Interdepartm en­ tal W orking Party concerned w ith the fo rm u la tio n o f a national

in form ation policy.

- T elecom m unications e quipm en t: In March 1984 a subm ission was made to the Industries Assistance Com m ission Inquiry into

te lecom m unica tions and related equipm ent and parts.

- Contract p ro p o sa ls: Under the term s o f th e ir enabling legislation, the A u th o ritie s m ust subm it contracts involving m ore than

$500 000 to the M inister fo r approval. The Departm ent provides advice to the M inister on w id e r policy im plications of these

proposals.

- ALRC R eport on Privacy: The Australian Law Reform C om m is­ sion's Report on Privacy, released late in 1983, has significant im plications fo r public adm inistration in Australia, as w ell as for individual A ustralians. Much o f the Report is concerned w ith m atters w hich im pinge on the activities of the the C om m unications p o rtfolio. Exam ples of problem s discussed in the Report include the develop m e nt o f new com m unications and inform ation tech­

nologies w hich could constitute a threat to privacy, use o f m ail and te lecom m unica tions system s fo r unsolicited com m unications, interception of telecom m unica tions and interception o f the mail. The Report also highligh ted A ustralia's failure to date to adopt the OECD guidelines on privacy, and it raised the possibility that the posts and telegraphs pow er in the C onstitution could be used to support a com prehensive federal privacy law. The D epartm ent was involved in the first half of 1984 in consultations w ith other

Departm ents and A uthorities on the im plications of the Report and the legislative changes that m ay follow .

- Prices Surveillance A u th o rity : The Treasurer has declared certain postal and telecom m unica tions services provided by Australia Post and Telecom as notified services fo r the purpose o f the Prices Surveillance Act. This means that in addition to approvals fo r ta riff charges w hich m ust be given by the M inister, these A uthorities m ust also in fo rm the PSA w ho m ay inquire into any proposed changes. The D epartm ent has provided advice to the M inister on the policy im p lica tio n s of this situation.

- Indian Ocean cable system : During the year the Overseas Telecom ­ m unications C om m ission was involved in negotiations w ith over­ seas telecom m unica tions authorities fo r the laying o f a subm arine cable system between Perth and Singapore via Jakarta, at a cost of approxim ate ly $180 m illion. The D epartm ent was involved in providing advice to the M inister on policy aspects of this project,

including the o p p o rtu n itie s fo r increased business fo r Australian m anufacturers tendering fo r certain com ponents. Vincent R eview : During the year, the 1982-83 Annual Report of a Special Prosecutor, M r Robert Redlich, was tabled in Parliament. It contained criticism of Telecom , saying it was doing less than it should in com batting SP bookm aking. S ubsequently M r Redlich conducted fu rth e r investigations into Telecom m anagem ent prac­ tices and w ro te to the M inister fo r C om m unications outlining

m atters he believed w arranted exam ination. In March the M inister announced that a M elbourne Queen's Counsel, M r F.H.R. Vincent, w o u ld conduct an independent review of allegations of im proper practice in the A ustralian T elecom m unications C om m ission, and Telecom 's response to them . M r Vincent was requested to let the

Special M inister of State have the report on this review not later than 30 June 1984.

47

Radiocom m unications in the

M odern W orld

Never before in A ustralia's history have so m any people used

radiocom m unica tions equipm ent in th e ir daily lives. M ost do so w ith o u t a second though t, the same w ay one turns on a television set. Overall, there are m ore radio transceivers in vehicles, boats, hom es, business firm s and public u tilities than ever before.

It is natural to ask w h y this is so. Some of the answers are:

- low capital cost of equipm ent

- high re lia b ility

- sm all size and ease of use

- sim ple licensing procedures - im m ediate benefit to the user in term s of efficiency and safety.

M ost o f us take fo r granted that the taxi we book to take us to the

a irp o rt w ill arrive on tim e, that the police and fire brigade vehicles w ill p ro m p tly respond to em ergencies, and that aircraft com m unica­ tions and navigational aids w ill fu nction norm ally. Little th o u g h t is given to the fact th a t it is the application of radiocom m unications technolo gy w hich makes it all possible. Even the cordless telephone, the rem ote co n tro lle d garage d o o r opener, your child's radio-

controlled to y car, all depend on the application of radio technology. A ll these everyday services, and the m ore exotic ones, such as

tracking of distant spacecraft and satellite com m unications, use the radio frequency spectrum and this natural resource can be likened to a m ajor highw ay. It is o f a fixed w id th and only a lim ited num ber of vehicles can use the same bit o f road at the same tim e w ith o u t

interfering w ith the other users. One of the responsibilities o f the D epartm ent is to regulate the use o f this radio 'h ig h w a y' to ensure that the m axim um num ber of users have access to the radio

spectrum in the m ost efficient and econom ic m anner possible. Like all Departm ents, DOC has a Central Office where the m ajor policy service and support is provided to the M inister fo r C om ­

m unications. There are m ajor offices in each State capital and

nineteen D istrict offices. A ll DOC State and D istrict offices have public counters and the sta ff provide a w ide range of services.

Services to the The D epartm ent controls the 'tra ffic ' on the radio frequency highw ay public by licensing the users. Except fo r specified low pow er devices, it is necessary fo r all users to obtain a licence authorising the service before com m encing operations. To do otherw ise is to contravene the

W ireless Telegraphy Act, w hich is soon to be replaced by the

R adiocom m unications Act.

A fee is charged fo r all licences except where the service is used solely fo r the preservation of hum an life or property such as the

am bulance service and rural fire brigades. The level o f fee charged depends principally on the am ount of the spectrum required fo r the service. These licence fees are im posed as taxes and return more than the cost o f adm inistering the radio spectrum . The portion in excess of actual costs is a royalty that serves to prom ote efficient use of the spectrum and contribute to G overnm ent revenue.

A t 31 March 1984 there were 494 000 licences currently issued, com pared to 460 000 in March 1983. This represents an increase of 8.7 per cent, a rate that has been m aintained since 1982. The m ost frequently issued licences are fo r tw o -w a y m obiles (220 000), citizen band (131 000), inshore boating (43 000) and tw o-w ay base stations (28 000).

A t e c h n i c a l o f f i c e r

(le ft) e x a m i n e s t h e

M o r s e C o d e

s e n d i n g p r o f i c i e n c y

o f a n A m a t e u r

O p e r a t o r C e r t i f i c a t e

c a n d i d a t e .

There has been continuing e ffort to sim p lify the licensing procedures that applicants m ust fo llo w . O ver-the-counter licensing is now

established at all State and D istrict offices fo r those licences that do not require a frequency assignm ent process. The recent purchase of co m p u tin g facilities and the current design w o rk on an ADR based licensing system are intended to greatly im prove the service to

applicants by largely autom ating w hat is now a manual procedure. Even w ith o u t ADR assistance, im proved m ethods and a general deregulation o f procedures have allow ed the record num ber of current licences to be issued by few er staff. This increased p ro d u ctiv­ ity has been greatly assisted by an established ADR licence renewal system w hich became operational in all States by the m iddle of 1982.

The D epartm ent is concerned that som e people continue to evade paying licence fees. S pectrum users w ho evade paying fees and operate ra d iocom m unica tions equipm ent ille g a lly cause th e ir share of spectrum m anagem ent costs to be borne by others and increase the likelihood o f interference, m isuse and ill-feeling from legitim ate

licensed users.

T h ro u g h o u t the year a num ber of m ajor licensing cam paigns were conducted. In all cases advance p u b licity th rough the local press and broadcast stations was arranged and fo llo w e d up w ith physical checks by field staff. The m ain target areas were the inshore boating service and the citizen band service. The approach adopted was to

invite unlicensed operators to com ply w ith the requirem ents and a reasonable tim e was allow ed fo r applications to be lodged. In a few instances co-operation was refused and these cases were investigat­ ed w ith a vie w to court proceedings. Initial licence fees and

anticipated renewal of licences greatly exceeded costs o f conducting the exercises.

49

All services The num ber o f all radiocom m unications licences issued since Septem ber 1977. The dotted line on the accom panying graph indicates the com puteris­ ation o f the licensing system , w hich began to be phased in from

Septem ber 1981. This led to a greater accuracy in recording o f data than was possible under the previous m anual system.

The drop in licences w hich occurred around 1981 was due to a

com bination o f reasons. Generally, there was a steep rise in fees in 1980, w hich led to a marked fa ll-o ff in the num ber of licences

renewed. There was also a delay in the manual rem oval of these non-renew ed licences from departm ental records. Consequently, the previous crest o f licence num bers was inflated, and the ensuing drop appeared m ore dram atic than was actually the case.

Radiocommunications licences

000’s

fc s s s S S S S S 5

σ Γ c ^ c o ’ c D ' o ^ o r c o ' S ' o T o j ' c o ' c B ' σ Γ c\T co c d o j c ^ i

All stations— This graph show s the num ber o f all radiocom m unications licences, excluding CBRS excluding CBRS, issued since Septem ber 1977.

000’ s

3 5 0 -

3 3 0 -

310 —

2 9 0 -

1 I I I I I I Γ I I ■ Γ

50

CBRS This graph show s the num ber o f CBRS licences issued since

S eptem ber 1977.

There w as an added factor in the CBRS w ith the in troduction in 1980 of the 5-for-1 licensing system , w hich is now no longer in use. This m eant th a t people could have up to five sets on the one licence, and the num ber o f licences therefore fell sharply.

0 0 0 ’s 190 —

170 —

150 —

130 —

110 —

90 —

70 —

50 —

Mobile stations This graph show s the num ber o f licences issued fo r m obile stations — land mobile in the land m obile service since June 1978.

service There has been an overall upw ard trend in licensing in the land

m obile service, as industry has com e to realise m ore and m ore the im portance o f radiocom m unications.

Mobile stations — land mobile service

0 0 0 s 240—t

230 —

2 20 -

200 —

1 9 0 -

180 —

170 —

51

Base stations — land mobile service

Ships Class A and B

This graph show s the num ber o f licences issued fo r base stations in the land m obile service since June 1978.

There has been an overall upw ard trend in licensing in the land

m obile service, as industry has com e to realise m ore and m ore the im portance o f radiocom m unications.

Base stations — land mobile service

000’s

This graph show s the num ber of licences issued fo r ship stations (Class A and Class B) since June 1978.

Ship station figures have increased rapidly since 1982 due to the successful licensing cam paigns am ong boat ow ners conducted annually by departm ental officers.

Ships class A and B

000's

S ^ ^ S S S S S S 5 i 5 » S S S | S 8 S | ;:

52

Examinations The Radio Frequency M anagem ent D ivision o f the Departm ent conducted a num ber of exam inations in 1983-84: - in to ta l, 9945 candidates w ere exam ined in seven categories - o f these, 244 required special exam inations due to disability,

rem ote location, or o th e r disadvantageous circum stances - am ateur radio exam inations constituted the largest category w ith 5820 candidates.

In M ay 1984, the D epartm ent extended its service to aspiring am ateur radio operators by intro d u cin g quarterly exam inations covering all required subjects. These exam inations are now also available at m any co u n try post offices on the same basis.

Decem ber 1984 w ill be the last occasion w hen the Broadcast

O perator's C ertificate o f Proficiency w ill be conducted by departm en­ tal officers. N egotiations during the year w ith industry, unions and te rtia ry in stitu tio n s have established a new procedure. In future, those in stitu tio n s w hose courses meet the agreed syllabus and standards w ill be accredited by the D epartm ent and successful students w ill q u a lify fo r certificates. This change w ill ensure that students are trained to a com m on standard in recognised colleges.

Provision has been made fo r rem ote-area students and a jo in t DOC, in d ustry and union co m m ittee w ill supervise the operation of the new arrangem ents.

Monitoring It is necessary to m o n ito r the radio spectrum to determ ine accurately the use to w hich it is being put. W ith o u t this in form ation, the nature and density o f tra ffic on the radio frequency highw ay can only be a p p ro xim a te ly estim ated. If the tra d itio n a l m ethod of individua lly tu n in g radio receivers was fo llo w e d , only a sm all percentage of

actual spectrum use at any one location at the one tim e could be determ ined. M odern m o n ito rin g technolo gy allow s thousands of frequencies to be scanned and usage recorded in m inutes fo r later high-speed analysis by com puter. A fte r careful consideration of the

various system s available, the D epartm ent has bought the first of this type o f radio m o n ito rin g equipm ent. Installation in a num ber of State offices is proceeding and additional units w ill be used in vehicles to gather data outside the m ajor cities. The first p rio rity is to measure

accurately the channel occupancy o f the thousands o f frequencies in use, in order to determ ine that the actual usage is the optim um fo r each service, and that present and future users w ill not be

disadvantaged by o vercrow ding or a m istaken belief that spectrum space is not available.

Prosecutions Despite the best efforts o f the licensing and regulatory staff a sm all m in o rity of spectrum users persist in operating radiocom m unica­ tions e q uipm en t in contravention of the W ireless Telegraphy Act and Regulations. The norm al practice is to warn those responsible fo r

m in o r offences that have not seriously interfered w ith other users, and have not jeopardised the safety o f life or the security of property. O ffenders are requested to com ply w ith the requirem ents and they usually co-operate w ith officers and rectify any deficiencies.

Some other offences are regarded as m ajor m atters requiring a fu ll investigatio n and preparation o f a brief of evidence fo r prosecution by the D eputy Crown S o licito r in the Federal Courts. Offences such as the fo llo w in g w o u ld be dealt w ith in this w ay:

- deliberate ja m m in g o f and/or disruption to a radiocom m unication service, p a rticularly one used fo r safety purposes - the establishm ent and operation of a radiocom m unications net­ w ork w ith o u t a licence

53

A t e c h n i c a l o f f i c i a l

i n s t a l l s d i r e c t i o n

f i n d i n g (DF)

e q u i p m e n t o n a

v e h i c l e u s e d b y th e

R a d io F r e q u e n c y M a n a g e m e n t D i v i s i o n .

Interference

- significant m o difications to radiocom m unications equipm ent that a llow its use on unapproved frequencies and/or higher than

authorised power.

The accom panying table lists the prosecution statistics fo r the period 31 March 1983 — 1 A pril 1984:

S t a t e

C o u r t a c t i o n s

i n i t i a t e d C o n v i c t i o n s

N S W 9 9

V ic 33 31

O l d 24 24

S A 2 2

W A 11 11

T a s 3 2

T o t a l 82 79

One o f the m ajor activities of field staff is investigating and resolving interference com plaints. This service is provided w ith o u t charge to any television view er, broadcast listener or radiocom m unications service user. Such activity brings DOC field staff into contact w ith a

54

very w id e cross-section of the co m m u n ity in m any d ifferent situa­ tions. Q uite varied experiences were reported by field staff d uring the year, som e o f w hich are included here as illustrations: - a broadcast studio in NSW received considerable interference from

a le gitim ate CBRS station w hich was operating in accordance w ith its licence. A fte r protracted investigations to alleviate the in te rfe r­ ence to the tape recorders and other equipm ent, the case was effectively solved w hen the broadcast station purchased the CBRS property. One can only surm ise that it was cheaper than replacing the interference-susceptible studio equipm ent. A fu rth e r report

indicated yet another CBRS station com m enced operations on the other side o f the studio. The location of the studio m ust rem ain co nfiden tial to prevent property investors from becom ing too

interested - w h ile pursuing television masthead a m p lifie r problem s in a

high-rise com plex the cure was found by opening a circuit breaker on the m ain pow er board. This was confirm ed conclusively by m any operations o f the breaker. U nfortunately, fu rth e r in vestig­ ation revealed that the breaker fed a dentist's surgery. It is fa ir to say th a t both the dentist and patient were not overly im pressed by the po w e r in te rru p tio n s even though the d rill was the interference source - on one occasion the location of a television interference co m plaint

was greatly enhanced by direct visual readout o f the source. Fine tu n in g o f the television set produced a listing of a program being keyed into a hom e com puter. The author's name was shown on the listing and was recognised as belonging to a local resident tw o

houses away. S oftw are co p yrig h t is certainly under threat - m arine inspections require the testing o f lifeboat transceivers, am ong m any other things. Such devices m ust survive a 20 m drop

into w ater. One officer uncovered a slight deficiency w ith the unit w hen it failed to surface after the test. M oreover, the line attached to the unit was also proven faulty. The vessel's M aster was not very im pressed, but the inadequacy of crucial safety equipm ent was clearly dem onstrated - one o f the m ost unusual interference com plaints investigated in

the past year was nearly dism issed as a crank call. A rather

desperate sounding w om an com plained that she could hear a series of alm ost m usical tones com ing co n tinou sly from her

stereogram , even w hen it was turned off, unplugged from the m ains — and the speakers were disconnected. She said it had been going fo r days, even during the early hours of the m orning.

A lth o u g h suspicions w ere raised that it was all im agined, a field o ffice r was asked to investigate because she said a visiting

neighb our had heard the tones and there was an A rm y installation next door, raising the p o ssib ility that high pow er transm issions w ere being received via some unintended rectifier. Later, the in itia lly sceptical fie ld officer reported som ew hat

sheepishly by tw o -w a y radio that he could also hear musical tones, rem iniscent of a w ell-know n tune he could not quite place, w hich seemed to pervade the hom e-unit at a low level. A rm ed w ith suggestions, w hich all proved w id e of the mark, he w e n t back in fo r another attem pt at fin d in g the source.

On his return to the office, an ear-to-ear grin advertised his success before he produced the cause o f the lady's distress — a m usical C hristm as card. This m arvel o f m odern technology, a greeting card

w ith a silicon chip program m ed to play a num ber of Christm as carols secreted between its leaves, failed to operate on cue when it was opened. Some m onths later, unaware o f its m usical capabili­

ties, the lady consigned it w ith other cards received to a cardboard box on the flo o r prior to disposal.

55

Here, it stirred into life electronically chim ing a selection of

Christm as carols day and night, causing the lady, as she adm itted in a flood o f tears, to have serious doubts regarding her sanity.

The accom panying table lists the interference com plaints investigat­ ed during the year. The pow er to control sources o f interference is lim ited under current legislation, and the R adiocom m unications A ct 1983, to be proclaim ed late in 1984 or early 1985, contains m any provisions to im prove this situation.

Interference statistics from 1 April 1983 to 31 March 1984 Radiocommunication Interference (RCt) NSW Vic Qld S/1 WA Tas Aus Total

O u t s t a n d in g 99 61 95 88 10 2 355

R e p o rte d 673 667 549 319 226 37 2 471

T o ta l 111 728 644 407 236 39 2 826

C le a r e d f o r y e a r 697 668 571 334 228 31 2 529

B a la n c e 75 60 73 73 8 8 297

Broadcast Interference (AM & FM Reception)

(BCD /V S W Vic Qld S/1 WA Tas Aus Total

O u t s t a n d in g 147 125 38 164 33 34 541

R e p o rte d 646 999 712 663 170 203 3 393

T o ta l 793 1124 750 827 203 237 3 934

C le a re d f o r y e a r 678 950 633 697 148 217 3 323

B a la n c e 115 174 117 130 55 20 611

Television Interference (TV!) /V S W Vic Qld S/1 WA Tas Aus Total

O u t s t a n d in g 680 523 280 421 63 78 2 045

R e p o rte d 4 0 1 6 3442 3467 1705 1726 335 14 691

T o ta l 4 6 9 6 3965 3747 2126 1789 413 16 736

C le a re d f o r y e a r 3981 3529 3317 1845 1522 361 14 555

B a la n c e 715 4 3 6 430 281 267 52 2 181

Australian Totals

AH sources of Interference Clover Reported Cleared Balance

T o ta l 2 941 20 555 20 407 3 089

The m ajor interference investigation of the year was a com plete survey of every accessible residence of the NSW Riverina tow n of Finley. The purpose o f the survey was to determ ine the incidence and causes o f interference to television reception fo llo w in g repeated com plaints by viewers. The intention is to use the results of this

survey to determ ine the m ost effective means of reducing view ers' reception difficulties.

Assistance to the Special provision is made to ensure that disabled candidates are not disabled disadvantaged in contesting am ateur operator exam inations. In m any cases the disabled candidate is exam ined at hom e, where due allowance is m ade fo r any disability. W here a person is severely

handicapped to the extent that it is not practical to undertake any but the m ost basic exam ination, generally confined to the safety aspects

56

M r M i c h a e l

W a l d o c k , r e c i p i e n t

o f t h e J a y c e e s

Y o u n g A u s t r a l i a n o f

he Y e a r a w a r d

o p e r a t i n g h is

'a d i o c o m m u n i c a t i ­ o n s e q u i p m e n t w i t h

n is g u i d e d o g

R o b b i e . M r

W a l d o c k , w h o is

s e v e r e l y s i g h t

im p a i r e d , m o n i t o r s

t h e a i r w a v e s as a

p u b l i c s a f e t y

s e r v i c e in t h e

B e r m a g u i a re a o f

t h e N S W Far S o u t h

C o a s t

Radio user groups

N ew services: developments

o f w o rkin g w ith radio equipm ent, a special licence is issued. This allow s the person to enjoy the benefits of am ateur radio operation under specified condition s w ith o u t the requirem ent to qualify fo r a certificate of proficiency. The D epartm ent facilitates the establish­ m ent o f radio system s designed to assist the handicapped, such as cordless aids in schools fo r the p ro fo u n d ly deaf, 'granny alarm s' fo r the e ld e rly and in firm , radio-controlle d door openers and other

m echanical aids, and the establishm ent of citizen band and am ateur radio stations in hospitals and rehabilitatio n centres fo r the benefit of patients.

The D epartm ent meets regularly the fo llo w in g radiocom m unications user organisatio ns: - A ustralian Electronics Industry Association (AEIA) - A ustralian Business and Industrial Radio Association (ABIRA) - The W ireless Institute o f A ustralia (WIA).

As w ell as fo rm a l m eetings w ith these organisations the D epartm ent is represented on a num ber o f sub-com m ittees concerned w ith specific issues o f com m on interest.

The D epartm ent also meets representatives o f other radio frequency users to discuss m atters o f interest. Typical o f these groups are the CREST organisation, a group concerned w ith the use of citizen band radio in em ergencies. Others include CB repeater groups, boating clubs, paging operators, bushfire fighters, police forces and

em ergency services. The D epartm ent is continuo usly updating the list o f user organisations to w hich proposed changes to operating or licensing procedures are put fo r opinion before im plem entation.

R adiocom m unications is ra pidly changing as technology discovers better w ays o f using the spectrum . Some o f the currently more

sig n ifica n t developm ents are: - trunked land m obile service — a means by w hich a much larger n u m ber o f users can be accom m odated on a given num ber of channels than occurs in conventional systems - addition al m icrow ave terrestrial system s to feed AUSSAT earth

stations - cellular radio system s — a means of autom atically re-using radio frequencies in a geographic area that gives m ore users access to the spectrum at the one tim e in the one place than was previously

possible

57

Miscellaneous

A te c h n ic a l o ffic e r

m a k e s fin a l a d j u s t m e n t s to th e

b r o a d b a n d H ig h

F re q u e n c y (HF) c o n ic a l m o n o p o l e a n t e n n a re c e iv e r in s ta lle d at th e P o rt

W a k e f ie ld ra d io m o n i t o r i n g s ta tio n

in S o u t h A u s tra lia .

- the grow th o f satellite earth stations in m ajor cities requiring

co-ordination o f the m icrow ave portion of the spectrum to a

degree not p reviously necessary - the increasing need to share the radio spectrum between all users to an extent not previously experienced - the requirem ent to accom m odate the spectrum needs o f sophistic­

ated system s such as electronic news gathering, vehicle location systems, ra ilw a y control system s and spread spectrum techniques.

A w all chart entitled A ustralian Radio Frequency Spectrum A llo ca ­ tions was produced during the year. It was the first tim e that a

com prehensive chart of this type had been published show ing in pictorial form the detail set out in the publication A ustralian Table o f Frequency A llo ca tio n s published in 1982.

On behalf o f the D epartm ent o f Transport, officers qualified as

m arine radio surveyors surveyed and inspected shipboard radio installations on request.

This activity is required under the provisions o f the N avigation Act, the British M erchant Shipping Act and the Safety o f Life at Sea

58

(SOLAS) C onvention o f 1974. A d d itio n a lly, staff surveyed State registered vessels on behalf of som e State Governm ents. The accom panying table show s the extent of this activity.

S t a t e - C o m m o n w e a l t h

s u r v e y ! i n s p e c t i o n

S t a t e s u r v e y 1

i n s p e c t i o n

N S W 411 14

V i c 91 3 3 4

Q l d 242 11

S A &

N T

81 170

W A 163 1 589

T a s 63 516

T o t a l s 1 051 2 6 3 4

Behind the scenes

A m a r i n e r a d io

s u r v e y o r te s ts th e

r a d a r in s t a lla t io n o f

a v e s s e l as p a rt o f

t h e a n n u a l s u r v e y

r e q u ir e d f o r s h ip s '

r a d i o / r a d a r i n s t a lla t io n s .

A lot o f w o rk goes on behind the scenes to enable the D epartm ent to serve the public. C om m ittees, both w ith in the Departm ent of

C om m unication s and between DOC and others, have to meet to make decisions. C onsultation takes place; papers, reports and other docum ents are prepared and records m aintained.

People require tra in in g in order to w ork as e fficie n tly as possible. The Radio Frequency M anagem ent D ivision (RFM) is involved in im p a rt­ ing skills either on its ow n or in conjunction w ith the D epartm ent's T raining Section and w ith other groups. For exam ple, on-the-job training is provided to Trainee Technical O fficers and others so that th e ir theoretical know ledge can be fu lly supplem ented by practical experience. O fficers are sent on short courses relevant to th e ir w ork, w h ile others upgrade th e ir qualifications by part-tim e study. RFM itself provides its regulatory officers w ith tra in in g in investigations and co u rt procedure, and has already begun to prepare and give courses on the new R adiocom m unications A ct 1983 and Regulations. In ad d itio n , staff have taken part in the D epartm ent's week-long m anagem ent developm ent course in order to im prove th e ir m anage­ m ent skills. A num ber o f technical officers are also sponsored to attend the m arine survey (radar) courses at the Australian M aritim e College in Launceston.

There has to be orderly planning in the use of the radio spectrum , o therw ise radiocom m unica tion services w ill cause interference to each other. The new R adiocom m unications A ct w ill reinforce the D epartm ent's pow er of preparing a spectrum plan w hich, by dividing

the spectrum into bands or portions set aside fo r use by particular services, allow s present and future services in Australia to be

developed in an orderly way.

59

A m a r i n e r a d io

s u r v e y o r te s ts a

p o r t a b l e l i f e b o a t

t r a n s c e i v e r f r o m a

t r a d i n g v e s s e l as

p a r t o f t h e a n n u a l

s u r v e y o f s h i p s '

r a d i o i n s t a l l a t i o n s .

Standards As part of its task o f ensuring the orderliness of the airwaves, the D epartm ent also sets m inim um technical standards (called specifica­ tions) fo r radiocom m unica tions equipm ent. This procedure ensures that the spectrum is used e fficiently and that life-saving devices meet m in im u m perform ance standards at the tim e they were tested.

A ustralia's specifications need to be consistent w ith those of other developed countries, and so the Departm ent continuo usly reviews them to reflect international trends and developm ents in squeezing m ore use o u t o f the spectrum . Some Australian specifications may d iffe r from those o f other nations because of the special circum st­ ances of our environm ent. These specifications, w hich have been developed under the W ireless Telegraphy Act and are o f an advisory nature, are to be replaced by legally binding Standards w hen the new R adiocom m unications Act is proclaim ed.

Type-testing Each State except Tasm ania has a type-testing laboratory where laboratories prototypes o f new equipm ent are subm itted fo r testing by m anufac­ turers and d istributors. If the equipm ent is passed, the Departm ent issues a type-approval certificate or type-acceptance docum ent,

w hich means the equipm ent is licensable.

Under the new R adiocom m unications Act, the D epartm ent w ill be charging a fee fo r each type-approval test. However, certain authoris-

60

Re-equipment

TAG aids policy

RFM initiatives

ed m anufacturers and im porters w ill be allow ed to do th e ir own

specification tests and s u b m it a report fo r departm ental type

approval.

The D epartm ent has a m illio n -d o lla r re-equipm ent program under way, and has already taken delivery o f autom ated, rem otely operated spectrum m o n ito rin g and surveillance equipm ent. This equipm ent w ill a llo w fo r a vastly increased a b ility to check the spectrum fo r such th in g s as rate o f usage and illegal usage o f radio equipm ent. There are also plans to upgrade laboratory facilities fo r equipm ent approval and research and developm ent, so that type-testing of new equip­ m ent can be done w ith m axim um efficiency.

The D epartm ent consults w id e ly in its efforts to develop policy

in itia tive s that w ill lead to sound m anagem ent o f the airwaves. One exam ple of fru itfu l consultations and the resulting exchange o f view s is to be seen in the Telecom m unications A d visory C om m ittee (TAG). It is chaired by the First A ssistant Secretary, RFM D ivision, and

secretariat services are also provided by DOC. The Com m ittee consists of m em bers fro m Telecom, OTC and the Departm ents of A via tio n , Defence, Defence S upport, Science and Technology, Indus­ try and C om m erce and Transport. TAC's role is to facilitate develop­

m ent and co-ordinatio n o f telecom m unica tions policy and to ex­ change in fo rm a tio n and advice on telecom m unications m atters affecting m ore than one C om m onw ealth organisation.

C onsultation also took place w ith industry, user groups, governm ent organisatio ns and the general public w h ile the new R adiocom m u­ nications Act was being prepared.

The R adiocom m unications Act is designed to replace the outdated W ireless Telegraphy A ct 1905, w hich can no longer be used to

m anage the use of the spectrum in the 1980s. New services,

undream ed o f by the fram ers o f the WT Act, and the increasing

problem of interference between the ever-grow ing num ber of users, require legislation that clearly sets out guidelines fo r present and fu tu re developm ent.

In itiatives by m em bers o f RFM staff have led to tw o w o rth w h ile

projects being undertaken. In the firs t exam ple a team in the

Tasm anian State Office, under the leadership o f Brian M uir, develop­ ed an autom atic battery discharge tester w hich was entered in the Tasm anian Enterprise W orkshop in 1984. T h irty inventions were entered in this co m p e titio n and the discharge tester was one of tw o chosen to have a Business Plan produced by a specialist team

w o rkin g on each invention. The invention w ith the best Business Plan w ill be entered in the N ational Enterprise W orkshop.

Secondly, Planning and D evelopm ent Branch in Canberra has developed a scanner linked to a sm all com puter to scan the radio frequency spectrum and determ ine channel loadings, in itia lly in the Sydney and M elbourne areas. This in fo rm a tio n is to be made

available to frequency assigners and regulatory officers and the m ethod em ployed w ill eventua lly be used nationw ide.

61

Background

HACBSS service

A d e le g a t io n f r o m

t h e F re n c h S e n a te F ra n c e -A u s tr a lia F r ie n d s h ip G r o u p v is it e d A u s t r a lia in

F e b r u a r y 1984 a n d w h i l e h e re t h e y a ls o

v is it e d th e A lic e

S p r i n g s te s t site o f

t h e F lo m e s te a d a n d C o m m u n i t y S a te llite B r o a d c a s tin g

S e r v ic e e a rth s t a t io n s tu d y . T h e y

a re ( f r o m left):

S e n a t o r s G e o rg e B e rc h e t, F lub e rt M a r t i n , P ierre G a m b o a a n d J e a n C h e r i o u x ; M r Ian

W a t e r s (DOC) a n d S e n a t o r P ierre V a llo n .

The A ustralian S atellite System

A ustralia's size and thin spread o f population has caused m ajor problem s in the provision of telecom m unications services, such as broadcasting, television and telephony.

This has m eant that in the past, such services have on ly been

provided progressively, w ith m any Australians having to live w ith poor services at best, and some w ith none at all.

To meet the special needs o f these and all other A ustralians, a

specialised d e live ry system , the A ustralian C om m unications Satellite System , has been designed, and w ill begin operation during 1985.

This system w ill consist of tw o satellites in geostationary orbit, a spare satellite on the ground, satellite control stations, and a num ber of tw o -w a y and receive-only earth stations. The satellites w ill be placed in a special o rb it so that they w ill appear to be stationary in the sky som ew hat to the east of Australia.

The satellites w ill relay signals transm itted from points in Australia back from space in beams to five areas. These areas are: continental Australia including Tasmania and som e offshore islands; W estern A ustralia; Central A ustralia; Q ueensland; and South-eastern A ustra­

lia including New South Wales, Victoria and Tasmania.

For people in the m ore rem ote areas of Australia, where reception of signals from conventional broadcasting services is im practical, the satellites w ill provide the Homestead and C om m unity Broadcasting Satellite Service.

The ABC w ill provide in itia lly th rough this service at least one

television service to anyone in A ustralia w ho w ishes to receive it. Special program s fo r each of the regional beams w ill be transm itted to the satellites. These w ill then be relayed back by high-pow ered transponders w hich w ill a llo w th e signal to be picked up by sm all and

relatively inexpensive receive-only earth stations w hich feed directly into standard television receivers.

62

AUSTRALIA’S DOMESTIC SATELLITES IN GEOSTATIONARY ORBIT

A U S S A T

36,000 Km

A U S S A T II

The th ird m ain use o f the satellite w ill be to greatly im prove the

coverage o f aeronautical com m unication s in the m ore rem ote areas of Australia. The use o f the satellite system w ill a llo w the location of aeronautical facilities w ell beyond the range of the current Telecom network.

Telecom w ill also be a m ajor user. In this way, Telecom w ill be able to offer prem ium telecom m unica tions services m ainly to business custom ers w ho live outside the reaches of the existing terrestrial system.

Educational use There has been considerable discussion and consultation between of the satellites the D epartm ent o f C om m unications and educational authorities on use of the A ustralian satellite system . W hile the responsibility fo r the provision o f educational services lies w ith the educational a u th o ri­

ties, DOC seeks to ensure th a t the o p portun ities to provide satellite- based educational services are identified and adequately explored.

The D epartm ent prepared fo r the C om m onw ealth/S tate A dvisory C om m ittee on the Educational use o f C om m unications Technology a report on satellite-based technical options fo r Schools of the Air. A fu rth e r report detailing the possible integration o f satellite services in

63

the M ount Isa School of the A ir was prepared by departm ental

officers and the Queensland D epartm ent o f Education in conjunction w ith AUSSAT Pty Ltd and Telecom Australia. The report was

instrum ental in the Queensland D epartm ent o f Education announc­ ing that it w ill undertake trial use o f the satellite system fo r the M ount Isa School o f the A ir com m encing in January 1986.

Other services A num ber of o th e r services are being developed to take advantage of satellite com m unications. These include business applications fo r the transfer of in fo rm a tio n and data between offices, such as a head office-regional office network. Police authorities and other co m m u n ­

ity authorities are also investigating the possible uses to w hich the satellite system m ig h t be put.

No doubt there are m any more applications o f satellite com m unica­ tions yet to be identified and developed.

Systems The satellite system is ow ned and operated by AUSSAT Pty Ltd, a ownership w h o lly governm en t-o w ned com pany. As a result of a G overnm ent decision, Telecom was invited to take up to 25 per cent shareholding

i§i§i

HACBSS earth station dish sizes

1.0-1,2m diameter

1.2-1,5m diameter

1.5m or larger

• This map is based on predicted shapes of HACBSS signals beamed from an AUSSAT satellite. • Antenna dish sizes are based on the known performance of earth stations in relation to predicted HACBSS signals. • Beam shapes take account of population distribution to minimise dish sizes for as many

people as possible. (For example, the more uniform beam in Western Australia reduces the number of communities that would otherwise need larger dishes.) • Manufacturers may well settle on a standard HACBSS dish size for use in most situations (say, 1.5m diameter).

64

ABC regional radio station

ABC regional television station

Studio

Rebroadcast (e.g. Self-help Television V Scheme)

Community Antenna Television System

CATV

LEF T: H A C B S S e a r t h s t a t io n

r e q u i r e m e n t s . A B O V E : R a d io a n d

t e l e v i s i o n u s e s o f

t h e s a t e llit e

t h r o u g h H A C B S S .

Legislation

A c r e w m e m b e r

se ts u p a s e q u e n c e

d u r i n g s h o o ti n g o f

t h e v id e o

d o c u m e n t a r y / d r a m a p r o d u c e d j o i n t l y b y F ilm

A u s t r a lia a n d th e

D e p a r t m e n t e x p l a i n i n g v a r i o u s a s p e c ts o f th e

H A C B S S s y s te m to p e o p l e in r e m o t e

a re a s w h o m i g h t be

t h i n k i n g o f

in s t a llin g s a te llite e a r t h - s t a t io n e q u i p m e n t .

in the com pany and did so fo rm a lly on 2 Ju ly 1984. The directors of AUSSAT are draw n from a w ide cross-section of the com m unity, including com m erce, academic and rural circles, and the public service.

The financing o f the satellite venture and initial operating costs has been provided by a m ix of com m ercial loans and an equity

co n trib u tio n from the C om m onw ealth. The issued share capital is $75 m illio n and an additional $350 m illio n in loan facilities has been

arranged w ith A ustralian and overseas banks.

The accum ulated net operating expenses to A pril 1984 was $8.1 m illio n ; the capital w orks in progress am ount to $188 m illion. These include spacecraft construction, launch vehicle expenses, m ajor city

earth station construction, sites and buildings and other com m ercial expenses.

It is expected that an additional $176 m illio n w ill be required to

com plete the capital w orks program .

The Satellite C om m unications A ct received Royal Assent on 26 A pril 1984. This Act provides the fram ew ork w ith in w hich AUSSAT w ill operate the satellite system . It guarantees AUSSAT's future w ith in the national telecom m unica tions infrastructure. Under the Act AUSSAT is to operate as a com m ercial tax-paying enterprise w ith its

prim ary objective the operation of a satellite telecom m unications system fo r A ustralia.

A requirem ent of the Act is that as far as practicable, AUSSAT w ill be obliged to m eet the requirem ents of: - the C om m onw ealth fo r the purposes o f provision and m ainten­ ance of air navigation and related safety services

- the ABC fo r the purposes o f providing television and broadcasting services to rem ote com m unities and dw ellings - Telecom fo r the purposes of provision of telephone services in rem ote areas, and fo r em ergency services.

66

Australian industry involvement

Use by Papua N ew Guinea

The G overnm ent has encouraged active participation by Australian in d u stry in the design and m anufacture of the satellite system and has paved the w ay fo r the transfer o f high technolo gy and the

accom panying em p lo ym e n t o p p o rtu n itie s to Australia. Australian in d u stry participation in the contracts let to date include: - sub-contracts fo r direct A ustralian content to a value of $5.4 m illio n let by HCI - A ustralian content w o rth a p proxim ate ly $16 m illio n in the M itsu ­

bishi M ajor City Earth S tation contracts and som e $350 000 w o rth of A ustralian content in the various small earth station contracts - earth station building contracts w hich are expected to be in the

o rd e r of $25-30 m illio n , nearly all o f w hich w ill be spent in

A ustralia.

An AU S S A T engineering support team com prising ten Australian satellite design specialists is presently stationed at the Hughes m anufacturin g plant to study the satellite construction and launch arrangem ents, and to m o n ito r overall technical requirem ents. In this way, the transfer to A ustralia o f advanced aerospace technology w ill

mean s ig n ifica n tly less reliance on overseas assistance during the planning and construction phases of the next and succeeding

generations of AUSSAT satellites.

D iscussions were held w ith senior officers o f the PNG Postal and Telecom m unicatio ns C orporation concerning PNG's use of the A ustralian satellite system . S ubsequently, the new ly elected G overn­

m ent o f PNG confirm ed its intention to seek access to transponder capacity on the satellites at an appropriate tim e, possibly in 1988, fo r do m e stic broadcasting and te lecom m unica tions purposes.

67

C om m unicating w ith the Public

O ddly enough fo r a Departm ent w hich includes the w ord 'c o m ­ m unications' in its title, DOC at tim es experiences d ifficu lty in

com m unicating governm ent policies to the public. The problem goes deeper than a mere question o f resources, w hether m anpow er or financial, althoug h these are im p o rta n t considerations.

The D epartm ent finds that the media in regional or rem ote areas w ill give tim e and space to its activities whereas the media in the cities, given th e ir w id e r interests, are m ore selective about w hat they

choose to report or com m ent upon. Specialist magazines often give the D epartm ent generous space. But a general com m ent is that governm ent cannot depend on the media to provide room fo r its pronouncem ents.

So the D epartm ent has to look to other w ays to inform the public. As w ith other Departm ents it has a strong m ailing list o f some 1850

people and organisations w ho receive copies of Press statem ents, publications and speeches. These recipients range from academics to shire councils. M any require in form ation on particular topics — fo r exam ple, the satellite or videotex.

M uch o f the D epartm ent's w ork concerns the provision o f new or better radio and television services and as a result considerable effort is put into o btainin g publicity fo r such services. Often these are

com ing on stream in regional or rem ote areas and as a result

p u b licity is easier to achieve. The Departm ent has also adopted the 'ta rg e t' approach w ith Press releases and tries to ta ilo r and distribute them to specified audiences or areas. This has w orked effectively w ith several m ini-cam paigns on radio licensing undertaken fo r the

D epartm ent's Radio Frequency M anagem ent Division.

A hunger to There is a great hunger in rem ote areas fo r in form ation about the know satellite. The D epartm ent's responsibility lies in particular w ith the developm ent o f the HACBSS program . It w ants desperately to com m unicate in fo rm a tio n about this service to rem ote areas and in

doing so has developed a successful newsletter, HACBSS News, and a videotape (w ith Film Australia), fo r use in rem ote areas. This runs fo r alm ost th irty m inutes and explains the HACBSS concept and the installation o f earth stations in some detail. Press releases and speeches are also used to push hom e the message that HACBSS is com ing, A t the end o f 1983-84 the Departm ent had received an encouraging

response fro m m any o f the tw elve Schools of the A ir in Australia contacted about the dissem ination o f HACBSS inform ation. One proposal greeted favourably is to have DOC officers engage in talkback sessions over the School o f the A ir w ith parents and

students. A n other proposal under consideration is to have a HACBSS audiotape as w ell as the videotape fo r d istrib u tio n to remote

com m unities and homesteads.

A ll o f these activities cost a great deal o f money. The HACBSS

videotape, fo r exam ple, cost about $70 000 and postage bills for getting Press releases and publications to the grass roots are high. Cost is one reason w hy the Departm ent has not ventured into

television advertising.

For a sim ilar reason it uses Press and radio advertising sparingly in its public relations exercises.

Regrettably, it has neither the tim e nor the resources to undertake surveys of the success or otherw ise o f its inform ation activities. Press clipping services indicate where releases are being used, and in w hat

68

m anner, but they do not explain w hy m any fail to appeal to

jo u rnalists, especially those in the m etropolitan media. DOC has no means, other than rudim entary, of m easuring the success or failure of its p u b licity measures in radio and television w here expensive m o n ito rin g w o u ld be needed.

The D epartm ent's senior officers are active in addressing confer­ ences and sem inars and the M inister makes speeches regularly. The C om m unication s D evelopm ent Division has been particularly active in this regard, presenting thirteen papers at sem inars and confer­ ences ranging fro m the Institution o f Radio and Electronics Engineers

(IREE) Conference in Sydney to an Indian G overnm ent-sponsored Asia/Pacific sem inar in New Delhi. These activities also have an obvious in fo rm a tio n and policy com ponent. Press releases form a valuable record o f G overnm ent actions in com m unication s and so do speeches. 'Back num bers' o f Press releases in particular are in heavy dem and, both w ith in the bureaucracy and outside it. (A list of DOC

Press releases fo r 1983-84 is included at A ppend ix H.)

Conference So fa r as conferences are concerned the D epartm ent scored an ignored historic 'firs t' w ith its ow n national conference in N ovem ber 1983. Once again it was curious that this conference, although w ell

attended and rated an ove rw h e lm in g success by people independent of the D epartm ent, received scarcely any attention from the media. A part fro m w idespread coverage o f the M inister's opening speech, w hich dealt w ith the controversial issue o f sporting rights on

television, the conference attracted little notice. Even the C a n b e r r a T i m e s , w hich often covers conferences and sem inars in considerable

detail, largely ignored the conference. Yet this was one of the few occasions, if any, w hen a D epartm ent of State has bared its soul to the public.

Media questions A n o th e r valuable means o f conveying in fo rm a tio n to the public is th ro u g h replies to questions by the media. During 1983-84, the

D epartm ent answered 152 sets of media inquiries requiring detailed answers, com pared to 140 fo r 1982-83.

A p p ro x im a te ly 80 per cent o f these inquiries concerned broadcasting m atters. The m ajor areas o f interest in broadcasting were those concerning broadcasting licences and supplem entary licences (41); the Special Broadcasting Service and its operations (19); broadcast­

ing interference problem s (14); and general broadcasting questions (46) in cluding the provision of ABC services, FM broadcasting, Radio A ustralia, AM stereo, dual-sound television, and broadcasting legis­ lation.

Other m edia inquiries sought inform ation about such topics as AU SSAT and satellites in general, W orld C om m unications Year, South Pacific Telecom m unications D evelopm ent Program, the DOC conference, cable television, self-help television, the RUCS scheme, advertising standards, CB radio and cellular radio. The Departm ent also receives m any inquiries and visits from the public and from the com m u n ica tio n s industry.

During the financial year, the D epartm ent also issued 138 media releases. We issued 136 during the same period in 1982-83.

Publishing The D epartm ent has an expanding Annual Publishing Program w hich expands is co-ordinated by the Inform ation and Public Relations Section w hich is d irectly responsible fo r m any DOC titles. Technical papers dealing w ith radio frequency m anagem ent m atters are produced

separately w ith in the RFM Division.

Publications produced by the Section during 1983-84 included: D e p a r t m e n t o f C o m m u n i c a t i o n s A n n u a l R e p o r t 1 9 8 2 - 8 3

S o u n d a n d T e l e v i s i o n B r o a d c a s t i n g S t a t i o n s 1 9 8 3

69

WCY B ulletin Nos 4, 5, 6

HACBSS N ew s Nos 2, 3 COM NEWS Nos 1, 2 UHF Television: a ll the facts UHF A ntennas: in sta lla tio n hints In fo rm a tio n Paper No 2: UHF television in A ustralia Im p le m e n ta tio n o f the S upplem entary Licence Scheme

Technical Paper 6: M u ltip le S ound Channels fo r Television R eprints: Let's Talk M arine Radio Let's Talk Self-help Television DOC Roles in A u stra lia 's C om m unications As w ell, a m ajor project was begun to produce fo u r-co lo u r maps depicting the station coverage areas o f all com m ercial, national and public radio and television broadcasting stations in Australia. These w ill be a m ajor benefit to DOC planners and the broadcasting

industry, and also are expected to appeal to sections o f the public.

It is envisaged that the m a jority o f these maps w ill be produced in A4 size, and w ill be bound in plastic fo ur-ring binders. The binders w ill be separated into volum es covering New South W ales and the

Australian Capital T e rrito ry; Victoria and Tasm ania; South Australia and the N orthern T erritory; Q ueensland; and W estern Australia.

This is a long-term project w hich w ill take several years to com plete. It is hoped that about 250 maps w ill be produced by the end of the 1984-85 year.

UHF information D uring 1983-84 the Departm ent instigated tw o large-scale inform - campaign ation cam paigns dealing w ith the introduction of UHF television and interference caused by the operation of unlicensed radio equipm ent. The UHF television cam paign was launched to coincide w ith the

in troduction o f m u lticu ltu ra l television in Canberra, Cooma, Goul- burn and Queanbeyan. The cam paign involved the letter-box

d istrib u tio n o f an explanatory brochure to about 100 000 households in these fo u r areas, arranging extensive media interview s, organising displays at m ajor shopping centres, and providing a 'h o tlin e ' fo r people w ith special queries about UHF. M ore than 350 calls were received.

A n other successful p u b licity cam paign was launched w hen the tow n of C ondobolin in NSW began a com m ercial UHF service in June 1984.

S im ilar cam paigns to that in Canberra are being planned to coincide w ith the in troduction of m u lticu ltu ra l television exclusively on UHF in Brisbane, Adelaide, W ollongong and Newcastle in June 1985.

Licence P ublicity cam paigns were used to encourage radio operators in the campaigns Dubbo (NSW) and Launceston (Tas) areas, and the w hole of

Queensland, to license th e ir equipm ent to help prevent interference to services and congestion o f available frequencies. In particular, use o f unlicensed UHF CB radios was causing a problem because of the steep rise in p o p u la rity o f these devices, especially in rural areas. The cam paigns n o rm a lly involved an advertising and media program , backed up by having DOC officers in the area to handle inquiries and explain the licensing procedure. The cam paigns all proved successful w ith a high response rate from previously unlicensed operators. A full-scale media cam paign was launched to coincide w ith the visit o f a team o f DOC officers to the tow n of Finley in southern NSW. Every household had to be checked to determ ine the cause of

interference to television reception. Newspaper and radio advertise­ ments, along w ith editorial com m ent, inform ed tow nspeople of the survey and, as a result, the DOC team experienced an excellent level of co-operation.

70

R e c e n t p u b l i c a t i o n s

p r o d u c e d b y th e

D e p a r t m e n t o n

d i s p l a y a t a n

A u s t r a l i a n

G o v e r n m e n t

P u b l i s h i n g S e r v i c e

b o o k s h o p .

Radio Frequency Spectrum «location

Departm ental The lib ra ry operates as a research and in fo rm a tio n centre used Library p rim a rily by departm ental officers, but also by other Departm ents, com m erce and industry, scholars, students and Canberra residents.

During the year the Library achieved some notable successes, including :

- the connection to the Dialog Inform ation Retrieval Service, a m ajor com puterised service p ro vid in g access to m illio n s of journal

articles, reports and conference proceedings - expanded the num ber of subject bibliographies of m aterials in the collection (listed at the end of this section), converting to w ord processing fo r storage and to provide fo r regular updates - achieved a 100 per cent increase in dem and on existing services - began an index to A ustralian Broadcasting Tribunal reports, the

first such index to be com piled - the m aintenance o f the Library's services and a significant increase in the size o f the collections despite severe staffing constraints - organised and hosted a very successful sem inar of the C om ­

m unications P ortfolio Librarians, w hich form ed the basis fo r w ide ranging co-operation and im proved services fo r users.

71

The lib ra ry's collections now form a m ajor resource in the com ­

m unications fie ld , w ith significant holdings on satellite com m unica­ tions, Videotex and in form ation technolo gy and all aspects o f radio and television broadcasting.

M aterials are being collected cu rrently in such areas as com puting and autom ation , law, w om en at w ork, and educational broadcasting. As w ell, the collections on com m unications engineering and electro­ nics are being im proved and expanded.

There are now m ore than 8000 books, conference proceedings, pam phlets, standards and audio-cassettes and more than 500 journal and new spaper title s are received. A w ell-equipped and attractive reading and display area is provided fo r library users.

The library offers a w ide range o f inform ation, reference, referral, com puter search and loan services to departm ental staff and the public and also m aintains a branch library in the D epartm ent's office in M elbourne. C urrent awareness services are provided through a quarterly L ib ra ry B ulletin listing new books and fo rthcom ing confer­ ences in the D epartm ent's areas o f interest, and a m o n th ly Current Contents service covering contents pages of recent journal issues and conference proceedings.

In contrast to these developm ents, a fu rth e r reduction in staffing resources coinciding w ith the dram atic increase in use, aggravated the Library's difficulties. C ataloguing rem ained suspended and services to the public had to be reduced. Further reductions in

services and to current awareness services w ill become necessary as the collection and dem and on services continues to g ro w beyond the capacity o f the tw o staff to manage.

Library subject bib lio g ra p h ie s available to the p u b lic Videotex and Inform ation Technology A borigina l Broadcasting* Cable Television Satellite C om m unications Satellites in A u stra lia * The ABC

M ajor Reviews in the C om m unications Portfolio Australian Broadcasting Tribunal Publications Technical The MAC S ystem * Antennas, M icrow aves and M obile Radio

EMC and Interference Fibre Optics F o r s ta ff

M anagem ent Ergonom ics and Occupational Health Effective W riting These bibliograp hies are regularly updated and are guides to DOC'S

holdings. A fe w (m arked w ith an asterisk*) include item s not held in this library. New bibliographies are added regularly.

Parliamentary The D epartm ent deals directly w ith the Parliam entary process liaison through: - preparation o f answers to questions asked of the M inister in the House o f Representatives and o f the p o rtfo lio representative in the

Senate - preparation of Cabinet Subm issions - provision o f com m ent on Cabinet Subm issions circulated to the D epartm ent by other departm ents

- liaison w ith the Cabinet Office

- the ta b lin g in Parliam ent of reports and papers. A list o f those

tabled d u rin g the year is at A ppend ix F

- subm ission o f papers to the Executive Council.

In addition , briefings are prepared fo r the M inister, and the Depart­ m ent assists w ith the preparation o f responses to correspondence addressed to the M inister.

D uring the year 1983-84, the m ost fre quently raised issues in this correspondence were:

B roadcastin g:

- radiated subscription television services - closure of ABC regional stations in T ow nsville and Rockham pton - cigarette advertising - supplem en tary licences - rem ote area broadcasting - category " S " broadcasting licences - transm ission o f O lym pic Games coverage to King Island - extension o f m u lticu ltu ra l television (N etw ork 0-28) - cam paigns fo r licences fo r Christian broadcasting - ABC p rogram m ing m atters.

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

AUTUMN 1982 1

BUDGET 1982 Q T

AUTUMN 1983

BUDGET 1983

AUTUMN 1984 | 5 ___ ______________ f

AUTUMN 1982

BUDGET 1982

AUTUMN 1983

BUDGET 1983

AUTUMN 1984

SENATE

l A

I B

l c E i i l l l i i i i

I D l i l i l i l i l i i l i f f l i

m

■

0 50

P A R L I A M E N T A R Y Q U E S T I O N S C O M M U N I C A T I O N S

P O R T F O L I O

100 150

............ Questions

i" ill Without Notice

| | Questions

On Notice

73

Freedom of Information

FOI internal procedures

Radio Frequency M anagem ent:

- ra d iocom m unica tions licence fees - CB radio behaviour - television and radio interference.

Satellite:

- Homestead and C om m unity Broadcasting Satellite Service - ow nership of the Australian dom estic satellite system .

The accom panying diagram s show a tim e series graph o f M inisterial correspondence a ctivity during the past three years and a bar chart show ing com parative frequencies fo r Parliam entary Questions.

During the period 1 Ju ly 1983 to 30 June 1984 the D epartm ent

received tw enty-three requests fo r docum ents under the Freedom of Inform ation Act.

Access was granted in fu ll to five o f these requests and in part to

thirteen others. One request was transferred to another agency in accordance w ith S16 of the Act, and access was refused to tw o

requests. A t the end o f the period tw o requests rem ained to be

finalised.

E xem ptions claim ed by the D epartm ent included:

536- Internal w orking docum ents; 537- Docum ents affecting enforcem ent o f the law and protection of public safety; 540- Docum ents concerning certain operations o f agencies; 541- Docum ents affecting personal privacy; 544- Docum ents affecting national econom y; 545- Docum ents containing m aterial obtained in confidence.

The requests ranged considerably in th e ir com plexity, from sim ple requests fo r access to docum ents relating to the personal affairs of the applicant to requests involving m any thousands o f docum ents associated w ith departm ental or G overnm ent policy. Consequently the tim e taken to n o tify applicants o f decisions ranged fro m fo u r days to one hundred days, the average being th irty-six days. No request was refused (under S24) on the grounds that it was too large, but several applicants were requested to reduce the scope of their

request to m anageable proportions. Even after being reduced these requests still involved considerable e ffort before decisions were finalised.

In addition to docum ents relating to personal affairs and policy, requests w ere also received fo r access to various departm ental records. The m a jo rity of requests how ever were fo r access to policy docum ents.

No requests were received fo r review of decisions taken in respect of requests finalised during the period, and the Departm ent collected $136.35 in charges.

The FOI Section, w hich com prises one fu lltim e officer, is responsible fo r processing all requests received by the D epartm ent and fo r

handling inquiries relating to FOI matters.

Requests received are registered and then forw arded to the relevant functional area(s) fo r identification of docum ents caught by the request. R ecom m endations are then made on the release of these docum ents and decisions made accordingly. The FOI Section is involved th ro u g h o u t the processing procedure and conducts all correspondence w ith applicants, thus ensuring that the requirem ents of the Act are fu lly observed.

Migrant post­ arrival decisions

'Special needs' decisions

O fficers authorised by the Secretary, in accordance w ith S23 of the Act, to grant and deny access to docum ents requested under the Freedom o f Inform ation A ct are:

- D eputy Secretary - First Assistant Secretary, Broadcasting - First Assistant Secretary, C om m unications Developm ent - First Assistant Secretary, C orporate Policy and Projects - First Assistant Secretary, Radio Frequency M anagem ent - First Assistant Secretary, Space, T elecom m unications and Postal

Policy.

In addition , Branch Pleads are authorised to grant access to certain docum ents.

The D eputy Secretary is also authorised to conduct internal reviews.

FOI sessions were conducted at all induction courses conducted w ith in the D epartm ent over the period covered by this Report.

During 1983 the G overnm ent reviewed substantial com ponents of m ig ra n t post-arrival services and program s in the areas of education, e m ploym ent, w elfare, the law and civil rights, interpreting/

translating, the arts and the media. The revised policy came into operation fro m Septem ber 1983.

The D epartm ent has been involved w ith im plem entation of the fo llo w in g G overnm ent decisions concerning m igrants: - an increase of fu nding fo r subsidies to public broadcasting

services fo r production of ethnic and A borigina l radio program s - relocation and im p rovem ent of m u lticu ltu ra l television (MTV) tra n sm itte rs, in order to alleviate certain problem s of poor

reception and in te rru p tio n to program s - transfer o f MTV transm ission from the VFIF band to the UPIF band - consideration of scope fo r use o f ABC facilities to show program s in languages other than English in centres not receiving MTV - consideration of possible satellite d istrib u tio n of MTV.

Several other decisions are applicable to all C om m onw ealth agen­ cies, fo r exam ple, the requirem ent to take into account the special needs o f m igrant w om en, and of m igrants in general, in the

fo rm u la tio n and im plem entatio n o f program s and services.

The D epartm ent fo llo w s the Australian Public Service policy of equal em p lo ym e n t opportun ity.

The D epartm ent is aware that its role in inform ing the public on

co m m unication s developm ents in Australia w o u ld be enhanced by greater capacity to dissem inate this in fo rm a tio n in languages other than English.

As m entioned earlier in th is Report, in A ugust 1983 the Departm ent produced a leaflet explaining to householders the im plications of the in tro d u ctio n of UFIF television. The pam phlet was distributed to letterboxes in the Canberra-Q ueanbeyan-Coom a- G oulburn district. It

carried a brief explanation in six languages other than English, and indicated w here non-English speaking people could obtain fu rth e r in fo rm a tio n .

The D epartm ent has plans to produce various foreign-language explanations o f the change from Channel 0 to Channel 28 in Sydney and M elbourne.

In cases of m ajor change to services, the Departm ent considers it essential to dissem inate in fo rm a tio n in a variety of languages. It w o u ld be desirable also to provide translations of the m any

in fo rm a tive leaflets and new sletters w hich the D epartm ent produces. This aim w ould be d iffic u lt to achieve, however, w ith o u t a significant increase in staffing and financial resources.

75

W orld C om m unications Y ear 1983

1983 was proclaim ed W orld C om m unications Year by the United Nations General Assem bly, to h ig h lig h t the im portance of com ­ m unications infrastructures in the econom ic and social developm ent of all countries.

The International T elecom m unication U nion (ITU), a technical agency of the UN, was responsible fo r international co-ordination o f the Year's program s and activities; the D epartm ent o f C om m unications was responsible fo r co-ordination o f WCY activities in Australia. One focus o f the Year was the im balance between countries in

telecom m unica tions developm ent. For exam ple, nearly 60 per cent of the w o rld 's p o pula tion does not have access to basic telecom m unica­ tions. A ustralia, w ith a relatively advanced com m unications infras­ tructure, is p a rticu la rly conscious of the telecom m unications needs

o f the developing countries, especially its neighbours in the South Pacific Region.

Independent Commission for World Wide Telecommunicat­

ions

Development

Sir Donald M aitland, GCMG, QBE, Chairm an of the new ly form ed Independent C om m ission fo r W orld W ide T elecom m unications De­ velopm ent and fo rm e rly Chairm an o f the United Kingdom WCY C om m ittee, w ro te to the Secretary of the D epartm ent in December

1983 seeking assistance w ith the w ork o f the Com m ission. The C om m ission, set up by resolution o f the ITU, has a one-year mandate to fin d w ays o f stim ulating the expansion of com m unications

facilities in developing countries. The Com m ission is com pletely independent and consists of m em bers of high international reput­ ation from adm inistations, operating agencies, m a jo r financial in­ stitu tio n s and in d ustry from developing and developed countries around the w o rld , serving on a vo lu n ta ry basis.

Sir Donald requested an Australian response concerning the fo llo w ­ ing issues: - the current A ustralian co n trib u tio n to telecom m unications de­ ve lopm ent in developing countries - w ays in w hich telecom m unications adm inistrations can best assist

telecom m unica tions developm ent in developing countries - any arrangem ents fo r liaison w ith m anufacturing industry to

ensure that the special interests of developing countries are taken into account - the current state of com m unications developm ent and the avail­ able choices o f technology

- the role o f telecom m unica tions in econom ic and social develop­ m ent - financing o f telecom m unications developm ent.

The D epartm ent co-ordinated the preparation of a com prehensive response paper fo r the C om m ission. Telecom, OTC and the ABC have significant in vo lve m e n t w ith training and consultancy aid to develop­ ing countries, especially in the South Pacific region and in Papua New Guinea. The D epartm ent perform s an ongoing task o f assistance w ith advertisem ent o f vacancies and prelim inary selection o f officers for ITU technical positions in developing countries. In recent years, several officers o f DOC have provided consultancy assistance to developing countries. A grant of $50 000 was made by DOC to support the w ork of the

Independent C om m ission. The Com m ission began its w ork during WCY 83 and it is hoped that the fru its of its study w ill extend w ell into

76

the fu tu re , assisting the developing w o rld th ro u g h the benefits of im proved te le com m unica tions facilities.

Telecom m unicat­ ions for Development Study: Vanuatu

At present, relatively little developm ent aid is allocated to telecom ­ m unications developm ent. Yet it is easy to conclude in tu itive ly that sig n ifica n t econom ic developm ent is unlikely to occur effectively if there is no adequate telecom m unica tions system .

The ITU has been active in a relatively new fie ld of research into the link between investm ent in telecom m unica tions infrastructure, and econom ic and social benefits to developing countries. A series of case studies has been conducted in various parts of the w o rld in an a tte m p t to dem onstrate conclusively that investm ent in telecom ­ m unications provides significant returns th rough econom ic grow th and social benefits. Such a dem onstration w o u ld provide a strong argum ent fo r consideration by international aid agencies in a llo ­ cation of aid funds.

As a special WCY project, DOC was invited by the ITU to co-sponsor an econom ic case study o f telecom m unications developm ent in Vanuatu. The D epartm ent contributed $20 000 to the proposed project and the ITU has undertaken to fund the balance.

South Pacific Development Program

It was signficant that in A ugust o f WCY 1983 the Australian Prime M inister, M r Hawke, co m m itte d A ustralia's support fo r the establish­ m ent o f this program during the South Pacific Forum in Canberra. A detailed description of A ustralia's involvem ent w ith this Program is included elsew here in this report.

WCY in Australia W ith in A ustralia, the em phasis fo r WCY centred largely on education. The w o rld o f com m unication s technology is advancing so rapidly that an im p o rta n t task fo r the D epartm ent is to prom ote public

awareness o f com m unication s developm ents. A special effort was m ade to include young people (see C om m unications and Young People, later in this chapter).

The D epartm ent produced five issues of a b i-m o n th ly WCY Bulletin (circulation 6000 A ustralia-w ide) during 1983, and a final issue, su m m a risin g the events o f the year, was produced in 1984. The WCY B ulletins provided in fo rm a tio n on com m unications developm ents in A ustralia, A ustralian telecom m unica tions aid fo r developing coun­ tries, and special WCY events held in various parts o f Australia.

T h e W C Y a w a r d p re s e n te d to M r

A lle n D e e g a n (see P age 79).

77

Australian conference

A list of WCY events in A ustralia during 1983-84 is included at

A ppendix G.

Tertiary in stitu tio n s, governm ent com m unications adm inistrations and professional associations organised a range of special WCY conferences, sem inars and w orkshops th ro u g h o u t the Year. Some of these were very technical and oriented tow ards the com m unications industry and specialists, w hile others presented com m unications in a broader perspective, exam ining im plications in sociological, educa­ tional or legal fields.

A m ong the varied them es adopted were: te rtiary education fo r the age of co m m unication s; law and technolo gy; com m unications and governm en t; organisational com m unication ; and international stan­ dards fo r d ig ita l telecom m unications networks.

The Law and T echnology Sem inar in A ugust 1983 made fittin g use of new technolo gy fo r its opening session. A satellite video link

established between Brisbane and England enabled the em inent British ju ris t Lord Denning to join a live teleconference w ith a panel of Australian lawyers.

As a special WCY event, DOC hosted a conference on the them e 'A ustra lia's C om m unications: W here Now?' at the Lakeside Hotel in Canberra on 16-17 N ovem ber 1983.

The aim o f the conference was to exam ine issues and likely future directions in the com m unications sphere. The conference attracted 280 participants fro m private and public sector organisations across Australia, w ith representatives fro m other governm ent departm ents and statutory authorities, com m unications industry companies, television, radio, Press, educational institutions and com m on-interest groups.

The conference was opened by the M inister, M r Duffy, and speakers from DOC and in dustry presented papers on the fo llo w in g topics: - C om m unity pressure — is it a spontaneous, effective force in

policy developm ent? - UHF television — the issues in the channel spacing debate: 7 MHz or 8 MHz? - C om m unications technology — a force fo r developm ent or a

lim ita tio n on grow th? - Should the developm ent of new com m unications services (the Australian satellite, electronic m ail, radiated subscription te le vi­ sion, cellular radio etc), lead to a new approach to regulation? - Engineering lim ita tio n s and social pressures fo r com m unications

developm ent. - Broadcasting services to rem ote and underserved Australians.

- S tatutory authorities in the C om m unications p o rtfo lio — their

independence, accountability and the public interest. - A ustralia's role in com m unications fo r developing countries — can A ustralia's electronics industry compete?

Follow ing each speaker, m em bers of an invited panel led discussion and answered questions from the floor. Panellists w ere chosen for th e ir particular expertise in the subject, and represented a w ide range of organisations and interest groups.

A feature o f the papers was the crossing of disciplinary boundaries in an integrated approach to the various topics discussed. The social, econom ic and political im plications of technical issues and techn­

olo g y were consistently identified and explored.

An underlying concern o f the conference seemed to be that those w ho plan and im plem ent technological innovations cannot in the future pursue purely technical avenues w ith o u t accepting

re sp o n sib ility fo r the social im plications of advances in com m unica­ tions.

A n other message em erging from the conference was a call fo r closer interaction and co-operation between governm ent organisations, private sector organisations and com m on-interest groups.

Given the level of interest show n and the apparent success of the conference, the D epartm ent is considering the potential fo r fu rth e r a ctivity o f this type. This is seen as a viable means o f m aintaining contact w ith the diverse groups w ho are either interested in or

affected by p o rtfo lio matters.

WCY Award A sig n ifica n t WCY activity, and a h ig h lig h t o f the DOC conference, presented was the bestow al o f the WCY Aw ard, designed to recognise the w ork of the A ustralian w ho has contributed m ost significantly to the

advancem ent o f com m unication s in Australia. A fu rth e r aim of the award was to increase public awareness o f the im portance of

A ustralian co n trib u tio n s to com m unication s technolo gy and applica­ tions.

The A w ard was supported by DOC, OTC and the B ulletin magazine. It consisted of $2000 and a special plaque crafted by South Australian Ms Jenny Gore, featuring the distinctive WCY logo enam elled on copper.

From a m e rito rio u s field including engineers, inventors and those w ho had w orked to apply technolo gy in a variety of fields, the w in n e r of the A w ard was M r Allen T. Deegan of Standard Telephones and Cables Pty Ltd. M r Deegan joined STC in 1939 and has, th ro u g h o u t

his career, been at the fo re fro n t of technological advances in

A ustralian and international com m unications. He was, in recent years, instrum ental in the establishm ent of STC's high-technology plant at Liverpool, Sydney, w here advanced equipm ent fo r A u st­ ralia's developing com m unications infrastructure is now being

m anufactured. In particular, the plant has fu lfille d a m ajor contract fo r the m anufacture of subm arine repeaters fo r the ANZCAN cable project. (The ANZCAN cable, one o f the w o rld 's largest telecom ­ m unications projects, w ill provide a subm arine cable linking Sydney — via N orfolk Island, Fiji and Hawaii — to Vancouver in Canada, w ith

a spur segm ent from N orfolk Island to Auckland, New Zealand. W ork on the ANZCAN cable project began in 1981 and is scheduled fo r co m pletion in 1984.) STC also fu lfille d a contract fo r the m anufacture of the control harness system fo r the Australian C om m unications Satellite System .

The aw ard was presented to M r Deegan by M r D uffy at the opening of the conference.

Dubbo display C o m m u n ity and local groups also adopted the WCY them e and organised activities to mark the Year.

The central w estern New South W ales tow n o f Dubbo planned a broad c o m m u n ity effort to prom ote WCY to the public.

During an O ctober long weekend, G overnm ent and volunteer

em ergency services manned a three-day exhibition of displays and lectures to the public. Police, Fire, Am bulance, State Emergency Service, A m ateur Radio, Rescue Squad and the Citizens Radio Em ergency Service Teams (CREST) were involved.

A h a lf-hour videotape docum entary on the behind- the-scenes w ork of the em ergency services in the tow n was available fo r public

view ing. The WCY exh ib itio n was in itia lly sponsored by the NSW Branch of the CREST organisation, but received w ide co m m u n ity support. P ublicity fo r the display was provided by local television, radio and

79

the Press and the venue was provided w ith o u t charge by a m ajor shopping centre in Dubbo.

Nunawading EXPO '83

Communications and young people

A t N unaw ading, in Victoria, m ore than 4000 people attended

C om m unications EXPO '83, a radiocom m unications display held on 3 Septem ber as a WCY event.

The Eastern and M ountain D istrict Radio Club organised the display to dem onstrate to the public how easily anyone — young or old — could have a co m m unication s hobby. The display included am ateur radio and shortw ave listening, am ateur television, and M orse code ; and teletype operations. Em ergency services, the A rm y and Telecom dem onstrated a range o f com m unications facilities and a num ber of electronics and com m unication s firm s exhibited th e ir latest equip­

ment.

As part of the p u b licity program before the event, m em bers of the club w ith som e o f th e ir equipm ent were featured as a segm ent of a com m ercial television program in M elbourne. The segm ent discuss­ ed the history o f am ateur radio operations in Australia and the role of am ateur radio in em ergency com m unications, including the

tragedies o f Cyclone Tracy and the Ash W ednesday bushfires. Viewers also heard h o w to become involved in radiocom m unications as a hobby.

A special WCY am ateur radio call sign, 'VK 3 WCY', issued by DOC in conjunction w ith EXPO '83, was used during the m onth preceding the i event. A m ateurs in A ustralia and overseas w ho made radio contact using this call sign w ere issued w ith a special WCY com m em orative card.

It is im p o rta n t that young people com e to understand and appreciate the im pact of com m unication s technology on the society w hich they w ill inherit. For that reason, m any of the WCY '83 activities were designed to include young people. This was particularly appropriate as 1985 has been proclaim ed by the U nited Nations General

Assem bly as International Youth Year.

Jam boree on the A ir On 15 and 16 O ctober 1983 the Scout Association of Australia

participated in the 26th annual Jam boree on the A ir (JOTA). The Jam boree on the A ir is an international event held th ro u g h o u t the scouting w o rld w ith the help of am ateur radio operators. Like a

tra d itio n a l jam boree it involves the m eeting o f m any scout and guide groups, w ith the difference that the m eetings take place by radio contact.

The 1983 JOTA was a registered WCY activity and the Departm ent of C om m unications assisted by providing 12 000 special WCY QSL cards, featuring both the WCY logo and the scouting em blem , fo r use by participating scout and guide stations. (Am ateur radio operators have a long-standing practice of sending each other 'co n firm the contact' cards, know n as QSL cards, after each radio contact.) Despite bad w eather and poor atm ospheric propagation conditions, the JOTA was quite successful. Some excellent overseas contacts

w ere recorded, and m any Australian contacts were prolonged — one of m ore than fo u r hours continuo usly having been reported. v

A record of 19 729 scouts and 8218 guides and m any w ell-w ishers took part in the 1983 JOTA. Some 960 am ateur radio operators also participated and helped to make a total of 8817 contacts, m ainly w ith other scouts and guides in Australia and overseas.

In te rn a tio n a l a rt prizes In early 1983 DOC conducted a nationw ide WCY art com petition for young people on the them e 'Telecom m unications fo r Everyone'. The

T h e M i n i s t e r f o r

C o m m u n i c a t i o n s , M r D u f f y , w i t h t w o

s t u d e n t s f r o m

G i n n i n d e r r a H ig h

S c h o o l in C a n b e r r a .

R o b in G i l l a r d (le ft)

a n d S a n d r a M i l l e r

( r i g h t ) w e r e p riz e

w i n n e r s in t h e

F o u r t h W o r l d W i d e

P h o t o a n d D r a w i n g

c o m p e t i t i o n , h e ld

d u r i n g W o r l d

C o m m u n i c a t i o n s Y e a r, 1983.

Other

competitions

Fourth W orld W ide Photo and D raw ing C om petition was held during 1983 by the ITU and a selection o f tw e n ty-five w in n in g entries from the A ustralian com petition w ere sent to Geneva to com pete in the in ternation al com petition.

The them e fo r the international com petition was 'Youth in the

Electronic A ge' and the aim was to help young people g row ing up in an in fo rm a tio n era to becom e m ore aware of the im portance of

co m m u n ica tio n s fo r econom ic and social progress.

The results o f the international ju d g in g were announced by the ITU in O ctober 1983. Ten Australian students were awarded international prizes.

Shawn Dobson, of Alice Springs, was placed eighth am ong the ten m a jo r prizew inners in the 8-12 years category. His w ork, a fu turistic m oonscape w ith a satellite link to earth, was featured on the front cover of the D epartm ent's A nnual Report last year.

A com bined entry from five students at the W ycheproof Education Centre, Victoria, w on a special group award in the 16-18 age category fo r the best collective photog ra phic w ork; fo u r other Australian

students w o n consolation awards.

M em ber countries o f the ITU donated the prizes, and those w on by A ustralian students included a radio recorder unit, watches, solar calculators, cheques and certificates. M r Duffy presented Shawn w ith his award in a cerem ony at A lice Springs High School. The successful W ych e p ro o f students travelled to M elbourne to m eet the M inister and receive the awards.

AUSSAT and A ustralia Post also conducted WCY com petitions for young people. AU SSAT's A ustralian Space Shuttle Science Contest invited high school students to devise experim ents w hich could not be perform ed on earth, but w o u ld need to be perform ed in space.

Plans are now in progress fo r the three w inning experim ents to be flo w n on a US National Aeronautics and Space A dm inistration

(NASA) space shuttle during 1985 or 1986, depending on when capacity becom es available.

The A ustralia Post co m petition was conducted on a Statewide basis and school children were invited to w rite letters on a range of

fu tu ris tic co m m unication s them es. The entries show ed a blend of skill, im agination and hum our.

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Radio and sto ry

O ther A ustralian WCY activities w hich focused on children included production o f a series o f radio spots fo r radio 3KZ in M elbourne and a conference on 'C hanging Faces: S tory and Children in an Electronic Age'. Each o f these activities was supported by a grant from the

D epartm ent's WCY budget.

The radio project was undertaken by a team o f young C hildren's Express A ustralia (CEA) reporters. CEA is a media com m unications program fo r young people between the ages of 12 and 18. Small team s o f young people receive tra in in g in a w orkshop program w hich ■

provides them w ith research, in te rvie w in g and editing skills in

production o f radio m aterial and new spaper copy.

In preparation fo r the WCY exercise, a CEA team visited a selection of schools where they interview ed students and recorded opinion s on a range of issues, including satellite te chnolo gy and com m unications fo r young people. The production team then enjoyed a series of

editing w orkshops w ith a 3KZ producer and in doing so, learned m uch about the professionalism and style o f a com m ercial radio station. The end product o f th e ir hard w ork was an entertaining series on 3KZ expressing a new voice on M elbourne's com m ercial radio — the voice o f young people. During Decem ber 1983 they w ent to air three tim es a day.

Changing Faces: S tory and C hildren in an Electronic Age, was the them e chosen fo r a conference held by the A ustralian National

Section of the International Board on Books fo r Young People (IBBY) at the U niversity o f Sydney fro m 25-27 A ugust 1983.

Keynote speaker was M r Aidan Chambers, a British children's author, e d ito r and critic, w h o took as his them e ch ild re n 's literature and the m icro-electronic book. An 'electronic book' is a program cassette w hich slots into a hom e co m puter and the te xt is displayed on the screen o f a visual display unit. The reader is able to interact w ith the story by rearranging or altering the text. Pictures can also be made to appear on the screen. These electronic books have been made in Britain and the U nited States, but they are not yet com m ercially

available.

O ther speakers at the conference addressed different aspects of the im pact of com m u n ica tio n s technolo gy on children and on story. A Technology Fair at the conference displayed a w id e range of

electronic equipm ent, including co m puter games. A n o th e r feature was the e xh ib itio n o f entries from DOC's WCY national art co m p e ti­ tio n fo r children.

Delegates to the conference came from every State and also from overseas. They included academics, teachers, librarians, w riters, illustrators, publishers, booksellers, m edia representatives from film , television, radio and the Press, com m unication s and com puter experts, parents and students. <·

A special WCY Not o n ly organisations and co m m u n ity groups but also individuals story entered into the s p irit of WCY 1983.

An unusual story o f a personal WCY e ffo rt w ith international benefits came to the D epartm ent in a letter fro m a keen am ateur radio

operator, M r G ordon Dowse, of Lism ore, NSW.

M r Dowse explained that the cities of Lism ore, and Ujung Pandang in South Sulawese, Indonesia, have established a tw in -city agreem ent to exchange cultures, ideas and visits w hich w o u ld be to the benefit o f both cities. As a WCY gesture, he decided to visit U jung Pandang w ith the aim of m eeting as m any radio am ateurs as possible to

'spread the w o rd ' about am ateur radio activities in A ustralia, and also to prom ote the tw in -c ity relationship.

W ith his w ife, M r Dowse was o fficia lly w elcom ed as a guest of Ujung Pandang and by the O rganisation o f A m ateur Radio Indonesia (ORARI), at the city council cham bers.

The local people, and particularly ORARI, extended w arm hospitality to the couple. A m ateur radio is g row ing in p o p u la rity in the region. M r Dowse m et and spoke w ith about 100 m em bers of ORARI and was presented w ith a special shield in recognition o f his efforts to

prom ote WCY in Ujung Pandang. The radio am ateurs o f that city entered into the sp irit of WCY and used the v isit to prom ote WCY w ith the local authorities w ho responded w ith support fo r the WCY

concept.

Mr Dowse reported that the com bination of the WCY prom otion and the tw in -c ity relationship did much to fu rth e r enhance com m unica­ tions between Lism ore and Ujung Pandang.

83

DOC Legislation

Changes in 1983-84 The three notable legislative events fo r the Departm ent during the year were:

- provision fo r the reintroductio n o f courier services and fo r the

in troduction o f electronic m ail services by A ustralia Post - the passage of the 'R adiocom m unications Package' of Acts

designed to replace the Wireless Telegraphy A ct 1905 - the passage of the Satellite C om m unications A ct 1984 and its

associated am endm ent Act designed to regulate use of the

Australian dom estic satellite system , AUSSAT.

The am endm ents to the Postal Services A c t 1975 re-created the A ustralia Post co urier service, abolished in 1981 on the recom m enda­ tions of the Lynch C om m ittee (the C om m ittee fo r the Review of

C om m onw ealth Functions). Electronic m ail involves electronic trans­ m ission of in fo rm a tio n but, unlike purely electronic com m unications such as the telephone, it involves 'hard copy' at some stage. The provision sim p ly em pow ers Australia Post to provide the service. It does not otherw ise interfere w ith the Telecom m onopoly over

A ustralian telecom m unications.

The radiocom m unica tions package was given Royal Assent on 22 December 1983 but w ill not com e into force until proclaim ed by the G overnor-G eneral. W hen it does come into force, it w ill introduce a num ber of im p o rta n t reform s in the field of radiocom m unications. It w ill introduce m andatory technical standards designed to reduce interference to radiocom m unica tions and w ill form alise planning for the use of the radio frequency spectrum . It w ill also provide for

m echanism s fo r settlem ent of interference disputes and w ill in tro ­ duce m ajor provisions fo r public participation in radiocom m unica­ tions planning and developm ent and fo r appeals against a d m inistra­ tive decisions to the A d m in istra tive Appeals Tribunal.

The package reflects the im portance radiocom m unications has acquired to the daily life o f Australians in the eighty-odd years since the original A ct was passed. M obile com m unications of all sorts, radio and television, navigation by sea or air and even m ajor systems such as that operated by Telecom w ould be either im possible or

m uch m ore d iffic u lt w ith o u t reliable radiocom m unications. In fact, there are few activities, from the m ost sim ple to the m ost com plex, w hich do not rely heavily on radiocom m unications. The strong em phasis on interference control and avoidance b u ilt into the

package marks a m a jo r advance in guaranteeing the a vailability of cheap, efficient and effective radiocom m unications.

The Australian satellite system, AUSSAT, represents Australia's w in d o w on the Space Age. It is a m ajor investm ent and needs to be integrated into A ustralia's present com m unications networks to guarantee efficient use fo r m axim um benefit to the com m unity.

The Acts set p rim a ry objectives fo r the satellite operating com pany, AUSSAT Pty Ltd, and im pose obligations on AUSSAT Directors and condition s on th e ir a ppoin tm e nt designed to ensure that over-riding

public interest concerns, such as air navigation, em ergency services and rem ote area com m unications, are served and that the m anage­ m ent of AUSSAT is not subjected to undue influence or control. The Acts guarantee the co n fid e n tia lity o f telecom m unications passing

over the satellite and provide fo r the integration of AUSSAT, Telecom and OTC operations.

M inor am endm ents were made to the A ustralian Broadcasting C orporation A c t 1983 (dealing w ith board m em bers and program -

84

m ing com plaints), the B r o a d c a s t i n g a n d T e l e v i s i o n A c t 1 9 4 2 (m ainly

form al in nature), the P o s t a l S e r v i c e s A c t 1 9 7 5 (rem oving the No

W ork as Directed — No Pay provisions and superseded conciliation and a rb itra tio n provisions and introducing provisions fo r rewards for in fo rm a tio n as to th e ft of property etc), the T e l e c o m m u n i c a t i o n s A c t

1 9 7 5 (rem oving No W ork as Directed — No Pay provisions and

superseded conciliation and operation provisions, and varying p ro visions relating to Telecom top m anagem ent and Telecom By-laws), and the T e l e v i s i o n S t a t i o n s L i c e n c e F e e s A c t 1 9 6 6 (varying

the licence fees payable by television station licensees).

85

International A ctivities

Australia's involvement

International Telecommunicat­ ion Union (ITU)

ITU Geneva meeting

C om m unications services on a global scale are planned and regulat­ ed by a num ber o f agreem ents and conventions to w hich Australia is a party.

The D epartm ent o f C om m unications is a central figure in A ustralia's participation in these arrangem ents, and takes a high profile in

co n trib u tio n s to the w ork of relevant international organisations.

Som e exam ples are discussed in this chapter.

The D epartm ent co-ordinates A ustralia's participation in the Interna­ tional Telecom m unication Union (ITU), the body which is responsible fo r m aintaining international co-operation in the use and develop­ m ent of all kinds o f telecom m unications, including m anagem ent of the radio frequency spectrum and the geostationary satellite orbit. The ITU is governed by the International Telecom m unication

C onvention (Nairobi 1982), an international treaty to w hich Australia is a signatory w ith 157 other countries.

The Radio Frequency M anagem ent D ivision has a num ber of

functions in this area. Firstly, it acts as a clearing house fo r

d istrib u tio n o f in fo rm a tio n relating to the ITU. RFM also notifies the International Frequency Registration Board (IFRB) in Geneva of details of frequency usage of those services in A ustralia requiring co-ordination w ith neighbouring countries. This includes, fo r exam ­ ple, all the co-ordinatio n fo r the use of the frequencies used by the

AUSSAT satellite network.

DOC, through the RFM Division, also participates actively in m ost of the study groups o f the International Radio C onsultative Com m ittee (CCIR), a perm anent organ of the ITU, and co-ordinates the activities of all o f them . These study groups com prise pre-em inent experts fro m governm ent and private organisations and perform a variety of specialised functions, w hich include exam ining radiocom m unication engineering questions, such as space research and radio astronom y,

radio-relay system s, and long-distance broadcasting, reporting to the CCIR and m aking recom m endations fo r the fo rm u la tio n of interna­ tional standards. RFM also co-ordinates the recruitm ent o f Australian experts fo r the

ITU's technical co-operation program . The purpose of this program is to render practical assistance to developing countries to fu rth e r the developm ent of th e ir telecom m unications infrastructures.

RFM also prepares the Australian brief for: - the ITU P lenipotentiary Conference, w hich is the governing body of the ITU, com prising representatives from all m em ber countries and is held every seven or eight years - the annual A d m in istra tive Council M eeting (which is like a board of

directors and to w hich Australia is one o f forty-one delegates) - W orld A d m in istra tive Radio Conferences - Regional A d m in istra tive Radio Conferences - the CCIR S tudy Groups.

During 1983-84 a num ber of these activities took place. A ll, of course, were im portant but am ong the higher profile m eetings was the 39th session of the ITU A d m inistrative Council in Geneva in A pril 1984. M atters of m ajor concern here included ITU financial and adm inistra­ tive arrangem ents, conferences, technical co-operation and develop­

m ent, and the use of weapons in outer space. The Australian

delegation was led by the Australian C ouncillor, M r Ross Ramsay,

86

W ARCon HF broadcasting

South Pacific Telecom m unicat­ ions Development

Program

First A ssistant Secretary, Radio Frequency M anagem ent Division. The tw o other m em bers of the delegation were M r Dennis Grant, of OTC, and M r Jirra M oore, fro m the Australian M ission at Geneva.

M r John M cKendry, A ssistant Secretary, Planning and Developm ent Branch o f RFM, led a delegation of officers from various departm ents and sta tu to ry bodies to the W orld A d m in istra tive Radio Conference (WARC) on High Frequency Broadcasting in Geneva fo r fo u r weeks beginning 10 January 1984. This conference set the technical bases fo r a fu rth e r conference in 1987. M r M cKendry was also a delegate to the m eeting o f the United Nations C om m ittee fo r the Peaceful Uses o f O uter Space, held in Vienna in June 1984.

The in itia tio n o f the $100 m illio n South Pacific Telecom m unications D evelopm ent Program during W orld C om m unications Year was a m ajor m ilestone fo r the South Pacific Island countries. The Program, w hich w ill span m ore than a decade, represents the culm ination of alm ost three years of e ffort by A ustralia, New Zealand and the South

Pacific countries.

The A ustralian policy aspects of this initiative have been co-ordinated by M r R P Mere, Assistant Secretary, C om m unications D evelopm ent D ivision. The Program has im plications fo r a variety of G overnm ent concerns and close w orking arrangem ents have been established w ith relevant policy D epartm ents and the Australian D evelopm ent Assistance Bureau (ADAB).

The S outh Pacific Island nations, w ith a collective population of some three m illio n people, are scattered over an area o f ocean about tw ice the size o f Australia. Typically they com prise groups o f islands large

and sm all, w ith significant population groups on outer islands often separated by vast distances. In a part of the w o rld where tra n sp o rt­ ation often substitutes fo r com m unications, the developm ent of

reliable telecom m unica tions is a basic need.

D evelopm ent of telecom m unica tions infrastructure is a m ajor task w hich poses heavy dem ands on the scarce financial and te ch n o lo g i­ cal resources o f the em erging nations of the South Pacific. W ith the exception of relatively developed countries such as Fiji, m ost Island countries are sig n ifica n tly dependent upon aid from countries such as A ustralia and New Zealand.

O rigins In 1980 the South Pacific nations asked w hether A ustralia could provide services fo r them on the planned Australian com m unications satellite system . A fte r careful study the countries were advised that services to South Pacific countries could not be provided w ith o u t sig n ifica n t im p a irm e n t of services to Australia. The design of the satellite was, how ever, able to accom m odate coverage fo r Papua New Guinea.

A ustralia also advised that the needs of the South Pacific countries w o u ld be taken into account in planning fo r the second generation satellite system . As an im m ediate co n tribution , Australia offered to participate in a study of the rural telecom m unications needs of the

Island countries.

The stu d y was convened by the South Pacific Bureau fo r Econom ic C o-operation (SPEC) in 1981 and was largely funded by Australia. Telecom A ustralia and the Overseas Telecom m unications C om m is­ sion each made available a senior telecom m unications engineer fo r

the study. New Zealand also contributed to the cost of the study and made available a senior engineer from the New Zealand Post Office. Over a six-m onth period, the team conducted field inspections in each o f the tw e lve participating Island countries: Fiji, Kiribati, Nauru,

Niue, S olom on islands, Tonga, Tuvalu, Vanuatu, Federated States of

87

M icronesia, Cook Islands, W estern Samoa and Papua New Guinea. The study report was presented fo r consideration by the Island countries at the N inth South Pacific Regional Telecom m unications M eeting held in Niue in N ovem ber 1982.

The report recognised the d ifferent stages of developm ent of the Island countries and th e ir d ifferent needs. It recom m ended a

considered balance o f satellite and terrestrial solutions on a country- by-country basis. The solutions also lent them selves to overall co-ordination by the Island countries.

Proposals

A W orking Party o f senior telecom m unications officials o f the region m et at SPEC Headquarters in Suva in March 1983 to form ulate

proposals fo r telecom m unica tions developm ent based on the study report. A d m in istra tive and organisational arrangem ents were also considered and the proposals were put to a m eeting of South Pacific Telecom m unications M inisters held in Tonga in A pril 1983.

M inisters agreed that there w o u ld be considerable advantage in approaching the developm ent of reliable telecom m unications in the region on a co-operative basis. They form ulated a num ber of

recom m endations w hich were considered by Heads of G overnm ent at the m eeting o f the South Pacific Forum held in Canberra in August 1983.

These proposals were introduced at the Forum m eeting by the Prime M inister of A ustralia, M r Hawke. He noted the significance of this in itia tive to the South Pacific countries and offered to make $300 000 available in 1983-84 to assist in the establishm ent of the Program. The proposal to establish the Program was unanim ously endorsed by Heads of G overnm ent.

M anagem ent The Program w ill be m anaged by the South Pacific countries

them selves under the aegis of SPEC.

The inaugural m eeting o f the M anagem ent Group fo r the South Pacific T elecom m unications D evelopm ent Program was held in Suva in January 1984.

M r Jim W ilkinson, fo rm e rly a m em ber of the Australian Broadcasting Tribunal and a senior executive w ith the Departm ent o f C om m unica­ tions, was appointed Program C ontroller early in 1984. He w ill be responsible to the countries of the region fo r im plem entation of the program .

The Office o f the Program C ontroller is located at SPEC Headquarters in Suva and w ill com prise a small team w hich w ill provide a planning and adm inistrative fram ew ork fo r the program .

O utlook Funds fo r the Program w ill be sought by the Director of SPEC from a num ber of sources such as the European Economic C om m unity (EEC), the U nited Nations D evelopm ent Program (UNDP), Japan, the U nited States, the United Kingdom , Canada and developm ent funding agencies such as the Asia Developm ent Bank. As already

m entioned, A ustralia is providing $300 000 in 1983-84 and New Zealand $NZ250 000 w hich w ill ensure early and effective establish­ m ent of the Program.

P rio rity tasks The im m ediate p rio rity tasks fo r the Program are seen to include the identification o f space segm ent options fo r satellite com m unications

in the dom estic and rural sectors. Equal w e ig h t w ill be given to the identification o f suitable radio and telephone com m unications sys-88

SPECTEL10

The peaceful uses of outer space

Satellite technology seminar

Asia Pacific Telecommunity

terns and equipm en t fo r the region. Much o f the early w ork w ill

require the provision of netw ork planning and engineering advice fo r participating countries.

The progressive developm ent of a detailed w ork plan is a m ajor p rio rity fo r the Program C ontroller. A second m eeting of the

M anagem ent G roup was held in Suva in June and the procedures fo r specifying co untry p rio rity projects fo r inclusion in the Program were discussed. The first detailed plan fo r the Program w ill be considered by the M anagem ent G roup in the context of the annual South Pacific Regional Telecom m unications M eeting to be held in the Cook Islands in N ovem ber 1984.

The S outh Pacific Bureau fo r Econom ic Co-operation (SPEC) held its Tenth A nnual South Pacific Regional T elecom m unications M eeting (SPECTEL 10) at Port Vila, Vanuatu from 24-28 October 1983. The A ustralian delegation was headed by M r R P Mere, Assistant

Secretary, C om m unications D evelopm ent D ivision, w ith represent­ ation also from Telecom A ustralia and OTC(A).

SPECTEL is the principal governm ent-level forum fo r telecom ­ m unications developm ent and tra in in g in the South Pacific Region. It is supported by Pacific Island countries including the Federated

States o f M icronesia, A ustralia and New Zealand. International developm ent organisations including the ITU and UNDP were also represented.

The m ajor item on the agenda was preparation fo r the inaugural m eeting o f the M anagem ent G roup fo r South Pacific Telecom ­ m unications D evelopm ent Program to w hich A ustralia is m aking a m ajor co n trib u tio n . The Program is discussed earlier in this chapter.

The U nited Nations C om m ittee fo r the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space (UNCPUOS) m eeting of the Expert Group on Direct Broadcasting from S atellites was held in Vienna in June 1984.

The D epartm ent was represented by M r David Eyles, Acting First A ssistant Secretary, C om m unications D evelopm ent Division, at this m eeting from 12-15 June 1984.

The m ain task of the Expert G roup was related to a study of the

fe a sib ility of using direct broadcasting satellites fo r educational purposes. The Group also addressed the possibility o f regional or international co-operation to achieve these objectives. The Expert Group w ill report the outcom e o f its study to the UNCPUOS Scientific and Technical S ub-com m ittee in February 1985.

The Indian Institute of Mass C om m unications, in association w ith UNESCO, invited the D epartm ent to present a paper and participate in its Asia-Pacific Regional Sem inar on the U tilisation of Satellite

T echnology fo r Mass C om m unications held in New Delhi from 10-12 A pril 1984.

M r Mere represented the D epartm ent. FHis paper was w ell received and generated considerable interest and discussion. Nations of the region w ere particularly interested in the w ay in w hich Australia was planning to deliver television and radio services to people living in rem ote areas via the HACBSS service. There was interest also in A ustralia's policy in relation to localism in broadcasting because of the parallels w ith the num ber of different languages, cultures and

regions w hich exist in a co untry such as India.

A ustralia is a m em ber of the Asia Pacific T elecom m unity (APT), a regional intergovernm ental organisation established under the aegis of the U nited N ations Econom ic and Social Com m ission fo r Asia and the Pacific (ESCAP), w ith headquarters in Bangkok, Thailand. Its main

objectives are the planning, program m ing and developm ent of

89

intraregional and international telecom m unications netw orks and the coordinatio n w ith in the region o f technical standards and routing plans fo r these networks.

The APT and the G overnm ent o f Japan sponsored an Asia Pacific T elecom m unications C onvention in Tokyo from 26 Septem ber to 1 O ctober 1983, fo r com m em orating W orld C om m unications Year 1983. A result o f this m eeting was the Tokyo Declaration, w hich calls on G overnm ents to accord telecom m unications a higher p rio rity in service allocation and seeks assistance from international organisa­ tions of APT activities.

The Australian Delegation was fo rm a lly headed by the Australian Am bassador to Japan, Sir Neil Currie, w ho delivered a speech on behalf o f the M in iste r fo r C om m unications. M r V.J. Kane, First

A ssistant Secretary, STAPP D ivision, chaired tw o sessions and presented tw o papers.

The M anagem ent C om m ittee of the APT m et in Bangkok in N ovem ­ ber 1983. The A ustralian Delegation was headed by M r John

Colem an, of the D epartm ent of C om m unications.

CICCP The D epartm ent has the overall national responsibility fo r co­

ordinating A ustralia's technical and policy advice to the Com m ittee on Inform ation, C om puter and C om m unications Policy (CICCP), a organ o f the O rganisation fo r Econom ic Cooperation and Develop­ m ent (OECD). In discharging this responsibility the D epartm ent consults w ith a w ide range of governm ent, academic and co m m unity groups. The CICCP is the only fo ru m in w hich like-m inded countries address policy issues arising from the developm ent and application o f technologies in the field of inform ation, com puter and co m m unic­ ation system s and services, including the societal and econom ic im plications o f such issues.

Two sessions o f the CICCP were held in Paris during the year, on 4-6 O ctober 1983 and 13-16 March 1984. Australia was represented at both m eetings by M r V.J. Kane, a Vice-Chairman of CICCP.

The m ajor item on the agenda fo r the October 1983 m eeting was a presentation and discussion on in form ation technology policy led by officials of the U nited Kingdom . The m eeting also discussed the vu ln e ra b ility o f the com puterised society, dw elling on com puter-

related crim inality. Country surveys have been undertaken and a proposal is under w ay to develop guidelines that could lead to

standardised legislation in m em ber countries. The underlying objec­ tive is to harm onise laws dealing w ith crim es using com puters.

At the March 1984 m eeting of CICCP discussion centred on the fo llo w in g topics: - Telecom m unications P olicy: The C om m ittee is developing pro­ jects to study policy aspects of ISDN, international satellite

developm ents in the private sector, the harm onisation o f m em ber country policies in respect to transborder data flow s, aspects of com puter softw are used in telecom m unications, and the

harm onisation of type approvals fo r telecom m unications term inal equipm ent. - In fo rm a tio n Technology fo r Econom ic D evelopm ent: The less developed countries in the OECD are concerned that they are being

left behind by countries like the USA, Japan, France, Germ any and the UK in introducing new inform ation technologies including telecom m unications systems. They see them selves m issing trade o pportun ities w ith a continuing decline in international com peti­ tiveness. The ICCP Com m ittee has program s in hand to assist these countries to raise the level of participation in new technolo­ gies. - Softw are D evelopm ents: the CICCP has produced a report entitled

Technology developments

Other overseas engagements

S o ftw a re : a N e w Industry. The purpose of the report is to identify problem s that seem to be arising though com puter developm ents in hardw are o u tstrip p in g the developm ent of softw are. The report argues that softw are is a key industry in its ow n right, and is not just an adjunct to co m puter hardware.

- G uidelines on the P rotection o f Privacy in Respect to Transborder Data Flow s o f Personal Data: A few years ago the OECD issued guidelin es w hich m em ber countries were asked to adopt in order to have a com m on approach to privacy aspects of personal data. The guidelines were prepared by a C om m ittee chaired by Mr

Justice M D Kirby, of Australia. To date, all countries except

A ustralia and Ireland have adopted the guidelines. - Trade In ICC Services: Trade in services, in this case com puter services and te lecom m unica tions services, is not unlike trade in goods between nations. For exam ple, com puter processing is

undertaken in the UK fo r m any European countries w hich use telephone circuits fo r the com m unication of data. The OECD sees this trade as an im p o rta n t issue in the 1980s. There is a general perception o f its econom ic im portance, such that countries should

not raise barriers to such activity. The GATT concept is cited as a m odel fo r establishing 'ru le s' between nations fo r trade in services. This is a m atter that the C om m ittee proposes to study in 1984 and 1985, again w ith a vie w to harm onising policies w ith in m em ber countries in order to facilitate trade and the 'free flo w of

in fo rm a tio n '.

The D epartm ent is represented by the C om m unications D evelop­ m ent D ivision at all m eetings of the Australian Science and Techn­ o logy Council (ASTEC) and the Technological Change C om m ittee (TCC). T hrough its involvem ent the D epartm ent has been able to

assist in the continuin g review of processes and trends in te ch n o lo g i­ cal develop m e nts in A ustralia and overseas.

During 1984 the Departm ent, th rough the C om m unications Develop­ m ent D ivision, participated w ith the Departm ents of Science and T echnology and Industry and Com m erce in a m ajor consultancy study o f the o p p o rtu n itie s fo r A ustralia arising out o f inform ation technolo gy. The D epartm ent has also been represented by the C om m unication s D evelopm ent D ivision on specialist groups advis­

ing on the policy and m anagem ent aspects of the STARLAB program , w hich has the objective o f launching a space telescope w ith a

s ig n ifica n tly enhanced resolution relative to existing systems.

The D epartm ent m aintains an objective of facilita tin g Australian in dustry to take advantage of possible o p portun ities arising from the in tro d u ctio n o f new com m unication s technologies. It consults closely w ith the D epartm ents of Industry and Com m erce and Science and Technology and encourages discussion w ith industry on m atters of com m on interest. M ore fo rm a l arrangem ents are established w ith

in dustry and other organisations in the developm ent of standards and specifications fo r broadcasting equipm ent.

M any other DOC officers travelled overseas during 1983-84 on co m m unication s p o rtfo lio related matters. The m ore senior of these included: - M r R.B. Lansdown, Secretary, DOC - M r E.E. Payne, Deputy Secretary - M r Peter W esterw ay, FAS, Broadcasting Division.

91

A ppendix A Civil radiocommunication stations licensed in Australia and external territories as at 31 March 1984

StationIService Number Station/Service Number

A E R O N A U T I C A L 432

A IR C R A F T — L a rg e 135

— S m a ll 2 843

A M A T E U R — B e a c o n 76

— L im it e d 2 774

— L im i t e d / N o v i c e 1 006

— N o v ic e 3 2 9 4

— U n r e s t r ic t e d 8 45 8

B A S E — 27 M H z 177

— HF 3 958

— L o w D u ty C y c le 64

— M F 16

— U H F 3 7 9 8

— V H F 15 334

— T e l e m e t r y 11

— U n d e f in e d 4 702

C BR S — 27 M H z 94 315

— U H F 36 480

C O A S T — C lass A 7

— C la ss B 15

D E V E L O P M E N T A L — 0 - 3 0 M H z 6

— 3 0 - 4 0 0 M H z 9

— 4 0 0 - 5 2 0 M H z 188

— 520 M H z -1 G H z —

D IS A S T E R — A e r o n a u t ic a l 26

— A i r c r a f t 17

— B ase 477

— F ixed 86

— F ix e d R e c e iv in g —

— L a n d M o b i l e 4 830

— L a n d M o b i l e P a g in g R e c e iv e r 16

— S h ip 1

E A R T H — C lass A 38

— C la ss B —

— C lass C 2

— C la ss D

— C lass E 2

— H o m e s t e a d —

E X P E R IM E N T A L — M is c e lla n e o u s 821

E X T E R IO R P A G IN G SERVICE — C la ss A 50

— C la ss B 44

— C lass C 20

FIXED CLASS A — Aeronautical 20

— External 21

— Internal 826

— Maritime 6

FIXED CLASS B — Low Duty Cycle 129

— Telemetry 251

FIXED CLASS C — 1 — 36 kHz 681

— 36 — 400 kHz 143

— 400 — 2800 kHz 513

— 2800 kHz— 10 MHz 378

— 10 — 20 MHz 17

— 20 — 40 MHz 35

— 40 — 80 MHz 15

— 80— 160 MHz —

— 160 MHz —

FIXED OUTPOST — Control 13

— Public Correspondence 735

— School of the Air 771

— Undefined 406

FIXED RECEIVING 713

GENERAL — Class A 16

— Class B —

— Class C —

— Class D —

— Class E —

HANDPHONE 16 279

INTERIOR PAGING — HF 299

— LF 58

— UHF 39

— VHF 442

— Undefined 440

LAND MOBILE PAGING RECEIVER 4 228 LIMITED COAST — 27 MHz 689

— HF 152

— MF 37

— VHF 174

— HF/MF 50

— HF/VHF 12

— Some combination of above — 6 sub-categories 80

— Undefined 119

MARINE RESCUE — Limited Coast 91

— Ship 503

92

S tation! S ervice N u m b e r S ta tio n ! Service N u m b e r

M O B IL E — 27 M H z 278

- HF 11 532

— M F 165

— U H F 35 596

— V H F 110 3 66

— S o m e c o m b i n a t i o n o f a b o v e

5 s u b - c a t e g o r i e s 717

— U n d e f i n e d 61 322

M O B IL E O U T P O S T 11 144

M U L T I P O I N T D IS T R IB U T IO N — R e c e iv e r A 12

— R e c e iv e r B —

— T r a n s m i t t e r A 1

— T r a n s m i t t e r B 5

O U T S I D E B R O A D C A S T ( T V ) 1 1 2

R A D I O D E T E R M I N A T I O N — A e r o n a u t i c a l B e a c o n 3 7

— F i x e d 6 7

— M a r i t i m e B e a c o n 12

— M o b i l e 261

— U n d e f i n e d 7 6

R E M O T E C O N T R O L C L A S S A

— U H F - L i n k 301

— V H F - L i n k 6 0

— U H F - T a l k - t h r o u g h 1 5 4 9

— V H F - T a l k - t h r o u g h 2 0 5

R E M O T E C O N T R O L C L A S S B — U H F - L i n k 1 0 31

— V H F - L i n k 41

R E M O T E C O N T R O L C L A S S C —

R E P E A T E R — A m a t e u r 1 1 9

— C B R S 5 8

S H I P C L A S S A

— 2 7 M H z 2 4 5 9 0

— H F 5 8

— M F 1

— U H F 1

— V H F 8 5

— S o m e c o m b i n a t i o n o f a b o v e

5 s u b - c a t e g o r i e s 13

— U n d e f i n e d 1 7 5 4

S H I P C L A S S B

— 2 7 M H z n o n - c l u b 7 1 6 6

— v o l u n t a r i l y f i t t e d 11 2 0 4

S H I P C L A S S C 2 2 4

S P E C I A L 4

T R U N K E D L A N D M O B I L E — 4 0 1 — 5 2 0 M H z 1 4

— > 5 2 0 M H z — 1 G H z

G R A N D T O T A L 4 9 4 0 9 1

93

A ppendix B Schedule of fees Radiocommunications licences (effective 1 September 1983)

C/ass o f station/service

A eronautical — private — non-private

A ircra ft — having 38 or m ore passenger seats or having a m axim um take-off w e ig h t o f 19 tonnes or m ore — other A m ateur

Base — — low d uty cycle speech (less than 1/2 hour a day on not m ore than 26 days in 12 calendar m onths), or te le m e try and/or telecom m and Citizen band Coast — Class A

— Class B

D evelopm ental Disaster Earth — Class A — Class B

— Class C — Class D — Class E — Homestead Experim ental Exterior paging

— Class A — Class B — Class C

Fixed — Class A — private — non-private — Class B low duty cycle speech (less than 1/2 hour a day on

not m ore than 26 days in 12 calendar m onths), or telem etry and/or telecom m and — high density — low density — Class C

— 1 — 36 kHz

— high density — lo w density

— 37 — 400 kHz

— high density — low density

— 401 — 2 800 kHz

— high density — lo w density

— 2801 — 10 000 kHz — high density — lo w density — 10 001 — 20 000 kHz

— high density — low density

Fee

$

45 60

130 35 19 150

64 11 640

12 700 250 25 250 1 300 6 400 12 700 59 700

70 50

640 1 300 350

50

205

66 50

130 105

250 200

660 510

950 760

1 650 1 320

94

Class o f sta tionlservice Fee

— 20 001 — 40 000 kHz

$

— high density 2 550

— low density 2 040

— 40 001 — 80 000 kHz — high density 4 450

— low density 3 500

— 80 001 — 160 000 kHz — high density 7 040

— low density 5 600

— greater than 160 000 kHz — high density 9 500

— low density 7 600

Fixed o u tpost 10

Fixed receiving 18

General — Class A 15

— Class B 100

— Class C 250

— Class D 500

— Class E 1 000

H andphone 11

In te rio r paging (per tra n sm itte r) 80

Land m obile paging receiver 18

Lim ited coast — private 40

— non-private 60

M arine rescue 10

M obile 35

M obile o u tpost M u ltip o in t d is trib u tio n

10

240 T ra n s m itte r— Class A — Class B 6 350

Receiver — Class A 200

— Class B 20

O utside broadcast te levision 200

R adiode term ination 100

Remote control — Class A 250

— Class B 270

Repeater — am ateur 25

— CB 25

Ship — Class A 20

— Class B — private 26

— non-private 35

— Class C 215

Trunked land m o b ile (per base tra n sm itte r active frequency) 1 300

95

A ppendix C Departmental addresses

Departmental offices

Regional Office Sydney

Central Office Melbourne

Central Office, Canberra Benjam in Offices Block 7, Purple Building Cnr Benjam in W ay and College Street Belconnen, ACT 2617 PO Box 34, Belconnen, ACT 2616 Telephone: (062) 64 1177 Telex: 62025 Facsim ile: 644608 Departm ental elem ents located in Benjam in Offices are: Secretary; Deputy Secretary; - Broadcasting D ivision (Broadcasting Policy Branch, Divisional

S upport and Engineering Section, Broadcasting Planning Task Force); - C om m unications D evelopm ent D ivision (C om m unications A p ­ plications Branch, C om m unications System s Branch); - Space, Telecom m unications and Postal Policy D ivision (External

Relations Branch, Finance and R egulatory Branch, Services and Standards Branch); - Radio Frequency M anagem ent D ivision (Planning and Develop­ m ent Branch, Executive S upport Section); - Corporate Policy and Projects D ivision (Policy Analysis and

C o-ordination Branch, M anagem ent Services Branch, Parliam en­ tary Section, Legislation Section, ADP Section, Inform ation and Public Relations Section).

W est Block MLC Building 105-153 M iller Street N orth Sydney, NSW 2060 PO Box 970, N orth Sydney, NSW 2060 Telephone: (02) 922 9111 Telex: 24624 Vocadex: (02) 922 7351 D epartm ental elem ents located in the MLC Building are: Broadcasting D ivision (Station Planning Branch); Radio Frequency M anagem ent D ivision and M anagem ent Services Branch.

M arland House 570 Bourke Street M elbourne, Vic 3000 GPO Box 5412CC, M elbourne, Vic 3001 Telephone: (03) 609 1555 Telex: 30148 Vocadex: (03) 67 2333 D epartm ental elem ents located at M arland House are: Corporate Policy and Projects D ivision (Station Establishm ent and O perations Branch); Broadcasting Division, Station Planning Branch); C om m unications Developm ent Division (C om m unications Technical U nit); Radio Frequency M anagem ent Division (Operations

Branch); M anagem ent Services Branch.

96

State

Broadcasting Engineers

State Managers (Radio Frequency M anagem ent Division)

New South W ales MLC B uilding 105-153 M ille r Street North Sydney, NSW 2060 Telephone: (02) 922 9111 Telex: 24624 Victoria

14 Queens Road M elbourne, Vic 3001 Telephone: (03) 266 8921 Telex: 37503 South A ustralia 32 S outh Terrace Adelaide, SA 5000 Telephone: (08) 51 2877 Telex: 88015 W estern A ustralia N ational W estm inster House 251 A delaide Terrace Perth, W A 6000 Telephone (09) 325 7733 Telex: 93254 Q ueensland 10th Floor, A viation House Cnr W ickham and B allow Streets Fortitude Valley, Qld 4006 Telephone: (07) 52 8822 Telex: 41258 Tasm ania (Technical Officer) C ontinental Building 162 M acquarie Street Hobart, Tas 7000 Telephone: (002) 20 4795/20 5011 Telex: 58265

New S outh W ales MLC Building 105-153 M ille r Street North Sydney, NSW 2060 Telephone: (02) 922 9111 Telex: 24624 Victoria 5th Floor

14 Queens Road M elbourne, Vic 3001 Telephone: (03) 266 8921 Telex: 37503 South A ustralia QBE Building

108-116 King W illia m Street Adelaide, SA 5000 Telephone: (08) 212 2153 Telex: 88200 W estern A ustralia

1st Floor CAGA Centre 256 A delaide Terrace Perth, W A 6000 Telephone (09) 325 5877 Telex: 93772

District Radio Inspectors

Queensland 10th Floor A viation House cnr W ickham and Ballow Streets

Fortitude Valley, Qld 4006 Telephone: (07) 52 8822 Telex: 41528 Tasmania

1st Floor C ontinental Building 162 M acquarie Street Hobart, Tas 7000 Telephone: (002) 20 5011 Telex: 58265

A ustralian Capital T erritory CANBERRA Shop 5, Level 3, Block F

Benjam in Offices Belconnen, ACT 2617 Telephone: (062) 64 4677 N orthern T erritory DARWIN Custom Credit House 83 S m ith Street Darwin, NT 5790 Telephone: (089) 81 5566 N ew South Wales LISMORE Australian G overnm ent Offices, 218 M olesw orth Street LISMORE NSW 2480 Telephone: (066) 216393 Telex: 66198 NEWCASTLE Suite 8A, 1st Floor, Tonella C om m ercial Centre, 125 Bull Street, PO Box 5190c NEWCASTLE WEST NSW 2302 Telephone: (049) 264199 Telex: 28170 TAMWORTH 28 Bridge Street, T am w orth PO Box W 75, WEST TAMW ORTH NSW 2340 Telephone: (067) 657969 Telex: 63318 W AGGA W AGGA 15 Trail Street, W agga W agga, PO Box 808, SOUTH W AGGA W AGGA NSW 2650 Telephone: (069) 211855 Telex: 69750 WOLLONGONG Australian G overnm ent Offices 86-88 M arket Street, W ollongong, PO Box 1766, WOLLONGONG NSW 2500 Telephone: (042) 289611 Telex: 29112

Victoria MLC B uilding BALLARAT 104 Curtis Street BALLARAT VIC 3350 Telephone: (053) 311317 Telex: 36904

BENALLA 56 Nunn Street BENALLA VIC 3672 Telephone: (057) 623288 Telex: 56137

BENDIGO Hills Bazaar B uilding, Bath Lane, Bendigo PO Box 458 BENDIGO VIC 3550 Telephone: (054) 431110 Telex: 37257

SALE A ustralian G overnm ent Centre 79-81 Raym ond Street SALE VIC 3850 Telephone: (051) 444555 Telex: 55228

Q ueensland BUNDABERG Lonsdale Court 49 W alker Street, Bundaberg PO Box 862 BUNDABERG QLD 4670 Telephone: (071) 722135 Telex: 49688

CAIRNS State G overnm ent Insurance Office Cnr Shields Street and The Esplanade PO Box 1225 CAIRNS QLD 4870

Telephone: (070) 514333 Telex: 48055

MACKAY 2A Sydney Street, Mackay PO Box 337

MACKAY QLD 4740 Telephone: (079) 511828 Telex: 48527

ROCKHAMPTON 6 East Street, Rockham pton PO Box 1401

ROCKHAMPTON QLD 4700 Telephone: (079) 276922 Telex: 49170

TOWNSVILLE 42-50 S turt Street PO Box 522 TOWNSVILLE QLD 4810 Telephone: (077) 715685 Telex: 47149

SOUTH AUSTRALIA M OUNT GAMBIER 40 Jam es Street PO Box 1545

M O UNT GAMBIER SA 5290 Telephone: (087) 256170 Telex: 80030 W HYALLA Customs House H orw ood Street PO Box 575 W HYALLA SA 5600 Telephone: (086) 455999 Telex: 80481

WESTERN AUSTRALIA PORT HEDLAND W ilson Street PO Box 182 PORT HEDLAND W A 6721 Telephone: (091) 732309 Telex: 99526

Statutory Australian Broadcasting Corporation Authorities Head Office Broadcast House Sydney, NSW 2000

GPO Box 9994, Sydney, NSW 2001 Telephone: (02) 339 0211 Telex: 20323 Australian Broadcasting Tribunal

153 W alker Street North Sydney, NSW 2060 PO Box 1308, North Sydney, NSW 2060 Telephone: (02) 922 2900 Telex: 26683 Australian Postal C om m ission

Head Office 71 Rathdowne Street Carlton, Vic 3053 PO Box 302, Carlton South, Vic 3053 Telephone: (03) 669 7171 Telex: 34096 Australian Telecom m unications C om m ission

Head Office C om m unications House 199 W illiam Street M elbourne, Vic 3000 Telephone: (03) 63 0331 Telex: 30146 Overseas Telecom m unications C om m ission (Australia) 32-36 M artin Place Sydney, NSW 2000 GPO Box 7000, Sydney, NSW 2001 Telephone: (02) 230 5000 Telex: 20591

Special Broadcasting Service Head O ffice 5 Elizabeth Street Sydney, NSW 2000 GPO Box 21, Sydney, NSW 2001 Telephone: (02) 232 7622 Telex: 21895

Satellite company AU SSAT Pty Ltd Level 23, MLC Centre

M artin Place, Sydney 2000 PO Box 1512, GPO Sydney 2001 Telephone: (02) 238 7800

A pp en dix D DOC legislation

The fo llo w in g legislation is adm inistered by the M inister fo r C om ­ m u n ications under the A d m in istra tive A rrangem ents Orders:

A u stra lia n B roadcasting C orporation A c t 1983 A u stra lia n B roadcasting C orporation (T ransitional and C onsequential A m e n d m e n ts) A c t 1983 Broadcasting a n d Television A ct 1942

B roadcasting Stations Licence Fees A c t 1964 Overseas Telecom m unications A ct 1946 P arliam entary Proceedings Broadcasting A c t 1946 Postal a n d T elecom m unications (T ransitional Provisions) A ct 1975 Postal Services A c t 1975

Telecom m unications A ct 1975 Television S tations Licence Fees A ct 1964 W ireless Telegraphy A ct 1905 W ireless Telegraphy R egulations A c t 1970 R adiocom m un ica tions Licence Fees A ct 1982 R adiocom m un ica tions (M iscellaneous Provisions) A ct 1982

101

A ppendix E Department goals

Overall goal

Contributing goals

The develop m e nt o f an environm en t in w hich, to the greatest

practical extent, all form s o f telecom m unications (including

radiocom m unica tions), sound and television broadcasting and postal services are available to meet the needs of the Australian population fo r those services.

- Encourage the efficient introduction of technological innovation in co m m unication s and related services, w h ile retaining develop­ m ent and sta b ility sufficient to sustain the degree o f confidence necessary fo r long-term planning and investm ent. - Restrict regulation to the m in im u m level possible fo r an effective

system.

- Prom ote a sustainable industrial base fo r local research, develop­ m ent, m anufacture, and assem bly o f com m unications and ancil­ lary facilities. - S upport services w hich are su fficie n tly flexible, dynam ic, enter­

prising and diverse to respond to changes in Australian society. - Ensure that the principles of fa ir cost, equity and individua l rights are observed th ro u g h o u t the com m unications sector.

- Enable in fo rm a tio n flow s between all users of com m unications system s in the m ost efficient and econom ic m anner practicable w ith m in im u m interference between services.

- Prom ote A u stra lia 's interests through international co-operation in com m unication s matters. - Develop an effective balance between public and private o w ner­ ship and control and involvem ent in the com m unications sector.

- O ptim ise the u tilisa tio n of resources in the achievem ent o f the

overall goal. - M aintain a w o rkin g environm en t w hich w ill attract and retain

skilled and m otivated staff.

102

A ppendix F Documents tabled in the Parliament: Communications Portfolio 1983—84:

- A u stra lia n Postal C om m ission Service a n d Business O utlook 1983-84. - A u stra lia n T elecom m unications C om m ission Service and B usi­ ness O utlook 1983-84. - A u stra lia n T elecom m unications C om m ission A n n u a l Report. - A u stra lia n Broadcasting T ribunal A n n u a l Report. - Overseas Telecom m unications C om m ission A n n u a l Report. - A U S S A T Pty Ltd A n n u a l Report. - A u stra lia n Postal C om m ission A n n u a l Report.

- A u stra lia n B roadcasting C orporation A n n u a l Report. - D ep a rtm e n t o f C om m unications A n n u a l Report. - S pecial B roadcasting Service Interim Report. - S pecial B roadcasting Service Report.

A ppendix G Australian WCY events during 1983—84

J u ly 1983 - 29 June-1 Ju ly — T e rtia ry Education fo r the Age of C om m unica­ tio n s' — International Conference arranged by the Royal M el­ bourne Institute o f Technology. - July — Prize-giving cerem ony fo r A ustralia Post's Morse Code

com petition in Queensland. - 11-12 J u ly — O rganisational C om m unication Conference, organis­ ed by the W arranam bool Institute of Advanced Education. Venue: W indsor Hotel, M elbourne. - 13-15 Ju ly — C om m unications and G overnm ent Sem inar, Can­

berra College o f Advanced Education.

A u g u st - 8 A ugust — official opening o f Inform ation Technology (IT) House, Canberra — a display hom e equipped w ith a range of com m unica­ tions facilities and electronic devices. (IT Houses w ere also set up

in Brisbane and M elbourne). - 24-25 A ugust — Law and Technology Sem inar, organised by the Inform ation Technology Week Com m ittee, Brisbane. - 25-27 A ugust 'C hanging Faces: Story and Children in an Electronic

A ge' — Conference held by Australian National Section of the International Board on Books fo r Young People (IBBY) at the U niversity o f Sydney. - 26 A u g u s t-4 Septem ber — WCY A ctivity Week fo r A m ateur Radio

and S hortw ave Listening in Victoria, organised by the W ireless Institute o f Australia, Victorian Division - 30 A ugust — A t the South Pacific Forum in Canberra, the

Australian Prime M inister, M r Hawke, introduced proposals fo r the South Pacific T elecom m unications Developm ent Program and com m itted $300 000 to assist w ith establishm ent o f the Program.

- Australian WCY Bulletin No. 4 issued.

S eptem ber - 3 Septem ber — 'C om m unications EXPO 83', a radiocom m unica­ tions display organised by the Eastern and M ountain D istrict Radio Club at N unaw ading, Victoria. - 5-9 Septem ber — IREECON International 1983, a convention and

exhibition held in Sydney by the Institute of Radio Electronics Engineers Australia. - 10 Septem ber — Announcem ent o f w inners of Australian Space Shuttle Science Contest conducted by AUSSAT Pty Ltd.

- 16-23 Septem ber — Library Week — T h e W orld Talks to You at Your Library'. - 26-30 Septem ber — Tenth Australian C om puter Conference, Royal Exhibition Building, M elbourne, Theme: 'The em erging in fo rm ­

ation environm ent'. - 29 S e p te m b e r-1 October — Three-day exhibition of displays and lectures about G overnm ent and volunteer em ergency services, organised in Dubbo, NSW, by the Citizens Radio Emergency

Services Teams (CREST). - Septem ber to N ovem ber — visit to Australia by Am erican astro­ nauts, organised by AUSSAT Pty Ltd and W estfield Shopping- towns.

104

Launch of the A ustralian WCY A w ard contest, conducted by the B u lletin m agazine, OTC and DOC. The award was designed to recognise the w ork of an A ustralian w ho has made an oustanding c o n trib u tio n to the influence of com m unication s on Australian life.

O ctober

16-17 O ctober — 26th Jam boree on the A ir — Scout Association of Australia.

30 O ctober — International w inners of ITU WCY A rt C om petition announced in Geneva; six A ustralian students w in m ajor prizes. A ustralian WCY Bulletin No. 5 issued.

N o ve m b e r 1-3 N ovem ber — 'E ducation and C om m unications T echnology', a conference organised by the Educational T echnology Centre of S outh Australia. E xhibition and Australian m eeting PEACESAT, Adelaide.

16-17 N ovem ber — 'A u stra lia 's C om m unications: W here Now?' — Conference organised by the D epartm ent o f C om m unications at the Lakeside International Hotel, Canberra. 16 N ovem ber — Presentation o f the Australian WCY Aw ard to M r Allen T Deegan, chairm an o f Standard Telephones and Cables Pty

Ltd.

D ecem ber 8 Decem ber — official opening of OTC's new telephone service between A ustralia and N orfolk Island via the ANZCAN cable. (The previous service was carried by high frequency radio.) A team of young C hildren's Express A ustralia reporters produced a

series o f radio 'spots' w hich w ent to air three tim es daily during Decem ber on radio 3KZ, M elbourne. They featured the view s of you n g people on a range o f issues, including satellite technology and com m unications. O fficers of DOC and Telecom presented papers to the WCY

Regional Sem inar, 'D evelopm ent of C om m unications Infrastruc­ tu re s' in Kuala Lum pur, Malaysia.

7984 M arch — A ustralia contributed $50 000 to assist w ith the w ork of the new ly-form ed Independent C om m ission fo r W orld W ide Telecom m unicaions D evelopm ent. (The C om m ission has a one- year m andate fro m the ITU to investigate and make recom m enda­ tio n s on the m ost effective w ays of stim u la tin g te lecom m unica­ tio n s developm ent in the developing nations.)

15 M ay — A group o f students fro m W ycheproof Education Centre, V ictoria, m ajor prizew inners in the International WCY A rt C om peti­ tio n organised by the ITU, received th e ir awards from the M inister in M elbourne. 23 M ay — A t Alice S prings High School the M inister presented

Shawn Dobson w ith his m ajor award from the International WCY A rt C om petition, organised by the ITU. M ay — Final issue (No. 6) of the Australian WCY Bulletin issued to

provide an overview o f WCY 83. M ay — A ustralian Response Paper sent to the Independent

C om m ission fo r W orld W ide T elecom m unications Developm ent. June — A ustralia co ntributed $20 000 tow ards an ITU econom ic study o f te lecom m unica tions in Vanuatu. The proposed study w ill fo rm part o f the ITU's w o rld -w id e program o f research into the link

between investm ent in telecom m unica tions and econom ic and social benefits fo r developing countries.

105

A ppendix Η Press statements issued by DOC during 1983-84

No. Date Title

83/62 1/7/83 Installation o f tra n sm itte r fo r

m u lticu ltu ra l television begins.

83/63 7/7/83 Better te levision transm ission

fo r Gold Coast.

83/64 13/7/83 G overnm ent says ' y e s ' to satellite project.

83/65 13/7/83 AUSSAT board gets new chairm an, directors.

83/66 15/7/83 New m em bers appointed to Australian

Broadcasting Tribunal.

83/67 22/7/83 G overnm ent announces appointm ents to

Special Broadcasting Service.

83/68 25/7/83 M ountain affects FM reception in M yrtleford,

spokesm an says.

83/69 1/8/83 First self-help television station receives go-ahead.

83/70 9/8/83 A ustralia Post's role to continue, M inister says.

83/71 11/8/83 ABC to get Second Regional Radio Network.

83/72 12/8/83 Telecom rearranges telephone charging zones in rural Australia.

83/73 12/8/83 Senior C om m unications officer retires.

83/74 23/8/83 G overnm ent to bring ABC radio/television

to m ore areas.

83/75 23/8/83 New ABC co m plex under consideration fo r Hobart.

83/76 23/8/83 ABC property proposal to continue to be developed.

83/77 23/8/83 Revised radiocom m unica tions licence fee scale announced.

83/78 23/8/83 G overnm ent m oves to clear broadcasting planning backlog.

83/79 23/8/83 D epartm ent to buy 150 earth stations fo r satellite program .

83/80 23/8/83 ABC m anagem ent resources to be im proved.

83/81 23/8/83 $289 m illio n fo r ABC in 1983-84.

83/82 23/8/83 New equipm en t to assist planning o f radio

frequency spectrum .

83/83 23/8/83 $100 000 earm arked fo r Public Broadcasting

Foundation w ork.

83/84 23/8/83 G overnm ent announces m u lticu ltu ra l television extension. 83/85 23/8/83 Changes to the Radio and Television Licence

Fees Act.

83/86 26/8/83 Canberra m u lticu ltu ra l television to start

on 14 October.

83/87 31/8/83 Satellite earth station testing to begin soon

at Innisfail.

83/88 31/8/83 M u lticu ltu ra l television service to tra n sm it

on UHF only.

83/89 6/9/83 M inister announces $2000 W orld C om m unications

Year Award.

83/90 7/8/83 UHF television stand to aid Canberra viewers.

83/91 7/8/83 New a p poin tm e nt to Telecom board announced.

83/92 9/9/83 A ustralia Post chairm an reappointed.

83/93 15/9/83 D epartm ent am ends radio log-keeping requirem ents.

106

No. Date Title

83/94 22/9/83 $100 m illio n South Pacific telecom m unica tions

project endorsed.

83/95 22/9/83 New radio frequency spectrum legislation

introduced.

83/96 26/9/83 ABC to televise final A m erica's

Cup race.

83/97 28/9/83 Satellite earth station testing to begin soon at

Port Hedland.

83/98 29/9/83 O pening o f ABC FM M aryborough postponed.

83/99 4/10/83 UHF television stand to go to Kippax Fair.

83/100 6/10/83 Television captioning fo r deaf people extended to Brisbane.

83/101 12/10/83 M inister expresses concern over 'unrealistic

expectations' on satellite.

83/102 13/10/83 M in iste r accepts Tribunal recom m endation fo llo w in g Foster Inquiry. 83/103 14/10/83 Excellent UHF reception likely, D epartm ent says.

83/104 14/10/83 ABC FM capital city netw ork to be com pleted in December.

83/105 17/10/83 M in iste r approves Telecom -run national

V ideotex service.

83/106 18/10/83 UHF television stand to go to G oulburn.

83/107 19/10/83 UHF television stand to go to Cooma.

83/108 20/10/83 G overnm ent endorses Telecom 's m onopoly position in telecom m unica tions.

83/109 28/10/83 U napproved cordless telephones causing interference.

83/110 31/10/83 A ustralian students w in prizes in W orld

A rt C om petition.

83/111 31/10/83 ABC FM M aryborough to open 5 Novem ber.

83/112 1/11/83 N ew guide to Australian broadcasting stations released.

83/113 10/11/83 2CN frequency change means better reception.

83/114 15/11/83 AU SSAT to rem ain separate com pany, M inister says.

83/115 15/11/83 G overnm ent to ask fo r p re lim in a ry RSTV proposals.

83/116 15/11/83 G overnm ent m oves to w iden country radio,

television choice.

83/117 15/11/83 G overnm ent introduces 'package' concept fo r satellite broadcasting.

83/118 18/11/83 M in iste r w elcom es start of m ulticultural

television.

83/119 21/11/83 Radio frequency spectrum usage

chart published.

Released by M r John Reeves(Lab, NT)

ABC FM D arwin to open on 2 December.

Released by M r G raem e Cam pbell (Lab, Kalgoorlie)

ABC FM Kalgoorlie to open on 2 December.

83/120 30/11/83 Scheme to bring m ore television and

FM radio services to rural areas.

83/121 6/12/83 B lu e p rin tfo r ethnic broadcasting developm ent sought fro m review.

83/122 8/12/83 M in iste r announces public broadcasting grants.

107

No. Date Title

83/123 19/12/83 M r George Slater to jo in Telecom.

83/124 20/12/83 D epartm ent investigating interference to VCRs. 83/125 21/12/83 New m em bers strengthen Broadcasting Tribunal. 83/126 21/12/83 A pplication s called fo r public broadcasting licences to serve A b origina l com m unities in Central Australia.

83/127 22/12/83 Form er Judge to head SBS Review Com m ittee. 83/128 22/12/83 Television spacing standard to be changed.

83/129 23/12/83 G overnm ent to review localism policy in

Australian broadcasting.

83/130 23/12/83 M inister approves television dual-sound

standard.

84/1 12/1/84 A m ateurs gain perm ission to tra n sm it in morse.

84/2 13/1/84 New station in ABC FM netw ork to open soon.

84/3 1/2/84 Telecom M anaging Director reappointed.

84/4 6/2/84 Departm ent appeals to farm ers to license radios.

84/5 7/2/84 G overnm ent stays w ith PAL system fo r ABC

satellite television.

84/6 8/2/84 SBS Review C om m ittee gets m ore tim e.

84/7 22/2/84 M inisters report on Telecom.

84/8 27/2/84 M inister issues RSTV guidelines.

84/9 2/3/84 Task Force established on A borigina l Broadcasting

and C om m unications.

84/10 8/3/84 Radio, television stations show strong

interest in extra licences.

84/11 12/3/84 Tow er w ork to im prove M elbourne m ulticultural

television reception.

84/12 15/3/84 Industrial relations expert appointed to

A ustralia Post.

84/13 15/3/84 G overnm ent launches independent review of

allegations against Telecom.

84/14 20/3/84 Eight new television stations to open

in self-help scheme.

84/15 22/3/84 Tribunal acted 'according to law ' w ith cigarette advertisem ents, M inister says.

84/16 26/3/84 Dual-sound television to start in Sydney

and M elbourne.

84/17 11/4/84 Q uieter and m ore efficient radio

operations introduced.

84/18 12/4/84 OTC Press release: Boost fo r Aust.

com m unications.

84/18 12/4/84 Campaign launched to stop unauthorised

radio operations.

84/19 17/4/84 M ountain to w n a w in n e r in self-help television.

84/20 19/4/84 Third com m ercial television station planned

fo r Perth.

84/21 27/4/84 Two new ABC FM stations to open in W A

and Victoria.

84/22 1/5/84 Television m ove w ill provide room fo r more

FM radio services.

84/23 2/5/84 Canberra art students to receive prizes.

108

No. Date Title

84/24 3/5/84 New tra n s m itte r to add pow er to Radio

A u stralia's broadcasting voice.

84/25 7/5/84 D ubbo area to be checked fo r unlicensed

radio operations.

84/26 10/5/84 M elbourne 'stron g co m p e tito r' as financial centre.

84/27 10/5/84 M in iste r outlines O lym pic radio, television coverage.

84/27 A 14/5/84 V ictorian art w inners to receive prizes.

84/27 B 16/5/84 Launceston area to be checked fo r unlicensed

radio operations.

84/28 18/5/84 Finley television interference under the m icroscope.

84 29 18/5/84 U nion official appointed to Special

Broadcasting Service.

84/30 22/5/84 D epartm ent to transfer 140 positions

to Canberra.

84/31 24/5/84 New ABC television tra n sla to r to

serve M erriw a.

84/32 25/5/84 New G ippsland ABC television

station to begin soon.

84/33 30/5/84 D epartm ent's subm ission to satellite inquiry

released.

84/34 6/6/84 M u lticu ltu ra l television com ing to Brisbane.

84/35 6/6/84 Earth station changes needed fo r AUSSAT's

ABC service.

84/36 8/6/84 S ydney/N ew castle television service

areas defined.

84/37 8/6/84 Tribunal given extension fo r satellite

in q u iry report.

84/38 11/6/84 Telephone instalm ent scheme fo r pensioners

announced.

84/39 12/6/84 Broadcasting Council appointm ents announced.

84/40 12/6/84 N ew arrangem ents instituted fo r broadcasting

courses and exam inations.

84/41 12/6/84 OTC chairm an is reappointed.

84/42 19/6/84 N ew radio equipm ent required to be fitted

fo r quiet base operations.

84/43 22/6/84 M u lticu ltu ra l television extends to W arburton.

84/44 22/6/84 M t Isa ABC FM station to open soon.

84/45 22/6/84 A lb a n y ABC FM station to open in July.

84/46 28/6/84 Consum ers w arned of possible interference

to VCRs.

84/47 29/6/84 UHF television stand to aid Brisbane viewers.