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Maritime College Act - Council of the Australian Maritime College - Report and financial statements, together with Auditor-General's Report - Year - 1984 (6th)


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The Parliament of the Commonwealth of Australia

AUSTRALIAN MARITIME COLLEGE

Annual Report of Council

1984

Presented 21 August 1985 Ordered to be printed 19 September 1985

Parliamentary Paper No. 320/1985

Australian Maritime College

ANNUAL REPORT OF COUNCIL 1984I

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© Commonwealth of Australia 1985

Design and artwork by Quy & Associates Launceston, Tasmania

Printed by Regal Press Launceston, Tasmania.

ISSN 0725-1319

2

Senator the lion Susan Ryan, Minister for Education, Parliament House, Canberra, ACT 2600.

Dear Minister,

In accordance with section 39 of the Maritime College Act 1978,1 have pleasure in presenting the sixth Annual Report of the Council of the Australian Maritime College for the period 1 January to 31 December 1984.

Yours sincerely,

EAL Connell, Chairman.

3

In November a ceremony was held to offlcially name the Swanson Building, the College's main administration and teaching building, in honour of Mr T B Swanson, CBE, Foundation Chairman of the College Council, October 1978 - December 1983. Assembled in front of the plaque, LtoR, the Chairman of Council, Mr FAL Connell, AM; MrT B Swanson, CBE; Mrs Swanson

CONTENTS

Page

Australian Maritime College 7

The Council 9

Sites and Buildings Development 11

Academic Development 13

Research and Associated Activities 15

Schools -Engineering 17

Fisheries 1 ®

Mautical Studies 1 9

College Services

9 1

Maritime Library

Specialist Programs and Resources Centre 7 1

Student Association 71

Appendices 1. Full-time Teaching and Senior Administrative Staff 23

2. College Statistics 3. Courses and Awards of the College 29

4. Students Completing Awards in 1 9 8 4 30

5. Prizes Awarded 32

6. Statutes and Rules 33

7. Visitors to the College 33

8. Donations 35

9. Freedom of Information Requests 35

Financial Statem ents 36

5

L

The dining room, Investigator Mall, Beauty Point

6

Australian Maritime College Establishment of the College During the late 1960's and early 1970's many representations were made by maritime industry interest groups for the establishment of advanced maritime training facilities in Australia. The resulting inquiries and

investigations culminated in the establishment in 1973 of a Commission of Inquiry into the Maritime Industry. The Commonwealth Government asked the

Commission, chaired by Mr Μ M Summers to report, as a matter of priority, on the training requirements of the industry, including the establishment of an Australian Merchant

Marine College. In its report in May 1974, the Commission concluded that training for the shipping and fishing industries was inadequate and recommended that the

Government should establish a comprehensive maritime college within the advanced education sector.

In late 1974 the Government accepted the Commission's advice and agreed to establish an Australian maritime college. This decision was given effect through the enactment of

preliminary legislation in 1976. A consequence of the legislation was the establishment of an Interim Council chaired by Mr T B Swanson, CBE, charged with

planning the new institution. The Maritime College Act 1978 proclaimed in October of that year, provided for the establishment of the Australian Maritime College as an

autonomous, national institution of tertiary education.

Between October 1978 and the end of 1984, the Commonwealth Government invested approximately $30 million in the

development of the College's Beauty Point and Mewnham campuses, including the provision of specialised teaching equipment such as vessels and simulators.

The College's first students enrolled in 1980. Through its three Schools of Engineering, Fisheries and nautical Studies, the College offers a wide range of accredited courses at

certificate to postgraduate diploma level. In addition a substantial number of short special purpose courses are conducted, mainly under the auspices of the Specialist

Programs and Resources Centre.

In 1984 enrolments in accredited courses totalled approximately 530. During the year over one thousand students attended short courses, generally of one week's duration.

Responsible Minister The statutory powers of direction of the Minister are set out in the Maritime College Act 1978 (as amended).

Functions, Powers and Objects of the College The Maritime College Act 1978 (as amended) states that the functions of the College arc:

(a) to conduct an institution for the provision of such maritime and maritime-related education and training as the Council, with the approval of the Minister, determines, or as the Minister requires, being

principally tertiary education for persons who wish to become, or are. otherwise engaged in connection with shipping or the fishing industry; (b) to use the facilities and resources of

the College to advance and develop knowledge and skills in the fields with which the College is concerned; (c) to award such degrees, diplomas and

certificates in relation to the passing of examinations or otherwise in relation to the education and training provided by the College as are provided for by the Statutes; (d) to consult and maintain liaison with

other institutions and authorities in Australia that are concerned with the provision of maritime education and training; and (e) to do anything incidental or conducive

to the performance of any of the preceding functions. (f) in pursuance of arrangements between the College and the Minister for

Transport, conduct on behalf of the Commonwealth - (i) short courses of maritime training; and

(ii) examinations and assessments for marine competency in accordance with the navigation Act 1912.

The powers of the College are described in the Act These include entering into contracts; erection of buildings; the occupation, use and control of any land or building owned or held

under lease by the Commonwealth and made available for the purposes of the College; employment of such staff as are necessary for the efficient performance of its functions;

accepting gifts, devises and bequests made to the College, whether on trust or otherwise, 7 and acting as trustee of moneys or other property vested in the College upon trust

Further Information Details of the operations and academic programs of the College are available from various publications produced by the College,

including the prospectus, School and special facility booklets, and course brochures.

Further information, including information about the College Act and Statutes enacted, may be obtained from the Information Officer, Australian Maritime College, PO Box 986, Launceston, Tasmania 7250, telephone (003) 260711.

Wyuna. the College's navigation and seamanship training vessel serving as the radio relay ship in the Sydney/Hobart yacht race 1984/85.

8

THE COUNCIL The Council met five times during the year, in March, May, July, September and Movember.

Members of Council as at 31 December 1984 Member ex officio

Capt D M Waters Principal

Members appointed by the Governor-General Mr I H Backler Chairman of the national Fishing Industry Training Committee

Mr J Bicknell Director, Marine Division of the Australian national Line

Capt W Bolitho

Miss M J Calder

Chairman, Australian national Line

Marine solicitor, honorary consultant to the Australian Law Reform Commission Review of Australian Admiralty Law

Mr FAL Connell, AM (Chairman) Mr A R Dailey

Past-President of the Australian Fishing Industry Council

Federal President (and Secretary, Victoria Branch) of the Australian Institute of Marine and Power Engineers

Mr P Eccles First Assistant Secretary, Marine Operations, Commonwealth Department of Transport

Mr J K Edwards, AO (Deputy Chairman)

Dr D D Francois

President, LBS Statewide Bank and a former General Manager of the Port of Launceston Authority Executive Director (Fisheries), Hew South Wales Department of Agriculture

Mr P Geraghty

Mr J B Prescott

Federal Secretary, Seamen's Union of Australia General Manager Transport, Broken Hill Proprietory Company Limited

Capt F G Ross Master of the vessel John Hunter and President of the Merchant Service Guild of Australia

Members appointed by the Council Mr D J Crockett Accountant, Australian Maritime College

Mr P Curwell Industrial Officer, Professional Radio and Electronics Institute of Australasia

Prof P T Fink, CB, CBE, FTS

Chief Defence Scientist, Department of Defence

Mr DA Gillies Marine Superintendent, CSIRO Marine Laboratories, and past Chairman of the 1TSW Branch of the Institute of Marine Engineers

CaptW Spencer Manager, Shipping and navigation Division Department of Marine and Harbours, Western Australia

Capt J W Spiers Chairman of the Australasian Steamship Owners' Federation, and General Manager of Associated Steamships Pty Ltd

Members elected by the teaching staff Dr J K Cannell Head, School of Engineering, Australian Maritime College

Mr S B Lewam Senior Lecturer, School of nautical Studies

Member elected by the students Mr Γ R Stein Student, Australian Maritime College

Membership Changes The term of appointment of Dr D D Francois expired on 9 December 1984. Council is grateful for the considerable assistance to the College given by Dr Francois and wishes to record its appreciation for his interest and substantial input

10 The flume tank, part of the School of

Fisheries complex at Beauty Point

SITES AND BUILDINGS DEVELOPMENT Two major works were undertaken in 1984. Alterations to the Specialist Programs and

Resources Centre to accommodate the ship-handling simulator were undertaken during the year in accordance with the general development program for the College. The work, which was integral to the

installation and design of the particular simulator configuration and equipment requirements, cost $400,000. The flume tank, part of the School of Fisheries complex at

Beauty Point, was commissioned in February, although development of the facility continued into the year. The tank was officially opened by the Chairman of Council,

Mr F A L Connell, AM, in July, marking the completion of the $2.8 million School of Fisheries and flume tank project.

Planning for the construction of a permanent Maritime Library building proceeded in anticipation of funds becoming available during the 1985/87 triennium. In keeping

with the approved capital works program, during 1984 the Library was accommodated in a demountable building. The 300 square metre building which cost $100,000 to construct and fit-out will be used as classroom space when vacated by the Library.

Several minor works were undertaken during the year, mainly the refurbishment of existing buildings and essential site works.

In 1984 the College received grants for three Community Employment Program projects:

(a) Overhaul of the training vessel Stephen Brown, a 67 metre former bulk carrier now permanently moored at the College's seamanship centre at Beauty

Point. Four people were employed for thirty weeks at a total project cost of $41,219.

(b) Restoration of the stables at historic Newnham Flail. Eight people were employed over a period of twelve to forty weeks at a total project cost of $ 154,955.

(c) Flume tank - a technical assistant was employed for fifty two weeks to assist in the development of flume tank gear at a total project cost of $16,000.

A further project, a recreational centre to be located at Beauty Point, was approved in November under the Community Employment Program. The centre has been designed for use by College students, stall and the local community.

1 1

H ydrographic su rv e y in g exercise: o b se rvin g b e a r in g a n d d i s t a n c e

ACADEMIC DEVELOPMENT During 1984 courses continued to be offered and new course developments proceeded,

meeting the objective for which the College was established as the national centre for maritime and maritime related education and training.

Courses at graduate diploma level in fisheries Technology and Hydrographic Surveying were conducted for the first time. It is anticipated that graduates from these courses will readily find employment in their

respective industries.

The Minister approved under sub section 7(a) of the Maritime College Act 1978 the introduction by the College of the following courses:

Bachelor of Engineering (Maritime) Bachelor of Applied Science (Marine Engineering) Bachelor of Applied Science (Nautical

Studies) Bachelor of Applied Science (Fisheries Technology) Graduate Diploma in Business (Shipping

Practice) Graduate Diploma in Advanced Marine Engineering Management

An assessment panel established by the Commonwealth Institutions Accreditation Committee for Advanced Education (CIACAE) visited the College in November 1984 to

examine a submission for accreditation of the Bachelor of Applied Science (Nautical Studies). The ClACAE's recommendations to the Minister to accredit the course are expected to be available early in 1985.

Preparation of accreditation submissions in respect of the other courses approved by the Minister was initiated for consideration by the CIACAE in 1985.

In addition the Minister approved the reaccreditation of the Diploma of Applied Science (Nautical Science).

The growth of student numbers in previous years continued into 1984 with an increase from 303 equivalent full time students in 1983 to 342 in 1984. It is anticipated that

about 390 equivalent full time students will enrol in 1985 which, while accounting for fewer cadetships likely to be offered by Un­ shipping industry in 1985, reflects increases

in the number of direct entry students expected to enrol in the new courses.

Demand for places on fisheries courses continued to increase. For the first time the Certificate ofTechnology in Fisheries Operations course had two intakes of

students (March and July). The College is confident of a similar demand in 1985. The Graduate Diploma in Fisheries Technology,

which was introduced in 1984, was fully subscribed.

The growth in previous years in short courses and short course participants also continued into 1984. Courses were conducted interstate and at sea as well as on the College

campuses in response to the needs of shipping and the fishing industry.

Detailed statistics on student enrolments are included in Appendix 2. Students completing their courses in 1984 and qualifying for

awards made by the College are listed by course in Appendix 4.

13

Shooting a net in the flume tank from the net loft

Λ fish trawl in the tank viewed through the observation window

RESEARCH AMD ASSOCIATED ACTIVITIES The Council of the College continued to support requests from staff members to

undertake research, consulting, and related projects, provided that this work was maritime or maritime related, was appropriate to the College's academic and

professional standing, and that teaching duties could be satisfactorally maintained.

In October 1984 the College's research and consultancy company, AMC Search Limited, a company limited by guarantee was incorporated. The company is similar in

intent and function to companies established by many other Australian tertiary educational institutions. During 1984 College staff conducted several research and consultancy

exercises including projects utilising the College's specialist facilities such as the flume tank. In future the College's research and consultancy work will be co-ordinated

through the company.

Two professional experience programs were approved and funded by Council in May 1984 in accordance with government guidelines. Principal Lecturer in Nautical Studies, Mr P

Muirhead, was granted leave to study the development, application-evaluation and validity of ship simulator and micro-computer programs related to ascertaining the practical skill levels of Certificate of Competency

candidates and other students. Mr Muirhead's program is being carried out at the University of Wales' Institute of Science and Technology. Lecturer in Fisheries, Mr R Wawrowski, was

granted leave to study the principles and application of computer assisted hydroacoustic echo integration assessment techniques in the calculation of biomass and

related matters in fisheries technology. Mr Wawrowski's program was carried out at BioSonic Incorporated in Seattle, USA, in conjunction with the University of Seattle. In

addition, eight members of staff pursued post graduate courses under the College's Staff Development Program. The courses were mainly leading to masters degrees in

engineering and science.

During the year, many staff were involved in community, industrial, and external educational activities. In a personal capacity, the Principal served on the Governing Council

of the United Nations World Maritime University in Sweden. He also served on a number of committees including the CS1KO Tasmanian State Committee and the National

Fishing Industry Training Committee. Tin- Principal participated in the Third International Marine Simulator Forum, lectured as visiting professor to the World

Maritime University and gave an occasional address to a graduation ceremony at the University of Tasmania. The Head of the School of Nautical Studies, Mr P McGovern,

and Senior Lecturer, Mr B Lewarn, continued to serve as Deputy Chairman and committee member respectively on the International Cargo Handling Coordination Association. Tasmanian Section. Mr Lewarn also served as

a committee member of the Chartered Institute of Transport, Tasmanian Branch. Head of the School of Fisheries, Mr A Carver, continued his membership of the National and Tasmanian Fishing Industry Training Committees, and the Tasmanian College of Advanced Education's Course Advisory

Committee on Aquaculture.

During the year the College hosted several seminars relating to the fishing and maritime industries. Members of staff contributed to these seminars as well as presenting papers

to interstate and international seminars. T he papers, which reflected the considerable expertise and knowledge which the College offers in the maritime and maritime related

fields, dealt with topics relating to ship and engine room simulation, marine engineering, and fisheries technology.

15

Radar Maintenance class

SCHOOLS School o f E n g in eerin g Course and syllabus planning was completed in 1984 for submission for accreditation

approval in 1985 of the four year Bachelor of Applied Science (Marine Engineering) course. This degree course, which will replace the former Diploma of Engineering (Marine), will

cater for non cadet students who wish to pursue shore based careers as well as cadet students planning seagoing careers. Preparation continued for the development of a Bachelor of Engineering (Maritime) course and modules for a Graduate Diploma in Advanced Marine Engineering Management.

Seven students successfully completed their studies for the Associate Diploma in Maritime Electronics. They are the first graduates from this course. Official recognition of both the

Associate Diploma in Marine Radiocommunication and the Associate Diploma in Maritime Electronics was granted in November by the Australian Institute of

Engineering Associates for Graduate Membership of the Institute.

Other developments of particular interest in the School included:

(a) The establishment of an ATS satellite communications terminal station linking the AMC with 50 similar stations in Australia and the Pacific region through

the Kangaroo and Peacesat networks.

(b) Further progress in the establishment of a comprehensive microprocessor laboratory and a control laboratory.

(c) The design and construction of a gas blending facility for the thermodynamics laboratory. The facility will enable research to be conducted into alternative gaseous fuels for diesel engines and will

facilitate investigation into the combustion properties of gas mixtures.

(d) A new computer controlled main ship's transmitter/receiver, STC Marine STR950, was installed in the marine communication laboratory. A Racal Decca

ARPA automatic radar plotting aid was fitted into the radar maintenance laboratory for development of radar maintenance and ARPA surveying

courses.

During the year staff of the School presented papers at seminars held by professional associations and institutions including the Australasian Corrosion Association, the Royal

Institute of Naval Architects, and the Australian Institute of Energy.

Students who qualified for awards during 1984 are named in Appendix 4.

Testing a steam turbine

17

School o f F isheries During 1984 the School of Fisheries continued the development and introduction of courses in response to the needs of the

fishing industry.

The Graduate Diploma course in Fisheries Technology was offered for the first time in 1984. The course attracted eleven students, all of whom held first degrees in life sciences or mathematics. The second semester of the course was devoted to project work. Four of

the group undertook their project outside the ANC with the following organisations: CSIRO's Division of Food Research, the Bureau of Agricultural Economics, the Tasmanian

Fisheries Development Authority and the Department of Primary Industry, Canberra.

Course and syllabus planning was completed for the Bachelor of Applied Science (Fisheries Technology) course which will be submitted for accreditation approval in 1985. The

course is designed around a threefold core of fisheries technology, fisheries biology and seafood technology and will replace the

existing Diploma of Applied Science (Fisheries Technology). The Schools of Engineering and nautical Studies will be involved in providing subject teaching for this course.

All Certificate and Diploma students undertook regular training cruises on the fisheries training vessel Bluefin. Fishing methods demonstrated included demersal, pelagic and prawn trawling, scallop dredging

and trawling, use of quadrupal prawn gear, droplining and squid jigging. Most of the demersal trawling was conducted on the east coast of Tasmania. The techniques of squid jigging and prawn trawling were demonstrated in Bass Strait. Bluefin was also

used in conjunction with a Fisheries Officers' course, demonstrating various fishing methods. In September, a group of second year Diploma students travelled on Bluefin to

"Seadays" in Melbourne. The Education Editor of the Melbourne "Age" and a photographer accompanied an October voyage conducted for fourth year Diploma students. A major feature article, based on the voyage, illustrated with colour photographs subsequently appeared in the "Age" Saturday Extra section.

The flume tank, which went into operation in February, was used extensively throughout the year for award course students, including use for project work by Graduate Diploma

and Diploma students. A total of 90 fishermen, from all major Australian and New 18 Zealand trawl fisheries, attended the College

for one week short courses in prawn or fish trawling. These students were enthusiastic about the potential of the tank as a teaching and developmental tool. In many cases, attitudes and opinions cherished over years of fishing were overturned in a matter of

hours. The tank was also used for the Fisheries Officers' course. Discussions were initiated with the Royal Australian Navy, the Department of Primary Industry, State fisheries authorities, and commercial fishing companies, regarding use of the tank for developmental work.

Equipment acquired by the School in 1984 included additional rescue craft for Bluefin and acoustic mensuration equipment for carrying out instrumented sea trials. Various items of equipment were also purchased for seafood handling courses.

A fisheries graduate diploma student using a spectrophotometer to assist in the analysis o f the glycogen content of oysters The School organised and hosted in July a

three day seminar The Australian Fishing Industry Today and Tomorrow', attended by about 75 representatives of all sectors of the fishing industry. Staff presented papers at the National Prawn Seminar at Kooralbyn, Queensland, in October. The Federal Minister for Primary Industry visited the School in November on the occasion of the announcement of CEP funding for the recreational facility at Beauty Point A group of students enrolled in the Associate Diploma in Food Handling at Hawkesbury Agricultural College (NSW) visited the AMC in May to study fishing technology. During their one week stay the students undertook a short voyage on Bluefin.

Students who qualified for awards during 1984 are named in Appendix 4.

School of n a u tic a l S tu d ies Student numbers in the School in all courses, including ratings training, were greater than in 1983. The School also conducted a very successful short course program throughout the year offering courses in topics ranging from survival and cargo handling for Antarctic expeditioners to ship stability, survival craft proficiency, and human relations and management for ships' officers. Courses for Customs Officers and students wishing to

complete appropriate Certificate of Competency qualifications were also conducted.

Code flag instruction

During the year a course development team comprising College staff and industry representatives assisted the School in the preparation of an accreditation submission for the one year Graduate Diploma in Business (Shipping Practice). The course has been designed to produce skilled, commercially orientated managers capable of operating successfully in the shipping and trading areas at local and international levels. Subject to accreditation approval by the Minister, it is planned to offer the course during 1985.

The navigation and seamanship training vessel Wyuna was used extensively throughout 1984, undertaking an increased number of voyages for nautical studies,

marine engineering, marine radiocommunication and ratings students. Voyages were made to the Furneaux Island group in Bass Strait, and eastern and southern Tasmania. In June, a ten day voyage was undertaken to Sydney and Broken Bay.

Over the Christmas New Year period 1984/85, Wyuna, manned by a volunteer AMC staff and student crew, served as the radio relay ship in the Sydney/Hobart yacht race.

Wyuna's radio room was equipped with satellite communication gear and manned by

an AWA crew which included one of the AMC s first graduates in marine radiocommunication, Miss Heather Yamton. At an AWA function held in Hobart to mark

the end of the race, the Commodore of the Sydney Cruising Yacht Club and the General Manager of AWA praised the Wyuna crew whom they described as having contributed to "exemplary and professional communications". Participation of Wyuna in the race was particularly beneficial in bringing to the attention of the Australian community the work of the College and the high professional standards for which it aims. The College is grateful to the sponsors of the race, in particular AWA, for funding Wyuna s participation as radio relay vessel in the race.

In addition to normal training programs, during the year testing of life saving methods and appliances was conducted. A new enclosed lifeboat underwent extensive trials

in connection with the revised Chapter Three SOLAS (Safety of Life at Sea) regulations. The College's report on these trials will be sent to

the Department of Transport in 1985. Teaching equipment developments included minor modifications to Wyuna and establishment of a sea transport centre. The centre incorporates "STRATSHIP" a computer-based shipping management game which simulates the financial consequences of running a fleet of ships in "real world" conditions.

Staff of the School were actively involved throughout the year in seminars conducted at the College, including "Australia and the law of the Sea", "Cargo Security and Damage"

(annual ICHCA seminar), and the Maritime Studies Conference. Speakers at the seminars were drawn from throughout Australia and overseas and included

Prof I Shearer, University of HSW, Dr V Prescott of the University of Melbourne, Miss M Calder, member of Council and honorary consultant to the Australian Law Reform Commission

Review of Australian Admiralty t,aw, and Dr D S Aldwinkle of Lloyds Register of Shipping. Senior Lecturer in nautical Studies, Mr R Haigh attended by invitation a course held in Paris in August and September on

"Aids to Sea navigation in Approaches and Berthing". The course was held by Agense pour la Co-operation Technique Industrielle Economique (ACTIM). Travel and accommodation costs were met by the

French Government.

Students who qualified for awards during 1984 are named in Appendix 4. 19

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COLLEGE SERVICES M aritim e Library Consistent with the ongoing development of the College, service to students and staff

provided by the Library continued to increase in 1984: loans increased from 9541 in 1983 to 125616 in 1984, and 4335 volumes were

added to the collection. During the year interlibrary loans and requests for literature searches on the DIALOG and AUSINET systems to which the College has on-line access also increased.

The development of the Beauty Point campus led to a demand for more publications and library services previously available only at the Newnham campus. A member of the Library staff is now in attendance at Beauty Point once each week. Beauty Point students also have the opportunity to use the Library when attending classes at Mewnham.

S p e c ia lis t P ro g ra m s an d R e so u rc e s C en tre The Centre has special responsibility for the College's training simulator and computer facilities, the Fire Fighting Centre and medical and first aid training.

During 1984 the Centre co-ordinated arrangements for most short courses. The following short courses were offered by the College for the first time in 1984:

Advanced navigation and ARPA Simulator Medical Training for Shipmasters Advanced Fire Prevention and Control on Board Ship

Basic Fire Fighting Stability Refresher Stability Techniques

Longitudinal Strength

The last three courses together with the courses on Inert Qas/Crude Oil Washing and Human Relations and Management for Ships' Officers were conducted at interstate

locations.

Basic Tanker Safety and Petroleum Tanker Familiarisation courses were conducted at sea by staff of the Centre.

Development of the Centre's existing specialist facilities continued through the year as follows:

(a) The diesel engine simulator was upgraded with a new PDF 11/44 central processor to replace the original PDP 11/34 in order to increase computer capacity; the simulator control programs were rewritten. Additional navigational

aids, new exercise areas and improved exercise recording facilities were added to the radar simulator. These

developments have greatly improved the performance and reliability of the College's first simulator installation.

(b) The central computer facility was enhanced with the addition of new languages - Fortran 77 and an updated version of Pascal. Various mathematics

packages were introduced and an evaluation was made into using the facility as a central wordprocessor. Student use of the facility increased throughout the year.

Various improvements to the Firefighting Centre at Bell Bay were made during the year. This facility, which is operated in association with local industry, provided valuable support

to firefighting services when a major fire occurred at a nearby factory during the year.

S tu d e n t A ssociation The AMC Student Association enjoyed an active and successful year. It continued to

promote the interests of students at the College, mainly through social, sporting and recreational activities. Lifesaving, canoe,

gliding, weight training, basketball, soccer and radio clubs were particularly well supported. Membership of the Association is voluntary and is open to all full-time students

at the College.

A facilities fee is payable to the College by all students upon enrolment. These fees are then made available to the Association to provide amenities and services for all students, whether members of the Association or not During 1984 a part time

office assistant was appointed to help with the Association's administration, particularly in financial matters.

APPENDICES Full-Time T each in g a n d Append* 1

S enior A d m in is tra tiv e S ta ff * .« 3 n u > w 1. Full-Time Teaching Staff School of Nautical Studies Specialist Programs and Resources Centre

Head of School Principal Lecturers

Senior Lecturers

Lecturers

Principal Tutor Tutors

P McGovern S L Horscroft P Μ P Muirhead R Haigh

S B Lewam A J Wilson A G N Crombie P S Faulkner

E L J Frost G H Goldsteen D J Harrod L B Piper

M R Renilson M G D Webb A Batey P Ashford D C Cameron

R E Massey P E Rudziewicz

Head of Centre Senior Lecturer Lecturer

R L Tasker I Smith Μ O Gyles

2. Senior Administrative Staff Principal Registrar Bursar

Librarian (Maritime Library)

D M Waters B Galloway N R Thomas C M Mallitt

School of Fisheries

Head of School Senior Lecturer Lecturers

Principal Tutor

W E A Carver JA Boyes F S M Chopin M G King

R Wawrowski J T Derrick

School of Engineering

Head of School Principal Lecturers

Senior Lecturers

Lecturers

J K Cannell C Bdagger E Mackinnon M J Collinson

J J Seaton I R Buckland D B Butler D R Edwards S A Gottschalk

Μ H Hook J Nash A B RTuff R R O Vervoon

A J Weddle

Appendix 2

COLLEGE STATISTICS

1. Full Time Staff As at 31 December 1984

Teaching Staff

Heads of Schools 3

Principal Lecturers 5

Senior Lecturers 7

Lecturers 21

Tutors 6

Technical Staff

Vessel Crew 7

Other 17

Library Staff

Professional 2

Other 4

Administration Staff

Maintenance and Other Total

42

24

6

31

7

110

24

2 . Full-Time Student Enrolments in 1984 (i) BY YEAR OF COURSE (actual student enrolments)

COURSE YR1 YR2 YR3 YR4 TOTAI

Graduate Diploma in Hydrographic Surveying 3 Graduate Diploma in Fisheries Technology 11 1 1

Diploma of Applied Science (nautical Science) 29 25 33 23 110

Diploma of Engineering (Marine) 24 26 22 19 91

Diploma of Applied Science (Fisheries Technology) 7 13 0 9 29

Associate Diploma in Marine Radiocommunication & Associate Diploma in Maritime Electronics 26 18 44

Certificate of Technology in Fisheries Operations 47 16 7 70

Miscellaneous - nautical Studies 57 57

Miscellaneous - Fisheries 5 5

Radar Maintenance 13 13

Ratings Training (Full) 93 93

TOTALSTUDEnTS 315 98 62 51 526

(ii) BY YEAR OF COURSE (equivalent full-time students)

COURSE

Graduate Diploma in Hydrographic Surveying Graduate Diploma in Fisheries Technology

YR1 YR2 YR3 YR4 TOTAL

3 3

11 11

Diploma of Applied Science (Nautical Science) 18 16 21 23 77

Diploma of Engineering (Marine) 27 28 6 20 80

Diploma of Applied Science (Fisheries Technology) Associate Diploma in Marine Radiocommunication & 4 13 0 9 26

Associate Diploma in Maritime Electronics 26 18 44

Certificate of Technology in Fisheries Operations 24 8 4 35

Miscellaneous - Nautical Studies 29 29

Miscellaneous - Fisheries 1 1

Radar Maintenance 7 7

Ratings Training (Full) 31 31

TOTAL EFTS 178 82 30 52 342

(iii) BY STATE (actual student enrolments)

COURSE NSW Vic Qld SA WA Tas ACT NT O/S TOTAL

Graduate Diploma in Hydrographic Surveying 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 3

Graduate Diploma in Fisheries Technology Diploma of Applied

1 2 1 0 3 2 0 0 2 11

Science (Nautical Science) 33 19 27 5 10 14 0 1 1 110

Diploma of Engineering (Marine) Diploma of Applied 38 17 13 4 8 9 1 0 1 91

Science (Fisheries Technology) 4 3 6 2 6 4 0 0 4 29

Associate Diploma in Marine Radio­ communication 8e Associate Diploma

in Maritime Electronics 11 3 6 4 5 12 1 0 2 44

Certificate of Technology in Fisheries Operations 14 11 17 7 8 12 1 0 0 70

Miscellaneous - Nautical Studies Miscellaneous -

6 9 9 1 14 10 0 1 7 57

Fisheries 0 0 0 0 0 5 0 0 0 5

Radar Maintenance Ratings Training

8 1 1 1 0 2 0 0 0 13

(Full) 45 14 13 4 14 3 0 0 0 93

TOTALS 160 79 94 28 69 74 3 2 17 526

26

(iv) BY SEX

COURSE MALE

Graduate Diploma in Hydrographic Surveying 3

Graduate Diploma in Fisheries Technology 11

Diploma of Applied Science (nautical Science) 107

Diploma of Engineering (Marine) 91

Diploma of Applied Science (Fisheries Technology) 28

Associate Diploma in Marine Radiocommunication & Associate Diploma in Maritime Electronics 40

Certificate of Technology in Fisheries Operations 66

Miscellaneous - nautical Studies 56

Miscellaneous - Fisheries 5

Radar Maintenance 13

Ratings Training (Full) 92

TOTALSTUDEnTS 512

(v) OVERSEAS STUDEnTS - BY ORIGin

Fiji 2

Hong Kong 1

India 1

Korea 1

Malaysia 1

new Zealand 2

Singapore 2

Solomon Islands 3

T onga 1

T uvalu 2

U.SA 1

TOTAL OVERSEAS STUDEnTS

FEMALE

1

4 4

1 0 0 1

14

o o i o o

3. Short Course Enrolments in 1984 Course Offerings Participants

Advanced Fire Prevention and Control on Board Ship 3 32

Advanced navigation and ARPA Simulator 4 23

Barge Handling for Antarctic Expeditioners 1 19

Basic Fire Fighting 5 57

Basic Petroleum Tanker Safety 7 222

Basic Radar 5 49

Bridge Teamwork 1 6

Cargo Loading for ATtARE 1 11

Communications Procedures - Antarctic Expeditioners 1 10

Elements of Shipboard Safety 2 30

Fir e Fighting Command 1 13

Fire Fighting for APiARE 2 21

Fire Prevention and Control 6 64

First Aid at Sea 3 38

Hazardous Goods 1 13

Human Relations and Management for Ships' Officers 6 74

Inert Gas/Crude Oil Washing 3 39

Liquefied Gas Tanker Safety 1 21

Liquefied Gas Tanker Safety Familiarisation 4 49

Longitudinal Strength 3 21

Magnetic Compass Compensation (Restricted) 1 9

Marine Radar Surveying 1 7

Medical Training for Shipmasters 1 13

Petroleum Tanker Discharge Safety 1 13

Petroleum Tanker Familiarisation 6 197

Petroleum Tanker Safety 2 29

Proficiency in Survival Craft 11 129

Radar Simulator 3 19

Sea Survival for ATtARE 1 11

Stability Refresher 3 27

Stability Techniques 4 22

Unmanned Machinery Spaces Operation 1 6

Totals 95 1294

The above figures include a total of 228 award course students who under took the following courses:

Advanced Fire Prevention and Control on Board Ship Advanced navigation and ARPA Simulator Basic Radar

Elements of Shipboard Safety Fire prevention and Control First Aid at Sea Human Relations and Management for

Ships' Officers Liquefied Gas Tanker Safety Medical Training for Shipmasters Petroleum Tanker Safety Proficiency in Survival craft Radar Simulator

Appendix 3

C ourses a n d A w ards of th e College SCHOOL. OF EriGIMEERiriG Graduate Diploma in Advanced Marine Engineering Management

Bachelor of Engineering (Maritime) Bachelor of Applied Science (Marine Engineering) Diploma of Engineering (Marine)

Associate Diploma in Marine Radiocommunication Associate Diploma in Maritime Electronics Certificate of Competency Preparatory

Studies

SCHOOL OF FISHERIES Graduate Diploma in Fisheries Technology Bachelor of Applied Science (Fisheries Technology)

Diploma of Applied Science (Fisheries Technology) Certificate of Technology in Fisheries Operation Certificate of Competency Preparatory

Studies

SCHOOL OF HAUTICAL STUDIES Graduate Diploma in Hydrographic Surveying Graduate Diploma in Business (Shipping

Practice) Bachelor of Applied Science (nautical Studies) Diploma of Applied Science (nautical

Science) Certificate of Competency Preparatory Studies SHORT COURSES

Advanced Fire Prevention and Control on Board Ship Advanced navigation and ARPA Simulator Advanced Petroleum Tanker Safety

Automatic Radar Plotting Aids Barge Handling for Antarctic Expeditioners Basic Fire Fighting Basic Petroleum Tanker Safety

Basic Radar Bridge Teamwork Business Management for Fishermen Cargo Loading for A1SARE Chemical/Gas Tanker Safety

Communications Procedures - Antarctic Expeditioners Elements of Shipboard Safety Fire Fighting Command Fire Fighting for AHARE 1 Fire Prevention and Control

First Aid at Sea

Fishery Officers Fish Handling and Processing Fishing Technology (Trawl) Fishing Vessel Hydraulics

Fishing Vessel Refrigeration Grain Loading Hazardous Goods

Human Relations Si Management for Ships Officers Hydroacoustic Fish Detection Inert Gas/Crude Oil Washing

Instrumentation and Control Introductory Fisheries Liquefied Gas Tanker Safety Liquefied Gas Tanker Safety Familiarisation Longitudinal Strength Magnetic Compass Compensation (Full) Magnetic Compass Compensation

(Restricted) Management for Offshore Industry Marine Diesel Operation Refresher Course Marine Automatic Radar Plotting Aid

Surveying Marine Electronics Marine Radar Surveying Medical Safety for Abalone Divers Medical Training for Shipmasters

Morse Communication Net Making and Mending net Repair and Maintenance Petroleum Tanker Discharge Safety

Petroleum Tanker Familiarisation Petroleum Tanker Safety Pilotage with Radar Prawn Trawl Gear Design & Operation

Proficiency in Seamanship Proficiency in Survival Craft Radar and Sonar Radar Maintenance

Radar Observer Radar Refresher Radar Simulator Radiotelephony Refresher/Familiarisation

Radiotelephone Operators General Certificate Radiotelephone Operators Restricted Certificate

Ratings Training Safety for Fishermen Sea Survival for AMARE Shipwright Retraining

Small Boat Radar Operator Stability Refresher Stability Techniques Trawl Gear Design & Operation

Unmanned Machinery Spaces Operation 29

Appendix 4

S tu d e n ts Com pleting C ourses in 1984

Diploma of Engineering (Narine) Marcello Bronzin Gregory Collinson David Colin Crane ■ Mark Stewart Drane

Gordon James Gore Keith Wayne Hoffman Errol James Milevskiy Jeffrey John Moloney

David Ross Peberdy Allan David Schwartz David l.eslie Smith William Gibson Smith

* with Distinction Associate Diploma in Narine Radiocommunication Ian Gregory Balmer

Graham Brian Collis David William Duncan Kim Harrington Samuelu Penitala Teo

Associate Diploma in Naritime Electronics Shawn Patrick Bulmer Foley Hugh lain Forehead

Alan Andrew Julian David Alan Morton * Ashley James Roach Bryn Edward Williams

* with Distinction Endorsement in Naritime Electronics to the Associate Diploma in Narine Radiocommunication

Peter Francis Pickernell

Graduate Diploma in Fisheries Technology David Robert Burford Robin William Chappell

Martin Lewis Exel Martin Leonard Holtz Andrew Laurence James McDermott Mark Gerald Norman Grant Pullen Hussein Bin Abdul Rahman Mark James Riddell

Phillip Charles Stewart

Diploma of Applied Science (Fisheries Technology) Rolf Clifford Michael Charles Courtney

Peter Maurice Duncan Timothy Owen Mirabella Robert William Scharkie Timothy Francis Stackhouse

Certificate of Technology in Fisheries Operations Mark Bell Andrew Michael Birch

Raymond John Gleeson Julie Maree McNamara

Graduate Diploma in Efydrographic Surveying Thomas James Blyth Peter Kierath

Michael John Ward

Diploma of Applied Science (Nautical Science) Joseph Alexander Cowie Ian William Dalgleish

Steven William Hall Alex Huntir Fuata PeneJione

Ian Andrew Loveland Bruce Boyd McMinn Matthew John Robinson Brett Cameron Shepherd Gregory John Sinclair William Austin Spicer Gregory Rolf Tonnison Anthony Gerard Tuckett Jacobus Francis Van Breda Joseph Pierre Van Breda

Other Award Courses Radar Naintenance Certificate John Eifion Davies Peter Edwin Fogg

John Frederick Greenwood David John Hawksworth Harry John Howell Roger Alan MEtntosh

Norbert Elgin Trupp Vasilios Valsamis

Appendix 5

Prizes A w arded fo r 1984

TITLE OF AWARD ELIGIBLE STUDENTS RECIPIENT

Solomon Bros. Award - Safety All courses •

Solomon Bros. Award - Best Practical Seaman

Diploma of Applied Science (Nautical Science) - Year 1 '

Solomon Bros. Award - Leadership

Diploma of Applied Science (Nautical Science) - Year 1

The Capt. Thomas Swanson Prize Diploma of Applied Science (Nautical Science) - Years 1, 2 & 3

TIMS Worcester' Memorial Award Diploma of Applied Science (Nautical Science) - Year 3 P R Smith

SATS General Botha' Award Diploma of Applied Science (Nautical Science) - Year 3 D J Dow

navigation Proficiency Award (Australian Institute of navigation) Diploma of Applied Science (Nautical Science) - Year 4

1 A Loveland

Company of Master Mariners of Australia nautical Science Award Diploma of Applied Science (Nautical Science) - Year 4

BC Winn

TIMS Conway- Prize Diploma of Applied Science

(Nautical Science) - Year 4 1 A Loveland

BLIP Sea Transport Prize Diploma of Applied Science

(Nautical Science) - Year 4 P E J De Guingand

Seamen's Union of Australia Prize Deck Ratings' Training K D Williams

Seamen's Union of Australia Prize Engine Room Ratings' Training R Billingham

The Capt. Thomas Swanson Prize Diploma of Engineering (Marine) - Year 3 B G Groves

Institute of Marine Engineers, Sydney Branch, W W Marriner Award Diploma of Engineering (Marine) - Year 1

T P W Peh

Institute of Marine Engineers, South Australia Branch Diploma of Engineering (Marine) - Year 2

S Marriott

Institute of Marine Engineers, Victoria Branch Diploma of Engineering (Marine) - Year 3

Institute of Marine Engineers, Newcastle Branch Diploma of Engineering (Marine) - Year 4

Institute of Marine Engineers, Australia-New Zealand Division, London Council

Diploma of Engineering (Marine) - Year 4 M S Drane

Hamworthy Engineering Prize Diploma of Engineering (Marine) - Year 4 G J Gore

BHP Prize for Proficiency in Marine Technology

Diploma of Engineering (Marine) - Year 4 G J Gore

AW\ Prize - Best First Year Student

Associate Diploma in Marine Radiocommunication - Year 1 N WCavill

AWA Prize - Best Qualifying Student

Associate Diploma in Marine Radiocommunication - Year 2 AJ Roach

AWA Prize - Best Radio Communicator

Associate Diploma in Marine Radiocommunication - Year 2 D W Duncan

Tasman Boat Brokers Prize Graduate Diploma in

Fisheries Technology

A L J McDermott

The Capt. Thomas Swanson Prize Diploma of Fisheries Science (Fisheries Technology) - Year 3

A. Raptis & Sons Award Diploma of Applied Science

(Fisheries Technology) - Year 4

T O Mirabella

Geo. Kinnear & Sons Net and Rope Work Award

Certificate of Technology in Fisheries Operations - Year 1, Semester 1

D R Whennen

Geo. Kinnear A? Sons Net and Rope Work Award

Certificate of Technology in Fisheries Operation - Year 1, Semester 2

A C Puglisi

Professional Fisherman Prize Certificate of Technology in Fisheries Operations - Year 1, Semester 1

A B Minks

Professional Fisherman Prize Certificate of Technology in Fisheries Operations - Year 1, Semester 2

M R Pointon

Professional Fisherman Prize Certificate of Technology in Fisheries Operations - Year 2

S J Carver

Professional Fisherman Prize Certificate of Technology in Fisheries Operations - Year 3

A M Birch

* denotes recipient yet to be determined

2 . For 1983

The following prizes were awarded later in 1984 in respect of the 1983 Academic year and are in addition to the recipients listed in the 1983 Annual Report

TITLE OF AWARD ELIGIBLE STUDENTS RECIPIENT

Institute of Marine Engineers Victoria Branch

Institute of Marine Engineers Newcastle Branch

The Capt Thomas Swanson Prize

The Capt Thomas Swanson Prize

Diploma of Engineering (Marine) - Year 3

Diploma of Engineering (Marine) - Year 4

Diploma of Applied Science (Nautical Science) - Years 1, 2 3

Diploma of Engineering (Marine) - Year 3

W G Smith

SDK Buckland

J P Van Breda

T J Pasakarnis

S ta tu te s a n d Rules Appendix 6

In 1984 Council amended Statute No. 3 - Election of Staff Member of Council Statute to include: "Tutor" in the definition of the members of the teaching staff of the College;

and “Principal Lecturer" and "Senior Lecturer" in the definition of the members of the senior teaching staff of the College.

Council also created the Traffic and Parking Rules (pursuant to Statute No. 2, General Management Statute). These Rules arc to facilitate the orderly control of traffic and

parking on campus.

V isitors to th e College The College welcomed many official visitors during the year including visitors from overseas, government, learned societies,

commerce, and related maritime fields. The visitors included the following:

The Hon K Wriedt, MHA, Leader of the Tasmanian Opposition

Cdr G R Lampard and Mr M Turner, RAN Research Laboratory (Underwater Weapons Research)

His Excellency Mr J C M Fula, High Commissioner for Zambia

Mr E White, Consul General for the USA

Professor K Back, Vice Chancellor of James Cook University of North Queensland and Professor A Lazenby, Vice Chancellor of the University of Tasmania

The Hon J Kerin, MP, Federal Minister for Primary Industry

Professor Dr R Motte, Head of Ocean Sciences, Plymouth Polytechnic

His Excellency Major-General S Husain, Ambassador of Pakistan

Mr N Jarman, General Manager, New Zealand Fishing Industry Board

The Hon P Morris, MP, Federal Minister for Transport, on the occasion of World Maritime Day

Mr S Chantarat, Lecturer in Marine Science, University of Thailand

His Excellency Mr A Lecaros-de-Cossio, Ambassador of Peru

The Tasmanian Legislative Council and Launceston City Council

Mr D Jones, Food and Agricultural Organisation, The United Nations

Appendix 7

Queens Fellowship and Marine Researcli Allocations Committee

Mr B Rah, Ministry of Communications, Korea

Mr G Knowles, Director General, NSW Department of Agriculture

NSW Fish Marketing Authority

His Excellency Mr G Cheng Nie, Ambassador of the Peoples' Republic of China

Senator F Chaney

Nr A Pasakamis, recipient of the Captain Thormrs Swanson prize for the best performance in the guided study component of the Diploma of Applied Science (Narine

Engineering)

Niss S Carver and her father, the Mead of the School of Fisheries, Nr A Carver. Niss Carver was awarded the Professional Fisherman prize for the best overall performance in Year

1 of the Certificate of Technology in Fisheries Operations

3 4

Presentation of the 1984 Commonwealth Development Bank Scholarship. L to R the State Nanager of the Commonwealth Development Bank, Nr R J O'Brien, the

recipient, Nr Pi Smith, the Principal, Captain D N Waters

A meeting of the Australian Maritime Studies Conference was held at the College in September. The Conference comprises representatives from TATE, port and marine

authorities, the fishing industry and the AMC. The 1984 meeting continued the Conference's previous work in the development of syllabuses for lower grade Certificates of Competency. The AMC

provided the secretariat for the Conference during the year.

In November the College was the venue for the annual general meeting of the International Association for Sea Survival Training. Representatives attended from the

UK, the USA, Norway, Denmark, Holland,

various Pacific islands and from throughout Australia. The College also hosted the annual general meeting of the Directors of State Emergency Services, a Council meeting of the

Commonwealth Institutions Accreditation Committee for Advanced Education, and a meeting of the Fishing Industry Research Committee.

The Army held a seven day Logistic Command Exercise (Logex 84) at the College, making extensive use of residential and meeting facilities.

An estimated 1000 visitors attended the College's Open Day. Both campuses were open for inspection.

D onations Appendix 8

In June the College took delivery of the 13m MY Pinduro, an ex Customs launch. The launch is being used to train customs officers who attend the AMC for five to six week

periods to obtain professional qualifications, and boat handling and maintenance experience. The launch is also being used in the Graduate Diploma in Hydrographic

Surveying, for short courses in compass adjustment and in the broad range of nautical studies. A group of AMC Nautical Studies staff members together with Customs Bureau staff

sailed Pinduro from Melbourne to Beauty Point

Mrs K Jones, widow of former Liverpool Polytechnic consultant to the College, Mr Keith Jones, donated a collection of maritime books from her late husband's library.

Hexham Engineering, Newcastle, donated to the College all spare equipment formerly carried for the upkeep of Stephen Brown when she was operated by Coal and Allied

Operations Pty Ltd.

The Port of Launceston Authority donated to the College a triple expansion steam engine from the decommissioned dredge, Ponrabbel. The engine will be restored and housed as a display piece on the College's

Newnham campus.

The College welcomes these donations and records its thanks to those concerned.

F reedom of Inform a R e q u e sts tion Appendix 9

One request was received in 1984 and was granted with exemptions under three sections of the Act. The request, which related to the circumstances under which a student

left the College, took seven weeks to finalise and was not achieved without incurring costs related to the diversion of resources during that time.

35

Australian M aritim e C ollege

In our opinion the accompanying Statement of Activity, Statement of Assets and Liabilities and Supporting Statements have been properly drawn up so as to show fairly the financial transactions of the Australian Maritime College for the year ended 31 December 1984 and the state of its affairs as at that date.

D M Waters Principal (15/5/85)

N R Thomas Secretary (15/5/85)

3 6

A u s t r a l i a n M a r i t i m e C o l l e g e

Statement of Assets and Liabilities As at 31 December 1984

Capital Accumulation (Balance transferred from Statement of Capital accumulation)

This is represented by:

Current A ssets Accrued Income Advances and Prepaid Expenses (Mote 14)

Cash at Bank and in Hand (note 6) Debtors (note 10) Restricted Funds (Supporting Statement 1) Stocks of Materials (at cost)

Fixed A ssets (note 7)

L ess Liabilities CURREnT LIABILITIES

Advances Commonwealth Grants Creditors and Accruals Unexpended Balance of Restricted Funds

Provision for Long Service Leave Provision for Annual Leave Provision for Vessels Survey Student Residences Funds (note 8)

non CURREnT liabilities Provision for Long Service Leave Provision for Vessels Survey

n et A ssets

1983

$ $

27 520 247

130 142

1 167 848 3 232 434 69 470

87 656 J32 302 4 769 8 52

26 041 559 30 811 211

1984

$ $

31 973 397

166 472

3 318 359 4 3 0 7 737 187 622

69 170 88 603 8 137 963

26 531 072 34 669 035

2 036 188 406 868

87 656 10 977 262 720

166 778 2 971187

1 356 000 300 875

69 170 28 955 310095 140 000 185 124 2 3 9 0 2 1 9

179 767 245 409

140 010 519 777 60 010 305 419

3 290 964 2 695 638

27 520 247 31973 397

37

A u s t r a l i a n M a r i t i m e C o l l e g e

Statement of Activity For the year ended 31 December 1984

Income

Commonwealth Grants for Running Expenses Accommodation and Catering - Student Residences

Fees (Specialist Programmes) Interest revenue Miscellaneous bunds transferred from Statement

of Capital Accumulation for relocation and co-location expenditure of a non capital nature Gain on disposal of Assets

1983

$ $

4 893 850

638 353 171 854 356 247 26 360

1984

$ $

5 725 300

751 253 167 046 369 195 40122

236 593 154 322

______ — 1958

6 323 257 7 209 196

Less Funds transferred to statement of Capital Accumulation or the purchase of assets (See Statement of Capital Accumulation) TOTAL INCOME

88046 6 235 211

174 910 7 034 286

Less Expenditure Schools Engineering Fisheries

Nautical Studies

Other Centres Marine Library Specialist Programmes and Resources Centre

Contracted External Academic Servicing (Note 13) Training Vessels - Operating and Maintenance Costs Simulators - Operator Costs Fire Fighting Centre

Student Residences Administration Maintenance and General Services Loss on disposal of Assets

Miscellaneous Carried Forward

629 933 787 510

299 888 384 719

695 718 1 625 539 962 074 2 134 303

260 771

444 516 293 064

199 599

244 917

813 116 30 522 34 271

367 250

738 974 865 685 818 907 831 ___ 4 290

5 743 901

553835

414 567

953 189

919 629 847 795 691 840 22 802

10 873 6 548 833

851146 25 936

877 909 76 107

38

$

1983 1984

Brought forward

E xcess o f R evenues over Current E xpenses L ess Mon Cash items:

Provision for Long Service Leave Depreciation (Mote 9) Provision for Annual Leave Provision for Vessels Survey

Provision for Doubtful Debts

$ $

5 743 901

491 310

20 952 1 043 253 30 672 60 000

83 620 1 210 655 47 375 60 000

3 241

1 154 877

(633 567)

$

6 548 833

485 453

1 404 891

Met Surplus (Deficit) Transferred to Statem ent o f Capital Accumulation (919 438)

A ustralian M a r itim e C o lle g e S t a t e m e n t o f R e s t r ic t e d F u n d s Statement 1

Income

School Balance Subsidies Interest Expenditure Balance

Centre 31 December Donations and 31 December

Donor 1983 Subscriptions Capital

Appreciation

1984

$ $ $ $ $

School o f Fisheries

Fishing Industry Research Trust Account Scholarships for

Fisheries Students 15 000 15 000 26 664 3 336

Project on Spencer Gulf Prawns 18 671 18 671

Courses in Flume Tank 6 420 21 294 — — 27 714

Commonwealth Development Bank of Australia Scholarship for

Fisheries Student 51 2 600 651 2 000

School o f Nautical Studies

HMS Worcester Memorial Award Award for Seamanship and

Ship Operations 1 264 133 143 1 254

Seaman's Union of Australia Prizes for College Students 1000 72 1072

School o f Engineering

Open University Commuted Study Leave fund for J Cannell 17 431 1 756 6 920 12 267

Administration

Captain Thomas Swanson Prizes Awards for College Students 2 667 289 100 2 856

Solomon Brothers Prizes Awards for College Students 150 150

Department of Employment and Industrial Relations Community

Employment 44 823 142 308 187 131

Programs TOTALS 87 656 201 023 2 250 221 759 69170

A u s t r a l i a n M a r i t i m e C o l l e g e

Statement 3

Statement of Capital Accumulation For the year ended 31 December 1984

1983 1984

$ $ $ $

BALAMCE FROM PREVIOUS YEAR 25 264 792 27 520 247

L ess Prior period adjustment for accumulated depreciation at 1 January 1984 1 584 465

_

Prior period adjustment for provision for annual leave at 1 January 1984 232 048

Prior period adjustment for accumulated provision for vessels survey at 1 January 1984 80 010

Prior period adjustment for reductions in fixed assets due to accounting policy changes 2 015 909 3 912 432

21 352 360 27 520 247

Commonwealth grant for Capital Works, Services and Equipment 6 970 001 5 332 000

Transfers from Statement of Activity (Recurrent Funds) - I Purchase of assets II Met Surplus (Deficit)

88 046 (663 567) (575 521) 174910 (919 438) (744 528)

Gifts received 10 000 20 000

27 756 840 32 127 719

Less:

Funds transferred to Statement of Activity to meet expenditure of a non capital nature 236 593 154 322

BALANCE TRANSFERRED TO STATEMENT OF ASSETS AND LIABILITIES 27 520 247 31 973 397

41

A u s t r a l i a n M a r i t i m e C o l l e g e Statement 4

Statement of Sources and Applications of Funds For the year ended 31 December 1984

SOURCES OF FUNDS 1983 1984

Funds from recurrent operations $ $ $ $

Net recurrent surplus - transferred to Capital Accumulation (663 567) (919 438)

Add recurrent funds applied to purchase of assets 88 046 (575 521) 174 910 (744 528)

ADD (SUBTRACT) non fund item s Provision for long service leave 20 952 83 620

Depreciation (Note 9) 1 043 253 1 210 655

Provision for annual leave 30 672 47 375

Provision for vessels survey 60 000 60 000

Provision for doubtful debts — 3 241

Profit on sale of non current assets — (1958) —

Loss on disposal of non current assets — 22 802

1154 877 1 425 735

Total funds from recurrent operations 579 356 681 207

Funds from other operations Commonwealth grant for capital works and services 6 970 001 5 332 000

Less capital funds applied to recurrent items 236 593 154 322

6 733 408 5 177 678

Gifts received 10 000 20 000

Total funds from other operations 6 743 408 5 197 678

GRAND TOTAL funds from all operations 7 322 764 5 878 885

Reductions in Assets Current Stocks of materials 27 112 —

Accrued income 7 433 —

Restricted Funds — 34 545 18 486 18 486

Non-current Training vessels 976 001 —

Furniture 118 780 —

Library Acquisitions 190 721 —

Works of art 4 099 —

Student Residences furniture 3 999 —

Student Residences Buildings — 91 038

1 293 600 91 038

Proceeds from sale of assets — 31 506

Increases in Liabilities Current Advances - Commonwealth Games 740 962 —

Unexpended balance of restricted funds 52 737 —

Student residences funds 17 869 18 346

811 568 18 346

TOTAL SOURCES OF FUNDS 9 462 477 6 038 261

42

Statement 4

APPLICATIONS OF FUNDS 1983 1984

$ $ $ $

Increases in Assets Current Accrued Income — 36 330

Advances and prepaid expenses 943172 2 150 511

Cash at bank and in hand 878 341 1 075 303

Restricted funds 52 737 —

Debtors 30 634 121 393

Stocks of Materials — 1 904 884 6 301 3 389 838

Non-Current Land — 2 540

Site improvements 171845 93 193

Buildings and service installations 1159 835 628 268

Buildings and renovations on leased property 18 500 70 336

Simulators 2 963 338 190

Plant and equipment 576 399 610 614

Motor vehicles 4 861 45 383

Student residence buildings 1 732 249 —

Student residence plant and equipment 16 826 4 021

Training Vessels — 8 500

Furniture — 31 282

Works of Art — 5 487

Student Residences Furniture — 3 683 478 5 942 1 843756

Reductions in Liabilities Current Advances Commonwealth Grants — 680 188

Unexpended balance of restricted funds — 18 486

Creditors and accruals 1 858 206 1 858 206 105993 804 667

Prior periods adjustments to fixed assets 2 015 909 —

TOTAL APPLICATIONS OF FUNDS 9 462 477 6 038 261

A ustralian M a r itim e C o lle g e

notes to and Forming Fart of the Accounts

ΠΟΤΕ

1. STATEMENT OF ACCOUNTING POLICY

(a) The Minister for Finance approved the format for the College's Financial Statements on 12 December 1983. These Statements are prepared in accordance with that approval on an accrual and going concern basis.

(b) The Statements have been prepared in accordance with the historical cost convention, thus amounts do not necessarily reflect realisable values or changes in the purchasing power of money.

(c) Depreciation on fixed assets is calculated on a straight line basis using rates designed to write the assets off over their useful life.

(d) Long Service Leave has been provided for all employees after five years service.

(e) The accompanying financial statements are prepared in accordance with the Guidelines for the Form and Standard of Financial Statements of Commonwealth Undertakings.

2. SUPPORTING STATEMENT

Supporting Statement 2, Statement of Trust Funds, has been omitted as there was no transaction in the period or balance carried forward from prior periods.

3. INSURANCE

Insurance cover other than compulsory third party policies for Motor Vehicles and a Public Liability policy for the general public is not held by the College. This is basically in accordance with the Commonwealth Government's Policy to carry its own risk.

4. AUSTRALIAN GOVERNMENT SUPERANNUATION SCHEME

The College has elected to contribute 15% of employees salaries as its contribution towards pensions granted on retirement or death of employees. This amount has been deemed by the Australian Government Actuary to be sufficient to meet the College's Liability at the point of retirement The cost of subsequent pension increases has not been provided for and the College may be required to contribute further lump sum payments at the time that pension increases are granted to former employees or their

dependants.

5. COMMITMENTS FOR ASSET PURCHASES

As at 31 December 1984, the undermentioned items have been contracted for or ordered by the College and the amounts have not been provided for elsewhere in the accounts. It is expected that the amounts listed will be paid during 1985.

1983 1 9 8 4

Building Contracts 558 142 16 094

Ship Handling Simulator 2 836 443 587 851

Miscellaneous 294 048 260 684

$3 688 633 $864 629

CASH AT BANK AND IN HAND

1983 1 9 8 4

Recurrent Funds 1 746 737 1 784 435

Capital Funds 546 191 1 083 220

Other Funds 767 626 1 245 858

Student Residences Funds 166 778 185 124

Cash Imprests 5100 9100

$3 232 434 $4 307 737

Advances Commonwealth Grants of $1 356 000 (1983 $2 036 188) were in the bank as at 31 December 1984.

4 4

m

7. FIXED ASSETS (a)

Gross Amount

1983

Accumulated Depreciation Written Down

Value

Gross Amount

1984

Accumulated Depreciation Written Down

Value

$ $ $ $ $ $

Value FIXED ASSETS - College Land 80 250 — 80 250 82 790 — 82 790

Site Improvements 1 424 213 80856 1 343 357 1 517 406 110 135 1 407 271

Buildings and Service Installations 9 463 306 206 578 9 256 728 10 091 574 315 213 9 776 361

Buildings and Renovations on leased Property 973 255 99 904 873 351 1 043 591 129 574 914 017

Training Vessels (See below) 4 020 356 900159 3 120 197 4 028 856 1178 253 2 850 603

Simulators 1177 906 352 745 825 161 1 516 096 533 733 982 363

Plant and Equipment 3 988 889 671 288 3 317 601 4 560 235 1102 048 3 458 187

Furniture 405 978 95 781 310 197 436 624 130 327 306 297

Motor Vehicles 111 714 25 227 86 487 135 269 38 494 96 775

Works of Art 27 000 — 27 000 32 487 — 32 487

21 672 867 2 432 538 19 240 329 23 444 928 3 537 777 19 907 151

FIXED ASSETS - Student Residences Buildings and Service Installations 6 647 795 148 079 6 499 716 6 556 757 205 051 6 351 706

Furniture 193 609 24 918 168 691 198 926 43 739 155 187

Plant 8? Equipment 154 806 22 183 132 623 153 011 35 983 117 028

6 996 210 195 180 6 801 030 6 908 694 284 773 6 623 921

28 669 077 2 627 718 26 041 359 30 353 622 3 822 550 26 531 072

(b) The Fixed Assets of the College are recorded at cost with the Buildings purchased with land at Beauty Point (Government exception of the following items: valuation 1979)

Gifts (valuations by College Staff (1984) Cottage at Flinders Street 16 500 16 500

1983 1984 Outbuildings at Seamanship

$ $ Centre 17 500 17 500

Works of Art 27 000 27 000 Land has been recorded at the government valuation on

Plant and Equipment 39 000 59 000 acquisition 1979, all additional costs have been shown as site

Site Improvements 11 000 11 000 improvements. These costs include such items as the

Gifts from the State (Government Evaluations 1979) provision of roads, water, sewerage, landscaping, tree surgery Land 39 750 39 750

and site investigation.

Buildings 59 250 59 250 (c) Training Vessels are recorded at their cost to the College.

There was an amount of $983 390 paid to the Ship Builders over and above the College payments as Ship Building Bounty M/hich is n o t discr.iosetci ejscivherc in tHo a c c o u n ts ^ ______ .

8. STUDENT RESIDENCES FUNDS

Balances as Income, Interest Balances as at 1 January and Subsidies Received During at 31 December

1984 1984 1984

$ $ $

Building Maintenance

107 223 11795 119 018

Fund

Replacement of Equipment and Furniture Fund

59 555 6 551 66106

Totals - Student Residences Funds

166 778 18 346 185 124

9. DEPRECIATION

College 1983 1 9 8 4

Land — —

Site Improvements 26 479 29 279

Buildings and Service Installations 78 688 108 635

Buildings and Renovations on leased Property 27 903 29670

Training Vessels 277 669 278 094

Simulators 176 595 180 988

Plant and Equipment 332 241 439 927

Furniture 32 834 34 734

Motor Vehicles 14 546 17 955

Works of Art — —

966 955

Student Residences Buildings and Service Installations 52 344 56 972

Furniture 10 688 19 004

Plant and Equipment 13 266 15 397

76 298 __ _ 91 573

$1043253 $1210 655

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1 0 . DEBTORS

1983 1984

Debtors 69 470 189 822

less Provision for Doubtful Debts — 3 241

$69 470 $186581

11. REMUNERATION OF COUNCIL MEMBERS

Included in Maintenance and General services are Sitting Fees of $2 478 (1983 $5 146) which were paid to Council Members in accordance with Section 16 of the Maritime College Act, 1978.

12. RATES

During 1984 payments were made to Local Councils of $28 038 (1983 $28 039) which represents ex gratia payments of Rates on the College properties.

13. CONTRACTED EXTERNAL ACADEMIC SERVICING

This amount was paid to other institutions for the provision of teaching services as detailed.

1983 1984

Tasmanian College of Advanced Education 325 000 325 000

Department of Technical and Further Education 42 250 89 594

$367 250 $414 594

14. ADVANCES AND PREPAID EXPENSES Includes advances of $3 207 420 (1983 $1 046 074) for the purchase of a ship handling simulator. Ownership of the simulator passes progressively to the College upon delivery of the components which is expected over the period 1 July 1984 to 30 April 1985.

15. SUBSIDIARY COMPANY

The College has a subsidiary company AMC Search Limited which was incorporated on 26 October 1984 but has not traded. The Company is limited by guarantee.

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OFFICE OF THE AUDITOR GENERAL

G.P.O. Box 707 Canberra, A.C.T. 2601

17 June 1985

The Honourable the Minister for Education Parliament House CANBERRA ACT 2600

Dear Minister

AUSTRALIAN MARITIME COLLEGE

Pursuant to sub-section 39(3) of the Maritime College Act 1978, the Australian Maritime College has submitted for my report its financial statements for the year ended 31 December 1984. These comprise:

• Statement of Assets and Liabilities

• Statement of Activity

• Statement of Restricted Funds

• Statement of Capital Accumulation

• Statement of Sources and Application of Funds, and

• Notes to and forming part of the accounts.

The statements, which hav » aeen prepared on an historical cost basis and in accordance with the policies outlined in Notes 1 and 4, are in the form approved by the Minister for Finance pursuant to sub-section 39(1) of the Act The statements have also been prepared in

accordance with the Guidelines for the Form and Standard of Financial Statements of Commonwealth Undertakings approved by the Minister for Finance. A copy of the financial statements is enclosed for your information.

In accordance with sub-section 39(3) of the Act, I now report that the statements are in agreement with the accounts and records of the College and, in my opinion:

• the statements are based on proper accounts and records, and

• the receipt and expenditure of moneys, and the acquisition and disposal of assets, by the College during the year have been in accordance with the Act The College did not invest moneys during the year.

Yours sincerely

J V Monaghan Auditor-General

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