Note: Where available, the PDF/Word icon below is provided to view the complete and fully formatted document
Tertiary Education Commission Act - Tertiary Education Commission - Triennium 1982-84 - Report - Volume 2 - Part 2 - Advice of Councils


Download PDF Download PDF

The Parliament of the Commonwealth of Australia

TERTIARY EDUCATION COMMISSION

Report for Triennium 1982-84

Volume 2—Part 2

Advice of Councils

Presented pursuant to Statute 23 September 1981

Ordered to be p rin te d 24 September 1981

Parliamentary Paper No. 200/1981

COMMONWEALTH TERTIARY EDUCATION COMMISSION

REPORT FOR 1982-84 TRIENNIUM

Volume 2 Part 2

Advice of Councils

August 1981

COMMONWEALTH TERTIARY EDUCATION COMMISSION

REPORT FOR 1982-84 TRIENNIUM

VOLUME 1

E R R A T A L I S T

PART 1

Page 12

Page 53

Page 97

Page 157

Page 161

Page 163

Page 178

Page 182

Page 255

Page 289

Para 1.30, penultimate sentence should begin "In June 1978..........

Table 2.15: Students commencing direct from school, females, 1976, should read 20,462 (not 20,452).

Footnote (2) should read "............23 November 1979".

Table 5.3: 3rd column, 5th line (Teacher education courses, W.A., 1984) should read 5,500 (not 5,550).

Para 5.65, first sentence should read "The VPSEC Working Party on Engineering Education, whose report was released late in 1980, concluded that the four major engineering schools..........".

Para 5.73, 6th line, "Wetern" should read "Western".

Para 6.31, the second last line of the indented quote should read "support to their best research workers and, when appropriate,....".

Para 6.42, last sentence should read "....: in 1979 such funds averaged $530 per member of the full-time teaching staff in eight institutions (compared with a figure of about $5,600 for universities)."

Table 8. 6: The first line of figures should read: Recurrent: 1,339.3 1,385.5(b) 1,352.8 1,400.0(b) 1,354.8 1,416.8(b) 1,351.8

Index, under "Academic Staff", delete "flexibilityj 7.16 - 7.25

PART 2

Page 135 - Table 9.3: The asterisks on the University of Sydney, Architecture Stage II, and the University of Wollongong, Science II, should be removed.

2.

PART 3

Page 136 - Table 8. 7: 2nd line of figures should read: -7.6 -15.4 9.9 -19.2 2.4 13.0 -11.5 -7.9

4th line of figures should read: 12.7 -11.4 -12.2 -3.5 -7.6 140.0 -14.0 -4.1

Page 150 - Table 8.8: First figure (Pre-service teacher education, 1978) should read 14,301 (not 14,297).

PART 4

Page v

Page vi

Page vii

Page 69

Page 82

Pages 93-4

Page 116

Page 117

Page 125

Page 127

Page 128

Page 140

Page 144

PART 5

Page 79

Chapter 5, Curriculum Development "Accredition" should read "Accreditation ".

Chapter 9, Staff Development, "Developments" should read "Deve lopment".

Table 3.3: "1982-2001" should read "1981-2001".

Table 4.19: Right side heading "No" should read " Ό 0 0 ". Heading should be centred.

Table 4.24: 2nd line of italics imperfectly aligned.

Duplicated in some copies.

Para 8.2, line 6, brackets should appear before "also" and after "levels".

Table 8.2: 1976/77 NSW Total, "7.1" should read "17.1" and, 1978/79 SA Total, "6.4" should read "16.4".

Para 8.21, 5th line, "$50m" should read "$150m".

Para 8.28, 12th Line, "this" should read "their".

Para 8.30, 4th line, comma to be inserted after "making".

Para 9.35, last line "$0.625m" should read "$0.652m".

Para 9.47(d), "institutions" should be appended to title.

Appendix F, : Mr Brooks C Wilson, Managing Director, Hoppers Australia Pty Ltd.

C O M M O N W E A L T H T E R T I A R Y E D U C A T I O N C O M M I S S I O N

Re p o r t for 1982-84 T r i e n n i u m

Vo l u m e 2 P a r t 2:

A D V I C E O F C O U N C I L S

Canberra August 1981«

Corrronwealth of Australia 1981

ISSN 0156-305X ISBN for set of two parts: 0 642 89453 1 ISBN for Part 2: 0 642 89454 X

COMMONWEALTH TERTIARY EDUCATION COMMISSION

REPORT FOR 1982-84 TRIENNIUM

VOLUME 2 Part 1 Recormiendations on Grants

Part 2 Advice of Councils

Printed by Canberra R eprographic Printers, 1 19 W o llo n g o n g St, Fyshw ick, A.C.T. 2 6 0 9

CONTENTS

SECTION A:

SECTION B:

SECTION C:

ADVICE OF UNIVERSITIES COUNCIL

ADVICE OF ADVANCED EDUCATION COUNCIL

ADVICE OF TECHNICAL AND FURTHER EDUCATION COUNCIL

PAGE

1

136

273

iii

S E C T I O N A

A D V I C E O F T H E U N I V E R S I T I E S C O U N C I L

August 1981

TERTIARY EDUCATION COMMISSION

UNIVERSITIES COUNCIL

BENJAMIN OFFICES BENJAMIN WAY BELCONNEN A C T 2616

CHAIRMAN: PROF. D. N. F. DUNBAR TELEPHONE 64 1133

21 August 1981

Dear Professor K a r m e l ,

We have pleasure in submitting to the Commonwealth Tertiary Education Commission our advice in relation to the university sector and our recommendations for the distribution of grants for the 1982-84 triennium.

We wish to thank the members of the Council's

Secretariat for their efforts in providing assistance preparing material for this Advice.

D. N.F. Dunbar (Chairman) E. Campbell R . K . Chambers P.J. Fensham Leonie Kramer P.S. Lang J. McG. McIntyre B.W. Rowland N. Stockdale R.M. Gillett (Secretary)

Professor P.H. Karmel, AC, C B E , C h a i r m a n , Commonwealth Tertiary Education Com m i s s i o n , PO Box 18, BELCONNEN, ACT 2616.

2 .

, 1 y . Bin con nen A C T . 2 6 1 6 Telex: 62585 Telegrams: Tecom Canberra

U N I V E R S I T I E S C O U N C I L

Members of the Couneit at August 1981.

CHAIRMAN

Emeritus Professor D a v i d Noel Ferguson Dunbar - to 22 June 1983.

MEMBERS

Professor Enid Mona Campbell, Q B E , Professor of L a w , Monash University - to March 1982.

Mr R o n a l d Kerw i n Chambers, Consultant Psychologist - to 22 June 1982.

Professor Peter James Fensham, Professor of Education, Monash University - to 31 August 1981.

Professor Leonie Judith Kramer, QBE, Professor of Australian Literature, University of Sydney - to 22 June 1982.

Dr Patrick Sellar Lang, QBE, Grazier - to 22 June

1983.

Mr John McGillivray McIntyre, Chairman and Managing Director, McIntyre and Associates Pty Ltd - to 22 Jun 1982.

Mr Barry William Rowland, QC, Barrister - to 22 June

1983 .

Mr Noel Stockdale, University Librarian, The Flinders University of South Australia - to 22 June 1983.

MEMBER ON LEAVE UNTIL MARCH 1982

Professor Harry Gregor G e l b e r , Professor of Political Science, University of Tasmania - 22 June 1982.

FORMER MEMBERS OF THE COUNCIL

Professor Lloyd Woodrow Cox, Professor of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University of Adelaide, 22 June 197 7 to 22 June 1980.

Dr Walter Laurence Hugh es, CBE, Managing Director, Walkers L i m i t e d , 22 June 1977 to 22 June 1979.

Professor John Rodney N i l a n d , Professor of Industrial Relations, University of New South Wales (temporary Member), 1 January to 31 December 1978.

3 .

C O N T E N T S

Paragraph Numbers

CHAPTER ONE : REVIEW OF RECENT DEVELOPMENTS

REVIEW OF VOLUME 1, PART 2 PROPOSALS Al.l - A1.6

RECURRENT FUNDS Academic Developments General Proposals Proposed Adjustment Grant Funding Levels Cost Adjustments

A1.7 Al. 9 Al.iO A l . 11 A l . 12

A l . 8

CAPITAL AND EQUIPMENT FUNDS Capital Equipment

RATIONALISATION

STUDENT FINANCES

SUPERANNUATION

PROPOSED UNIVERSITY OF THE NORTHERN TERRITORY

RESEARCH CENTRES OF EXCELLENCE

A l .13 - A l .15

A l .16 - A l .17

Al. 13

A1.2 0

A l . 21

A l .22 - A l . 2 3

A l .24 - A1.2 7

CHAPTER TWO : COUNCIL'S APPROACH TO RECOMMENDATIONS

OPERATING GRANTS Approach to 1982-84 Recommendations General Development Grants Research Distribution of General Recurrent

Funds

Recurrent Grants for Special Purposes Summary of Proposals

A2.1 A 2 .3 A2.8

A2.12 A 2 .20 A2.21

- A2.2 - A2.7 - A2.ll

- A2.19

CAPITAL GRANTS A 2 .22 - A 2 .25

CHAPTER THREE : STUDENT ENROLMENTS

CURRENT ENROLMENT LEVELS A3.1 - A3.3

FUTURE ENROLMENT TRENDS A3.4 - A3.12

PROPOSED ENROLMENT LEVELS t 1982-84 Distribution of Student Load Advanced Education Enrolments in Universities

A3.13 A3.14

A3.20

- A 3 . 20 - A 3 . 19

4.

CHAPTER F O U R : COMMENTARY ON UNIVERSITIES

INTRODUCTION A 4 .1

Development of Australian Universities A 4 .5 Statistical Review A4.14

Consolidation in Higher Education A4.23

- Teacher Education A4.37

A 4 . 38 A4.13 A4.22 A 4 . 38 A 4 . 38

COMMENTS ON INDIVIDUAL UNIVERSITIES A4.39 - A4.190

NEW SOUTH WALES University of Sydney University of New South Wales University of New England University of Newcastle Macquarie University

University of Wollongong

A4.43 - A4.74

A4.47 - A4.49

A4.50 - A4.54

A 4 . 55 - A 4 .60

A4.61 - A4.65

A4.66 - A4.70

A4.71 - A4.74

VICTORIA University of Melbourne Monash University La Trobe University

Deakin University

A4.75 - A4.102 A 4 . 81 - A 4 . 84

A 4 .85 - A 4 . 88

A 4 . 89 - A4.94

A4.95 - A4.102

QUEENSLAND University of Queensland James Cook University Griffith University

A4.103 - A4.128 A4.109 - A4.115 A4.116 - A4.121 A4.122 - A4.128

SOUTH AUSTRALIA University of Adelaide Flinders University

A4.129 - A4.155 A4.137 - A4.150 A4.151 - A 4 . 155

WESTERN AUSTRALIA University of Western Australia Murdoch University

A 4 . 156 - A 4 . 173 A4.164 - A4.169 A4.170 - A4.173

UNIVERSITY OF TASMANIA A4.174 - A4.180

AUSTRALIAN NATIONAL UNIVERSITY A4 .181 - A 4 . 190

CHAPTER FIVE : FINANCIAL RECOMMENDATIONS

OPERATING GRANTS

GENERAL RECURRENT G R A N T S , 1982-84 Assessment of General Recurrent Grants Specific Provisions Earmarked Grants

A5.1 - A5.42

A5.4 - A5.18

- A5.12

5 .

A 5 .4 A 5 .13 A5.14 A 5 . 15

Constraints on Expenditure A5.16

General Recurrent Grants Recommended for 1982-84 A5.17

EQUIPMENT GRANTS, 1982 A5.19

Assessment of Equipment Grants A5.20

Earmarked Grant, 1982 A5.21

Administration of Equipment Grants A5.22

Equipment Grants Recommended for 1982 A5.23

SPECIAL RESEARCH GRANTS, 1982-84 A S . 25

Assessment of Special Research Grants A S .26 Purpose of Special Research Grants A S .27

Conditions on the Use of the Grants A S .28

Special Research Grants Recommended for 1982-84 AS. 30

TEACHING HOSPITALS RECURRENT GRANTS, 1982-84 A S .31

Teaching Hospital Recurrent Grants Recommended for 1982-84 AS . 34

STUDENT RESIDENCES RECURRENT GRANTS, -1982-84 A S . 35

Calculation of the Grants A S .39

Student Residences Recurrent Grants Recommended for 1982-84 A S .42

CAPITAL GRANTS A S . 43 -

1981 CAPITAL PROGRAM A S .45 -

APPROACH TO 1982 PROGRAM A S . 47 -

Existing Building Commitments A S .48 -

New Major Buildings A S .50 -

Design Grant A S .S3

Minor Building Grants A S .54 -

Summary A S .56

APPENDIX 1

SELECTED STATISTICS

APPENDIX 2

CONDITIONS ATTACHING TO THE USE AND ADMINISTRATION OF EQUIPMENT AND SPECIAL RESEARCH GRANTS.

- A S . 18

- A S . 24

- A S . 24

- A S . 30

AS. 29

AS. 34

AS. 42 AS. 41

AS. 56

AS. 46

A S . 56 A S . 49 AS. 52

AS. 55

T A B L E S

CHAPTER ONE Pave

Al. 1 Equipment and Capital Grants, 13

Australian Universities, Estimated 1981, Sought and Available 1982

CHAPTER TWO

A 2 . 1 Operating Grants - Summary of Funds 26

Available 1981, Funds Recommended by Council, 1982 to 1984

A 2 .2 Capital Grants for Universities - 27

Actual 1981, Proposed 1982

CHAPTER THREE

A3.1 Students at Australian Universities, 28

1976 to 1981

A3.2 Student Load at Australian Universities, 28

by Level and Type of Course, 1976 to

1981

A3.3 Undergraduate Student N u m b e r s , by 30

University, 1976 to 1981

A3.4 Higher Degree Student Numbers, by 31

University 1976 to 1981

A3.5 Total Student N u m b e r s , by University, 32

1976 to 1981

A3.6 Undergraduate Student Load, by 33

University, 1976 to 1981

A3.7 Higher Degree Research Student L o a d , 34

by University, 1976 to 1981

A3. 8 Higher Degree Coursework Student Load, 35

by University, 1976 to 1981

A3. 9 Total Student Load, by University, 36

1976 to 1981

A3.10 Distribution of Student Load M a x i m a ,

by U n i v ersity, Actual 1981, Proposed 1982 to 1984

39

A3.11 Distribution of Total Student 4 0

Load, by University, Actual 1981, Proposed Ranges 1982 to 1984

Page

CHAPTER FOUR

A4.1 Universities Outside the Capital 44

Cities; Enrolments by Level and Type, 1980

A 4 .2 Higher Degree Student Load as a 46

Proportion of Total Student Load, by University, 1981

A 4 .3 Science-based and Arts-Based 4 8

Student Load as a Proportion of Total Student Load, 1980

CHAPTER FIVE

A5.1 Summary of Funds Available for 86

Operating Expenditure for Each University, 1981

A5.2 General Recurrent Grants Recommended 89

for Each University, 1982 to 1984

A 5 .3 Equipment Grants Recommended for 97

Each University, 1982

A 5 .4 Special Research Grants Recommended for Each University, 1982 to 1984 98

A 5 .5 Recurrent Grants Recommended for

Teaching Hospitals, 1982 to 1984 100

A 5 .6 Progress of 1981 Capital Program 103

A 5 .7 Recommended Capital Program for 1982 106

A5.8 Recommended Capital Grants for Minor 108

Building Projects of Universities 1982

APPENDIX 1

Al Undergraduate Students at Australian H 2

Universities, by University and level of Course, 1975

Al(a) Undergraduate Students at Australian Universities, by University and Level of Course, 1980

8 .

1 1 3

Page

A2

A2 (a)

A3

A3 (a)

A4

A4 (a)

A5

A5 (a)

A6

A6 (a)

A7

A 7 (a)

A8

Undergraduate Students at Australian Universities, by University and Type of E n r o l m e n t , 1975

Undergraduate Students at Australian Universities, by University and Type of E n r o l m e n t , 1980

Bachelor Degree Students at Australian Universities, by University and Field of Study, 1975

Bachelor Degree Students at Australian Universities, by University and Field of Study, 1980

Bachelor Degree Students at Australian Universities, by University afid Selected Age Groups, 1975

Bachelor Degree Students at Australian Universities, by University and Selected Age Groups, 1980

Higher Degree Students at Australian Universities, by University and Level of Course, 1975

Higher Degree Students at Australian U n i v e rsities, by University and Level of Course, 1980

Higher Degree Students at Australian Universities, by University and Type of E n r o l m e n t , 1975

Higher Degree Students at Australian Universities, by University and Type of E n r o l m e n t , 1980

Higher Degree Students at Australian Universities, by University and Field of Study, 1975

Higher Degree Students at Australian Universities, by University and Field of Study, 1980

Student/Staff Ratios at Australian Universities, by University and Departmental Group, 1975

114

115

116

117

118

119

120

121

122

123

124

125

126

9 .

Page

A8 (a)

A9

A9 (a)

AiO

AlO(a)

All

A12

Student/Staff Ratios at Australian U n i v e rsities, by University and Departmental Group, 1980

Full-time Equivalent Teaching-and Research Academic Staff at Australian Universities, by University and Grade, 1975

Full-time Equivalent Teaching-and- Research Academic Staff at Australian Universities, by University and Grade, 1980

Full-time Teaching-and-Research Academic Staff at State Universities, by University and Type of Appoint­ ment, 1977

Full-time Teaching-and-Research Academic Staff at State Universities, by University and Type of Appoint­ ment, 1979

Full-time Teaching-and-Research Staff at State Universities; Senior Lecturer and Lecturer Numbers by Salary Levels, 1979 (and totals for 1977)

Full-time Teaching-and-Research Staff at State Universities by University and Age Group (as at 31 December of previous

Year) 1977 and 1979

127

128

129

130

131

132

133

10.

A B B R E V I A T I O N S

ASTEC

CRCEC

CSIRO

EFTS

Australian Science and Technology Council

Commonwealth Research Centres of Excellence Committee

Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation

Equivalent Full-time Student

NARU

TEAS

Volume 1, Part 1

Volume 1, Part 2

Williams Committee

North Australia Research Unit (Australian National University)

Tertiary Education Assistance Scheme

Tertiary Education Co m m i s s i o n , Report for 1982-84 Triennium, Volume 1, Part 1, Recommendations on Guidelines, February 1981

Tertiary Education Co m m i s s i o n , Report for 1982-84 Triennium, Volume 1, Part 2, Advice of Universities Council, October 1980

Committee of Inquiry into Education and Training (1979)

WSU Weighted Student Unit

11.

P R E F A C E

The Universities Council has prepared this Advice in the context of the funds which the Commonwealth Tertiary Education Commission has indicated are available for university purposes within the Commonwealth Education Policy ^and Financial Guidelines to the Commonwealth Education Commissions determined by the Government in June 1981.

The Council has developed its Advice on the basis of the views set out in Volume 1, Part 2 of the Report for

1982-84 Triennium (October 1980) and subsequent discussions with universities as well as consultation with the appropriate State co-ordinating authorities.

The Council's Advice is set out in the following

way: a summary of recent developments (Chapter 1) is followed by an outline of the Council's approach to the 1982-84 triennium (Chapter 2); student enrolments for 1982­ 84 are discussed in Chapter 3 and various aspects of the

activities of individual universities are commented on in Chapter 4; f i n a l l y , the financial recommendations are set out in Chapter 5. Appendix 1 comprises selected statistical tables showing data on students and staff at Australian u n i v e rsities. Appendix 2 sets out the conditions attaching to the use and administration of equipment and special research grants.

NOTES ON STATISTICS

. Throughout, the data presented are the latest

available to the Council at the time of providing this Advice. Some of the recent data shown may

be subject to later r e v i s i o n .

. The statistics presented in this Advice do not

cover students, staff or expenditure associated with the Royal Military College, Duntroon, the RAAF Academy, Point Cook and the Royal Naval College, Jervis Bay for which the Commission makes no direct financial provision.

. Any discrepancies between totals and the sums

of components in tables are due to rounding.

• The symbol - is used to denote nil or negligible.

12.

Definitions of the statistical and other terms used in this Advice are set out in Volume 1,

Part 2, Appendix 2. Further statistical information on s t u d e n t s , staff and university expenditure is available from the Commission's annual publication, Seleated University Statistics.

COST ADJUSTMENT PROCEDURE

The Government has decided to discontinue the present arrangements for retrospective cost supplementation. For the 1982-84 triennium, a system of adjusting grants for cost increases on a prospective basis has been

instituted.

The amounts for 1982 announced in the Tertiary Education Commission Guidelines 1982-84 include an allowance for prospective cost increases in relation to the non-salary components of recurrent grants and equipment and capital grants up to the end of 1981 and for prospective

cost increases in relation to the wages and salaries components of recurrent grants up to the end of 1982. The grants specified on this basis represent the cash amounts which will be provided for 1982.

The recurrent grants for 1983 and 1984 include the same allowance for prospective cost increases as was included in the recurrent grants for 1982 ; these amounts will be adjusted on a prospective basis before the commencement of each program y e a r .

13.

CH APTER 1 : R E V I E W OF RECENT D E V EL O P ME N T S

Review of Volume 1, Part 2 Proposals

A 1 .1 The Council presented its Advice for Volume 1 of

the Report for 1982-84 Triennium to the Commission in October 1980. It justified the increases in funds it was

seeking for the university sector on several grounds. First, the Council was concerned with the need to maintain, and in some cases restore to an acceptable level, the

general quality of university activities. The Council noted in its Advice some signs of decline in the sector,

in particular the increasing use of obsolete equipment, deterioration of buildings and decreased provision of library and other services. The Council concluded that continuation of the present funding level for the university

sector would result in "... a serious impairment of the

capacity of some universities to maintain acceptable academic standards and to fulfil properly their teaching and research functions" (Volume 1 , Part 2, paragraph 2.23). The Council's other proposals for increased funds are set

out in paragraphs 8.17 to 8.43 of Volume 1, Part 2.

A1.2 Secondly, the Council proposed additional funds to

permit the introduction of some new academic developments. For the most part these developments were concerned with the concentration, in a few centres, of academic activities in which many universities are currently involved in a relatively small w a y . Proposed academic developments are set out in paragraphs 8.45 to 8.63 of Volume 1, Part 2.

A1.3 Thirdly, the Council sought substantial increases

in capital grants and in the earmarked equipment grant, along with the reinstatement of triennial funding for equipment.

A1.4 The Council's Advice was based on its assessment

of the reasonable needs of universities for the period under review: having regard for both the general economic climate under which the Commission's recommendations were to be framed, and the expected level of enrolments for the university sect o r . The Council is therefore very concerned that the Commission felt unable to support more of the funding proposals it advanced and at the Government's

failure to meet even the Commission's recommendations.

A 1 .5 Since the Council completed its Advice for

Volume 1, a number of significant events have occurred which have a bearing on the funding of universities in 1982-84. In chronological order these events were:

14.

. the release of the Commission's Report for 1982-84 Tviennium (February 1981)

. the announcement of the Government's decisions on the Review of Commonwealth, Funetione (April 1981)

. the appointment of the Commonwealth Research Centres of Excellence Committee (May 1981)

. the Government's statement on Education Policy and Financial Guidelines to the Commonwealth Education Commissions (June 1981)

. the release of the Commission's Report on the Proposal to Establish a University in the northern Territory (June 1981).

. the release of the Commission's Progress Report on Consolidation in Advanced Education (July 1 9 8 1 ) .

A1.6 Although many of the financial recommendations of

the Commission have been overtaken by subsequent decisions of the Government, there are several matters on which the Council feels it appropriate to comment.

R ecurrent F unds

ACADEMIC DEVELOPMENTS

A l .7 The Commission supported the Council's proposal

for the establishment of a school of fisheries and included funds for this within its recommendations. However, it did not believe that additional funds were justified for the Council's other proposals. The Commonwealth Government in

its Guidelines statement requested the Commission to give consideration to the establishment of a school of fisheries and to advise on the desirability of locating it in

Tasmania. The Council proposes to deal with this matter during the triennium.

A l .8 The Government also made provision within the

Guidelines for the development of new community language programs and universities have been invited to submit proposals for the establishment of such courses.

GENERAL PROPOSALS

A l .9 The Council proposed increases in general

recurrent grants for research and research training, libraries, maintenance, and unavoidable cost increases (see Volume 1, Part 2, paragraphs 8.17 to 8.43). These areas were identified by the Council as those where continuing financial stringencies are most likely to lead

15.

to declining standards in universities. The Council based this view not only on the latest statistical information available, but also on its observations during visits to universities in 1980 and its judgement of the likely situation by the end of the 1979-81 triennium. The Council believes that this first hand knowledge is very important in assessing the needs of the universities, particularly as the latest expenditure figures available at the time when

Volume 1, Part 2 was being prepared related to 1979. Unfort u n a t e l y , the Commission was not prepared to recommend additional funding at the level proposed, although it did support some increases for maintenance and libraries.

PROPOSED ADJUSTMENT GRANT

A1.10 The proposed adjustment grant (to replace

progressively, general development g r a n t s ) to enable univer­ sities to make adjustments to their staffing structures was not supported by the C o m m i s s i o n . The Council has since re-examined this matter and its position is set out in paragraphs A 2 .3 to A2.7.

FUNDING LEVELS

Al.ll Following receipt of the Guidelines, the Commission advised the Council of the levels of operating and capital funds within which the Council's advice should be framed. For total recurrent grants, the amounts available for the 1982-84 triennium, when adjusted to exclude funding of research centres of excellence and the funds transferred from the advanced education sector for those colleges of advanced education expected to be merged with universities, are, for each year of the triennium,

some 2.5 per cent, 3.5 per cent and 4.0 per cent respect­

ively below the levels sought by the Council.

COST ADJUSTMENTS

A1.12 The Government has decided that from the end of

1981, cost adjustments will be made on a prospective basis rather than through retrospective adjustments as in the past (see Preface for further details).

C a p i t a l and E quipment F unds

c a p i t a l

A1.13 In Volume 1 , Part 2 (Table 9.4), the Council

proposed a significant increase in funds for 1982 over 1981 for both minor works and major building projects. The increases were some $18.9 million and $16.9 million

16.

respectively. The Council argued that expenditure of this magnitude is required to meet the most pressing needs of universities in the forthcoming triennium.

A1.14 The Commission recognised that there was a

considerable backlog of building needs in higher education as well as an increasing requirement for major renovations and replacement particularly in the older institutions. For these reasons it recommended a significant increase in capital grants for both higher education sectors, although not to the level sought by the two Councils. The Council is

seriously concerned that the Commonwealth Government, did not accept the Commission's recommendations in full. The Guidelines provide only $34.8 million for capital works for both universities and colleges of advanced education in 1982, an amount which represents only about one half of that proposed by the two Councils. Within this amount the

Government intends that provision should be made for some high priority building projects to commence in 1982.

A1.15 The implications of the continuing low level of

capital funds and the inability to make inroads into the substantial backlog of building projects is discussed in paragraphs A5.43 to A5.56.

EQUIPMENT

A1.16 The Council in Volume 1, Part 2 (paragraphs

7.60 to 7.63) argued strongly that the existing level of equipment funding fails to meet the reasonable needs of universities. It also supported a return to triennial funding for equipment. The Government has provided some additional funds to assist institutions in replacing out­ dated equipment and in responding to needs arising from technological change, although the increase is less than the amount proposed by the Council and supported in full by the Commission. The Council welcomes this additional provision; however, it regrets that triennial funding will not be

extended to equipment.

A1.17 Table Al.l below sets out the equipment and

capital grants sought by the Council compared with those which are to be provided; estimated 1981 funds available are also shown.

17 .

TABLE A1 . 1

EQUIPMENT AND CAPITAL GRANTS, AUSTRALIAN UNIVERSITIES, ESTIMATED 1981, SOUGHT AND AVAILABLE 1982

(Estimated 1981)(a)

Sought by Council 1982

Available in 1982

$m $m $m

Equipment (42.4) 49.4 45.7(b)

Capital (11.0) 36.5 (c)

(a) Expressed on the same basis as the funds available for 1982.

(b) Includes an amount transferred from the advanced education sector in respect of colleges of advanced education to be merged with universities.

(c) To be determined by the Commission (a total of $34.8 million is provided for both higher education sectors).

R a t i o n a l i s a t i o n

A1.18 In Volume 1, both the Council and the Commission

discussed the opportunities and potential for co-ordination and rationalisation within the higher education sector. The Government has taken up this theme in its Review of Commonwealth Functions and its Guidelines statement with a view to promoting a major rationalisation and reallocation of resources in higher education. The major decisions affecting universities a r e :

. Murdoch University/University of Western Australia - funding to be based on significant collaboration and sharing of resources.

. Deakin University - phasing out of the Engineering S c h o o l .

. Thirty designated colleges of advanced education to be consolidated - this will involve amalgama­ tion with universities in Armidale, Newcastle, Wollongong and Townsville.

A1.19 Developments relating to the last two of these

decisions have been included by the Commonwealth Tertiary Education Commission in its Progress Report on Consolidation in Advanced Education, July 1981. The Council's views on all three matters are set out in this

Advice at paragraphs A4.24 to A4.26.

18 .

Student Finances

A1.20 T h e Government has taken a number of decisions

concerning student finances including the reintroduction of tuition fees for certain courses, the commencement of a student loan scheme and changes in the eligibility and conditions for TEAS allowances. Of these changes only the

reintroduction of fees is likely to have a significant impact on enrolment levels. This is discussed further in paragraphs A3.5 to A3.ll. Tuition fees are to be

reintroduced for students undertaking second and higher degrees and will apply to new enrolments from the beginning of 1982. Students taking their first qualification or a recognised combined course will remain exempt from fees, as will those in receipt of Commonwealth, State, or university

scholarships above a certain value. Details on the level of fees, those liable to pay fees and those exempt, were announced by the Minister for Education on 2 July 1981.

Su PE RANNUAT I ON

A1.21 The Council made no specific allowance for

increased superannuation costs in Volume 1, Part 2 as the matter was being addressed by the Commission. The Council supports the Commission's recommendation (Volume 1, Part 1, paragraphs 8.75 to 8.77) that additional funds be provided to enable universities to meet their superannuation liabilities up to a limit of 14 per cent of the salaries of staff entitled to superannuation. The Government announced in its Guidelines statement that

it intends to examine the Commission's recommendations regarding additional funds for superannuation purposes separately.

P roposed U n i v e r s i t y of the N orthern T erritory

A1.22 As part of its Review of Commonwealth Funotions the Government decided that Commonwealth funding will not be provided for the establishment of a university in the Northern Territory in the 1982-84 triennium. Subsequently,

the Commission, which had earlier been asked to examine a formal proposal, provided a d v i c e ^ ^ to the Government that the establishment of a university in the Northern Territory would be premature. However, the Commission recommended

that an external studies centre should be established at the Darwin Community College and that the North Australia Research U n i t (NARU) of the Australian National University be strengthened. In preparing its report to the Government,

the Commission had available to it the views of the Council.

(1) Tertiary Education Commission, Report on the Proposal to Establish a University in the Northern Territory, AGPS, Canberra, 1981.

19 .

A1.23 The Minister for Education announced on 15 July

1981 that the Government had accepted the Commission's advice and that the funds required to implement the above proposals were to be found within the amounts already

allocated for the 1982-84 triennium. The Council's

A 5 C13mendati° nS With resPect to the NARU are at paragraph

R esearch C entres of E xcellence

A1.24 In its recommendations to the Minister for

Education on the 1981 Guidelines (Report for 1979-81 Triennium, Volume 4 Appendix B ), the Commission outlined the background to the concept of special research centres, recommended in the former Universities Commission's Sixth Report, May 1975. The Commission endorsed the concept of special research centres which had been developed by the Council and recommended that the Government approve their implementation in a program to commence in 1981.

A1.25 The Government subsequently appointed a Common­ wealth Research Centres of Excellence Committee (CRCEC) under the Chairmanship of Mr S.B. Myer to make recommend­

ations on the establishment of Centres. The terms of reference require the Committee to consult the Universities C o u n c i l , the Australian Science and Technology Council, and funding bodies such as the Australian Research Grants Committee, the National Health and Medical Research Council and the National Energy Research Development and Demonstration Council and such other bodies as it considers appropriate.

A1.26 An amount of $16 million has been included for the

program in the Guidelines for the 1982-84 triennium. Grants under the scheme will be administered by the Commission.

A1.27 The Council welcomes this initiative by the

Government, and the opportunity to co-operate with the Committee in the important task of selecting Centres for support under the program. The Council expects to comment further on the program in Volume 3 of this Report.

2 0 .

C H A P T E R 2 : C O U N C I L ' S APPROACH TO REC OMME ND AT I ON S

Operating Grants

APPROACH TO 1982-84 RECOMMENDATIONS

A 2 .1 The Council has re-examined the proposals it put

forward in Volume 1 , Part 2 for the triennium in the light of funds which will now be available. The new

initiatives which had been proposed were based on the premise that there was a need for funds in those areas

additional to funds at present available to the university sector. However, in view of reduced funding levels for 1982-84, it is evident that the new initiatives proposed could now only be supported at the expense of even greater

reductions than those already necessary in the grants to some universities.

A 2 .2 T h e Council has reluctantly decided, therefore,

that, with the exception of some additional provision for research, the initiatives it proposed can no longer be supported.

GENERAL DEVELOPMENT GRANTS

A2.3 In Volume 1, Part 2, the Council proposed

that the conditions which have hitherto applied to general development grants be modified to enable universities to make adjustments to their staffing structures. The Council suggested that the grant might be renamed adjustment grant

and that a limited number of universities might be added to those already receiving it. Additional funds were sought for this purpose (Volume 1 , Part 2, paragraphs 8.20 and 8.21 ).

A2.4 The Commission did not support the concept of

adjustment grants on the basis that it did not believe that special funds should be provided to facilitate early retirement or staff retraining (Volume 1 , Part 1 , para­ graph 5.41). However, it noted that within available funds

the existing grant could be extended, if judged appropriate by the Council, to cover more institutions and a somewhat wider range of purposes.

A 2 .5 The Council has new reviewed the general develop­

ment grant scheme in the context of the Commission's recommendation and the reduced funds available to the university sector in the 1982—84 triennium. The original grants to the Universities of Sydney and Melbourne were additional funds intended to compensate for limited growth

in their general recurrent g r ants. They represented additional funds both to the individual universities and to

21.

the university sector. W i t h the introduction of funding within fixed Government guidelines, however, support for the general development grant program could be achieved only at the expense of funds for other purposes. Nevertheless, the Council extended the scheme to additional universities during the 1979-81 triennium because of the importance it attached to providing some incentive for change in established universities during a period of little growth.

A 2 ·6 In view of the success of the scheme, the Council

gave serious consideration to earmarking part of the general recurrent grants to most universities for use as general development grants. However, it has not done so principally because it considers that with the present financial

constraints, universities should have the maximum freedom to use general recurrent funds in ways which they judge to be

best suited to their needs. With considerable reluctance, the Council has therefore decided to discontinue the scheme.

A 2 ·7 When extending the general development grant

program for the 1979-81 triennium, the Council indicated that it was not able to give the universities concerned any firm undertaking that it would be able to continue the

grants beyond 1981. In the allocation of funds for 1982-84, the Council has taken existing commitments into account.

RESEARCH

A2.8 In Volume 1 , Part 2, the Council emphasised

once again the essential role of the universities in research and research training and the need for increased funding in this area. The Council expressed its concern that standards of research activity would decline if additional funds were not made available for general research support. It saw a continuing need for up-to-date and expensive equipment for research purposes and argued that funds should be provided to enable the expansion of activities supported from the existing special research grant.

A2.9 The Council welcomes the endorsement by both the

Commission and the Government of the special commitment of universities to research and research training. It is concerned, however, that the Commission made no specific provision in its recommendations for increased funding for research activities other than through the equipment grant — principally on the ground that support from non-Commonwealth sources for research in universities has been increasing in recent years. The Council welcomes and supports the funding of research in universities from a variety of sources. Nevertheless it reiterates the points it made in Volume 1 , Part 2 (paragraph 8.23) that success in attracting

2 2 .

research funds depends on the basic facilities available in the university and that the provision of such facilities should continue to be the responsibility of the Council. Universities can make effective use of other research

grants only if they have adequate basic resources. In the

Council's view, success in attracting research grants imposes an increasing burden on the limited resources now existing in universities.

A2.10 The Council has previously endorsed the ASTEC

recommendation that universities re-examine procedures for allocating research funds. It is important for universities to be selective in funding research activities and the Council is in complete agreement with the Commission's view

(Volume 1 , Part 1 , paragraph 6.31) that in distributing research funds, universities should have regard to the potential for high quality research of both individuals and teams of research workers. Funds should be made available

not only to those with established reputations but also to provide others with the opportunity to embark on research activities. Furthermore, research programs should be

regularly reviewed, perhaps more critically than in the past, and funds should be withdrawn from those programs which have lost momentum or have ceased to make a

satisfactory contribution to the universities' research efforts.

A2.ll Because of the importance it attaches to research

and research training and the need to provide adequate research support for promising younger members of staff, the Council has decided to proceed with its Volume 1 , Part 2 proposal to increase the amount allocated for special

research during the triennium. In doing so, the Council has reviewed the conditions applying to the grants. These conditions, which embody the principles set out above, are

considered in detail in Chapter 5 and in Appendix 2, together with the basis for the distribution of grants between universities.

DISTRIBUTION OF GENERAL RECURRENT FUNDS

A2.12 When appropriate adjustments have been made for

funds transferred from the advanced education sector for those colleges of advanced education merging with univer­ sities, the total of general recurrent grants available to universities for each year of the 1982-84 triennium will be

about one p e r cent below the equivalent figure for 1981. In view of this lower level of resources, the Council has been influenced in its allocation of funds among univer­ sities by such factors as: the potential for resource

sharing between institutions; the potential for reducing ranges of activities within institutions; growth of smaller universities; and shortfalls in enrolment levels. It

expects that universities for their part will need to adopt a similar approach toward their internal distribution of f u n d s .

A2.13 In Volume 1, Pavt 2, the Council took the view

that, unless funds were increased, the universities would be unable to maintain adequately their present range of activities. It is vital that acceptable academic standards be preserved and the Council considers that this can be achieved within the funds available for the 1982-84 triennium only through the co-ordination of academic activities between institutions and by some reductions in the ranges of activities undertaken within institutions.

A2.14 Recent developments support the Council's views on

the need for greater co-ordination and rationalisation of activities in higher education. The Commonwealth Government is now committed to a major program of amalgamations and rationalisation of activities within the tertiary sector. In its Guidelines statement the Government made it clear that it expects real savings in resources to result from initiatives in this area. Moreover, it expects the Commission "to continue to promote the most efficient use of the resources available for tertiary education and to consider the opportunities for greater efficiency and savings by reducing unnecessary duplication of effort among faculties and s c h o o l s " . T h e Commission's distribution of funds between the higher education sectors assumes that consolidation and rationalisation will have to produce cost savings progressively over the triennium.

A2.15 There is little doubt that considerable potential does still exist for co-operation and resource sharing between institutions and the Council encourages all univer­ sities to explore possible co-operative arrangements, both with other universities and with colleges of advanced

education, particularly within their own regions.

A 2 .16 In Volume 1, Pavt 2, the Council encouraged

universities to examine critically the range of courses which they were providing. The Council is concerned at the extent to which universities - even the smaller ones - are committed to small classes in a wide range of academic activities with consequential high costs. It has taken some account of this in the allocations for 1982-84 and will continue to review the basis on which it funds small

faculties and departments (see paragraph A S .10).

^ ^ Commonwealth Education Policy and Financial Guidelines to the Commonwealth Education Commissions, Ministerial Statement, Jun e 1981.

24 .

A2.17 The rationalisation of existing activities may-well result in fewer choices for students, at least in the

short term, and for some universities may lead to reduced student intakes. However, if the quality of university operations is to be maintained within lower levels of funding, some reduced availability of university education must be expected. The potential for rationalisation both within and between institutions is considered further in

Chapter 4.

A2.18 The Council has also recognised the need to

provide for the development of the newer universities which have demonstrated a capacity for further growth in student numbers. While earlier views of what constituted an acceptable size and range of activities for a university may

now be open to question, it is evident that the Council will

need to make some increasing financial provision for growth at several institutions.

A2.19 Some account has also been taken of consistent and

substantial shortfalls in planned undergraduate student load during the 1979-81 triennium. In accord with the Council's previously stated view that universities would be seriously and adversely affected by abrupt changes in funding levels,

reductions in the funds available to the institutions concerned are less than might otherwise have been expected.

RECURRENT GRANTS FOR SPECIAL PURPOSES

A2.20 As mentioned earlier, the Council has decided to

increase the amount available as special research grants over the triennium. Total grants for teaching hospitals and student residences will be reduced fran the 1981 level in line with reductions in the general recurrent grant.

SUMMARY OF PROPOSALS

A2.21 A summary of the operating grants proposed for

each of the years of the 1982-84 triennium is set out in

Table A2.1. Details of the allocation of funds between individual institutions are set out in Chapter 5.

25.

TABLE A2.1

OPERATING GRANTS : SUMMARY OF FUNDS AVAILABLE 1981 , FUNDS RECOMMENDED BY COUNCIL, 1982-84

Grant 1981(a) 1982 1983 1984

$000 $000 $000 $000

General recurrent 937,285 950,900(b) 947,500(b) 947,600(b)

Equipment 42,392 45,700(b) n.y.a. n.y.a.

Special research 7,807 8,000 10,000 13,500

Teaching hospitals 2,741 2,700 2,700 2,700

Student residences 4,436 4,400(b) 4,400(b) 4,400(b)

Research centres of excellence 3,400(c) 5,000 5,900

TOTAL 994,661 1,015,100(d) 969,600(d) 974,100(d)

(a) Estimates expressed in comparable terms to the grants for the 1982-84 triennium.

(b) Includes amounts transferred frcm the advanced education sector for the mergers between colleges of advanced education and universities in Wollongong, Townsville, Armidale and Newcastle.

(c) Includes $1.2 million carried over frcm 1981.

(d) Excludes funds for community language programs in 1982-84; and equipment grants for 1983 and 1984.

n.y.a. = not yet available; funds for equipment are provided on an annual basis.

C a p i t a l G r a n t s

A2.22 The Commission has asked the Council to provide

advice on a capital program for universities in 1982 on the following b a s i s ; that after allowing for funds to meet existing commitments to major building projects (estimated to be some $5.9 million) funds required for minor works and

new major buildings (including design projects) should not, in total, exceed $10.3 million. This amount includes funds transferred from the advanced education sector for minor works in respect of four colleges of advanced education which are expected to amalgamate with universities.

A2.23 Options for distributing the $10.3 million are

severely limited. The Council has consistently expressed concern at the inadequate provision for minor works, but in view of its commitment to maintaining a minimal program of

new major buildings it is unable to do more than recommend that the minor buildings grant remain at the level available

26.

in 1981. An amount of $7.3 million, which includes

provision for the four colleges of advanced education referred to above, has been set aside for this purpose.

A2.24 The Council considers it essential, in the longer

term interests of universities, that a program of new major buildings be continued, however modest, and has recommended a program (including design) involving expenditure of $3 million in 1982.

A2.25 Table A2.2 summarises capital grants recommended for 1982. Details of the present capital program and the

Council's specific proposals for 1982 are presented in paragraphs A5.43 to A5.56.

TABLE A2.2

CAPITAL GRANTS FOR UNIVERSITIES - ACTUAL 1981; PROPOSED 1982

1981 1982 $m $m

Existing building commitments 2.94 5.90

New buildings 1 .66 2.70

Design 0.32 0.30

Minor building works 7.00 7.30(a)

11.92 16.20

(a) Includes provision for four CAEs expected to amalgamate with universities.

27 .

CHA PT ER 3 : S T U D E N T ENROLMENTS

Cu r r e n t En r o l m e n t Le v e l s

A3.1 In Volume 1, Part 2, the Council reviewed in

detail the enrolment patterns for the university system as a whole up to and including 1980. Now that preliminary

information on 1981 enrolment levels is available, it has been included with earlier data in Table A3.1 which shows student numbers over the period 1976 to 1981; student load over the same period is shown in Table A3.2.

TABLE A3.1

STUDENT ENROLMENTS AT AUSTRALIAN UNIVERSITIES, BY LEVEL, 1976 TO 1981

Tear

Higher degree Undergraduate Total Ful l-time

undergraduates as a proportion of total undergraduates

Humber Increase on previous

year

Humber Increase on previous

year

Number Increase on previous

year

per cent per cent per cent

1976 17,564 5.5 135,903 3.7 153,464 3.9 68.8

1977 18,402 4.8 139,517 2.7 157,919 2.9 68.6

1978 19,139 4.0 140,267 0.5 159,406 0.9 66.9

1979 19,873 3.8 140,269 ~ 160,142 0.5 65.2

1980 20,538 3.3 141,946 1.2 162,484 1 .5 64.1

1981(a) 21,704 5.7 144,233 1.6 165,937 2.1 63.5

(a) Preliminary.

STUDENT LOAD BY LEVEL AND

TABLE A3.2

AT AUSTRALIAN UNIVERSITIES, TYPE OF COURSE, 1976 TO 1981

Tear

Research

Higher degree

Coursework Total Undergraduate Total

Increase on previous year per cent

1976 16,245 7,106 23,351 114,087 137,438 3.7

1977 16,797 7,402 24,199 1 16,651 140,851 2.5

1978 17,267 7,871 25,138 115,531 140,669 -0.1

1979 17,488 8,132 25,620 1 14,043 139,663 -0.7

1980 17,809 8,684 26,493 113,640 140,133 0.3

1981(a) 18,160 9,488 27,648 114,972 142,620 1.8

(a) Preliminary.

28.

A3.2 The 1981 figures show that student numbers

continued to increase at both the higher degree and under­ graduate levels although it should be noted that the total figure of 165,937 includes about 1,200 students who would

previously have been enrolled at the Mt Nelson campus of the Tasmanian College of Advanced Education but who are now enrolled at the University of Tasmania following the consolidation of tertiary education in Southern Tasmania. Table A3.2 indicates that, even allowing for the transfer

of these students, the decline in undergraduate student load evident in recent years may be levelling out. At the same

time the higher degree student load is continuing to increase.

A3.3 A detailed analysis of the 1981 data will be

carried out once final figures are available. The prelimin­ ary data nevertheless suggest that there may be some slowing down of the general movement towards part-time study. However, at the higher degree level, the growth in numbers and load occurred mainly as a result of increased part-time

enrolments, and not in full-time enrolments where the lack of adequate financial support for these students is a major influence. The major increase was in coursework

enrolments. The 1981 data also indicate that the upturn in demand for enrolments in the physical sciences, engineering and technology areas evident in recent years has continued. Details of student numbers and student load over the period

1976 to 1981 for each university are set out in Tables A3.3 to A3.9 .

Future Enrolment Trends

A3.4 In Volume 1 , Part 2 (paragraph 7.102 to 7.108)

the Council identified inadequate financial support for students as a major factor in the declining proportion of recent school leavers entering universities and in the

continuing trend towards part-time study at both the higher degree and undergraduate levels.

A3.5 Since then a number of decisions have been taken

by the Commonwealth Government which relate to student finances. These include the reintroduction of tuition fees for students commencing second and higher degrees from the

beginning of 1982 and the introduction of a student loans scheme coupled with changes to eligibility conditions for TEAS allowances. The Council expects that the Commission will be commenting on these matters in its Report.

A3.6 It is difficult to make any accurate assessment

of the impact of the reintroduction of fees on university enrolments. Clearly some students will be deterred from commencing courses although the extent to which this will happen is a matter for conjecture. The impact is also

likely to vary from university to university.

29 .

TABLE A3.3

UNDERGRADUATE STUDENT NUMBERS, BY UNIVERSITY, 1976 TO 1981

University 1976 1977 1978 1979 1980 1981

Sydney 14,537 14,855 14,762 14,448 14,884 14,642

New South Wales 15,418 15,483 15,408 15,120 15,001 15,360

New England 7,170 7,285 7,328 7,573 7,564 7,911

Newcastle 4,185 4,257 4,038 3,961 3,912 3,897

Macquarie 8,864 9,211 9,085 9,256 9,253 9,089

Wollongong 2,111 2,348 2,579 2,607 2,614 2,828

NEW SOUTH WALES 52,285 53,439 53,200 52,965 53,228 53,727

Melbourne 14,000 13,695 13,933 13,686 13,850 13,818

Monash 12,059 11,766 11,629 11,686 11,829 11,786

La Trobe 8,033 8,302 8,033 7,995 8,015 7,778

Deakin - 2,432 3,456 4,348 4,717 5,179

VICTORIA 34,092 36,195 37,051 37,715 38,411 38,561

Queensland 16,541 16,672 16,599 16,167 16,281 16,053

James Cook 1,605 1,525 1,548 1,577 1,566 1,627

Griffith 771 1,100 1,485 1,495 1,818 2,015

QUEENSLAND 18,917 19,297 19,632 19,239 19,665 19,695

Adelaide 8,373 8,134 7,823 7,756 7,741 7,949

Flinders 3,547 3,664 3,505 3,542 3,467 3,365

SOUTH AUSTRALIA 11,920 11,798 11,328 11,298 11,208 11,314

Western Australia 8,723 8,716 8,611 8,508 8,625 8,643

Murdoch 1,429 1,812 2,199 2,196 2,283 2,548

WESTERN AUSTRALIA 10,152 10,528 10,810 10,704 10,908 11,191

Tasmania 3,286 3,255 3,265 3,166 3,212 4,577

Australian National - Faculties 5,231 4,993 4,976 5,164 5,296

j 5,168

- Institute 20 12 5 18 18

TOTAL AUSTRALIA 135,903 139,517 140,267 140,269 141,946 144,233

(a)

Preliminary.

30

TABLE A3.4

HIGHER DEGREE STUDENT NUMBERS, BY UNIVERSITY, 1976 TO 1981

University 1976 1977 1978 1979 1980 1981 ta)

Sydney 2,821 2,812 2,865 2,897 3,075 3,163

New South Wales 2,464 2,545 2,622 2,778 2,779 2,905

New England 713 729 815 810 897 1,003

Newcastle 316 364 391 403 390 494

Macquarie 993 1,109 1,156 1,237 1,263 1,400

Wollongong 157 150 167 190 235 261

NEW SOUTH WALES 7,464 7,709 8,016 8,315 8,639 9,226

Melbourne 2,087 2,101 2,078 2,157 2,271 2,329

Monash 1,692 1,784 2,069 2,224 2,267 2,375

La Trobe 516 584 636 714 755 760

Deakin - 13 27 55 82 99

VICTORIA 4,295 4,482 4,810 5,150 5,375 5,563

Queensland 1,674 1,845 1,918 2,041 2,077 2,166

James Cook 249 274 283 319 327 318

Griffith 64 97 125 122 180 213

QUEENSLAND 1,987 2,216 2,326 2,482 2,584 2,697

Adelaide 1,222 1,211 1,161 1,138 1,086 1,102

Flinders 351 381 415 404 383 395

SOUTH AUSTRALIA 1,573 1,592 1,576 1,542 1,469 1,497

Western Australia 1,081 1,149 1,145 1,131 1,166 1,192

Murdoch 60 96 144 165 202 237

WESTERN AUSTRALIA 1,141 1,245 1,289 1,296 1,368 1,429

Tasmania 250 270 252 269 305 505

Australian National - Faculties 468 459 433 407 417 (

- Institute 383 429 437 412 381 ( 787

TOTAL AUSTRALIA 17,561 18,402 19,139 19,873 20,538 21,704

(a)

Preliminary.

31.

TABLE A3.5

TOTAL STUDENT NUMBERS, BY UNIVERSITY, 1976 TO 1981

University 1976 1977 1978 1979 1980 1981 (a)

Sydney 17,358 17,667 17,627 17,345 17,959 17,805

New South Wales 17,882 18,028 18,030 17,898 17,780 18,265

New England 7,883 8,014 8,143 8,383 8,461 8,914

Newcastle 4,501 4,621 4,429 4,364 4,302 4,391

Macquarie 9,857 10,320 10,241 10,493 10,516 10,489

Wollongong 2,268 2,498 2,746 2,797 2,849 3,089

NEW SOUTH WALES 59,749 61,148 61,216 61,280 61,867 62,953

Melbourne 16,087 15,796 16,011 15,843 16,121 16,147

Monash 13,751 13,550 13,698 13,910 14,096 14,161

La Trobe 8,549 8,886 8,669 8,709 8,770 8,538

Deakin - 2,445 3,483 4,403 4,799 5,278

VICTORIA 38,387 40,677 41,861 42,865 43,786 44,124

Queensland 18,215 18,517 18,517 18,208 18,358 18,219

James Cook 1,854 1,799 1,831 1,896 1,893 1,945

Griffith 835 1,197 1,610 1,617 1,998 2,228

QUEENSLAND 20,904 21,513 21,958 21,721 22,249 22,392

Adelaide 9,595 9,345 8,984 8,894 8,827 9,051

Flinders 3,898 4,045 3,920 3,946 3,850 3,760

SOUTH AUSTRALIA 13,493 13,390 12,904 12,840 12,677 12,811

Western Australia 9,804 9,865 9,756 9,639 9,791 9,835

Murdoch 1,489 1,908 2,343 2,361 2,485 2,785

WESTERN AUSTRALIA 11,293 11,773 12,099 12,000 12,276 12,620

Tasmania 3,536 3,525 3,517 3,435 3,517 5,082

Australian National - Faculties 5,699 5,452 5,409 5,571 5,713 ( j r - r -

- Institute 403 441 442 430 399 ( ' ■

TOTAL AUSTRALIA 153,464 157,919 159,406 160,142 162,484 165,937

(a)

Preliminary.

32

TABLE A3.6

UNDERGRADUATE STUDENT LOAD, BY UNIVERSITY, 1976 TO 1981

University 1976 1977 1978 1979 1980 1981 '

Sydney 14,039 14,267 14,157 13,796 13,991 13,996

New South Wales 33,999 14,154 14,008 13,841 13,105 13,305

New England 4,899 4,985 4,980 5,007 4,750 4,662

Newcastle 3,351 3,350 3,134 2,990 2,880 2,795

Macquarie 6,426 6,546 6,325 6,269 6,126 5,935

Wollongong 1,626 1,774 1,980 1,905 1,864 1,959

NEW SOUTH WALES 44,340 45,076 44,584 43,808 42,716 42,652

Melbourne 12,008 11,815 12,027 11,814 12,050 12,197

Monash 10,623 10,233 10,033 10,005 10,110 10,230

La Trobe 6,746 6,771 6,381 6,263 6,371 6,129

Deakin 2,043 2,382 2,510 2,683 2,871

VICTORIA 29,377 30,862 30,823 30,592 31,214 31,427

Queensland 12,847 12,984 12,547 12,414 12,364 12,344

James Cook 1,386 1,304 1,321 1,332 1,293 1,341

Griffith 754 1,071 1,378 1,400 1,570 1,681

QUEENSLAND 14,987 15,359 15,246 15,146 15,227 15,366

Adelaide 7,048 6,829 6,559 6,457 6,483 6,646

Flinders 2,999 3,035 2,865 2,811 2,734 2,655

SOUTH AUSTRALIA 10,047 9,864 9,424 9,268 9,217 9,301

Western Australia 6,999 7,115 7,070 6,973 7,043 7,033

Murdoch 1,028 1,380 1,533 1,511 1,520 1,559

WESTERN AUSTRALIA 8,027 8,495 8,603 8,484 8,563 8,592

Tasmania 2,796 2,692 2,734 2,581 2,569 3,552

Australian National - Faculties 4,494 4,293 4,105 4,148 4,127 4,078

- Institute 19 10 12 16 7 4

TOTAL AUSTRALIA 114,087 116,651 115,531 114,043 113,640 114,972

(a)

Preliminary.

33

TABLE A3.7

HIGHER DEGREE RESEARCH STUDENT LOAD, BY UNIVERSITY 1976 TO 1981

University 1976 1977 1978 1979 1980 1981 (a)

Sydney 2,165 2,177 2,270 2,327 2,450 2,230

New South Wales 1,775 1,700 1,832 1,801 1,753 1,850

New England 463 494 554 619 630 691

Newcastle 343 441 463 478 476 497

Macquarie 627 713 654 675 668 688

Wollongong 175 156 164 178 198 206

NEW SOUTH WALES 5,549 5,681 5,936 6,078 6,175 6,162

Melbourne 2,311 2,329 2,165 2,184 2,302 2,378

Monash 1,645 1,637 1,763 1,813 1,785 1,878

La Trobe 677 754 796 828 862 858

Deakin 20 35 70 102 121

VICTORIA 4,633 4,740 4,759 4,895 5,051 5,235

Queensland 1,400 1,517 1,510 1,592 1,599 1,598

James Cook 208 222 235 294 297 298

Griffith 50 91 119 135 159 212

QUEENSLAND 1,658 1,830 1,864 2,011 2,055 2,108

Adelaide 1,410 1,414 1,432 1,318 1,306 1,307

Flinders 341 348 393 380 369 387

SOUTH AUSTRALIA 1,751 1,762 1,825 1,698 1,675 1,694

Western Australia 1,006 1,082 1,111 1, 090 1,111 1,100

Murdoch 92 113 152 154 189 258

WESTERN AUSTRALIA 1,098 1,195 1,263 1,244 1,300 1,358

Tasmania 275 303 335 339 360 410

Australian National - Faculties 588 618 595 579 583 585

- Institute 692 666 690 644 610 608

TOTAL AUSTRALIA 16,245 16,797 17,267 17,488 17,809 18,160

34.

(a)

Preliminary.

HIGHER DEGREE COURSEWORK STUDENT LOAD, BY UNIVERSITY, 1976 TO 1981

University 1976 1977 1978 1979 1980 1981

Sydney 1,397 1,381 1,348 1,303 1,448 1,619

New South Wales 1,063 1,158 1,210 1,271 1,422 1,500

New England 411 441 435 354 417 448

Newcastle 86 63 88 77 69 133

Macquarie 604 655 721 783 824 954

Wollongong 31 34 51 77 116 158

NEW SOUTH WALES 3,593 3,733 3,853 3,865 4,296 4,812

Melbourne 619 582 734 776 757 751

Monash 740 823 931 1,045 1,080 1,106

La Trobe 108 110 141 180 199 211

Deakin ~ 2 2 - 1 -

VICTORIA 1,467 1,517 1,808 2,001 2,037 2,068

Queensland 692 655 725 719 745 852

James Cook 138 130 137 132 132 111

Griffith 27 39 42 30 64 62

QUEENSLAND 857 824 904 881 941 1,025

Adelaide 315 289 288 330 319 323

Flinders 164 179 178 184 161 154

SOUTH AUSTRALIA 479 468 466 514 480 477

Western Australia 431 468 454 466 488 487

Murdoch ~ 16 51 75 99 85

WESTERN AUSTRALIA 431 484 505 541 587 572

Tasmania 61 73 54 71 96 294

Australian National - Faculties 154 131 111 109 121 102

- Institute 62 171 170 150 126 138

TOTAL AUSTRALIA 7,106 7,402 7,871 8,132 8,684 9,488

(a)

Preliminary.

TABLE A3.9

TOTAL STUDENT LOAD, BY UNIVERSITY, 1976 TO 1981

University 1976 1977 1978 1979 1980 1981[

Sydney 17,601 17,826 17,775 17,426 17,889 17,845

New South Wales 16,838 17,012 17,050 16,913 16,280 16,655

New England 5,774 5,921 5,968 5,980 5,797 5,801

Newcastle 3,780 3,854 3,685 3,545 3,425 3,425

Macquarie 7,657 7,914 7,700 7,727 7,618 7,577

Wollongong 1,832 1,964 2,195 2,160 2,178 2,323

NEW SOUTH WALES 53,482 54,491 54,373 53,751 53,187 53,626

Melbourne 14,938 14,726 14,926 14,774 15,109 15,326

Monash 13,008 12,693 12,727 12,863 12,975 13,214

La Trobe 7,531 7,636 7,318 7,271 7,432 7,198

Deakin - 2,065 2,419 2,580 2,786 2,992

VICTORIA 35,477 37,120 37,390 37,488 38,302 38,730

Queensland 14,939 15,156 14,782 14,725 14,708 14,794

James Cook 1,732 1,656 1,693 1,748 1,722 1,750

Griffith 832 1,201 1,539 1,565 1,793 1,955

QUEENSLAND 17,503 18,013 18,014 18,038 18,223 18,499

Adelaide 8,773 8,533 8,279 8,105 8,108 8,276

Flinders 3,504 3,562 3,436 3,375 3,264 3,196

SOUTH AUSTRALIA 12,277 12,095 11,715 11,480 11,372 11,472

Western Australia 8,437 8,666 8,635 8,529 8,642 8,620

Murdoch 1,120 1,509 1,736 1,740 1,808 1,902

WESTERN AUSTRALIA 9,557 10,175 10,371 10,269 10,450 10,522

Tasmania 3,133 3,068 3,123 2,991 3,025 4,256

Australian National - Faculties 5,236 5,042 4,811 4,836 4,831 4,765

- Institute 773 847 872 810 743 750

TOTAL AUSTRALIA 137,438 140,851 140,669 139,663 140,133 142,620

(a)

Preliminary.

36.

A3.7 The Council would not expect total undergraduate

enrolments to be greatly affected by the Government's decisions. Students enrolled in first degrees or diplomas together with several other categories of students upgrading courses in various ways will not have to pay f e e s . However,

some universities, including those with a major commitment to external studies, do enrol significant numbers of mature age students with previous tertiary qualifications in undergraduate programs and these enrolments may be affected. Universities with a major commitment to external studies may

also be affected.

A3.8 The reintroduction of fees may have an impact on

individual higher degree enrolments but the Council does not expect there to be any decline in total enrolments for the

university sector as a whole. Enrolments in both research and coursework masters programs have been graving steadily in recent years and most universities claim that there is a substantial unsatisfied demand from well qualified students

for admission to many courses. In the research area, a high

proportion of full-time students receive either Commonwealth or university scholarships and will therefore be exempt from fees; this is particularly true for the older universities. Demand from the remaining students, many of whom will be part-time, may well be sufficient to maintain research

enrolments at current levels.

A3.9 The situation for coursework is rather diff e r e n t .

Few students hold scholarships and most courses are arranged to suit part-time students. As most students will in future have to pay fees for these courses some reduction in the

recent rapid growth of cours ework enrolments is to be expected. Nevertheless many students enrolled in coursework programs are employed in fields relevant to the courses they are u n dertaking. Some may expect employer assistance towards the cost of fees while others are likely to be

sufficiently motivated to meet the level of fees which will apply from 1982.

A3.10 In summary, while the Council does not expect the

reintroduction of fees to have a major impact on enrolment levels in the university sector, it is now planning for higher degree enrolments to level out over the triennium rather than for the continuing growth proposed in Volume 1.

A3.11 Until further details are known about the proposed

loans scheme and the changes to TEAS eligibility conditions, it is difficult to assess their impact on enrolment levels. However, the Council would not expect these changes to have a significant effect on undergraduate enrolments.

37.

A3.12 Another important factor which will influence

enrolment levels during the 1982-84 triennium is the reduced financial resources available. W ith recurrent funds available for distribution to universities as much as 4 per cent below the levels considered necessary by the Cou n c i l , it will not be possible for all universities while offering the existing range and variety of programs to maintain acceptable academic standards. As a result the Council expects that some universities will find it n e cessary, in the light of the funds available to them, to restrict

student intakes. The Council has taken this into account in its assessment of appropriate student load limits for each u n i v e r s i t y .

P roposed E nrolment L e v e l s , 1982-84

A3.13 The Commission has confirmed that planning for

universities should be on the basis of the student load ranges contained in Volume 1 of the Commission's Report: 139,000 to 142,000 WSU for each year of the triennium. The Commission invited the Council to review its earlier proposals for student load levels in the light of funds now available and expressed the view that it would be preferable to aim at the lower rather than the upper end of the ranges.

The proposed distribution of load set out in Tables AS.10 and A3.11 is consistent with the Commission's request.

DISTRIBUTION OF STUDENT LOAD

A3.14 For each year of the 1979-81 triennium, the

Council provided ranges of total student load for each institution with upper limits on higher degree research and coursework enrolments. Following discussions with universities, the Council considered whether it should revise its approach to the limitations of higher degree

enrolments. In Volume 1, Fart 2 , paragraph 8.11, it coneluded:

...The Council is now less persuaded of the need for such restraints, believing that in the present circumstances it may­ be preferable for universities to determine for themselves the appropriate balance between higher degree and undergraduate enrolment levels within a range of total student load suggested by the Council. The Council will be giving further consider­ ation to this question in the preparation of its Volume 2 Advice to the Commission.

A3.15 With the added restraints now imposed on the

university sector through reduced levels of resources and the reintroduction of some fees, the Council has decided that it should adopt a more flexible approach to the specification of suitable levels of student load in 1982-84. The Council has now imposed constraints only where it sees

them contributing to the achievement of an appropriate balance of enrolments either within or between institutions.

A3.16 Consistent with the more selective approach it

has adopted towards the distribution of resources for the triennium, the Council has, as far as possible, taken into account the particular circumstances of each university- in the distribution of student load. For the larger, established universities the Council has set upper limits

rather than ranges for both total student load and under­ graduate load. Details are shown in Table A3.10. Within the limits established, each of these universities will be able to determine for itself appropriate levels of higher degree enrolments.

A3.17 Enrolment levels at each of the universities shown

in Table A3.10 have remained fairly constant in recent years and the Council sees no benefit to be gained by any

increase in their size. Indeed the Council has specified maximum levels of student load which in most cases, are below 1981 levels and would have no objections if univer­ sities were to reduce their size even further. However, in

view of the high level of demand for admission to these

institutions, the Council considers that this is unlikely to o c c u r . The limits on undergraduate enrolments are specifically intended to provide smaller neighbouring universities with the opportunity to increase, or at least maintain, undergraduate enrolments during the triennium. Further comments are made in relation to individual

universities in Chapter 4.

TABLE A3.10

DISTRIBUTION OF STUDENT LOAD, BY UNIVERSITY, 1981(a), PROPOSED MAXIMA 1982 TO 1984

University

1981 1982 1983 1984

Under­ graduate Total Under­ graduate Total

Under­ graduate Total Under­ graduate Total

Sydney 13,996 17,845 13,600 17,500 13,600 17,500 13,600 17,500

New South Wales 13,305 16,655 13,200 16,400 13,100 16,300 13,000 16,200

Melbourne 12,197 15,326 12,000 15,000 12,000 15,000 12,000 15,000

Monash 10,230 13,214 10,100 12,900 10,000 12,800 10,000 12,800

Queensland 12,344 14,794 12,300 14,800 12,300 14,800 12,300 14 ,800

Adelaide 6,646 8,2 76 6,500 8,100 6,400 8,000 6,300 7,900

Western Australia 7,033 8,620 6,900 8,500 6,850 8,450 6,800 8,400

39 .

(a) Preliminary.

A3.18 For the remaining universities, the Council has

established ranges of total student load. These are set out in Table A3.11. In all cases the ranges are wider

than those which applied during the 1979-81 triennium in recognition of the greater uncertainties in enrolments facing universities in 1982-84. As in the previous triennium, universities will have the opportunity to achieve student load targets anywhere within the proposed ranges without prejudice to their grants.

A3.19 The Council has not set firm upper limits for

either research or coursework higher degree load at these institutions. In general it considers it unlikely, in view of the reintroduction of fees, that present levels will be greatly exceeded during the triennium. At some of the smaller institutions, where special provision has been made for growth in undergraduate load, the Council expects those universities to treat this as their primary objective. Some constraints on the level of higher degree research load are included in the comments on individual institutions in Chapter 4.

TABLE A3.11

DISTRIBUTION OF TOTAL STUDENT LOAD, BY UNIVERSITY, 1981(a) AND PROPOSED RANGES 1982 TO 1984

University 1981 1982 1983 1984

New England 5,801 5,550-5,750 5,500-5,700 5,450-5,650

Newcastle 3,425 3,200-3,400 3,100-3,300 3,000-3,200

Macquarie 7,577 7,300-7,500 7,200-7,400 7,100-7,300

Wollongong 2,323 2,300-2,500 2,350-2,550 2,400-2,600

La Trobe 7, 198 7,050-7,250 7,050-7,250 7,050-7,250

Deakin 2,992 3,000-3,200 3,050-3,250 3,100-3,300

James Cook 1,750 1,650-1,850 1,650-1,850 1,650-1,850

Griffith 1 ,955 2,000-2,200 2,100-2,300 2,200-2,400

Flinders 3,196 3,150-3,350 3,200-3,400 3,200-3,400

Murdoch 1 ,902 1,900-2,100 2,000-2,200 2,100-2,300

Tasmania 4,256 4,150-4,350 4,150-4,350 4,150-4,350

Australian National 5,515 5,150-5,350 5,100-5,300 5,050-5,250

(a) Preliminary.

ADVANCED EDUCATION ENROLMENTS IN UNIVERSITIES

A3.20 Under the proposed arrangements for the

amalgamation of the universities and colleges of advanced education in Armidale, Newcastle, Wollongong and Townsville funding for the combined institutions will be provided

40.

through the Universities Council. However, advanced education courses are expected to remain distinct and the student load in those courses will continue to be regarded as advanced education e n r o lments; enrolments suggested by

the Advanced Education Council are set out in paragraph A5.13. Student load ranges in Table A3.11 for the University of New England, the University of Newcastle, the University of Wollongong and James Cook University relate

therefore to university activities only.

CHA PT ER A : COMMENTARY ON U N I V E R S I T I E S

In t r o d u c t i o n

A4.1 In paragraph 1.22 of Volume 1, Part 2 the

Council stated:

The Council believes that a full review of its recently completed triennial discussions with the universities should form an integral part of its planning for the allocation of resources

among the institutions. It intends, therefore, to include with its detailed financial recommendations in Volume 2 of this Report an account of some of the achievements, problems and prospects of each university.

In this chapter the Council has set out some of the

similarities and differences among universities, some statistical comparisons and some of the consequences of consolidation as well as commenting briefly on the individual universities.

A4.2 The Council sees several reasons for commenting on

individual institutions. First, it believes that it should take this opportunity to identify the particular consider­ ations which have influenced its distribution of available funds.

A4.3 Secondly, the Commission has specifically sought

the Council's views on a number of matters relating to particular universities; and there are several other issues, arising either from the Commission's Volume 1 , Part 1 or from the Government's Guidelines, on which the

Council would wish to comment:

. The future of external studies at Deakin

University.

. The longer term future of Griffith University in relation to the admissions policy of the University of Queensland.

. The desirability of maintaining pre-service teacher education programs at Flinders University.

. Increased collaboration and sharing of resources between Murdoch University and the University of Western Australia and the resultant implications for funding of the two institutions.

. Amalgamation of four universities - New England, Newcastle, Wollongong and James Cook - with neighbouring colleges of advanced education.

42.

. Rationalisation of the provision of engineering education in Victoria with particular reference to Deakin University.

. The funding of the Institute of Advanced Studies

of the Australian National U n i v e r s i t y .

A 4 .4 Thirdly, in Chapter 2 of Volume 1, Part 2 the

Council addressed the role and functions of universities generally, and the features which distinguish them from other forms of tertiary education. Individual universities have varying aspirations and distinctive roles to play within the general framework of the university system.

Comment on each institution will enable differences between institutions to be more clearly recognised, and promote a greater understanding of the diversity existing within the university system in this country.

DEVELOPMENT OF AUSTRALIAN UNIVERSITIES

A4.5 In Volume 1 , Part 2 (paragraph 2.7), the

Council pointed out that distinctions can be drawn between universities on the basis of such factors as age, size, location and the range of disciplines offered. Differences

between the institutions can largely be explained by the historical development of the system.

A 4 .6 The first Australian university - the University

of Sydney - was established in 1850. By 1911 a university

had been established in each State. These now form an

easily recognised group, offering a wide range of disciplines - including most of those in the professional areas - and with strong appeal to school leavers. In the

ensuing 38 years only the Australian National University, established in 1946 as a national research and research training institution, was added to the system.

A 4 .7 The creation in 1949 of the New South Wales

University of Technology - later to become the University of New South Wales - saw the beginning of a period of

continuing development within the sector which resulted in the establishment of twelve new universities in a period of less than thirty years. The most recent of these, Deakin

U n i v e r s i t y , was established in 1977.

A 4 .8 These more recent universities might be considered

in two categories: those located in metropolitan areas (for example. Monash, Griffith and Macquarie); and those outside the capital cities (for example, New England and James Cook). This broad distinction is useful in reaching some

understanding of the way in which these universities have developed and of how they perceive their responsibilities.

43.

A 4 .9 Each of the more recently established metropolitan

universities has tried to provide a form of university education rather different from that already existing in the city. This has been reflected sometimes in different academic and administrative structures, for example, in the use of broadly based schools as the basic unit, rather than traditional academic departments - a change designed to provide greater flexibility, and to encourage inter­ disciplinary studies; and in the development of new teaching techniques. These universities have seen themselves as complementing the older institutions by offering at least to some extent, an alternative style of university education.

A4.10 Many of these recently established universities have had to face economic restraints and some slackening of student demand, instead of the period of significant growth and development foreshadowed when they were established. Thus, they have made some changes in their style of

operation, and have revised their expectations of growth, particularly in the short t e r m .

A4.ll With the exception of Deakin University, all the

non-metropolitan universities were originally colleges of metropolitan universities. Since gaining autonomy, each has assumed responsibility for providing undergraduate univer­ sity education to the population of its particular region, and has developed either a specialist role relating to its

environment (for example, research in marine studies and tropical veterinary science at James Cook) or a particular area of expertise (for example, external studies at New England and Deakin). For the most part student numbers are

small, the largest institution being the University of New England with some 8,500 enrolments in 1980 of which only 2,600 were internal students. Table A4.1 summarises enrolments at the non-metropolitan universities.

TABLE A4.1

UNIVERSITIES OUTSIDE THE CAPITAL CITIES; ENROLMENTS BY LEVEL AND TYPE, 1980

Undergraduate Higher degree Total students

Internal External Internal External

New England 2,553 5,011 318 8,461

Newcastle 3,912 - 390 - 4,302

Wollongong 2,614 - 235 - 2,849

Deakin 2,128 2,589 33 49 4,799

James Cook 1,566 3 27 1,893

44.

1

A4.12 These universities need to determine, perhaps to a

greater extent than their metropolitan counterparts, the appropriate balance between their responsibilities in the local geographical region and their wider role as members of the national and international community of universities. Moreover, as relatively small institutions, each faces the problem of meeting the needs of the local community without creating difficulties for themselves by offering too diverse

a range of courses with limited staff and other resources.

A4.13 There are, of course, other bases for comparisons

between universities. There are those with a major commit­ ment to external studies, and those with medical schools, for example. Some have similar characteristics (such as age, size or location) and may be facing comparable probl e m s ; for instance, the University of Adelaide and the University of Western Australia or Macquarie and La Trobe Universities.

STATISTICAL REVIEW

A4.14 The statistical information regularly provided by universities is an indicator of the similarities and differences which exist between individual institutions. The following paragraphs draw some comparisons on the basis

of student and staffing characteristics. Reference is made, where appropriate, to the statistical tables contained in Appendix 1 .

A4.15 An important characteristic of university

education is the commitment to higher degree w o r k . The extent to which resources, as measured in terms of student load, are applied in this area differs significantly between

institutions. This is illustrated in Table A4.2. As a general rule, the larger and older institutions have a relatively greater involvement in higher degree w o r k , and especially to research training, than do the more recently established universities. The enrolments in higher degrees by coursework show much greater variation.

A4.16 In general, the older universities enrol a high

proportion of their students on a full-time basis (see Table A 2 (a ), Appendix 1). This reflects both their attract­ iveness to recent school leavers, most of whom are full-time students and their provision of professional courses such as

medicine, dentistry and veterinary science, which generally require full-time attendance.

A4.17 There are, however, some exceptions to this

pattern. The University of Queensland has a lower proport­ ion of full-time students than might be expected because it alone of the long established universities has a major

45.

TABLE A4.2

HIGHER DEGREE STUDENT LOAD AS PROPORTION OF TOTAL STUDENT LOAD, BY UNIVERSITY, 198!

HIGHER DEGREE

University

Research Coursework Total ιοναυ student toad

Sydney

per cent 14.1

per cent 8.3

per cent 22.4 17,839

New South Wales 11.1 9.0 20.1 16,655

New England 11.9 7.7 19.6 5,804

Newcastle 14.5 3.9 18.4 3,425

Macquarie 9.1 12.6 21.7 7,577

Wollongong 9.1 6.6 15.7 2,320

NEW SOUTH WALES 12.0 8.7 20.7 53,620

Melbourne 15.5 4.9 20.4 15,326

Monash 14.3 8.3 22.6 13,214

La Trobe 11.9 2.9 14.8 7,198

Deakin 4.1 - 4.1 2,987

VICTORIA 13.5 5.3 18.8 38,725

Queensland 11.1 5.5 16.6 14,794

James Cook 17.1 6.3 23.4 1,750

Griffith 10.8 3.2 14.0 1,955

QUEENSLAND 11.6 5.3 16.9 18,499

Adelaide 15.8 3.9 19.7 8,276

Flinders 12.1 4.8 16.9 3,196

SOUTH AUSTRALIA 14.8 4.2 19.0 11,472

Western Australia 12.8 5.6 18.4 8,615

Murdoch 13.6 4.4 18.0 1,902

WESTERN AUSTRALIA 12.9 5.4 18.3 10,517

Tasmania 9.5 7.0 16.5 4,256

Australian National (Faculties) 12.3 2.1 14.4 4,765

TOTAL AUSTRALIA 13.0 6.5 19.5 142,604

(a)

Preliminary.

46

commitment to external studies. On the other hand, Griffith University, which has only recently offered many of its programs o n a part-time basis, still has a high proportion

of full-time students.

A 4 .18 Information on ages of students and enrolments by

field of study complements that on type of enrolment. The

younger age distribution of students attending the older universities (see Table A 4 (a ), Appendix 1) reflects the high proportion of recent school leavers in their under­ graduate courses while the older age profiles of the newer

institutions are consistent with the significant numbers of special entry, mature age and external students they enrol. Enrolments by field of study (see Table A 3 ( a ), Appendix 1) illustrate the wide range of disciplines available at the older universities; those more recently established all

offer courses in the traditional Arts and Science areas but only a few offer specialised courses (for example, University of Newcastle, medicine; Murdoch University, veterinary science).

A4.19 The involvement of the older universities in the

professional disciplines, most of which are science-based, is also reflected in Table A4.3, which shows the proport­ ions of science-based and arts-based student load at each university in 1980 (final data for 1981 have not yet been

analysed). All the older institutions have an above average proportion of science-based load. The newer universities are generally below average although there are exceptions, including James Cook with its engineering faculty and particular interests in marine studies and tropical

veterinary science and Murdoch with its veterinary school. The very low proportions of science-based enrolments at New England, Macquarie and Deakin reflect their commitment to teacher education and external studies.

A4.20 The academic staffing structure at individual

universities (see Table A9(a), Appendix 1) shows that in general the newer universities have less than 50 per cent of their academic staff at the levels of senior lecturer and above whereas at the older universities the proportion of senior staff is, in some cases, as high as 70 per cent. The

tables also show marked changes in many universities between 1975 and 1980.

A4.21 As might be expected, student/staff ratios tend

to be lower at the smaller institutions (see Table A 8 (a ), Appendix 1). Although the average for all universities is about 12:1, most of the small universities have ratios of about 10:1 or less. This reflects the economies of scale

which can be achieved in the larger institutions and the need for the smaller universities to maintain sufficient numbers of academic staff to enable them to provide students with a reasonable range of educational choices.

TABLE A4.3

SCIENCE-BASED(a) AND ARTS-BASED STUDENT LOAD AS A PROPORTION OF TOTAL STUDENT LOAD, 1980

Science based Arts based Total load per cent per cent

Sydney 36.2 63.8 17,889

New South Wales 38.3 61.7 16,280

New England 16.6 83.4 5,797

Newcastle 28.5 71.5 3,425

Macquarie 11.8 88.2 7,618

Wollongong 29.5 70.5 2,178

NEW SOUTH WALES 30.5 69.5 53,187

Melbourne 39.5 60.5 15,109

Monash 29.7 70.3 12,975

La Trobe 20.7 79.3 7,432

Deakin 17.4 82.6 2,786

VICTORIA 30.9 69.1 38,302

Queensland 41.6 58.4 14,708

James Cook 35.4 64.6 1,722

Griffith 26.8 73.2 1,793

QUEENSLAND 39.5 60.5 18,223

Adelaide 39.4 60.6 8,108

Flinders 28.9 71.1 3,264

SOUTH AUSTRALIA 36.4 63.6 11,372

Western Australia 36.5 63.5 8,642

Murdoch 35.6 64.4 1,808

WESTERN AUSTRALIA 36.3 63.7 10,450

Tasmania 35.0 65.0 3,025

Australian Nati o n a l ^ 16.8 83.2 4,831

TOTAL AUSTRALIA 32.3 67.7 139,390

^ Science-based student load includes all science disciplines (other than mathematics, psychology and geography), agriculture, dentistry , engineering, medicine and veterinary science.

^ Excludes the Institute of Advanced Studies and Centres.

48 .

II

Thus the student/staff ratios reflect the higher costs of the smaller institutions and illustrate the need for these universities to examine closely their current ranges of offerings with a view to eliminating some activities.

A4.22 Student/staff ratios also vary quite noticeably

between universities within particular disciplines. The Commission referred (Volume 1, Part 1, paragraph 5.18) to the relatively low student/staff ratios in education at some universities. Significant variations are also evident

in most other disciplines. While in some cases lower ratios might reflect declining student demand, variations are usually indicative of the different teaching practices adopted by universities. In this context, it is important

to note that the Council makes no special provision for the different approaches to teaching adopted by universities. The block recurrent grants provided to institutions are based essentially on broad national parameters and the

responsibility for the internal allocation of funds, both between academic and other activities and between disciplines, rests with individual institutions.

CONSOLIDATION IN HIGHER EDUCATION

A4.23 In Volume 1 of this Report, the Commission (see

Part 1, Chapter 5) and the Councils recognised the need for greater co-ordination of activities within the tertiary- sector and indicated ways in which this might be achieved during the 1982-84 triennium. Subsequently, the Common­ wealth Government made rationalisation and consolidation the

focal points of its guidelines for the tertiary education sector. As they affect universities, the Government's decisions are broadly consistent with the views expressed by the Council.

A4.24 The disadvantages of smallness of size in the

advanced education sector, referred to by the Commission (Volume 1, Part 1, paragraphs 5.42 to 5.46) also apply to the smaller universities; in particular, their relatively higher operating costs, limitations on the range and quality of educational choice available to students, and reduced opportunities for members of staff. In Volume 1,

Part 2 (paragraph 7.12) the Council encouraged some of the smaller universities to pursue amalgamation, or some form of close formal co-operation with neighbouring colleges of advanced education, in order to make better use of academic

resources and thus provide improved educational opport­ unities within their regions. The Council therefore accepts the Government's decision that the universities and colleges of advanced education in Armidale, Newcastle, Wollongong and Townsville amalgamate. Progress made on the amalgamation

49 .

of the institutions in each city is reviewed in the

Commission's recent progress report to the Commonwealth G o vernment.'1'

A4.25 The Council proposed (Volume 1, Part 2,

Appendix 1) that Murdoch University and the University of Western Australia should take into account the opportunities for sharing and concentrating resources in their planning for the 1982-84 triennium, a view embodied by the

Government in its decision that the grants for the two universities should be based on collaboration and greater sharing of resources. The Council emphasises that similar potential also exists for greater co-operation between neighbouring institutions in other States.

A4.26 The Government's decision that the engineering

school at Deakin University should be closed progressively has overtaken the Commission's request that the Universities and Advanced Education Councils provide it with specific proposals concerning the rationalisation of engineering

education in Victoria. However, the Council agrees with the views expressed earlier by the Victorian Post-Secondary Education Commission that engineering education in the State should be more concentrated than at present. Arrangements which would allow for some continuing provision of engineering education in the Geelong region are considered

in paragraph A4.80.

A4.27 As stated in Chapter 2 (paragraph A2.13), the

Council is taking particular account of the potential for increased co-operation and resource sharing between institutions and the need for some universities to reduce the existing range of their academic activities, in the distribution of general recurrent funds.

A4.28 Several universities have asked the Council to

identify such activities, and in some cases particular disciplines or areas of study are mentioned in the comments on individual universities. In general terms, the Council regards Asian studies, foreign languages, small third and

fourth year classes in courses such as physics and chemistry, and co-ordination of post-graduate supervision as typical illustrations of activities where benefits will flow from collaboration. A particular example would be the teaching of foreign languages in Victoria where co-operative arrangements already exist between the metropolitan

institutions. The Council notes that there have been problems in the current arrangements but encourages the three universities concerned to explore fully ways of

(1) Commonwealth Tertiary Education Commission, Progress Report on Consolidation in Advanced Education, July 1981.

50.

collaborating further in language teaching. The development of community language programs may provide further opport­ unities for collaboration.

A4.29 Universities have claimed that there are practical

difficulties related to the co-ordination of activities, such as distance between institutions, reconciliation of terms and semesters and different timetabling. The Council expects universities to resolve such problems and encourages both staff and students to adopt a more positive approach to

co-operation.

A4.30 The Council is also concerned at the proliferation

of committees within universities over recent years and the consequent burdens this places on both academic and administrative staff. While several universities have specifically addressed this problem, the Council sees

further scope for improvement and encourages all univer­ sities to keep their procedures under review. The Council is also aware of the administrative burdens it places on universities, particularly in relation to requests for information; it too will review its requirements with the

intention of reducing its requests to the minimum necessary to enable it to discharge its responsibilities.

A4.31 Both the Government and the Commission have

expectations that real and immediate savings in financial resources will result from initiatives such as those described above. In the Council's view, the principal aims

of the rationalisation of tertiary education should be to increase and improve educational opportunities for students, and to make more effective use of available resources; rationalisation should not be seen primarily as a way of

reducing expenditure - although this may result in the longer term. Better value for money spent should be the

first objective of steps taken to co-ordinate tertiary education.

A 4 .32 Recurrent funds available to the university

sector in 1982 and later years of the triennium are

significantly below the 1981 level. With staff salaries and related costs constituting some 85 per cent of all recurrent expenditure, the need to reduce expenditure may require some reductions in staff numbers.

A4.33 The Council believes that, with careful planning,

universities will be able to operate with smaller budgets and still maintain the quality of their academic activities, although the range of these activities would need to be reduced. The present turnover of tenured academic staff of between 3 and 4 per cent a year together with the flexi­

bility which should result from measures such as those suggested by the Council in Volume 1, Part 2 (for example, more short-term appointments, fractional appointments,

51.

redeployment and retraining, secondments and exchange) should in time permit the necessary reductions in staff to be achieved without recourse to retrenchments.

A4.34 However, the reduced funds available in 1982, and

the Council's decision on their distribution will impose considerable short-term difficulties on some universities. The immediate necessary reductions in expenditure may be so large that some universities might need to consider the retrenchment of staff as a solution.

A4.35 An alternative and preferable course of action

might be for universities to take decisions immediately to phase out selected academic activities by admitting no new students from 1982. This may not result in immediate

savings in staffing costs but the reduced level of activi­ ties should produce some general savings. Restrictions on short-term and part-time appointments and normal wastage of staff through turnover should enable universities to operate within the recurrent grants fixed by the Council. Staff

involved in the teaching of courses or programs being phased out are likely to seek and obtain positions elsewhere; others might be redeployed or retrained for other activities. Sharing of staff between institutions might also help to alleviate the problem.

A4.36 The Council recognises that such an approach

brings its own difficulties. The general quality of operations in universities can be expected to suffer a temporary decline as academic positions fall vacant and cannot be filled. However, once reductions in selected activities have been achieved, universities should be in a position to restore and perhaps improve the quality of their remaining programs. If they act at once and are prepared to

commit themselves to reducing the range of their activities, then the adjustment to lower funding levels can more readily be achieved.

A4.37 Teacher education. The Council has noted the

Commission's agreement with its earlier assessment that, in general, there is no need for a major redirection of

resources within the university sector to offset the declin­ ing demand for teachers. In the allocation of resources, however, the Council has taken into account the varying involvement of individual universities in teacher education.

A4.38 As noted in Volume 1, Part 2 (paragraph 7.94) the

Council sees the greatest potential for resource saving in the field of teacher education in the growth of co-operation between neighbouring institutions. The proposed amalgama­ tions in New South Wales and Queensland involve universities which have traditionally had a relatively high level of

52.

commitment to teacher education and represent a major step in the rationalisation of teacher education activities. The Council would again encourage those universities with limited involvement in teacher education to consider moving

out of the field completely. If there is a need to continue

pre-service teacher education in order to sustain effective higher degree and research p r o grams, there could be collaboration with other universities or colleges of advanced education.

COMMENT S ON I N D I V I D U A L U N I V E R S I T I E S

A4.39 The comments on individual universities which

follow are set out on a State-by-State basis in the order in

which data on universities are usually presented. A general section on each State is followed by a brief review of each

university within that State. This allows issues pertaining to some or all universities in a particular State (for example, demographic forecasts for Queensland and Western Australia) to be discussed in a general way. Moreover, it

provides for easier recognition of the relationships which already exist between neighbouring institutions and facilitates discussion of the potential for co-operative effort.

A4.40 The Council reaffirms the importance it attaches

to the national and international character of universities but since they form an integral part of the communities in

which they are located it is at this level that the greatest

potential exists for interaction with other institutions and co-ordinating authorities.

A4.41 The sections on each university include, where

applicable, some reference to each of the following: a brief historical perspective; the current situation; aims and aspirations for the future; and special strengths and we a k n e s s e s . Specific matters relating to the 1982-84

triennium include: student load planning figures; support for particular initiatives; factors taken into account in assessing appropriate levels of recurrent funding; and capital and equipment requirements for 1982.

A4.42 No attempt is made in these commentaries to be

comprehensive; rather, the Council has sought to express some views and opinions about individual institutions based on the universities' triennial submissions, the impressions received during the Council's triennial visits to the

universities, and discussions with State co-ordinating authorities.

53 .

New South Wales

A4.43 The six New South Wales universities fall into

two broad groups: those in the metropolitan area — the University of S y d n e y , the University of New South Wales and Macquarie University; and those situated in the regional cities of Wollongong, Newcastle and Armidale.

A4.44 With the exception of the University of S y d n e y ,

the universities in New South Wales have in recent years experienced some difficulties in achieving the minimum undergraduate student load levels suggested by the Council. Although there are prospects for recovery in undergraduate enrolments during the 1982-84 triennium, some uncertainty

exists about the future enrolment levels at all but the two largest metropolitan universities. The reimposition of fees for some second and higher degree students introduces a further uncertainty in the future student demand. The continuing decline in enrolment levels at the University of Newcastle has concerned the Council for some y e a r s . On the other hand, there was an increase in enrolments at the University of Wollongong in 1981 with reasonable expect­ ations for continued growth over the triennium.

A4.45 The Council takes the view that both the

University of Sydney and the University of New South Wales could, without disadvantage to themselves, restrict their student load to levels lower than those achieved in 1981. Such reductions will not only be consistent with the lower level of resources available to them but will also provide some better opportunity for growth in other New South Wales universities.

A4.46 The Council sees the 1982-84 triennium as

essentially a period of adjustment and rationalisation of activities for the universities in New South Wales.

UNIVERSITY OF SYDNEY

A4.47 As the oldest university in Australia, the

University of Sydney occupies a prominent position within the system. Because of its long tradition, it has estab­ lished a special reputation both in its State and beyond. It is part of cultural, as well as academic, history and its

responsibilities to the community, especially in a period when available resources are limited, bring with them special problems - for example in the preservation of its architectural heritage. The range and variety of its activities may change but it is of great national importance that its academic and cultural assets be maintained.

A4.48 As a large, well-established, metropolitan university, the University of Sydney has had a relatively stable total student load over a number of y e a r s . The

54 .

Council believes that its student load for the 1982-84 triennium should not exceed 17,500 WSU of which no more than 13,600 WSU should be undergraduates. Some increase in research student load would be acceptable within the total

specified.

A 4 .49 Although the recurrent grants for the University-over the triennium are somewhat lower than in 1979-81, the Council is confident that the funds it is recommending will enable the University, with some internal adjustment, to maintain its quality of operation. In this regard, the Council welcomes such initiatives as the amalgamation of the Departments of Civil and Mining Engineering and endorses the

approach the University is taking towards reviewing and rationalising its activities. Further opportunities exist for collaboration with other institutions in areas of similar academic interest and the Council expects the University to take the lead in seeking to reduce duplication

of activities in the Sydney area.

UNIVERSITY OF NEW SOUTH WALES

A4.50 The University of New South Wales was established

in 1949 as the New South Wales University of Technology with the aim of placing special emphasis on science and technology; these fields continue to be the main areas of the University's academic strength. The University changed

its name in 1958 to reflect the incorporation of a wider

range of disciplines in the humanities and social sciences.

A4.51 The University's total student load has declined

over recent years from a peak in 1978 of 17,050 WSU to

16,655 in 1981. In view of the reduced funds now available,

the relatively restricted nature of its site, and the desirability of allowing some of the smaller universities in the State to increase their student load, the Council has taken the view that the University should further reduce its total student load progressively over the triennium. Within

the maximum planning figure of 16,200 WSU by 1984, the Council would see merit in some increase in higher degree research enrolments and also encourages the University to increase its enrolments in the sciences and technologies if

students of the requisite standard are seeking to enrol.

A4.52 The general recurrent grants recommended for the

University in 1982-84 reflect this reduction in student load. On the other hand, the Council has recognised the

science and technology orientation of the University by providing a larger equipment grant in 1982 in part to assist in the replacement of obsolete and worn out equipment.

A4.53 The Council understands that the University is

examining the future of its activities at the W.S. & L.B. Robinson University College, Broken Hill. The College's

55.

enrolments are very low and unlikely to increase signific­ antly in the future. The Council also is aware that the

structure of post-secondary education in the far western region of New South Wales is under consideration by the New South Wales Government.

A4.54 The University appears to have a capacity to adapt

its academic and management structure to meet changing patterns of demand. This flexibility will be even more important in the future if the University is to continue to respond to the increasing need for specialist programs in a period of rapid technological change.

UNIVERSITY OF NEW ENGLAND

A4.55 The University of New England became an autonomous

institution in 1953 having been a college of the University of Sydney for the previous 15 years. While the University sees itself as having a close relationship with the northern region of New South Wales, it also has a national role

through its major commitment to external studies programs. The University also has a number of centres and units, many related to the rural industry, which are largely self­ supporting. It actively contributes to the development of Agricultural Science teaching in several neighbouring countries as well as supporting rural aid programs through

agencies of the United Nations.

A4.56 The University's undergraduate student load has declined by some 7 per cent since 1979 partly because of the

University's wish, supported by the Council, to maintain its entry standards. On the other hand, there has been a

gradual increase in higher degree enrolments over recent ye a r s , with the development of an increasing range of external courses. The ratio of higher degree to undergrad­ uate load is high for the size of the University and,

although the Council has noted the major involvement of the University in post-experience programs in teacher education, it would be concerned if there were to be any significant increase in the proportion of external and part-time higher degree enrolments. The reintroduction of fees could have an impact on the University's part-time and external enrolments both graduate and undergraduate which, in 1981, constituted

some 75 per cent of total student numbers.

A4.57 The Council has therefore assumed a declining

total student load for the University over the 1982-84 triennium and has provided funds accordingly. The funds recommended also take account of the proposed merger with the Armidale College of Advanced Education which is expected

to have an advanced education enrolment of 1,000 EFTS in each year of the triennium.

56.

A4.58 The Council is pleased to note the University has

undertaken reviews of several of its activities in recent years - in particular, the Faculty of Rural Science and the

Faculty of Education. It would encourage the University to continue to examine critically its range of offerings in all disciplines and where appropriate amalgamate certain departments - especially the small ones - so that effective educational opportunities may be maintained within available

resources.

A4.59 As part of this examination, the University may

also need to consider the extent of its contribution to various student services and welfare activities in the light of the diminishing level of available fu n d s .

A4.60 The Council continues to regard the University as

an important centre of external studies and encourages increasing collaboration and co-ordination with others in the same field as a means of providing an improved educa­ tional opportunity within the level of funds available.

UNIVERSITY OF NEWCASTLE

A4.61 The University of Newcastle became an autonomous

institution in 1965 after 13 years as a College of the

University of New South Wales. The University has a

relatively wide range of faculties, including a newly established Faculty of Medicine, and provides an important educational facility in the region. Like the adjacent Newcastle College of Advanced Education, the University has in the past depended extensively on teacher training

scholarships to support many of its students and with the almost total withdrawal of such scholarships both institutions have suffered substantial declines in student

enrolments. This drop in student demand, which may also be related to local economic and social pressures, has led to the proposal to amalgamate the College and University. The

grants recommended for the University in 1982-84 are based on such an amalgamation proceeding from the beginning of 1982 .

A4.62 Since 1977 the University's undergraduate student load has, if enrolments in medicine are excluded, declined by nearly 25 per cent. The Council sees little prospect of

any early growth in enrolments and has fixed student load ranges accordingly. Nevertheless it would welcome a return to growth in the undergraduate load if sufficient students are available with the appropriate level of gualification

for admission. Some improvement in the availability of residential accommodation may contribute to higher levels of enrolment.

57 .

A4.63 Research higher degree enrolments have remained relatively stable over recent years; the University's student load in this area is already comparatively high and

the Council sees no reason for growth during the triennium.

A4.64 The recently established Faculty of M e d icine,

which will reach its planned size in 1982, has imposed a

severe strain on the University since it has been expanding at a time when the rest of the University has been declining

quite sharply in student l oad. To some extent these move­ ments have balanced one another with the consequence that the difficulties being experienced by the University have not always been readily apparent in the published

statistics.

A4.65 The Council has been concerned for some time at

the difficulties facing the University and has sought to assist it by reducing the funds available to it more slowly than would have been justified by changes in student load. In areas other than medicine, the University has made reductions in its levels of staffing but with further reductions now necessary it will need to look very closely at the possibility of closing some small departments and reducing the range of programs being provided. Although the amalgamation with the Newcastle College of Advanced Education may create some initial problems, the opportunity

to achieve economies through a single governing body should in time give the University renewed vitality.

MACQUARIE UNIVERSITY

A4.66 Macquarie University was established in 1964 as

the third university in the Sydney metropolitan area. Some 60 per cent of its enrolments in 1981 are part-time. The

University regards its involvement in the provision of courses for part-time students, many of whom are of mature- age, and its commitment to external studies particularly in the science disciplines, as important aspects of its

activities. Its emphasis on small group teaching and the absence of a traditional faculty and department structure, give it a distinctive style of operation well suited to this

type of student community.

A4.67 Considerable uncertainty surrounds the enrolment prospects facing the University in the 1982-84 triennium. With its high proportion of mature-age students, the reintreduction of fees may have an adverse impact on future

student demand for places both at the undergraduate and higher degree coursework levels. The University has, in any case, experienced some difficulty in attracting full­ time undergraduate students and, since 1977, undergraduate

student load has fallen by almost 10 per cent. The

University already has the highest proportion of students

58 .

enrolled in higher degree coursework programs in the country and it is unlikely that demand in this area will increase

significantly over the triennium. These trends are reflected in the total student load ranges proposed by the Council shown in Table A3.11. W i thin the planned student load, the Council believes there is an opportunity for the University to increase the number of research students.

A4.68 The University sees the 1982-84 triennium as a

period of consolidation and rationalisation involving a redeployment of resources rather than a time of new developments. A scheme of School Reviews, similar to those undertaken by the Australian National University^has been instituted with a view to facilitating this redirection of effort and reorganisation. The Council endorses such an approach. Like other universities, some reduction in the

range of courses offered may be n e c e s s a r y . In many cases

this may be most effectively achieved through increasing collaboration with other universities and colleges of advanced education.

A4.69 The Council favours diversity among universities and is aware of the special importance which Macquarie University attaches to its programs in teacher education. Nevertheless, in view of the very low student/staff ratio

in education mentioned by the Commission in Volume 1, Part 1 (see paragraph 5.18), the University may well need to examine the balance of resources among its various discipline groups.

A4.70 In view of the expected fall in student load it

should be possible for the University to cope with its needs for additional space in some fields by a rearrangement of existing accommodation.

UNIVERSITY OF WOLLONGONG

A4.71 The University was incorporated in 1972 after 11

years as a College of the University of New South Wales.

Agreement has been reached recently between the Councils of the University and the adjacent Wollongong Institute of Education on the formation of a new institution offering courses from sub-graduate to higher degree levels. That

agreement has been communicated to the New South Wales Government. At the same time, the Commonwealth has endorsed the amalgamation of these institutions and an appropriate allowance has been included in the grants to the University

for the triennium on the basis of this proposal.

A4.72 Located in a heavily industrialised area with a

multicultural population, the University sees itself playing an important role in the r e g i o n . It provides leadership in the local community and concentrates its research activities

59 .

in such areas as mining engineering, metallurgy, geology and migrant education; it also places some emphasis on an inter-disciplinary approach in both teaching and research.

A4.73 Understandably, the University has concentrated in its initial years on developing its teaching p r o grams. However, the Council is concerned that it has diversified its activities too widely resulting in a relatively large

number of departments, some with very few students. Some consolidation of its activities during the triennium is indicated. This may well be facilitated by the series of

internal reviews introduced by the University with the aim of improving both its academic programs and its administrative efficiency.

A4.74 The University's enrolment patterns over recent years have been affected by changes in intake at some of the

Sydney metropolitan institutions and a continuing growth in part-time enrolments. Nevertheless there was quite a strong growth in total student load in 1981 and the Council believes that further steady growth is possible during the 1982-84 triennium. It has therefore proposed student load ranges for the triennium which will enable the University to continue, as a prime objective, to increase its under­ graduate numbers. The Council has also allowed for a modest increase in higher degree enrolments, but would not wish the University to exceed a research student load of 250 WSU by

the end of the triennium.

V i c t o r i a

A4.75 The situation in Melbourne is not unlike that in

Sydney. There are two large universities, the University of Melbourne and Monash University, where enrolment levels are now relatively stable; the third. La Trobe University, was

established in 1964 at about the same time as Macquarie University and has a similar level of enrolments. Deakin University, in Geelong, was established in 1977 from a merger of the two colleges of advanced education in the

city, the Gordon Institute of Technology and the State College of Victoria, Geelong.

A4.76 Total student load in the Victorian universities has continued to increase gradually over recent years with the general growth of Deakin University, and a steady increase in higher degree enrolments in all universities,

being partly offset by some decline in undergraduate enrolment at La Trobe University.

A4.77 The Council's planning for the 1982-84 triennium

provides for some reduction in the total student load at the University of Melbourne and Monash University, consistent with the levels of funds they will be receiving. The

60.

Council also expects student load at La Trobe University to remain at about its present level and undergraduate enrolments at D e akin University to stabilise over the triennium. The total effect of the Council's proposals would be some reduction in total student load in the State's

universities by 1984.

A4.78 In Volume 1 , Part 1 (paragraph 5.66) the

Commission asked both the Universities Council and the Advanced Education Council to put forward specific proposals on the rationalisation of the provision of engineering programs in Victoria. As mentioned in paragraph A4.26, the

decisions that the Commonwealth Government has subseguently made concerning engineering in Victoria have overtaken that request.

A4.79 The Council agrees that some consolidation of

engineering education in Victoria is necessary and had itself been giving serious consideration to the future of engineering at Deakin University. In the interests of rationalisation, the Council supports the Government's decision that there should be no further intake into

engineering at Deakin U n i v e r s i t y . However, it recognises that some continuing provision of engineering education in the Geelong region may be desirable.

A4.80 The Council is aware that the Victorian Post­

Secondary Education Commission has put forward suggestions . for collaboration between Deakin University and the Ballarat College of Advanced Education in relation to engineering education. The Council believes, however, that another

alternative worthy of consideration would be for either the University of Melbourne or Monash University to establish a branch of its engineering school in Geelong, teaching perhaps first and second year courses t h e r e . Such a program would clearly be identified as part of the activities of

the metropolitan university involved but advantage could be taken of existing facilities at Deakin Un i v e r s i t y . The Council has encouraged Deakin University to explore such an

arrangement with the University of Melbourne and Monash U n i v e r s i t y .

UNIVERSITY OF MELBOURNE

A4.81 The University of Melbourne, established in 1853, is the second oldest university in Australia. As such it

has developed over the years a capacity to grow and adapt to

changing conditions which is now standing it in good stead. Because of its experience and reputation, the Council sees the University as well placed to provide leadership in

developing collaboration with others in the provision of balanced educational opportunities in Victoria. Like the

61.

University of S y d n e y , the University of Melbourne is an important part of the cultural and academic history of its State.

A4.82 The University has for many years applied quotas

to all its undergraduate courses and seeks to maintain a high entry standard. Its p o l i c y , which is strongly supported by the Council, is to balance staffing, student demand and facilities with the result that enrolment levels at the University stabilised during the 1970s. In recent years the University has concentrated on the development of

its research work and postgraduate programs and has expressed the wish to continue to grow in this a r e a .

A4.83 The Council would not wish the University to

increase its present size and has established an upper limit for total student load of 15,000 WSU, which is generally in line with the enrolment levels achieved in recent years; within this total no more than 12,000 WSU should be under­

graduate enrolments. It should be noted that these figures do not include undergraduate students of the RAAF Academy. The Council would have no objection to the University increasing its higher degree student load provided this was contained within the total load of 15,000 W S U .

A4.84 The Council endorses the University's desire to

develop its research activities, an aspiration already aided by the introduction of its own 1 research development grants', to assist in the development of new research proje c t s .

MONASH UNIVERSITY

A4.85 Monash University, the second university founded in Melbourne, has now reached a size and maturity which assure its acceptance as an established university. The University has a substantial commitment to research training and in addition now has one of the highest enrol­ ment levels in masters coursework programs of all universities.

A4.86 Monash University has, in the Council's view, been

relatively well funded in recent years in relation to its size and the distribution of students among its faculties. Its proportion of science-based activities is, for instance, significantly lower than any of the other large universities

{see Table A 4 .3). In view of the reduced levels of funds

now available, some reduction has been made in the University's general recurrent grants for the 1982-84 triennium. Because of this lower level of funding the Council proposes that the University should stabilise its

total student load at a maximum of 12,800 WSU by 1984 of

which no more than 10,000 WSU should be undergraduate. The

62.

Council would encourage the University to examine closely its range of undergraduate courses with a view to eliminating some of the options currently available to students. The existing balance between undergraduate and

higher degree student load is appropriate to a university of Monash's size and range of disciplines. The Council has noted that in some disciplines, such as education, the

University has a major commitment to higher degree work; it sees this as appropriate and would not wish to limit either research or coursework higher degree enrolments within the total load proposed.

A4.87 The Council is aware of the recent introduction by

the University of a new superannuation scheme but has made no allowance for the increased level of employer contribu­ tion which this requires in its allocation of funds.

A4.88 The Victorian Post-Secondary Education Commission identified Monash University as one of the essential centres for engineering education in the State. The Commission's

working party on engineering recommended that Monash University and the Caulfield Institute of Technology be required to consider how best their separate activities in engineering education could be co-ordinated. The Council would encourage the University to look for ways in which

co-operative activities might be developed not only with Caulfield Institute of Technology but also with other institutions.

LA TROBE UNIVERSITY

A4.89 La Trobe University increased steadily in size

between taking its first undergraduate students in 1967 and 1977 when it enrolled almost 9,000 students, representing a total student load of more than 7,600 W S U . Since then,

although higher degree enrolments have continued to rise, there has been a noticeable decline in undergraduate enrolments. In 1981, undergraduate student load was some 10 per cent below the 1977 level, and total student load

had fallen to 7,200 WSU.

A4.90 The Council considers it unlikely that undergrad­

uate enrolments will increase over the 1982-84 triennium particularly as the reintroduction of tuition fees for second qualifications may reduce demand from the mature age students who make up a significant proportion of La Trobe's

undergraduate enrolments. At the higher degree level, the University has sought some increase in its research enrol­ ments on the grounds that it has been unable to offer places

to a number of well-qualified applicants. Again the reintroduction of fees for higher degrees is likely to have some effect on demand for enrolments.

63.

A 4 .91 The range of student load of 7,050-7,250 WSU for

each year of the triennium, reflects the Council's view that enrolments at La Trobe University are likely to stabilise over the next few years. The appropriate balance between undergraduate and higher degree enrolments is a matter for the University itself to determine.

A4.92 The levels of general recurrent grants which the

Council is recommending for La Trobe University have been assessed in the context of the reduced funds available to universities and reflect the planned student load levels. The Council has recognised the growth in research activity by providing a significant increase during the triennium in the special research grant. Furthermore, the University will receive an increase in its equipment grant in 1982 in

recognition of its increasing need to replace worn out and obsolete apparatus.

A 4 .93 The University has expressed some concern from

time to time at the lack of balance in its student numbers

between arts-type disciplines and those which are science- based, a situation which arises in part from the absence of the more technologically orientated faculties. The Council sees little prospect of an early change in the proportion of

science-based enrolments but would encourage the university to give consideration to the development of special research groups in the natural sciences with appropriate funding from within its total resources.

A4.94 The University appears to have special strengths

in the social and behavioural sciences not only in its research programs but also in the provision of high quality undergraduate studies of a generalist nature, particularly to mature age students in the local community.

DEAKIN UNIVERSITY

A4.95 Deakin is the only university in Victoria located

outside the metropolitan area of Melbourne. It commenced operations in 1977 with enrolments of some 2,000 WSU, largely made up of students previously enrolled at the two colleges of advanced education in Geelong - the Gordon Institute of Technology and the State College of Victoria, Geelong. The University has a major commitment to external

studies with about 55 p e r cent of all students enrolled in off-campus p r o g r a m s . Total enrolments have risen steadily since 1977 and student load amounted to almost 3,000 WSU in 1981.

A4.96 Growth in undergraduate enrolments in Deakin University during the forthcoming triennium is likely to be affected by the reintroduction of tuition fees. Many of the students commencing bachelor degree programs at Deakin University already hold some form of tertiary qualifications

and may in future have to pay fees. In the Council's view

this is likely to lead, at least in the short term, to some

declining demand for enrolment. Another factor affecting undergraduate enrolments is the decision that there will be no new intake into engineering courses at the University. In 1980, 168 students were enrolled in bachelor degree courses in engineering; by the end of 1984 these courses

will be virtually phased out. For these reasons, the

Council expects little, if any, increase in undergraduate enrolments at Deakin University during the 1982-84 triennium.

A4.97 Some scope exists, however, for increased enrol­

ments of higher degree students; this is reflected in the

student load ranges set out in Table AS.11. The Council has not encouraged the growth of higher degree enrolments until undergraduate programs were satisfactorily established but the University could now with advantage, increase its

higher degree enrolments if it wishes to do so. The Council has therefore increased the upper limit on research student load to 200 WSU by 1984. The Council would encourage the

University to achieve this increase as far as possible with full-time enrolments in research programs rather than by increasing its part-time or external student n u m b e r s .

A4.98 The introduction of further coursework programs is a matter for the University to determine within the ranges of total student load established by the Council.

A4.99 The levels of general recurrent funds available to

the University for the 1982-84 triennium take account of savings expected from the phasing out of engineering and make some provision for continuing growth in student load. The University will also receive a substantial increase in

its special research grants over the triennium.

A4.100 The Council has noted the University's particular problem with regard to superannuation but at this time has made no special provision pending the outcome of the Government's consideration of the general problem.

A4.101 The University is currently located on three sites

and the main emphasis in the University's building program is the consolidation of all activities on the Waurn Ponds c a mpus. The Council recognises the difficulties of the University in operating at a number of different locations

and has recommended that funds be made available in 1982 for the design of a general purpose academic building which would permit the transfer of the School of Education to the main campus.

A4.102 The Commission expressed the view (Volume 1 , Part 1 , paragraph 6.74) that institutions with a major commitment to external studies should collaborate with a

65.

view to reducing duplication of programs and improving the quality of materials. The Council encourages Deakin University to co-ordinate its off-campus activities as far as possible with other institutions both within Victoria and

elsewhere in Australia. Deakin University has identified its commitment to off-campus programs - and in particular innovations in methods of teaching - as one of its special strengths. The Council believes that the University could with advantage share the expertise it has developed in this

field with other institutions both in the development of techniques and teaching materials and in the introduction of new programs and courses.

Q u e e n s l a n d

A4.103 All three universities in the State have drawn the

Council's attention to the potential to increase student numbers which exists in the State. They point to a popula­

tion growth rate in Queensland some 10 per cent above the

national average; to an increasing retention rate in the final year of secondary school; and to the relatively low participation of the 17-22 years age group in universities.

James Cook University in particular draws attention to the significantly lower participation rate in North Queensland.

A4.104 The Council accepts that there may be an increas­

ing demand for undergraduate places in the Queensland universities. However, as stated earlier, within the funds available, the Council is able to support only limited growth in student enrolments in the State during the 1982-84 triennium with particular consideration being given to the

appropriate distribution of students, between the two universities in the Brisbane region.

A4.105 In Volume 1, Part 2 (paragraph 1.12) the

Council noted that the Commission had sought the Council's views on the longer term future of Griffith University in relation to the admissions policy of the University of Queensland. At that time there was some concern about the

rate at which Griffith University was growing, since, in 1979, only five years after enrolling its first under­ graduate students, undergraduate enrolments had levelled out at about 1,500.

A4.106 Since then, the situation at Griffith University has changed significantly. Total student load has increased from 1,455 WSU in 1979 to almost 2,000 WSU in 1981 mainly

through growth in undergraduate enrolments. At the same time, undergraduate enrolments at the University of Queensland have stabilised at a level well below the peak levels of the mid-1970s. Several other factors have contributed to the continuing growth at Griffith University: the increasing acceptance of the University in the

6 6 .

c ommunity, particularly now that its first graduates are in the workforce; the greater range of opportunity for students with the opening of the University's School of Social and Industrial Administration; improved provision

for part-time students; improved access to the campus; and the provision of residential accommodation.

A4.107 The Council considers that the University should

continue to grew to enable it to consolidate existing activities, to diversify course offerings and to operate more cost-effectively. With the University of Queensland restricting its undergraduate enrolments to no more than the present levels, the Council sees no reason why Griffith University cannot continue to grow for some years to come.

A4.108 The Council has noted several instances of

co-operative activities between the tertiary institutions in the Brisbane area. Perhaps the best example is the nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer which is located at Griffith University but serves the two Universities and the Queensland Institute of T e c h n o l o g y . The Council believes

that considerable scope exists for similar arrangements both in Queensland and elsewhere and encourages all universities to investigate the possibilities of closer collaboration in teaching and research.

UNIVERSITY OF QUEENSLAND

A4.109 The University of Queensland, established in 1909, is one of the two largest universities in Australia as measured by student enrolments. Traditionally the University has seen the provision of undergraduate teaching

programs as its prime responsibility. Its major involvement in external studies is a reflection of the University's commitment to provide such opportunities in a State the size of Queensland and with its wide distribution of population. The relatively recent establishment of the James Cook University - formerly a College of the University of Queensland - and Griffith University has enabled the University to reassess its priorities and to concentrate to

an increasing extent on research and research training.

A4.110 The Council sees no benefits to be gained from the

University increasing its total student load; a total load of 14,800 WSU for each of the years 1982 to 1984 represents

an appropriate maximum. Consistent with its proposals for Griffith University the Council would not wish the University of Queensland to exceed 12,300 WSU in undergrad­ uate l oad. The University has drawn the Council's attention

to its relatively small proportion of research student load and its wish to expand in this a r e a . The Council sees no

reason why the University should not enrol more students in both research and masters coursework programs within the total load of 14,800 WSU.

67.

A4.111 The main thrust of the University's triennial

submission, and one of the principal matters for subsequent discussion between the Council and the University, is the University's view that for many years it has been under­ funded relative to the other established universities, and in particular the University of Melbourne. The University claims that this underfunding is reflected in the high percentage of funds spent on salaries and salary related

costs, with consequent severe restrictions on the usual range of non-salary expenditures. The University also considers that the planned expansion of research and research training activities has been hindered through lack of adequate funding, with full-time research enrolments well below the desired level due, at least in part, to the

University's inability to fund an adequate number of postgraduate awards.

A4.112 The Council has given the University's claims very

serious consideration. It notes that in spite of apparent underfunding the University has a student/staff ratio slightly lower than the national average and noticeably lower than that of most of the other large universities. The apparent underfunding may also be slightly exaggerated by the method used by the University to distribute student

load across disciplines.

A4.113 Nevertheless, the Council accepts that, given its size and range of disciplines, and relative to the recurrent grants received by the other large universities, the

University of Queensland could reasonably expect to receive a higher level of recurrent funding. The Council recognised this in its allocation of funds for the 1979-81 triennium during which, unlike all the other large universities, the University of Queensland suffered no decline, in real terms,

in total recurrent funds available to it. The Council is now recommending a modest increase in both recurrent funds and equipment grant for the University, and will consider further adjustments to its funding relative to other

universities as resources permit.

A4.114 The University has also drawn to the attention of

the Council the substantial financial support received by some universities from State Governments for the clinical dental services they provide, compared to the relatively small sum received by the University of Queensland. The

Council sees this as a matter to be resolved between the

University and the appropriate State authorities.

A4.115 Although some additional operating funds are being provided, the Council expects the University to examine carefully its present range of activities, particularly in the light of possible duplication with other institutions.

One area with potential for further co-operation is that of

68 .

external studies, where the Council is asking all universities with a substantial commitment to this mode of study to co-operate to the fullest extent possible in the development of programs and the preparation of suitable

teaching materials.

JAMES COOK UNIVERSITY

A4.116 The James Cook University of North Queensland,

established in 1970, is typical of the smaller non-metropolitan universities referred to in paragraphs A4.ll and A4.12. It has a major commitment to the provision of university level education to the people of North Queensland, to research and to studies relevant to its

tropical location.

A4.117 The University has seen potential for growth in

its undergraduate numbers both because of population growth and the low current participation of North Queensland residents in university education. In spite of this, undergraduate enrolments at James Cook University have remained stable for some years and it is not evident that

the University will be able to increase its enrolments substantially during the 1982-84 triennium. Nonetheless the Council considers that it has made adequate financial provision for the University to increase its undergraduate

enrolments should students of suitable quality seek admission. The range of total student load specified for each year of the 1982-84 triennium of 1,650-1,850 WSU, is judged by the Council to be realistic. However, the Council would have no objections if the University were to exceed

the upper limit through growth in undergraduate enrolments.

A4.118 The University has a particularly high level of

involvement in higher degree work. The research student load at some 17 per cent of total load is the highest of any

Australian State university (see Table A 4 .2). This is due partly to the areas of special expertise developed by the University, and partly to the lew undergraduate numbers. However, the Council believes it to be important that an

appropriate balance be maintained between undergraduate and higher degree work and would not want the University to exceed the present level of research student load - which has remained at about 300 WSU since 1979 - during the

forthcoming triennium. The University could develop its higher degree coursework activities should it wish to do so.

A4.119 Its small size, the wide range of courses it

offers - many of which are science-based - its relatively high level of involvement in research and research training and the costs associated with its isolated location, inevitably result in high recurrent costs per student. The

Council recognises these special characteristics of the James Cook University and has in the past funded it

69 .

accordingly. However, in view of the continuing high costs associated with small departments, the Council would encourage the University to explore carefully the possibility of reducing its range of activities. In the present economic climate, the University may be well advised to explore with other universities suitable co-operative

arrangements in fields of common interest.

A4.120 The Council sees benefits in the rationalisation

of teacher education between the James Cook University and the Townsville College of Advanced Education. It has in the past encouraged the University to examine closely the potential for co-operation and association between the two

institutions. The amalgamation planned between the institutions should produce a better quality of educational opportunity for students in the region. As set out in

Chapter 5, funds have been provided accordingly.

A4.121 The University has special research strengths in

tropical veterinary science, marine sciences related to research on the Great Barrier Reef, cyclone research and sugar research. The Council wishes to see these and similar special programs continuing to receive strong support. As with the range of teaching provided, the Council emphasises

the need for a small university such as James Cook to be

selective in the range of research topics it is prepared to encourage.

GRIFFITH UNIVERSITY

A4.122 Griffith University, established in 1971, offers undergraduate programs based on an integrated, multi­ disciplinary approach rather than the more traditional concentration on well-defined subject areas. The University sees particular strength in this approach to both its teaching and research activities.

A4.123 Although Griffith University's growth both in student numbers and range of academic activities has been significantly slower than originally envisaged, the Council believes that the University should continue to grew to a total student load within the range 2,200-2,400 WSU by 1984.

A4.124 Higher degree student numbers at the University, particularly research enrolments, have increased steadily in recent years and, as Table A4.2 shows, research students now represent more than 10 p e r cent of total

load. The Council accepts this as an appropriate balance for the University at its present stage of development. Nevertheless it believes that the major emphasis during the coming triennium should be placed on undergraduate growth and development, and the Council would expect the University

to have a research student load of no more than 250 WSU by

1984.

70 .

A4.125 The Council is aware that the newer, smaller

universities such as Griffith University face particular difficulties in times of financial restraint. New academic activities are planned and staff appointed in expectation of

growth in student numbers and funds which are not fully realised; moreover, with generally younger staff structures than the larger and older institutions, they face relatively high costs in the form of incremental creep and little

turnover as a result of staff retirements. Nevertheless, the Council believes that it has made adequate provision in the 1982-84 triennium to enable the University to consolidate its existing staffing structure and to introduce

some new activities. At the same t i m e , Griffith University would be well advised to plan carefully during the triennium and take the opportunity to provide appropriate flexibility in its staffing arrangements.

A4.126 As with other universities, steps should be taken

to reduce duplication with nearby institutions. In particular collaboration with others in fields such as Asian studies, foreign languages, and computer science as well as

in the extension of co-operation in library and computing services would be desirable. Suitable concentration of these and other special interests can result in much more effective educational opportunities within the limited

resources now available.

A4.127 The University's participation in co-operative arrangements with the Commonwealth and Queensland Governments and the Commonwealth Games Foundation has resulted in the location of the Commonwealth Games Housing Village on the University campus. The benefits of this are

already evident not only in increased demand for student places at the University but also from the wider range of

students now able to avail themselves of the courses offered by the University. The University has expressed some concern, however, at the effect that the three-week break in

its academic year for the duration of the Games in September 1982 may have both on student intakes in 1982 and on the

teaching and research activities of the University. The University has developed plans which will minimise the disruptive effects caused by its closure for the period of the Games, but will no doubt be helped by any assistance

that the University of Queensland and others may be able to p r o v i d e .

A4.128 In its triennial submission, the University put

forward a proposal for a School of Fisheries. The idea of

such a school was supported by both the Council and the

Commission in Volume 1 of this Report and, as noted in paragraph A 1 .7, the Commonwealth Government has asked the Commission to consider the establishment and location of such a school.

7 1 .

S o u t h A u s t r a l i a

A4.129 The major issues affecting the South Australian

universities at present include the appropriate balance of enrolments, particularly at the undergraduate level, between the two universities, developments in relation to medical and dental manpower, and co-operation between the tertiary- institutions in the State on co-ordination of academic p r o g r a m s .

A4.130 Over recent years the combination of demographic

factors, reduced student demand and economic restraints has resulted in a steady decline in the total numbers of

students enrolled in undergraduate courses at the two South Australian universities. This fall in numbers, together with a swing away from full-time study, has resulted in a

drop in undergraduate student load from a peak of just over 10,000 WSU in 1976 to 9,300 WSU in 1981. The Tertiary

Education Authority of South Australia expects total undergraduate student numbers at the two universities to remain at about the 1981 level over the 1982-84 triennium. Total recurrent funds recommended for the two South Australian universities take account of the lower enrolment levels of recent y e a r s .

A4.131 At present, the total provision of undergraduate

places is in excess of demand, a situation likely to

continue for the next few y e a r s . In these circumstances the Council proposes to limit enrolments at the University of Adelaide to provide a reasonable opportunity for Flinders University to increase its present size. The Council has also taken account of the University of Adelaide's congested

site; it considers that some reduction in undergraduate numbers might assist the University in its stated wish to increase its on-campus research activities.

A4.132 A South Australian Health Commission Report A Review of Medical Manpower in South Australia, released in May 1980, revealed:

. South Australia currently has the highest doctor/ population ratio in Australia (1:459 compared with the national average of 1:528);

. the State has the highest rate of graduate output

per head of population in any State.

A4.133 Discussions took place between the two univer­ sities and the relevant State authorities following this report by the South Australian Health Commission and one by a Commonwealth Committee of Officials on medical manpower. As a result, the universities agreed to reduce intakes into

72.

the medical schools in 1981 by a total of 18, 15 at the

University of Adelaide and 3 at Flinders University - a reduction of approximately 10 p e r cent of total intake into the State's medical schools.

A4.134 Similarly, a review of dental manpower in the

State found that the number of dental graduates per head of population in South Australia was twice the average for Australia as a whole. The Report'2) called for some

reduction in intakes to the University of Adelaide Dental School. The University has now reduced its intake from 57

in 1979 t o 30 in 1981.

A4.135 The Council notes with approval collaboration between the two South Australian universities in several academic areas and in the proposal for a joint library store. Nevertheless, further opportunities exist for

sharing of scarce resources in courses with small enrol­ ments, in honours and in research degree progr a m s .

A4.136 The Council would encourage the universities, in

conjunction with the Tertiary Education Authority of South Australia, to pursue a greater degree of co-ordination of activities with colleges of advanced education in the region, particularly in the field of teacher education. The

Commission questioned (Volume 1, Part 1, paragraph 5.70) whether it is desirable for Flinders University to maintain its program of pre-service teacher education rather than transfer it to the neighbouring Sturt College of Advanced Education, but this will now be part of a wider

consideration in view of the formation of the Adelaide College of Advanced Education.

UNIVERSITY OF ADELAIDE

A4.137 The University of Adelaide, as the only university

in the State until 1966, has built for itself over more than

one hundred years a reputation for high quality teaching and research.

A4.138 In the interests of balanced development between

the two universities the Council expects the university to reduce its undergraduate student load from the present level of just over 6,600 WSU to 6,300 WSU by 1984 within a total

load of 7,900 WSU. No specific limits are placed on either

research or coursework enrolments within that total load. 2

(2) Dental Services in South Australia: A Report to the Minister of Health by the Committee of Inquiry, Health Commission of South Australia, August 1 9 8 0 .

73 .

A4.139 The University has been relatively well funded in

recent years and this has been taken into account, together with planned student load levels, in the Council's assess­ ment of recurrent funds for the University in 1982-84.

A4.140 In discussions with the Universities Council, the University emphasised its commitment to research and the pursuit of excellence. Nevertheless, the Council was concerned at the general impression it received from many

groups, whether representing the administration, staff or student interests, who appeared to take the view that the only way to solve their problems was for more funds to be

provided. At a time wjien financial pressures are increasing, it is important for all universities to seek more effective ways of using the funds available.

A4.141 To some extent the University appears to have

exacerbated its difficulties by using only tenured appointments at the level of lecturer and above. In this

context the Council is pleased to note that the University has undertaken a review of its budgetary procedures with particular reference to staffing policy. The Council understands that the University is considering the

implementation of various initiatives along the lines of those outlined by the Council in Volume 1 , Part 2 (paragraphs 7.13 to 7.26).

A4.142 The Council is aware of the new administrative

arrangements being introduced in the University in 1981, one effect of which will be to reduce the number of committees within the university structure with the expectation of a more effective use of resources.

A4.143 Waite Agricultural Research Institute. The Universities Council, and previously the Universities Commission, have, in their funding of the University of Adelaide, recognised the special role of the Waite Agricultural Research Institute. The Council has commented

on the matter most recently in Volume 2 of its Advice for

the 1979-81 triennium (paragraphs B72-74). The University itself in 1980 examined the position of the Institute within the University structure and, following the recommendations of an internal review committee chaired by Justice Roma Mitchell, agreed to a new administrative and funding arrangement for the Institute. Nevertheless, the Council has continued to receive representations seeking to have the

Institute recognised as a national research school, arguing, at the same time, for funds designated in some way as

supplementary to the University's existing commitment to the Institute.

A4.144 The Council has examined these proposals carefully and has once again reviewed the position of the Waite Agricultural Research Institute within the University of

74.

Adelaide. It understands and accepts the view strongly expressed by all concerned that the Institute should remain part of the University of Adelaide. To the Council, this

means that the University must accept the responsibility for the general management of the Institute, including its appropriate staffing and funding at a level which will enable it effectively to discharge its agreed functions. Under such an arrangement, the Institute must, for its p a r t , participate fully in the activities of the University and accept, along with other areas of the University, the

consequences of any changes in funding levels or resources.

A4.145 The suggestion that funds for the Waite Institute

should be earmarked has often been linked to the view that

the Institute should operate in the manner of the Research Schools at the Australian National University. The Council would point out, however, that funds for the Australian National University research schools are not earmarked but are included in the block grant provided to that University to meet the needs of both the research schools and the

faculties. The Council also sees an essential difference between the Waite Institute and the Australian National University research schools in the role played by the Institute in the training of undergraduate students.

A4.146 The Council therefore sees no occasion to

designate funds specifically for the Institute although, as stated on previous occasions, its special role continues to be recognised in the level of funding provided for the University of Adelaide. The research activities of the

Institute are regarded for funding purposes by the Council as comparable with the activities of the research schools of the Australian National University.

A4.147 In its triennial and supplementary submissions, the University sought recognition of the Waite Institute as a national research school. To some extent this argument still appears to rest on comments made by the Australian Universities Commission in its Fifth Report. At that time there may have been merit in such recognition since it might well have resulted in full Commonwealth funding for the

Institute at a time when the general funding of universities was shared between the Commonwealth and the States. Now that universities are fully funded by the Commonwealth such

an argument no longer applies and the Council sees no grounds for the identification of any research school as a national school.

A4.148 The Council is aware of the contribution that the

Waite Institute has made - and is making - to agricultural research; it is also conscious of the work of high quality

being undertaken in this field in other institutions. It is of the view that the quality of the research carried out by

75.

any institution will be the essential basis on which the scientific community will accord it appropriate recognition.

A4.149 The Council is confident that within the resources

available to it, the University of Adelaide will be able to maintain the effectiveness of the research programs of the Waite Institute.

A4.150 The Council has also noted the U n i v e r s i t y ’s

representations for special consideration to be given to the capital requirements of the Institute. However, in view of the limited funds available to the Council for building and minor works programs in 1982, the Council is unable to make any special provisions for the Waite Institute. The University should continue to assess the capital require­

ments of the Institute in the context of priorities for the University as a whole.

FLINDERS UNIVERSITY

A4.151 As one of the smaller and more recently

established universities, Flinders might reasonably have expected that the growth in enrolments which it experienced through the early 1970s would have continued for some years. Instead the undergraduate student load which exceeded 3,000 WSU in 1977 had fallen to 2,655 WSU by 1981 due almost

entirely to a decrease in full-time enrolments in arts, economics and education.

A4.152 The planning ranges of total student load

established by the Council for the University for the 1982-84 triennium reflect its wish to see this decline reversed. The upper limit of 3,400 WSU in 1984 is some

200 WSU above the 1981 total student load and provides the opportunity for the University to increase its undergraduate enrolments. The Council has provided funds accordingly.

A4.153 The Council has given careful consideration to the

expressed desire of the University to increase its research enrolment. For the present, it proposes to rely on the

existing arrangements whereby students make their own choice of the university where they will seek research training. While placing no firm limit on research enrolments, the Council believes a steady level of 400 WSU during the

triennium to be appropriate. The level of higher degree coursework enrolments may be determined by the University within the ranges of total student l o a d .

A4.154 The University is strongly committed to research and relative to its numbers of academic staff has an

impressive record of attracting funds from such bodies as the Australian Research Grants Committee and the National Health and Medical Research Council. The University has

76 .

expressed concern that it was not included amongst those institutions receiving increased special research grants in the 1979-81 triennium. Under the revised basis for the distribution of special research grants (see paragraphs A5.25 to A5.29), Flinders University will receive a larger

fraction of funds available as special research grants.

A4.155 The Council is aware of the University's intention

to introduce an accounting strand in its Bachelor of Economics course and to make this available to a limited number of students in 1982. Although it understands Flinders University's wish to provide additional courses

such as accounting, the Council is concerned to encourage the balanced development of higher education in Adelaide and expects the University to consult closely other institutions and the Tertiary Education Authority of South Australia before introducing or expanding programs of this kind.

W e s t e r n A u s t r a l i a

A4.156 In Western Australia the prospects for future

population growth and development are better than in most other States.

A4.157 The University of Western Australia, Murdoch University and the Western Australian Post-Secondary Education Commission have all drawn attention to demographic forecasts which suggest steady growth in enrolments of the

17-22 years age group over the 1982-84 triennium if the current participation rate of university education in Western Australia were to be maintained.

A4.158 While there may be some increased student demand

during the 1982-84 triennium, the Council has not been able to provide funds for the two universities in Western Australia sufficient to allow student intake to be increased and at the same time maintain the quality and variety of

educational opportunity. Provision has been made for the total undergraduate student load in each year of the triennium to be approximately the same as in 1981 although some redistribution is proposed between the two

universities.

A4.159 After careful consideration of the appropriate balance of enrolments between the universities, the Council has decided that some modest reduction in the total student load of the University of Western Australia is desirable.

Murdoch University, on the other hand, would benefit from an increasing student intake - particularly of full-time undergraduates - provided there is no decline in entry standard.

77 .

A4.160 The future of Murdoch University and its

relationship with the University of Western Australia has been the subject of considerable discussion since it was first raised in the Williams Report early in 1979,

culminating in the recent decision of the Commonwealth Government concerning funding of the two institutions. The Council understands that the two universities have undertaken some co-operative activities and are developing plans for further rationalisation.

A4.161 While progress has been achieved the Council

believes there is further scope for collaboration. The University of Western Australia might, for instance, reduce its student load in those disciplines represented at Murdoch University where ample capacity for expansion exists. Greater collaboration between the two universities on matters such as the acceptance of course credits and in the sharing of staff resources should also be possible. In some of the sciences, in mathematics and in foreign languages particularly, there should be real educational benefits from a sharing and rationalisation of the resources of the two institutions. Co-operation might well be facilitated by the adoption of a common pattern for the teaching year.

A4.162 The Council has provided funds to both

universities in the expectation that co-operation of the kind described will be developed. Unless this is achieved, a consequential decline in the quality of educational opportunity being provided can be expected. The Council will continue to confer with the two universities as

necessary on future co-operative arrangements.

A4.163 Co-operation between institutions in Western Australia is of particular importance because of the remoteness of Perth from other major centres of population. This remoteness imposes on institutions an added obligation

to collaborate closely in the provision of facilities so that the academic opportunities offered may be the best possible within the resources available. This applies not only to the two universities but also to co-operation between the universities and colleges of advanced education in the region, and in particular with the Western Australia

Institute of Technology. It would be most unfortunate if either complacency on the one hand or aggressive competition on the other were to lead to an undesirable and inefficient distribution of scarce staff resources or equipment.

UNIVERSITY OF WESTERN AUSTRALIA

A4.164 The University of Western Australia has a history

of excellent relations with the Western Australian community; the University sees this as one of its principal strengths. The Council acknowledges the special interest of the University in matters relating to Western Australia and

78 .

the considerable extent to which it provided for the needs and expectations of the State while it was the only

university there. N o w , however, it is important for the University of Western Australia to play its full part in collaborating closely with Murdoch University in the provision of a wide range of educational opportunities of high quality.

A4.165 As indicated in paragraph A4.159, the Council sees

benefit in the University of Western Australia reducing its total student load during the 1982-84 triennium, to an upper limit of 8,400 WSU in 1984, of which no more than 6,800 WSU

should be undergraduates. The University would be free to determine its research and coursework enrolments within these limits. The student load maxima proposed are consistent with the reduced levels of funds available and the provision of better opportunity for Murdoch University to achieve g r o w t h .

A4.166 In view of the funds now available, the University

will no doubt wish to review the new developments mentioned in its submission and subsequent discussions. The Council has some reservations about the language centre in the form proposed but believes that the University should be able to

introduce the proposed legal practice course within the funds being provided, if it so wished.

A4.167 The Council understands that a review of administ­

rative arrangements is being undertaken and encourages the University to examine its procedures with a view to achieving a greater flexibility in the use of funds with less reliance being placed on a rigid departmental alloca­

tion related to WSU. The relatively high proportion of tenured Senior Tutor positions also appears to be placing undue constraint on budget flexibility.

A4.168 The Council is concerned at what appear to be some

anomalies in relation to the provision of space in certain disciplines. The obvious difference in the circumstances of staff in the Faculty of Medicine at the Royal Perth Hospital and at the Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital is perhaps the

clearest e x a m p l e . In this situation where substantial capacity provided for teaching purposes exists in one location, it is very difficult for the Council to provide additional funds for facilities elsewhere, particularly at a time of great shortage of funds for capital p u r p o s e s .

A4.169 Another area which concerned the Council on its

visit to the University was the state of the Architecture building area. This is clearly of unacceptable quality by any criteria, yet it is accorded a relatively low priority by the University. Although it is understood that some

space in a new building has since been made available to the

Faculty it will probably be some ten years before funds can

79 .

be provided for a complete new building. Recruitment of staff in the existing circumstances must become increasingly difficult. The Council therefore believes that the University might well ask itself whether or not it should

continue its involvement in the subject. Unless more satisfactory provision can be made it may be preferable in the interests of both students and staff for the existing activity to be transferred elsewhere or s imply discontinued.

MURDOCH UNIVERSITY

A4.170 Murdoch University, for a variety of reasons, has

not grown at the rate originally planned. Nevertheless, the Council considers that there are good prospects of some growth in enrolments during the 1982-84 triennium and has made provision for the University to reach a total student load within the range 2,100 WSU to 2,300 WSU by the end of

the triennium. The Council believes that the University should be given every opportunity to increase its undergraduate numbers - particularly school leavers - and the ranges provided allow for substantial growth in undergraduate enrolments. The University has increased its research student load quite rapidly in the past two years but further increase is not expected by the Council if the University is to achieve satisfactorily, within the funds available, its immediate principal objective of growth in undergraduate load. Similarly, the Council expects no more than limited growth in masters by coursework p r o grams.

A4.171 Like other recently established universities, Murdoch's early expectations of more rapid growth have not been fulfilled and some problems have arisen because of a lack of balance between staff numbers and student d e m a n d . The Council believes that greater collaboration between Murdoch University and the University of Western Australia, particularly in the later years of courses and in research

supervision, will help to redress this balance.

A4.172 The Council has been impressed, for example, by

the quality of courses and research in the School of Veterinary Science and in the related biological sciences. In mentioning these strengths the Council does not wish to imply that other disciplines are not providing high quality teaching and research. Rather it seeks to highlight the need for the University to examine its activities critically and seek to concentrate in some areas where it has special strengths and advantages rather than attempt to spread its resources too thinly over a wide range of subjects.

A4.173 Murdoch University has a special commitment to

external studies which the Council is willing to support. Nevertheless it is doubtful whether there is a need to develop a wide range of special materials in view of the

80 .

extensive variety already available from such institutions as Deakin University and the Open University in the United Kingdom to name but two. It seems highly desirable for

those universities in Australia with a major involvement in external studies to share the development work as much as possible. Closer collaboration between them would be highly desirable.

T a s m a n i a

A4.174 The University of Tasmania, as the only university

in the State, is expected to provide not only a wide range

of liberal arts and professional courses, but also academic and cultural leadership within the community.

A4.175 The State's population remains relatively small with the result that most of the University's professional faculties, including medicine, engineering and agriculture, cater for such small numbers of students that their exist­

ence would be difficult to justify elsewhere in Australia. The University is relatively expensive and any steps which it may be able to take to improve the quality of educational

opportunity by collaboration with other institutions in specialist fields would be warmly supported by the Council.

A4.176 In view of the 1981 student load of some 4,260

W S U , which the University believes it can sustain, the Council is providing for a range of 4,150-4,350 WSU for each year of the triennium. This will allow some flexibility for the University to achieve higher student load levels, with the possibility of achieving some increase in research

student enrolments during the triennium.

A4.177 The Council has already commented on the recent

changes in the arrangements for higher education in Tasmania (see Volume 1, Part 2, paragraphs 7.8 to 7.11). While

supporting the new situation, the Council wishes to have further discussion with the University on the best means of providing for two-year diploma courses in some disciplines such as art and music. In the meantime an appropriate

provision for the courses transferred has been included in the grants recommended by the Council for the University in 1982-84 (see paragraph A5.13).

A4.178 The Council has noted with approval the steps the

University has taken to co-ordinate its research and support activities through the establishment of its Central Science Laboratory which has as an aim the rationalisation of major equipment resources. The Council also wishes to encourage

the University where appropriate to undertake the provision of a range of courses under contractual arrangements with the Tasmanian College of Advanced Education, the Australian Maritime College and perhaps other institutions.

81.

A4.179 The University is well placed to collaborate

closely in research and research training with such bodies as the CSIRO Division of Fisheries and the Antarctic Division of the Department of Science and Technology. The funds available to the University in the 1982-84 triennium

should enable it to participate effectively in such fields as marine and antarctic studies. As noted at paragraph A1.7, the Commission will be taking up the establishment of a school of fisheries in an Australian university during the

course of the triennium.

A4.180 The Council is also aware of the heavy liabilities

the University will have to meet arising from its present superannuation scheme. While the matter of superannuation is being considered separately by the Commonwealth Government, the Council recognises that in the meantime the University may well have to take some difficult financial

decisions if it is to maintain the quality of its academic p r o grams.

A u s t r a l i a n N a t i o n a l U n i v e r s i t y

A4.181 The Australian National University was established in 1946 as a post-graduate university "to encourage and provide facilities for post-graduate research and study both generally and in relation to subjects of national importance to A u s t r a l i a 3) in i960, the Canberra University College - then affiliated to the University of Melbourne - became part of the Australian National University. The University

now comprises two separate but interrelated parts, the Institute of Advanced Studies and the Faculties - until recently known as the School of General Studies.

A4.182 Although the University regards itself primarily as a national institution, it recognises a responsibility within the Faculties to provide facilities for university education to the local community through a wide range of

courses in arts, social sciences, law and science. The Council provides funds for the Australian National University as a single institution with the appropriate distribution between the Institute of Advanced Studies and

the Faculties being determined by the University.

A4.183 Student load in the Faculties has declined from

over 5,200 WSU in 1976 to less than 4,800 WSU in 1981. This

decline has occurred mainly in the undergraduate student load due to a significant decline in full-time enrolments; part-time enrolments have actually increased quite substantially. There has been a marked decline in the 3

(3) Australian National University Act 1946, section 6(a).

82.

number of school leavers entering the University frcm outside the local region and this has had a significant effect on the occupancy rates of student residences at the University - particularly at the affiliated colleges.

A4.184 The Council sees little prospect of any increase

in student load in the Faculties over the coming triennium, particularly in view of the Government's recent decisions on the reintroduction of some tuition fees and on less flexible study leave arrangements for public servants, who make up a

large proportion of the Faculties' enrolments. The ranges of student load established by the Council for the University as a whole, set out in Table A3.11, assume a continuing decline in undergraduate enrolments in the

Faculties, although the Council would expect higher degree enrolments to remain at about their present levels.

A4.185 The levels of staffing and expenditure in the

Faculties are significantly higher than in corresponding disciplines in comparable State universities. This appears to be due to the number of small departments and the variety

of courses offered at a time of falling student load and the

University may well have to look closely at reducing or eliminating some of these activities.

A4.186 The Council recognises the special role of the

Institute of Advanced Studies in relation to the national research effort. It has taken into account the ASTEC recommendation that financial support for the Institute be maintained at an adequate level. The financial recommend­

ations for the University appropriately recognise the funds needed to enable the Institute to maintain its current high standards of operation and include an element of growth

consistent with the increase in special research grants for the State universities. The Council has noted that the expenditure on teaching and research in the Faculties is comparatively high even for the prevailing departmental sizes; the time may be opportune for the University to

examine its distribution of funds between the Institute and the Faculties.

A4.187 The Council endorses the measures being taken by

the University to provide continuing support for new research initiatives. The Institute is in a particularly favourable position to pursue new directions of research and the Council would encourage it to continue to place emphasis

on innovative activities. The external reviews of the activities of the research schools have been of benefit to the University which has introduced a similar program in the

Faculties. The Council expects that appropriate changes will continue to be implemented as a result.

83.

A4.188 Following the Commonwealth Government's acceptance of the Commission's advice that the North Australia Research Unit (NARU) of the Australian National University should take a wider role in the development and co-ordination of

research in the Northern T e r r i t o r y , additional funds have been provided, within the total resources for the University, for the strengthening of NARU. Further details are set out in paragraph A5.13. The Council will be holding

discussions with the University about the use of the additional funds.

A4.189 Superannuation costs have been of particular concern to the University for some years and the Council recognises the substantial obligations the University faces under the Commonwealth Superannuation Act. The Council is aware that the University is continuing to examine its position, particularly in relation to the significant

differences in both contributions and benefits between staff in the University scheme and those in the Commonwealth Scheme.

A4.190 The Council is pleased to note that the University

is now proceedng with the construction of a 90" telescope of novel design at Siding Spring. While the Council has been unable to provide funds specifically for this purpose, the University will be receiving some increase in its equipment

grant in 1982.

CHAPT E R 5 : F I N A N C I A L RE COMME NDAT I ONS

O P E R A T I N G GRANTS

A5.1 The grants estimated to be available for operating

expenditure in 1981, expressed in comparable terms to the grants for the 1982-84 triennium, are set out in Table A5.1.

A5.2 The Council's general approach to the assessment

of operating grants for the 1982-84 triennium is discussed in Chapter 2 of this A d v i c e . Within this framework, the

recommended distribution of operating grants among univer­ sities for each year of the triennium is set out below; as

equipment continues to be funded on an annual basis, the recommended distribution is for 1982 only. Provision for Research Centres of Excellence is not included; the allocation of funds for this purpose will be made by the

Government after the Commonwealth Research Centres of Excellence Committee has reported (see paragraph A1.25). Similarly, the grants for each year of the triennium exclude funds earmarked for the development of community language programs. The allocation of these funds will also be

determined later.

A5.3 Details of the changed cost adjustment procedures

applying in 1982-84 are given in the Preface to this Advice. All grants for 1982 are expressed in terms of the cash

amounts which will be available. The grants for 1983 and

1984 are shown in comparable terms to those for 1982 and

will subsequently be adjusted for prospective cost i ncreases.

G e n e r a l R e c u r r e n t G r a n t s , 1 9 8 2 - 8 4

ASSESSMENT OF GENERAL RECURRENT GRANTS

A5.4 For the 1982-84 triennium, the Council has .taken

into account in its assessment of general recurrent gran t s , the levels of student load shown in Table A3.ll. However, the Council has continued the practice established in earlier a d v i c e (1 1 of not relating funding precisely to

student load. As noted in Volume 1, Part 2 (paragraph 8.75), recent changes in the average costs per unit of student load (WSU) in the various discipline groups were taken into account in arriving at the recommended total

(1) See, for instance. Volume 2 of the Report for 1979-81 Triennium, paragraphs B32 to B34.

TABLE A5.1

SUMMARY OF FUNDS AVAILABLE FOR OPERATING EXPENDITURE FOR EACH UNIVERSITY, 1981

(Estimates expressed in comparable terms to the grants for 1982-84 triennium)

University

General recurrent Equipment Special research

Teaching hospitals Residences Total

$ Ό00 $'000 $'000 $'000 S'ooo $'000

Sydney 104,423 5,334 1,116 476 399 111,748

New South Wales 101,401 4,573 990 457 3 18 107,739

New England 31,845 1,007 236 - 472 33,560

Newcastle 27,228 1,529 170 59 59 29,045

Macquarie 39,096 1,007 302 - 104 40,509

Wollongong 16,719 846 97 - 66 17,728

NEW SOUTH WALES 320,712 14,296 2,911 992 1 ,418 340,329

Melbourne 89,413 4,420 1,138 498 665 96,134

Monash 73,677 2,376 879 294 311 77,537

La Trobe 37,891 1,025 295 - 2 36 39,447

Deakin 17,990 909 44 - 29 18,972

VICTORIA 218,971 8,730 2,356 792 1 ,241 232,090

Queensland 84,157 4,482 864 334 540 90,377

James Cook 16,401 6 75 88 - 184 17,348

Griffith 13,675 442 66 - - 14,183

QUEENSLAND 114,233 5,599 1,018 334 724 121,908

Adelaide 54,220 2,762 739 302 170 58,193

Flinders 25,186 854 163 77 37 26,317

SOUTH AUSTRALIA 79,406 3,616 902 379 207 84,510

Western Australia 51,289 2,143 377 163 3 11 54,283

Murdoch 16,289 552 73 - - 16,914

WESTERN AUSTRALIA 67,578 2,695 450 163 311 71,197

Tasmania 30,146 827 170 81 163 31 ,387

ALL STATES 831,046 35,763 7,807 2,741 4,064 881,421

Australian National 106,239 6,629 - - 372 113,240

TOTAL AUSTRALIA 937,285 42,392 7,807 2,741 4,436 994,661

86.

level of the general recurrent grant; the Council has used these same cost parameters in assessing the distribution of funds to universities.

A 5 .5 Since 1975, provision has been made within

general recurrent grants for costs in relation to chairs of community practice in medical schools, the Commonwealth Post-graduate Award Scheme and teaching hospital administra­ tion (see Sixth Report, paragraphs 13.25, 13.33 and 13.34

r e s pectively). Such costs are now reflected in the expenditure patterns of universities, and in the revised cost parameters being used by the Council for 1982-84. It

is therefore no longer necessary to provide specifically for them.

A 5 .6 The Council has also had under consideration the

recommendation of the Williams Committee Report on Education and Training (1979) which suggested it "reconsider the assumptions about the range of activities and the size on which the financial formula was based" (R5.31). The

Committee was particularly concerned that in "the next twenty years it is likely that small universities will only be able to operate economically if they offer a smaller range of subjects than was envisaged during the planning

stage and approved by the Universities Commission for financing" (R5.31).

A5.7 In assessing the level of grant for each institu­

tion, one basic assumption has been that once a critical size - expressed in terms of student load (WSU) - has been

exceeded in a given discipline, expenditure per WSU is constant (see Sixth Report, paragraph 13.11). In the past, faculties or departments below the critical size have attracted additional funds in recognition of the higher

relative costs per WSU involved. The critical sizes used until now were determined at a time when there was not only

considerable growth in student load but also expectations of continued growth. Under these circumstances, it was not unreasonable for universities to plan for small units to

grow substantially in terms of student load.

A5.8 However, the situation has now changed and it

is most unlikely that under the prevailing conditions of relatively stable total student load and contracting resources, small faculties or departments will be able to grow in the foreseeable future to student load levels earlier regarded as likely.

A 5 .9 Elsewhere in this Advice (see paragraphs A 2 .13

to A2.17), the Council has sought to encourage universities to examine critically whether they should continue small, costly activities which are not large enough to provide a satisfactory educational experience for students. All

institutions can with advantage be more selective in accommodating to reduced levels of funds and, through increased collaboration, rationalise small activities into larger units.

A5.10 While the Council continues to recognise that

small faculties or departments are relatively costly to operate, it has used lower critical sizes for faculties and departments in its calculation of general recurrent grants, and will be examining the situation further during the

course of the triennium.

A5.ll The recommended distribution of general recurrent grants between universities for each year of the 1982-84 triennium is set out in Table A5.2. As requested by the

Commission, no provision has been made for increases in superannuation costs beyond the amounts applying in 1981 pending the Government's examination of the Commission's recommendations that additional funds be provided in 1983 and 1984 for this purpose.

A5.12 Details of the specific provisions and the

earmarked grants included in the allocations are set out below.

SPECIFIC PROVISIONS

A5.13 The Council has already commented on each

university in Chapter 4 of this Advice, and has there identified some of the general considerations which have been taken into account in arriving at the allocation of general recurrent grants for 1982-84. Specific provisions for which allowance has been made are listed below:

. The transfer of courses from the Tasmanian College of Advanced Education to the University of T a s m a n i a . As requested by the Commission (see Volume 1, Part 1, paragraph 7.42) the Council has consulted the Advanced Education Council and, for each year of the triennium, has included an appropriate financial provision for the courses transferred; such provision has been based on the expectation that the University will maintain the appropriate vocational emphasis of the courses involved.

. The merger of colleges of advanced education in

Armidale, Newcastle, Wollongong an d Townsville with universities in those centres. On the assumption that these mergers will be effected from the beginning of 1982, the Council has

sought advice from the Advanced Education Council

88 .

TABLE A5.2

GENERAL RECURRENT GRANTS RECOMMENDED FOR EACH UNIVERSITY, 1982 TO 1984

University 1982 1983 1984

$'000 $'00 0 $'000

Sydney 103,350 103,240 103,320

New South Wales 99,780 99,530 99,500

New England 36,330* 35,800* 35,600*

Newcastle 36,720* 35,780* 35,400*

Macquarie 38,390 38,110 38,000

Wollongong 20,900* 21,050* 21,300*

NEW SOUTH WALES 335,470 333,510 333,120

Melbourne 89,090 88,920 88,920

Monash 72,540 72,330 72,310

La Trobe 37,400 37,210 37,210

Deakin 18,090 18,190 18,300

VICTORIA 217,120 216,650 216,740

Queensland 83,990 83,830 83,980

James Cook 20,120* 20,020* 19,930*

Griffith 13,890 14,050 14,450

QUEENSLAND 118,000 117,900 118,360

Adelaide 53,300 52,910 52,680

Flinders 24,910 24,760 24,750

SOOTH AUSTRALIA 78,210 77,670 77,430

Western Australia 50,730 50,560 50,470

Murdoch 16,310 16,310 16,470

WESTERN AUSTRALIA 67,040 66,870 66,940

Tasmania 29,910 29,700 29 ,690

ALL STATES 845,750 842,300 842,280

Australian National 105,150 105,200 105,320

TOTAL AUSTRALIA 950,900 947,500 947,600

* Includes an amount transferred from the advanced education sector in respect of the colleges of advanced education to be merged with universities.

89

concerning the appropriate distribution of the funds transferred from that sector for this purpose. The Council recognises that both the Government and the Commission expect these rationalisations to produce significant cost savings which will be realised progressively over the triennium. The Council has identified separately the minimum amounts which may be used only for the teaching functions associated with the advanced education courses involved. Expenditures on administration, library, general services and the like should not be met from this

identified grant which is intended to provide for academic staff salaries and other costs directly relating to the teaching process. The governing body may, of course, provide such additional

funds for advanced education purposes as it deems appropriate. The Council has arrived at these minimum amounts after receiving advice from the Advanced Education Council on the appropriate

student load levels for each year of the

triennium. These levels are set out below.

University Planned advanced education student load (EFTS)

1 982 1983 1984

New England 1,000 1,000 1,000

Newcastle 1,925 1,950 1,975

Wollongong 830 8 50 8 60

James Cook 810 840 86 5

In accordance with the Commission's views set out in Volume 1 , Part 1 (see paragraph 5.80), the planned student load levels are, by 1984, consonant with the minimum amounts identified for teaching purposes in advanced education courses

shown in the table below.

Minimum amounts for teaching purposes in advanced

University education courses

1 982 19 83 1984

$m $m $m

New England 3 .00 2 .90 2.75

Newc astle 6.40 6.05 5.90

Wollongong 2 .40 2 .40 2 .40

James Cook 2.35 2.40 2.40

90 .

The Council recognises that in each case there will need to be some structural reorganisation within the university to give effect to the new

situation. There are, however, particular problems in Newcastle where the student load of the Newcastle College of Advanced Education has declined from 2,508 EFTS in 1978 to just over

2,000 EFTS in 1981. For 1981, the Advanced

Education Council provided funds equivalent to a planned student load level some 15 per cent above that actually achieved. This has resulted in a

level of staffing substantially higher than would be seen as appropriate by the Advanced Education Council for the student load proposed in 1982-84. In these circumstances and in view of the funds

now available, the Council believes that some adjustment should be made to the staffing levels of the Newcastle College of Advanced Education to bring them more closely into line with the

available funds before the University is asked to accept responsibility for the amalgamated institution. The funds recommended assume that no more than 90 p e r cent of the existing staff of the

Newcastle College of Advanced Education will be employed in the new institution.

Phasing out of the engineering course at Deakin Uni v e r s i t y . In accordance with the Government's decision, the Council has made no financial

provision within the grants to Deakin University for new students to be admitted to its engineering course after 1981.

Waite Agricultural Research Institute - University of A d e l a i d e . As noted in paragraph A4.146, the

Council has continued to make an appropriate provision within the general recurrent grant available in each year of the triennium to the

University of Adelaide for the research activities of the Waite Agricultural Research Institute. This provision has been determined on a similar basis to that included for the research activities of

the Institute of Advanced Studies at the Australian National University.

General development g r a n t s . As noted in paragraph A 2 .7, provision has been included within the general recurrent grants to the seven universities currently receiving general development grants to

enable them to meet existing commitments.

91.

Library servi c e s . In Volume 1, Part 2 (see paragraph 6.8), the Council acknowledged the significant role played by university libraries within the national collection of library material. It also noted that the larger

metropolitan universities provide an important library service in their local regions or States. The size and importance of university library collections, particularly as reference sources, and the extent to which university libraries are net lenders of material within the national inter-library loan system illustrate their role. The Council has taken into account the special position in the tertiary education sector of the

libraries of the University of Adelaide, the University of Queensland and the University of Sydney in the levels of general recurrent grants recommended for the triennium.

Department of Child Health - University of S y d n e y . As noted by the Commission Γη Volume 1, Part 1 (see paragraph 1.65), the Institute of Child Health is to be closed as from the end of 1981

and an academic Department of Child Health established at the University of Sydney. The Council has made provision within the 1982-84 grants to the University of Sydney for its continuing academic responsibilities at the Royal Alexandra Hospital at a level which is consonant

with the student load in the Faculty of Medicine.

Co-ordination and development of research in the Northern Terr i t o r y . In accordance with the decisions taken on tertiary education in the Northern Territory (see paragraph A1.22), provision has been included in the general recurrent grants of the Australian National University for the University's North Australia Research Unit. The Council intends having discussions with the Australian National University before the end of 1981 on the use of

these funds.

It is understood that the guestion of additional funding for the establishment of an external studies centre at the Darwin Community College will be taken up by the Advanced Education Council

in its Advice.

92.

Assistance to non-government educational institutions. As indicated in paragraph 1.41 of Volume 2 of Report for 1979-81 Triennium, the following activities relating to legal practice education have been funded during the 1979-81

triennium through the universities identified:

(a) Law Extension Committee - an earmarked grant has been provided to the University of Sydney for this purpose amounting to an

estimated $355,000 in 1981;

(b) Professional Admission Summer School - provision has been included in the general recurrent grant for the University of Melbourne; and

(c) Leo Cussen Institute for Continuing Legal Education - an earmarked grant has been provided for Monash University to enable the Institute to offer courses for

students from both Monash University and the University of Melbourne; in 1981 the

grant is estimated to be some $325,000.

The Council has continued to include a specific provision within the grants to the universities involved for these purposes at levels consistent with recent trends in enrolments and the

reduction in total resources available to the university s e c t o r . It proposes, however, to continue earmarking funds only for the Leo Cussen Institute during the 1982-84 triennium - see paragraph A5.15.

Clinical and non-clinical loadings and merit differentials. In its 1976 Review, the Academic Salaries Tribunal recommended that provision for salary loadings and merit differentials be made within the grants available to universities in accordance with the principles laid down in that

Review. For the 1982-84 triennium, Council has continued to make an appropriate provision in the grants to those universities which maintain salary loading and merit differential schemes.

For the University of Newcastle, this provision takes account of the projected growth in the number of clinical staff in the Medical F a c u l t y .

EARMARKED GRANTS

A5.14 University of Newcastle - Faculty of Medicine. In Volume 1, Part 2 (paragraphs 8.82 and 8.83), the Council proposed continuing the earmarked grant for the Medical Faculty at the University of Newcastle during the

1982-84 triennium at the same level in real terms as the

Universities Commission recommended in July 1976. The continuation of an earmarked grant will assist the establishment of the Faculty but the Council believes that the level of the earmarked grant should reflect in some

measure the reduced level of resources available to universities. A c c o r d i n g l y , the Council is recommending earmarked funds in each year of the triennium at levels slightly below those originally proposed. The earmarked grants recommended for the Faculty are, nevertheless, substantially higher than for the 1979-81 triennium. Provision for expenditure associated with the Medical School relating to academic services, student services and general university services has been included within the University's general recurrent grant.

A5.15 Monash University - Leo Cussen Institute for Continuing Legal Education. The agreement between the University of Melbourne, Monash University and the Institute requires that, if practicable, the grant should be

separately identified. In these circumstances, the Council recommends that the earmarked grant be continued in the 1982-84 triennium but at a slightly lower annual level consistent with the reduced resources now available to the universities.

CONSTRAINTS ON EXPENDITURE

A5.16 It is the responsibility of the universities

themselves to determine their patterns of expenditure, subject to the provisions of the States Grants legislation and the following requirements:

(a) earmarked grants should be used only for the

purposes specified;

(b ) the introduction of new teaching activities should be consistent with the procedures adopted by the Commission and endorsed by the Common­ wealth Government (the current procedures are set out in Volume 1, Part 1, paragraphs 1.17 and

1.18); and

(c) general recurrent grants should not be used to support affiliated colleges and student residences.

94.

GENERAL RECURRENT GRANTS RECOMMENDED FOR 1982-84

A5.17 The Council recommends:

that general recurrent grants be provided, for each of the years of the 1982-84 triennium as set out in Table A5.2 .

A5.18 The grants provided for earmarked purposes within

the general recurrent grant are as follows:

Amount

Unitersity Purpose 1982

$000

1983 $000

1984 $000

Newcastle Faculty of Medicine, for

teaching-and-research purposes 3 ,700 3,680 3,660

Monash Legal Workshop course 3 20 3 20 3 20

E quipment G rants , 1982

A5.19 The total equipment grant of $45.7 million avail­

able in 1982 is about $3.3 million above the 1981 level.

This level includes funds transferred from the advanced education sector in respect of the colleges of advanced education to be merged with universities. The additional funds that have been made available by the Government are primarily "to assist institutions in replacing out-dated

equipment and in responding to needs arising out of technological change".(2) The Council has taken account of these needs in distributing the grant to individual universities.

ASSESSMENT OF EQUIPMENT GRANTS

A5.20 The Council has continued to base the calculation

of equipment grants on the revised approach it adopted for 1980 and 1981.(3) This approach takes into account the most recently available student load data, the range of disciplines covered by each institution and the actual

equipment expenditure of universities over recent years in the various discipline groups. 2 3

(2) statement by the Minister for Education on Commonwealth Education Policy and Financial Guidelines to the Commonwealth Education Commissions, 4 June 1981.

(3) See Volume 3 of the Report for 1979-81 Triennium, paragraphs A17 and A18.

95.

EARMARKED GRANT, 1982

A5.21 The only commitment remaining is a final earmarked

grant in 1982 for the University of Newcastle's Medical Faculty. The grant of $425,000 recommended by the Council takes account of the total amounts included in the earmarked grants for 1979 and 1980.(4)

ADMINISTRATION OF EQUIPMENT GRANTS

A5.22 Revised guidelines on the administration of

equipment grants were introduced by the Council for 1981. These guidelines are set out in Appendix 2 and will continue to apply in 1982.

EQUIPMENT GRANTS RECOMMENDED FOR 1982

A5.23 The Council r e c o m m e n d s :

that equipment grants he provided for 1982 as set out in Table A 5 .3.

A5.24 The grants in Table A5.3 include the earmarked

provision for the University of Newcastle's Medical Faculty referred to in paragraph A5.21.

S p e c i a l R esearch G rants , 1982-84

A5.25 In paragraphs A 2 .8 to A 2 .11, the Council noted

that it has decided to proceed with its Volume 1 , Part 2 proposal to increase the amount allocated for special research grants during the 1982-84 triennium.

ASSESSMENT OF SPECIAL RESEARCH GRANTS

A5.26 Following a detailed review, the Council has

concluded that the current approach, with some minor modification to give greater emphasis to assisting younger staff, provides a suitable basis for distributing the grants for the 1982-84 triennium. The changes which have been

adopted are intended to relate the calculation of the grants more closely to their purpose and, by 1984, are fully reflected in the distribution of the grants shown in Table A 5.4. 4

(4) see Volume 2 of the Report for 1979-81 Triennium, paragraph B 8 6 .

96.

TABLE A5.3

EQIPMENT GRANTS RECOMMENDED FOR EACH UNIVERSITY, 1982

University___________________________________Amount

$ 10 00

Sydney 5,540

New South Wales 5,050

New England 1,130*

Newcastle 1,780*

Macquarie 1,060

Wollongong 1 ,010*

NEW SOUTH WALES 15,570

Melbourne 4,650

Monash 2,750

La Trobe 1,180

Deakin 960

VICTORIA 9,540

Queensland 4,650

James Cook 79 0*

Griffith 500

QUEENSLAND 5,940

Adelaide 2,970

Flinders 920

SOUTH AUSTRAL IA 3,890

Western Australia 2,320

Murdoch 620

WESTERN AUSTRALIA 2,940

Tasmania 930

ALL STATES_____________________________________ 38,810

Australian National 6,890

TOTAL AUSTRALIA 45,700

* Includes an amount transferred from the advanced education sector in respect of the colleges of advanced education to be merged with universities.

97 .

TABLE A5.4

SPECIAL RESEARCH GRANTS RECOMMENDED FOR EACH UNIVERSITY, 1982 TO 1984

University 1982 1983 1984

$'000 $'000 $'000

Sydney 1,140 1,325 1,83 0

New South Wales 1,015 1,220 1,645

New England 240 395 530

Newcastle 175 280 380

Macquarie 310 425 590

Wollongong 100 165 220

NEW SOUTH WALES 2,980 3,810 5,195

Melbourne 1,160 1,225 1,655

Monash 895 925 1,235

La Trobe 305 460 620

Deakin 50 130 190

VICTORIA 2,410 2,740 3,700

Queensland 885 1,095 1,48 0

James Cook 95 190 290

Griffith 70 135 180

QUEENSLAND 1 ,050 1 ,420 1 ,950

Adelaide 750 775 905

Flinders 170 240 325

SOUTH AUSTRALIA 920 1 ,015 1 ,230

Western Australia 390 630 890

Murdoch 75 135 195

WESTERN AUSTRALIA 465 765 1 ,085

Ta smania 175 250 340

TOTAL AUSTRALIA 8,000 10,000 13,500

9 8

PURPOSE OF SPECIAL RESEARCH GRANTS

A5.27 In view of the increases proposed in the level of

the grants, the Council has reconsidered the purposes for which special research grants are made available. Essentially, it endorses the existing purposes of the grants

in providing general research support, particularly to promising, younger members of academic staff so that they can in due course compete effectively for funds from other grant awarding bodies, or to those staff members who have

responsibilities for the training of research students.

CONDITIONS ON THE USE OF THE GRANTS

A5.28 Guidelines on the use of special research grants

for the 1982-84 triennium are set out in Appendix 2.

A5.29 The Council is also seeking from each university

beginning in 1982 a report on the particular purposes to which the grant was applied and the mechanism used for its

allocation. This might well form part of the normal

Research Report published annually by most universities.

SPECIAL RESEARCH GRANTS RECOMMENDED FOR 1982-84

A5.30 The Council recommends:

that special research grants be provided for each of the years of the 1982-84 triennium as set out in Table A 5 .4 .

T eaching H ospi tal s R ecurrent G rants , 1982-84

A5.31 For a number of years, recurrent grants for

teaching hospitals have been provided as a contribution towards the maintenance and service costs, and the library costs incurred by teaching hospitals in the training of

medical students in their clinical years. The recurrent grants in recent years have been maintained at virtually the same level in real terms.

A5.32 In Volume 1, Part 2, the Council sought some

increase in the grants for 1982-84 in recognition of the larger numbers of clinical students now receiving their training at teaching hosp i t a l s . However, the Commission did not support such an increase, noting that the grants are intended only as a contribution to the costs involved

(see Volume 1, Part 1, paragraph 8.48).

A5.33 The Council h a s decided, in the light of the

reduced resources available to the university sector for the triennium, to reduce slightly the level of the grant. Within this reduced l e v e l , the Council has made some minor adjustments to the grants for individual universities so that they more closely reflect the current numbers of clinical students at each institution.

TEACHING HOSPITAL RECURRENT GRANTS RECOMMENDED FOR 1982-84

A5.34 A c c o r d i n g l y , the Council recommends:

that recurrent grants for medical teaching hospitals associated with university medical schools he provided for the 1982-84 triennium as set out in Table A 5 .5.

TABLE A5.5

RECURRENT GRANTS RECOMMENDED FOR TEACHING HOSPITALS, 1982 TO 1984

University

Amount per annum $'000

Sydney 470

New South Wales 440

Newcastle 70

Melbourne 490

Monash 280

Queensland 350

Adelaide 280

Flinders 90

Western Australia 160

Tasmania 70

TOTAL AUSTRALIA 2,700

S t u d e n t R e s i d e n c e s R e c u r r e n t G r a n t s , 1982-84

A 5 .35 Recurrent grants have been made available by the

Commonwealth Government since 1951 to those affiliated colleges and halls of residence at Australian universities which are collegiate in n a t u r e . The grants are a

contribution towards such costs as the provision of tutorials and pastoral care but are not intended as a subsidy for board and lodgings.

100.

A5.36 The Council in Volume 1 , Part 2 (see para­

graphs 7.111 to 7.126) reviewed arrangements for recurrent assistance for student residential accommodation and noted its intention to explore further during the 1982-84 trienn­ ium the problems of providing residential accommodation. In the meantime, the Council proposed to adopt a definition of

collegiate-style accommodation which has been endorsed by the Association of Heads of Residential Colleges and Halls of Universities of Australia. The Commission has accepted the Council's views, concluding that it saw no reason to

recommend any significant modification to the long-standing practice of assistance to student residences ( see Volume 1, Part 1, paragraphs 6.81 to 6.84).

A5.37 Accordingly, the Council is recommending recurrent grants for those student residences which, in its view, conform substantially with the revised definition of collegiate-style accommodation set out in Volume 1, Part 2

(see paragraph 7.120). The Council intends, however, to keep the situation under review during the triennium.

A5.38 Although the Council proposed that the grant for

1982-84 be maintained at the existing level in real terms (Volume 1 , Part 2, paragraph 7.121), it is unable to do so within the level of funds now available. A reduction has

therefore been made in the total grant available in each year of the 1982-84 triennium, consistent with the general reduction in funds available to universities.

CALCULATION OF THE GRANTS

A5.39 The Council has also reviewed the method of

assessing the appropriate levels of the grant for individual halls and colleges.

A5.40 At present, grants to each institution are based

on the actual occupancy levels achieved during the funding year (see Tertiary Education Commission's Recommendations for 1978, paragraph 5.41). The Council has been concerned that the existing method is unnecessarily complex, both in

its legislative expression and in its administration. The Council is therefore recommending a simplified approach for the 1982-84 triennium.

A5.41 E s sentially, this involves the appropriation of a

fixed sum of money which will be distributed among the halls and colleges in accordance with administrative procedures to be approved by the Minister. The distribution will be similar to that currently in use but based on occupancy

levels achieved during the previous y e a r . The Council understands that such an approach would be acceptable to the Association of Heads of Residential Colleges and Halls of

101.

Universities of Australia. The funds available in 1982 to each residence deemed to be "collegiate" are expected to be close to the grants received in 1981.

STUDENT RESIDENCES RECURRENT GRANTS RECOMMENDED FOR 1982-84

A5.42 A c c o r d i n g l y , the Council recommends:

that $4.4 million be provided as recurrent grants to affiliated colleges and halls of residence in each year of the 1982-84 triennium; the distribution of these funds to be made in accordance with administ­

rative procedures to be approved by the Minister.

The grants recommended include an appropriate provision for the student residences associated with the colleges of advanced education to be merged with universities in Armidale and Townsville.

C A P I T A L GRANT S

A5.43 The Council has for some time been concerned that

the level of funds provided for capital purposes is not consistent with maintaining in satisfactory condition buildings representing a total investment of well over $1,500 million. It believes that unless capital funds are

increased substantially in the next few years, universities will suffer considerable h a r m with teaching and research being seriously hampered. In Volume 1 , Part 2 (para­ graph 9.21) the Council drew attention to several areas in universities which are clearly unsatisfactory and, in

some cases, dangerous. The Council fully supports the Commission's view that if "expenditure on the backlog is deferred, the levels of building expenditure required in future triennia will be increased and the current generation of students will continue to be penalised" (Volume 1, Part 1, paragraph 8.101).

A5.44 The Council's approach to the distribution of

capital grants for 1982 is discussed at paragraphs A2.22 to A2.25. The detailed allocation of the funds is set out

below. All grants for 1982 are expressed in terms of the

cash amounts which will be available; grants for other years are shown in comparable terms.

1981 C a p i t a l P rogram

A5.45 Construction is proceeding on five projects during 1981, comprising two continuing projects and three projects which commenced in 1981. Table A5.6 sets out the progress of projects in the 1981 capital program.

102.

103

TABLE A5.6

PROGRESS OF 1981 UNIVERSITIES CAPITAL PROGRAM

Maximum Commonwealth Cash flow

University Project contribution

towards cost of project

Prior to 1981 (actual)

1981

(estimated) 1982 (planned)

Beyond 1982 (planned)

$ Ό00 $'0 00 $ Ό 00 $'0 00 $' 0 00

New South Wales Australian Graduate School of Management 4,800 4,501 299 Nil Nil

New England Dixson Library extension 3,170 117 53 3 1,780 740

Newcastle Clinical teaching facilities 10,490 8,217 1 ,443 83 0 Nil

Melbourne Refurbishing of Chemistry

Building - Stage 1 1,230 Nil 3 60 8 70 Nil

Queensland Social Sciences (Psychology) - Stage 2 3,090 Nil 670 2,420 Nil

TOTAL 22,780 12,835 3,305 5,900 740

A5.46 With the possible exception of the clinical

teaching facilities for the University of Newcastle, all projects are expected to expend the grant available in 1981. The clinical teaching facilities project, which is a joint development involving the University and the N e w South Wales Health Commission, has been subject to lengthy planning

delays.

A pproach to 1982 P rogram

A5.47 In preparing its Advice on the basis suggested by

the Commission {see paragraphs A2.27 and A2.28), the Council has examined carefully the funds required in each of the following categories: existing building commitments, new major buildings, design work and minor building works.

EXISTING BUILDING COMMITMENTS

A5.48 The existing commitment from earlier programs is

limited in 1982 to four projects:

Estimated balance of Commonwealth contribution at

University/Project 1 January 1982

$ m

University of New England - Dixson Library Extension 2.52

University of Newcastle - Medical School - Clinical Teaching Facilities 0.83(a)

University of Melbourne - Refurbishing Chemistry Building - Stage 1 0.87

University of Queensland - Social Sciences (Psychology) -Stage 2 2.42

(a) This amount may vary depending on the actual level

of expenditure in 1981 (see paragraph A5.46).

A5.49 With the exception of the Dixson Library Extension

these projects are expected to be completed in 1982.

104 .

NEW MAJOR BUILDINGS

A5.50 As noted in Volume 1 , Part 2 (paragraph 9.44)

the Council has before it a long list of high priority

building proposals which have been approved at Stage A (Concept Stage) of the Commission's buildings procedures. Several of these projects have proceeded to Stage B (Developed Sketch Plan), and can be considered ready for

construction in 1 9 8 2 . In addition the Council has received concept proposals for eighteen other building projects with a total value of some $37 million. Because of the

continuing low level of funds available for capital works and the already long list of high priority projects awaiting design and construction, the Council has decided to defer consideration of these p r oposals.

A5.51 It is clear that only a small number of new major

buildings can be commenced in 1982 and, after careful consideration the Council has identified the following projects as its top p r i o rities:

. University of Melbourne - Refurbishing of Chemistry Building - Stage 2 (estimated cost $1.38 m i l l i o n ). In Volume 4 of the Report for 1979-81 Triennium the Council proposed that funds be provided for refurbishing of the Chemistry

Building as a single project. The Commission however suggested that the project should be carried out in two stages and provision was made to commence only Stage 1 in 1981. Stage 2

represents the balance of the work which is necessary to rectify the dilapidated and hazardous conditions existing in critical areas such as laboratories and chemical storerooms. Completion

of this work will defer indefinitely the need for a much more costly new building.

. University of Queensland - Clinical Sciences Building (estimated cost $3.36 million). The Council is concerned at the inadequacy of clinical teaching facilities in Queensland and this project is the University's most urgent priority. Over­

crowding in the existing building is impeding the activities of the Medical Faculty and is a matter of particular concern because of the hazardous conditions in some of the laboratories. This project was originally proposed as a free standing building in two stages. However a better solution

in terms of siting and cost has emerged, involving an additional two floors of a new hospital building, which will provide a similar floor area to that envisaged in the staged approach.

105.

. University of Sydney - Architecture Building - Stage 2 (estimated cost $5.13 million)' Completing the building by providing Stage 2 would relieve serious overcrowding and replace old, temporary and sub-standard accommodation which would be demolished once this project is finished.

A5.52 Table A5.7 sets out the Council's recommendations in relation to the major capital works program for universities in 1982.

TABLE A5.7

RECOMMENDED CAPITAL GRANTS FOR MAJOR BUILDING PROTECTS OF UNIVERSITIES, 1982

University Project

Maximum Commonwealth contribution towards cost

of project

Estimated balance of Commonwea 1th contribution at 1 January

1982

Grant

recommended for 1982

$'000 $'000 S'000

CONTINUING PROJECTS

New England Dixson Library Extension 3,170 2,520 1,780

Newcastle Clinical Teaching Facilities 10,370 830 830

Melbourne Refurbishing of Chemistry, Stage 1 1,230 87 0 870

Queensland Social Sciences (Psychology) - Stage 2 3,090 2,420 2,420

Sub-total 17,860 6,640 5,900

NEW PROJECTS

Melbourne Refurbishing of Chemistry, Stage 2 1 ,380 1,380 500

Queensland Clinical Sciences 3,360 3,280 1,200

Sydney Architecture, Stage 2 5,130 4,870 1,000

Sub-total 9,870 9,530 2,700

TOTAL 27,730 16,170 8,600

106.

DESIGN GRANT

A5.53 In order that a number of projects may be ready

for construction without delay when funds become available in the future, the Council proposes that design funds to a

total of $0.3 million be provided for the following projects which have been approved at the Concept Stage:

• University of New England - Animal House (estimated cost $0.63 million). A new animal house is required to replace old and totally unsatisfactory accommodation. It will provide much

needed facilities to cater for a wide range of

animals required in particular, by the Faculty of Rural Science.

. University of Queensland - Priestley Building - Stage ~2 (estimated cost $3.0 million). Stage 2 is required mainly to provide additional space for computer science and the Computer Centre which have expanded rapidly in recent y e a r s . The current temporary accommodation is crowded leading to

inefficiency, problems with equipment reliability and safety hazards. It will also provide some

much needed additional space to be shared by several science departments which are currently operating in overcrowded and hazardous conditions.

. Deakin University - General Purpose Academic Building - Stage Γ (estimated cost $1.3 million). This building would permit the transfer of the School of Education to the University's main

campus at Waurn Ponds and would allow the Library some much needed additional space. The project also includes the relocation of transportable buildings from the Vines Road site and the

construction of a toilet b l o c k .

MINOR BUILDING GRANTS

A5.54 As mentioned in paragraph A2.23 the Council

believes that the level of funds available for minor works is well below that required for the proper and necessary alteration and refurbishing of university buildings and p l a n t . The Council, in Volume 1 , Part 2, assessed that an amount of some $19 million for each year of the triennium

was required to meet the reasonable needs of universities in this respect. The Council is seriously concerned that because of the low level of funds available it is able to

recommend grants only at the same real level as in 1981;

this has been assessed at $7.3 million (including provision for the four colleges of advanced education expected to amalgamate with universities).

107 .

A5.55 The Council recommends that the minor building

grant be distributed according to Table A5.8 below.

TABLE A5.8

RECOMMENDED CAPITAL GRANTS FOR MINOR BUILDING PROJECTS OF UNIVERSITIES, 1982

University Amount

Sydney New South Wales New England Newcastle Macquarie Wollongong

$00 0

800 550 380* 400*

180 330*

NEW SOUTH WALES 2,640

Melbourne Monash La Trobe Deakin

800 320 2 50 350

VICTORIA 1,720

Queensland James Cook Griffith

650 270* 180

QUEENSLAND 1,100

Adelaide Flinders

400 180

SOUTH AUSTRALIA 580

Western Australia Murdoch

300 180

WESTERN AUSTRALIA 480

Tasmania 450

ALL STATES 6,970

Australian National 330

TOTAL AUSTRALIA 7,300

* Includes an amount transferred from the advanced education sector in respect of the colleges of advanced education to be merged with universities

108

SUMMARY

A5.56 The Council recognises that on the basis suggested

by the Commission there will be insufficient funds to meet the recommendations in full of both the Universities Council and the Advanced Education Council from the $34.8 million available. The Council's proposals for capital grants in

1982 are summarised as follows:

198 2 $ m

Existing building commitments 5.9

Minor building grants 7.3

New major buildings 2.7

Design grant 0.3

16.2

109 .

.

A P P E N D I X 1

S E L E C T E D S T A T I S T I C S

The following tables present some selected statistics on students and staff at Australian u n i v e rsities. Most of the data have been derived from the Commonwealth Tertiary Education Commission's annual statistical collection and highlight some of the similarities and differences that exist between

i n s t i tutions, some of which are referred to in Chapters 3 and 4. The information is presented for the years

1975 and 1980 to indicate the significant changes which have occurred over that period.

The tables showing the a g e s , position on salary ranges and type of appointment of academic staff (Tables 10, 10(a), 11 and 12) have been compiled from special statistical collections undertaken by the Commission for 1977 and 1979.

Definitions of the statistical terms used in the following tables are set out in Appendix 2 to

Volume 1, Part 2 of the Commission's Report for 1982-84 Triennium.

112.

r

TABLE A1

UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS AT AUSTRALIAN UNIVERSITIES, BY UNIVERSITY AND LEVEL OF COURSE, 1975

Masters Preliminary Postgraduate Diploma

Bachelor Other Total

Sydney - 1,073 13,177 669 14,919

New South Wales 113 670 14,162 393 15,338

New England 18 712 5,854 150 6,734

Newcastle - 294 3,726 78 4,098

Macquarie 24 160 7,643 182 8,009

Wollongong 15 96 1,830 34 1,975

NEW SOUTH WALES 170 3,005 45,392 1,506 51,073

Melbourne 279 425 12,442 414 13,560

Monash 164 601 10,578 315 11,658

La Trobe 81 351 6,817 70 7,319

Deakin - - - - -

VICTORIA 524 1,377 29,833 799 32,537

Queensland 168 498 15,061 333 16,060

James Cook 19 - 1,554 32 1,605

Griffith - - 433 - 433

QUEENSLAND 187 498 13, 048 365 18,098

Adelaide 16 671 7,284 152 8,123

Flinders 25 237 2,858 SI 3,177

ADELAIDE 41 908 10,142 209 11,300

Western Australia 223 ΑΊΑ 8,204 209 9,110

Murdoch - 31 641 - 672

WESTERN AUSTRALIA 223 505 8,845 209 9,382

Tasmania 25 274 2,795 101 3,195

Australian National - Faculties 209 4 ,612 275 5,096

- Institute 17 - - 3 20

Total 226 - 4,612 278 5,116

TOTAL AUSTRALIA 1,396 6, 56? 119,671 3,467 131,101

113

TABLE A1(a)

UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS AT AUSTRALIAN UNIVERSITIES, BY UNIVERSITY AND LEVEL OF COURSE, 1980

Masters Preliminary Postgraduate Diploma

Bachelor Other Total

Sydney 125 557 13,684 518 14,884

New South Wales 68 381 14,072 480 15,001

New England 25 810 6,415 314 7,564

Newcastle - 226 3,563 123 3,912

Macquarie 48 208 8,731 266 9,253

Wollongong 5 136 2,404 69 2,614

NEW SOUTH WALES 271 2,318 48,869 1,770 53,228

Melbourne 258 628 12,592 372 13,850

Monash 145 574 10,739 371 11,829

La Trobe 56 458 7,455 46 8,015

Deakin 27 114 4,482 94 4,717

VICTORIA 486 1,774 35,268 883 38,411

Queensland 215 366 15,240 460 16,281

James Cook 26 8 1,485 47 1,566

Griffith - - 1,775 43 1,818

QUEENSLAND 241 374 18,500 550 19,665

Adelaide 6 280 6,886 569 7,741

Flinders 18 245 3,061 143 3,467

SOUTH AUSTRALIA 24 525 9,947 712 11,208

Western Australia 197 306 7,809 313 8,625

Murdoch - 86 2,086 111 2,283

WESTERN AUSTRALIA 197 392 9,895 424 10,908

Tasmania 10 224 2,768 210 3,212

Australian National - Faculties 55 78 4,788 375 5,296

- Institute - - - 18 18

Total 55 78 4,788 393 5,314

TOTAL AUSTRALIA 1,284 5,685 130,035 4,942 141,946

f .

TABLE A2

UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS AT AUSTRALIAN UNIVERSITIES, BY UNIVERSITY AND TYPE OF ENROLMENT, 1975

Full-time Part-■time External Total

Number Per cent Number Per cent Number Per cent Number Per cent of State total

Sydney 12,865 86.2 2,054 13.8 - - 14,919 29.2

New South Wales 11,910 77 .7 3,199 20.9 229 1.5 15,338 30.0

New England 2,731 40.6 134 2.0 3,869 57.5 6,734 13.2

Newcastle 2,472 60.3 1,626 39.7 - - 4,098 8.0

Macquarie 4,268 53.3 3,008 37.6 733 9.2 8,009 15.7

Wollongong 1,072 54.3 903 45.7 - - 1,975 3.9

NEW SOUTH WALES 35,318 69.2 10,924 21.4 4,831 9.5 51,073 100.0

Melbourne 10,297 75.9 3,161 23.3 102 0.8 13,560 41.7

Monash 9,071 77.8 2,587 22.2 - - 11,658 35.8

La Trobe 5,070 69.3 2,249 30.7 - - 7,319 22.5

Deakin - - - - - - - -

VICTORIA 24,438 75,1 7,997 24,6 102 0.3 32,537 100.0

Queensland 9,053 56.4 4,188 26.1 2,819 17.6 16,060 88.7

James Cook 1,171 73.0 434 27.0 - - 1,605 8.9

Griffith 387 89.4 46 10.6 - - 433 2.4

QUEENSLAND 10,611 58.6 4,668 25.8 2,819 15.6 28, 098 100. 0

Adelaide 5,904 72.7 2,161 26.6 58 0.7 8,123 71.9

Flinders 2,430 76.5 747 23.5 - - 3,177 28.1

SOUTH AUSTRALIA 8,334 75. 7 2,908 25.7 58 0.5 11,300 100.0

Western Australia 5,926 65.0 2,867 31.5 317 3.5 9,110 93.1

Murdoch 397 59.1 118 17.6 157 23.4 672 6.9

WESTERN AUSTRALIA 6,323 54.5 2,985 30.5 474 4.8 9,782 100.0

Tasmania 2,217 69.4 811 25.4 167 5.2 3,195 100.0

Australian National - Faculties 3,208 63.0 1,888 37.0 5,096 (

- Institute 18 90.0 2 10.0 - - 20 ( n.a.

Total 3,226 63.1 1,890 36.9 - - 5,116 (

TOTAL AUSTRALIA 90,467 69.0 32,183 24.5 8,451 6.5 131,101 n.a.

115.

TABLE A2(a)

UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS AT AUSTRALIAN UNIVERSITIES, BY UNIVERSITY AND TYPE OF ENROLMENT, 1980

Full-time Part-time External Total

Number Per aent Number Per cent Number Per Cent Number Per cent of State Total

Sydney 12,879 86.5 2,005 13.5 - - 14,884 28.0

New South Wales 11,472 76.5 3,131 20.9 398 2.7 15,001 28.1

New England 2,326 30.8 227 3.0 5,011 66.2 7,564 14.2

Newcastle 2,063 52.7 1,849 47.3 - - 3,912 7.3

Macquarie 3,896 42.1 4,108 44.4 1,249 13.5 9,253 17.4

Wollongong 1,352 51.7 1,262 48.3 - - 2,614 4.9

NEW SOUTH WALES 33,988 63,9 12,582 23.6 6, 658 12.5 53,228 100.0

Melbourne 10,467 75.6 3,334 24.1 49 0.4 13,850 36.1

Monash 8,733 73.8 3,096 26.2 - - 11,829 30.8

La Trobe 4,949 61.8 2,999 37.4 67 0.8 8,015 20.9

Deakin 1,485 31.5 643 13.6 2,589 54.9 4,717 12.3

VICTORIA 25,634 66.7 10,072 26.2 2,705 7.0 38,411 100.0

Queensland 8,759 53.8 4,825 29.6 2,697 16.6 16,281 82.8

James Cook 1,066 68.1 500 31.9 - - 1,566 8.0

Griffith 1,516 83.4 302 16.6 - - 1,818 9.2

QUEENSLAND 11,341 57. 7 5,627 28.6 2, 697 13.7 19,665 100.0

Adelaide 5,507 71.1 2,206 28.5 28 0.4 7,741 69.1

Flinders 2,277 65.7 1,190 34.3 - - 3,467 30.9

SOUTH AUSTRALIA 7,784 69.5 3,396 30.3 28 0.2 11,208 100,0

Western Australia 6,116 70.9 2,505 29.0 4 - 8,625 79.1

Murdoch 954 41.8 441 19.3 888 38.9 2,283 20.9

WESTERN AUSTRALIA 7,070 64.8 2,946 27.0 892 8,2 10,908 100.0

Tasmania 2,195 68.3 996 31.0 21 0.7 3,212 100.0

Australian National - Faculties 2,946 55.6 2,350 44.4 5,296 (

- Institute 8 44 .4 10 55.6 - - 18 ( n.a.

( Total 2,954 55.6 2,360 44.4 - - 5,314

TOTAL AUSTRALIA 90,966 64.1 37,979 26.8 13,001 9.2 141,946 n . a .

116.

TABLE A3

BACHELOR DEGREE STUDENTS AT AUSTRALIAN UNIVERSITIES, BY UNIVERSITY AND FIELD OF STUDY, 1975

Agriculture A rein" tecture Arts Dentistry Economics Education Engineering Law Medicine Science Vet.Science Total

Sydney 335 322 3858 525 1 0 6 1 319 11 5 4 1 5 3 6 1463 2 2 2 1 383 1 3 1 77

New South Wales - 1152 286 8 - 24 2 3 175 2 8 6 8 104 6 1 3 3 1 2 2 9 9 - 1 4 1 62

New England 294 4 0 1 8 - 956 7 - - - 5 7 9 - 585 4

Newcastle 146 1263 - 6 9 0 75 802 - - 752 - 372 8

Macquarie - 31 3 6 1497 820 - 2 1 6 - 1974 - 764 3

Wollongong “ ~ 6 6 1 * 357 - 539 - - 276 - 18 3 3

NEW SOUTH WALES 629 1620 15804 525 6984 1396 5363 2798 2794 8101 383 46397

Melbourne 301 540 3772 241 14 7 3 1 1 2 0 9 6 8 1 0 6 9 1 2 6 1 2 0 2 0 241 1 3 0 0 6

Monash - - 312 9 - 16 0 6 642 988 13 6 2 934 1917 - 1 0 5 7 8

La Trobe 225 - 4 0 2 3 - 946 522 - - - 11 0 5 - 6 8 2 1

VICTORIA 526 540 10924 241 4025 2284 1956 2431 2195 5042 241 30405

Queensland 131 250 5092 293 163 9 1935 902 8 9 1 1 9 3 0 1557 4 4 1 1 5 0 6 1

James Cook - - 324 - 329 371 213 - - 317 - 155 4

Griffith - - 237 - - - - - - 196 - 4 3 3

QUEENSLAND 131 250 5653 293 1968 2306 1115 891 1930 2070 441 17048

Adelaide 216 179 239 5 292 702 - 6 2 0 607 745 1 5 2 8 - 728 4

Flinders - - 1702 - 254 275 - - 129 4 9 8 - 2 8 5 8

SOUTH AUSTRALIA 216 179 4097 292 956 275 620 607 874 2026 10142

Western Australia 103 110 3277 137 118 9 6 8 0 684 390 597 106 7 823 4

Murdoch - - 397 - - 101 - - - 116 27 6 4 1

WESTERN AUSTRALIA 103 110 3674 137 1189 781 684 390 597 1183 27 8875

Tasmania 50 - 12 4 8 - 307 77 175 169 246 523 2 7 9 5

Australian National 260 - 2174 - 740 - 6 3 1 814 4 6 1 9

TOTAL AUSTRALIA 1915 2699 43574 1488 16169 7119 9913 7917 8636 19759 1092 120281

TABLE A3 (a)

BACHELOR DEGREE STUDENTS AT AUSTRALIAN UNIVERSITIES, BY UNIVERSITY AND FIELD OF STUDY, 1980

Agriculture Architecture Arts Dentistry Economics Education Engineering Law Medicine Science Vet.Science Total

Sydney 330 348 3889 548 1178 502 1151 1576 1248 2528 386 13684

New South Wales 55 1085 2729 - 2616 386 2404 1198 1158 2441 - 14072

New England 173 - 4430 - 1024 309 - - - 479 - 6415

Newcastle - 92 1179 - 789 87 645 - 187 584 - 3563

Macquarie - - 2822 - 1585 2073 - 1102 - 1149 - 8731

Wollongong - - 1338 - 82 21 531 - - 427 - 2404 1

NEW SOUTH WALES 558 1525 16387 548 7274 3378 4731 3876 2593 7608 386 48869'

Melbourne 313 511 4003 244 1422 638 1016 717 1371 2113 244 12592

Monash - - 3182 - 1694 441 818 1515 948 2141 - 10739

La Trobe 217 - 4173 - 1118 713 21 - - 1213 - 7455

Deakin - 162 1932 - 366 1343 168 - - 511 - 4482

VICTORIA 520 673 13290 244 4600 3135 2023 2232 2319 5978 244 35268

Queensland 197 207 5450 306 1574 1661 784 903 2072 1722 364 15240

James Cook - - 464 - 386 170 138 - - 327 - 1485

Griffith - - 832 - 157 74 - - - 712 - 1775

QUEENSLAND 197 207 6746 306 2117 1905 922 903 2072 2761 364 18500

Adelaide 217 208 2029 262 720 - 604 666 719 1461 - 6886

Flinders - - 1627 - 344 166 - - 348 576 - 3061

SOUTH AUSTRALIA 217 208 3656 262 1064 166 604 666 1067 2037 9947

Western Australia 183 109 2796 154 1078 443 593 394 892 1167 - 7809

Murdoch - - 929 - 84 378 - - - 468 227 2086

WESTERN AUSTRALIA 183 109 3725 154 1162 821 593 394 892 1635 227 9895

Tasmania 51 - 881 - 406 104 176 270 271 609 - 2768

Aust. National 238 - 2278 - 785 - - 640 - 847 - 4788

TOTAL AUSTRALIA 1974 2722 46963 1514 17408 9509 9049 8981 9214 21475 1221 J30035{

(i)

Includes 5 students who could not be classified to a field of study.

TABLE A4

BACHELOR DEGREE STUDENTS AT AUSTRALIAN UNIVERSITIES, BY UNIVERSITY AND SELECTED AGE GROUPS, 1975

Age Group (Years)

Under 23 23 to 29 30 & over Total Under 23 as a

proportion of total

Sydney 11,095 1,667 415 13,177

14,594 ' '

per aent ' 84.2

New South Wales 11,627 2,185 628 79.7

New England 2,557 1,738 1,559 5,854(i) 43.7

Newcastle 2,633 754 331 3,726 70.7

Macquarie 4,332 1,979 1,332 7,643 56.7

Wollongong 1,256 396 178 1,830,.,

46,824[

68.6

NEW SOUTH WALES 33,500 8, 719 4,443 71.5

Melbourne 9,419 1,834 1,189 12 442

' (i)

10,578 ' ’

75.7

Monash 7,791 1,615 1,148 13.1

LaTrobe 4,341 1,442 1,034 6,817 63.7

Deakin - - -

29,837^

-

VICTORIA 21, 551 4,891 3,371 72.2

Queensland 8,667 3,768 2,599 15,061

1,554 1

57.5

James Cook 1,115 256 174 71.8

Griffith 367 27 39 433 fij

17,048 7,300v ;

84.8

QUEENSLAND 10,149 4,051 2,812 59.5

Adelaide 5,576 1,119 604 16.4

Flinders 1,902 610 346 2,858...

10,158{ {>

66.6

SOUTH AUSTRALIA 7,478 1, 729 950 73.5

Western Australia 5,523 1,582 1,098 8,204 67.3

Murdoch 308 127 206

641 (i) 8,845(i)

48.0

WESTERN AUSTRALIA. 5,831 1,709 1,304 65.9

Tasmania 1,964 529 300 2,795 70.3

Australian National 3,139 966 507 4,612 68.1

TOTAL AUSTRALIA 83,612 22,594 13, 687 Cij 120,119 69.6

Note: Students at Point Cook, Jervis Bay and Duntroon are included.

Includes a number of students whose age was not stated.

118.

TABLE A4 (a)

BACHELOR DEGREE STUDENTS AT AUSTRALIAN UNIVERSITIES, BY UNIVERSITY AND SELECTED AGE GROUPS, 1980

Age Group (Years)

Under 23 23 to 29 30 & over „ , VTJnder 23 as a 0 a proportion of total

Sydney 11,308 1,656 720 13,684

per cent " 82.6

New South Wales 11,185 2,262 1,096 14,608U) 76.6

New England 2,150 1,614 2,651 6,415 33.5

Newcastle 2,253 730 580 3,563 63.2

Macquarie 3,955 2,084 2,692 8,731 45.3

Wollongong 1,337 613 454 2,404

49,405 1 12,685

55.6

NEW SOUTH WALES 32,188 8,959 8,193 65.2

Melbourne 9,616 1,794 1,270 75.8

Monash 7,896 1,475 1,368 10,739 73.5

La Trobe 4,285 1,654 1,516 7,455(1, 57.5

Deakin 1,456 1,143 1,865 4,482

35,361[ ' 32.5

VICTORIA 23,253 6, 066 6,019 65.8

Queensland 8,474 3,245 3,521 15,240 55.6

James Cook 987 253 245 1,485 66.5

Griffith 1,241 231 303 1,775 69.9

QUEENSLAND 10, 702 3,729 4,069 18, 500 57.8

Adelaide 5,236 965 685 6,886 76.0

Flinders 1,797 688 576 3,061 58.7

SOUTH AUSTRALIA 7,033 1,653 1,261 9,947 70. 7

Western Australia 5,634 1,174 1,001 7,809

2,086

72.1

Murdoch 750 496 837 36.0

WESTERN AUSTRALIA 6,384 1,670 1,838 0,805 (1) 64.5

Tasmania 1,880 569 319 2,768

4,788

67.9

Australian National 2,772 957 1,046 57.9

TOTAL AUSTRALIA 84,212 23,603 20, 745 130,664(r) 64.4

Note: Students at Point Cook, Jervis Bay and Duntroon are included.

^ Includes a number of students whose age was not stated.

119.

1 2 0.

f

TABLE A5

HIGHER DEGREE STUDENTS AT AUSTRALIAN UNIVERSITIES, BY UNIVERSITY AND LEVEL OF COURSE, 1975

Ph.D & Doctorate

Masters - Research

Masters Coursework

Total

Percentage Coursework

Sydney 519 952 1,277 2,748

per cenv 46.5

New South Wales 623 571 1,137 2,331 48.8

New England 179 182 300 661 45.4

Newcastle 94 141 101 336 30.1

Macquarie 154 283 471 908 51.9

Wollongong 58 55 37 150 24.7

NEW SOUTH WALES 1,627 2,184 3,323 7,134 46.6

Melbourne 509 1,097 513 2,119 24.2

Monash 486 561 544 1,591 34.2

La Trobe 166 227 34 427 8.0

Deakin - - - - -

VICTORIA 1, 161 1,885 1,091 4,137 26.4

Queensland 560 All 648 1,685 38.5

James Cook 74 64 108 246 43.9

Griffith 9 9 - 18 -

QUEENSLAND 643 550 756 1,949 38.8

Adelaide 458 434 262 1,154 22.7

Flinders 124 63 110 297 37.0

SOUTH AUSTRALIA 582 497 372 1,451 25.6

Western Australia 359 294 313 966 32.4

Murdoch 15 27 - 42 -

WESTERN AUSTRALIA 374 321 313 1,008 31.1

Tasmania 109 79 16 204 7.8

Australian National - Faculties 190 169 83 442 18.8

- Institute 300 14 14 328 4.3

Total 490 183 97 770 12.6

TOTAL AUSTRALIA 4,986 5,699 5,558 16,653 35.8

121.

TABjjE Δ5 (a)

HIGHER DEGREE STUDENTS AT AUSTRALIAN UNIVERSITIES, BY UNIVERSITY AND LEVEL OF COURSE, 1980

Ph.D & Doctorate

Masters - Research

Masters - Coursework Total

Percentage Coursework

Sydney 639 1,031 1,405 3,075

per cent 45.7

New South Wales 695 529 1,555 2,779 56.0

New England 231 249 417 897 46.5

Newcastle 147 157 86 390 22.1

Macquarie 263 261 739 1,263 58.5

Wollongong 88 60 87 235 37.0

NEW SOUTH WALES 2,065 2,287 4,289 8,639 49.6

Melbourne 646 899 726 2,271 32.0

Monash 540 665 1,062 2,267 46.8

La Trobe 222 343 190 755 25.2

Deakin 31 51 - 82 -

VICTORIA 1,439 1,958 1,978 5,375 36.8

Queensland 717 513 847 2,077 40.8

James Cook 106 109 112 327 34.3

Griffith 69 43 68 180 37.8

QUEENSLAND 892 665 1,027 2,584 39.7

Adelaide 443 396 247 1,086 22.7

Flinders 152 95 136 383 35.5

SOUTH AUSTRALIA 595 491 383 1,469 26.1

Western Australia 404 354 408 1,166 35.0

Murdoch 71 58 73 202 36.1

WESTERN AUSTRALIA 475 412 481 1,368 35.2

Tasmania 146 99 60 305 19.7

Australian National - Faculties 223 114 80 417 19.2

- Institute 294 20 67 381 17.6

Total 517 134 147 798 18.4

TOTAL AUSTRALIA 6,127 6, 046 8,365 20,538 49. 7

122.

I

TABLE A6

HIGHER DEGREE STUDENTS AT AUSTRALIAN UNIVERSITIES BY UNIVERSITY AND TYPE OF ENROLMENT, 1975

Full-time Part-·.time External Total

Number Per cent Number Per cent Number Per cent Number Sydney 803 29.2 1936 70.5 9 0.3 2748

New South Wales 779 33.4 1490 63.9 62 2.7 2331

New England 204 30.9 262 39.6 195 29.5 661

Newcastle 125 37.2 211 62.8 - - 336

Macquarie 192 21.1 716 78.9 - - 908

Wollongong 44 29.3 106 70.7 - - 150

NEW SOUTH WALES 2147 30.1 4.721 55.2 255 3. 7 7134

Melbourne 782 36.9 1337 63.1 - - 2119

Monash 675 42.4 916 57.6 - - 1591

La Trobe 209 48.9 218 51.1 - - 427

Deakin - - - - - - -

VICTORIA 1666 40.3 2471 59.8 - - 4137

Queensland 455 27.0 1230 73.0 - - 1685

James Cook 97 39.4 149 60.6 - - 246

Griffith 11 61.1 5 27.8 2 11.1 18

QUEENSLAND 563 28.9 1384 71.0 2 0.1 1949

Adelaide 628 54.4 439 38.0 87 7.5 1154

Flinders 150 50.5 147 49.5 - - 297

SOUTH AUSTRALIA 778 53.6 586 40.4 87 6.0 1451

Western Australia 353 36.5 577 59.7 36 3.7 966

Murdoch 20 47.6 22 52.4 - - 42

WESTERN AUSTRALIA 373 37.0 599 59.4 36 3.6 1008

Tasmania 97 47.5 58 28.4 49 24.0 204

Australian National - Faculties 262 59.3 180 40.7 - - 442

- Institute 316 96.3 12 3.7 - - 328

Total 578 75.1 192 24.9 - - 770

TOTAL AUSTRALIA 6202 37.2 10011 60.1 440 2.6 16653

123.

TABLE A6 (a)

HIGHER DEGREE STUDENTS AT AUSTRALIAN UNIVERSITIES BY UNIVERSITY AND TYPE OF ENROLMENT, 1980

Full-time Part-time External Total

Number Per cent Number Per cent Number Per Cent Number

Sydney 978 31.8 2080 67.6 17 0.6 3075

New South Wales 826 29.7 1885 67.8 68 2.4 2779

New England 200 22.3 118 13.2 579 64.5 897

Newcastle 182 46.7 208 53.3 - - 390

Macquarie 247 19.6 1005 79.6 11 0.9 1263

Wollongong 78 33.2 157 66.8 - - 235

NEW SOUTH WALES 2511 29.1 5453 63.1 675 7.8 8639

Melbourne 902 39.7 1206 53.1 163 7.2 2271

Monash 699 30.8 1568 69.2 - - 2267

La Trobe 331 43.8 424 56.2 - - 755

Deakin 20 24.4 13 15.9 49 59.8 82

VICTORIA 1952 36.3 3211 59.7 212 3.9 5375

Queensland 520 25.0 1530 73.7 27 1.3 2077

James Cook 104 31.8 223 68.2 - - 327

Griffith 47 26.1 133 73.9 - - 180

QUEENSLAND 671 26.0 1886 73.0 27 1.0 2584

Adelaide 520 47.9 461 42.4 105 9.7 1086

Flinders 147 38.4 236 61.6 - - 383

SOUTH AUSTRALIA 667 45.4 697 47.4 105 7.1 1469

Western Australia 432 37.0 685 58.7 49 4.2 1166

Murdoch 87 43.1 107 53.0 8 4.0 202

WESTERN AUSTRALIA 519 37.9 792 57.9 57 4.2 1368

Tasmania 149 48.9 124 40.7 32 10.5 305

Australian National - Faculties 286 68.6 131 31.4 417

- Institute 355 93.2 26 6.8 - - 381

Total 641 80.3 157 19.7 - - 798

TOTAL AUSTRALIA 7110 34.6 12320 60.0 1108 5.4 20538

124 .

TABLE A7

HIGHER DEGREE STUDENTS AT AUSTRALIAN UNIVERSITIES, BY UNIVERSITY AND FIELD OF STUDY, 1975

Agriculture Architecture Arts Dentistry Economics Education Engineering Law Medicine Science Vet.Science Total

Sydney 154 194 910 56 138 446 158 281 58 294 59 2748

New South Wales - 66 256 - 504 138 763 8 110 486 - 2331

New England 84 - 100 - 86 264 - - - 127 - 661

Newcastle - 1 94 - 29 63 88 - - 61 - 336

Macquarie - - 290 - 163 206 - 2 - 247 - 908

Wollongong - - 20 - 8 4 43 - - 75 - 150

NEW SOUTH WALES 2S8 261 1670 56 928 1121 1052 291 168 1290 59 7134

Melbourne 93 36 461 56 270 212 271 106 189 394 31 2119

Monash - - 328 - 220 310 135 119 102 377 - 1591

La Trobe 27 - 151 - 39 56 - - - 154 - 427

Deakin - - - - — - - - - - - -

VICTORIA 120 36 940 56 529 578 406 225 291 925 31 4137

Queensland 177 90 382 12 222 141 179 20 88 322 52 1685

James Cook - - 39 - 18 65 24 - - 15 25 246

Griffith - - 8 - - - - — - 10 - 18

QUEENSLAND 177 90 429 12 240 206 203 20 88 407 77 1949

Adelaide 112 130 206 18 91 72 129 7 87 302 - 1154

Flinders - - 111 - 7 87 - - 1 91 _ 297

SOUTH AUSTRALIA 112 130 327 18 98 159 129 7 88 393 - 1451

Western Australia 52 11 253 6 150 104 135 3 66 186 - 966

Murdoch ~ 16 - - 4 - - - 16 6 42

WESTERN AUSTRALIA 52 11 269 6 150 108 135 3 66 202 6 1008

Tasmania 10 - 59 - 7 7 14 9 3 95 - 204

Aust. National 38 - 305 - 104 4 - 17 40 262 - 770

TOTAL AUSTRALIA 747 5 28 3989 148 2056 2183 1939 572 744 3574 173 16653

125 .

TABLE A7(a)

HIGHER DEGREE STUDENTS AT AUSTRALIAN UNIVERSITIES, BY UNIVERSITY AND FIELD OF STUDY, 1980

Agriculture Architecture Arts Dentistry Economics Education Engineering Law Medicine Science Vet.Science Total

Sydney 143 216 1110 93 119 355 208 272 199 316 44 3075

New South Wales 26 124 379 - 577 242 755 13 103 547 - 2779(3-)

New England 100 - 112 - 119 443 13 - - 110 - 897

Newcastle - 5 152 - 65 34 65 - 10 59 - 390

Macquarie - - 478 - 201 320 - 6 - 258 - 1263

Wollongong - - 52 - 14 17 87 - - 65 - 235,.,

NEW SOUTH WALES 269 345 2283 93 1095 1411 1128 292 312 1355 44 8639K%

Melbourne 98 94 574 54 275 299 196 92 250 301 37 2271 (i)

Monash - - 421 - 282 686 239 130 146 363 - 2267

La Trobe 54 - 248 - 40 203 5 - - 205 - 755

Deakin - - 16 - 9 25 7 - - 25 - 82 / ♦ j

VICTORIA 152 94 1259 54 606 1213 447 222 396 894 37 5375 }

Queensland 126 68 595 16 244 270 185 51 129 319 68 2077

James Cook - - 81 - 20 65 41 - - 84 36 327

Griffith - - 67 - 2 3 - - - 108 - 180

QUEENSLAND 126 68 743 16 266 338 226 57 129 511 104 2584

Adelaide 89 12 224 23 138 88 104 28 110 270 - 1086

Flinders - - 129 - 7 116 - - 43 88 - 383

SOUTH AUSTRALIA 89 12 353 23 145 204 104 28 153 358 - 1469

Western Australia 77 1 235 11 183 155 178 5 105 210 - 1166

Murdoch - - 70 - - 54 - - - 56 22 202

WESTERN AUSTRALIA 77 7 305 11 183 209 178 5 105 266 22 1368

Tasmania 20 ~ 80 - 20 32 6 3 6 138 - 305

Aust. National 27 - 329 - 82 4 - 34 40 282 - 798

TOTAL AUSTRALIA 760 526 5352 197 2397 3411 2089 549 1141 3804 207 20538^^

(i)

Includes 14 students who could not be classified to a field of study.

■ 9 Z T

TABLE AS

STUDENT/STAFF RATIOS AT AUSTRALIAN UNIVERSITIES

Agriculture Architecture Arts Languages Arts n

Other Dentlstry Economics Education Engineering Law Mathematics Medicine Science Social Vet. Work Science

Total

Sydney 7.9 14.6 7.5 14.5 6.2 17.7 16.8 9.1 32.8 12.9 10.2 8.8 15.0 7.3 12.0

New South Wales - 10.7 5.1 16.1 - 18.5 13.8 8.3 14.3 13.7 9.5 8.2 18.0 - 11.5

New England 8.0 - 9.5 14.8 - 14.0 20.7 - - 13.7 - 7.5 - - 12.6

Newcastle - 8.2 7.0 13.4 - 13.6 17.8 8.4 - 13.2 - 9.1 - - 11.4

Macquarie - - 10.4 14.2 - 16.4 9.3 - 8.8 11.9 - 7.5 - - 11.7

Wollongong - - 3.5 12.2 - 17.4 17.8 8.8 - 13.3 - 7.9 - - 11.4

NEW SOUTH WALES 7.9 11.6 .7.6 14.6 6.2 16.7 14.1 8.5 22.1 13.2 9.8 8.3 16.7 7.3 11.8

Melbourne 8.1 11.4 9.7 16.4 5.2 19.8 16.2 10.8 24.0 16.7 7.8 9.9 13.4 6.2 12.1

Monash - - 9.2 15.7 - 17.3 15.9 9.0 18.0 15.3 8.5 12.2 - - 13.1

La Trobe 11.2 - 11.6 17.3 - 20.5 18.1 - - 15.0 - . 8.9 - - 14.8

Deakin - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

VICTORIA 9.1 11.4 9.6 16.5 5.2 18.7 16.6 9.9 20.4 15.7 8.1 10.3 13.4 6.2 12.9

Queensland 9.6 13.9 10.7 14.2 5.1 12.8 19.8 10.8 25.4 12.6 9.7 9.6 11.5 6.8 11.8

James Cook - - 5.6 9.8 - 14.2 14.9 6.3 13.0 7.9 - 6.4 - 7.7 8.8

Griffith - - 11.8 12.1 - - - - - - - 9.2 - - 10.4

QUEENSLAND 9.6 13.9 10.4 13.6 5.1 13.1 18.7 9. 7 24.6 11.8 9.7 8.9 11.5 6.9 11.4

Adelaide 5.3 13.8 9.1 14.1 5.3 16.4 17.4 9.2 22.3 11.8 9.7 9.3 - - 11.3

Flinders - - 5.9 14.7 - 11.9 20.5 - - 7.3 4.7 7.7 19.7 - 11.6

SOUTH AUSTRALIA 5.3 13. 8 8.1 14.4 5.3 15.1 18.9 9.2 22.5 10.6 8.7 8.8 19. 7 - 11.3

Western Australia 7.2 8.1 10.8 15.7 4.1 19.5 15.5 9.9 20.9 12.0 7.5 9.0 10.6 - 12.0

Murdoch - - - 12.8 - - 19.2 - - - - 6.1 - 4.9 10.0

WESTERN AUSTRALIA 7.2 8.1 10.8 15.3 4.1 19.5 15.9 9.9 20.9 12.0 7.5 8.5 10.6 4.9 11.9

Tasmania 4.6 - 8.8 14.9 - 15.4 19.2 4.7 12.7 10.5 5.2 6.4 - _ 9.7

Australian National 14.9 - 7.9 13.3 - 12.3 18.1 10.8 8.1 H .7

TOTAL AUSTRALIA 8.2 11.8 8.7 14.9 5.4 16.5 15.8 9.0 21.0 13.0 8.8 8.8 14.4 6.8 11.9

(i)

For the ANU, Students and Staff of the Faculties only are included

127 .

TABLE AS (a)

STUDENT/STAFF RATIOS AT AUSTRALIAN UNIVERSITIES (i) BY UNIVERSITY AND DEPARTMENTAL GROUP, 1980

Agriculture Architecture Arts Languages Arts Other

Dentistry Economics Education Engineering Law Mathematics Medicine Science Social Work ! Vet.

Science Total

Sydney 7.7 13.8 12.0 15.8 7.9 13.0 16.7 9.6 26.7 12.7 9.1 10.5 13.9 6.7 12.3

New South Wales - 12.4 7.3 14.2 - 17.8 11.0 8.8 14.4 13.0 9.7 8.2 14.3 - 11.6

New England 9.1 - 13.8 14.7 - 16.4 15.2 - - 11.6 - 7.3 - - 13.0

Newcastle - 6.7 9.4 10.6 - 12.2 11.7 7.3 - 10.6 6.5 9.0 - - 9.6

Macquarie - - 7.7 15.2 - 18.1 8.4 - 19.2 10.7 - 8.1 - - 12.4

Wollongong - - 8.4 10.0 - 14.4 12.0 10.1 - 12.6 - 7.7 - - 10.5

NEW SOUTH WALES 8.4 12. 3 10.1 24.3 7.9 16.0 12.1 8.9 20.2 22.3 9.2 8.9 24.2 8.7 11.9

Melbourne 9.7 12.4 11.5 17.0 5.3 21.5 16.3 10.3 23.7 16.6 8.9 10.6 11.3 6.7 12.7

Monash - - 9.2 15.5 - 17.3 16.3 9.3 15.8 14.3 8.4 11.8 16.3 - 13.1

La Trobe 9.4 - 9.0 14.6 - 20.2 15.5 11.8 - 13.0 - 11.1 10.0 - 13.8

Deakin - 11.4 - 14.3 - 16.9 11.8 5.6 - 14.1 - 9.1 - - 12.1

VICTORIA 9.6 12.2 10.2 25.5 5.3 18.9 15.0 9.4 28.5 14.8 8.7 20.9 22.7 6. 7 23.0

Queensland 11.1 10.3 9.5 13.5 5.8 16.4 16.0 9.6 23.3 13.6 10.3 10.3 10.8 5.7 11.7

James Cook - - 6.3 9.4 - 13.8 9.1 4.8 13.0 5.9 - 6.0 - 7.2 7.8

Griffith - - 3.3 25.1 - 11.5 0.4 - - - - 6,2 - - 10.4

QUEENSLAND 11.1 10.3 6.8 24.2 5.8 25.3 13.6 8.4 22.8 12.5 20.3 8.4 20.8 5.9 11.1

Adelaide 4.9 11.8 9.1 12.7 4.4 17.4 10.9 8.9 21.8 12.8 10.6 9.2 - 10.9

Flinders - 6.9 12.5 - 15.3 11.6 - - 8.2 6.5 7.9 12.0 - 10.0

SOUTH AUSTRALIA 4.9 11.8 8.3 22.6 4.4 16.8 11.3 8.9 22.8 11.6 9.0 8.8 22.0 _ 10.6

Western Australia 11.9 7.3 8.7 15.4 5.5 18.7 16.0 11.3 20.0 12.5 7.8 11.3 10.0 12.4

Murdoch - - 4.0 14.2 - 9.7 10.0 - - 13.8 - 9.4 - 5.2 9.9

WESTERN AUSTRALIA 11.9 7.3 8.1 25.2 5.5 17.8 13.7 22.3 20.0 22. 7 7.8 20-8 20.0 - 11.9

Tasmania 7.6 ~ 7.3 10.6 - 17.5 13.0 4.7 18.2 11.1 6.1 8.5 - - 9. 7

Australian National 11.8 - 6.9 13.0 - 11.1 - - 15.1 18.8 - 6.6 - - 11.1

TOTAL AUSTRALIA 8.9 11.8 . 9.0 24.4 6.0 16.S 23.3 9.0 29.4 23.4 9.0 9.3 22.4 5.2 11.8

(i)

For the ANU, Students and Staff of the Faculties only are included

TABLE A9

FULL-TIME EQUIVALENT TEACHING-AND-RESEARCH ACADEMIC STAFF AT AUSTRALIAN UNIVERSITIES, BY UNIVERSITY AND GRADE, 1975

Professor Associate Professor Senior

Lecturer Lecturer Principal Tutor

Senior Tutor

Tutor Total

Sydney 107 158 299 420 _ 79 418 1481

New South Wales 118 120 269 535 - 47 371 1460

New England 41 35 102 122 - 12 116 428

Newcastle 32 34 76 112 - 21 47 322

Macquarie 36 40 121 158 - 165 83 603

Wollongong 16 11 23 65 - 3 32 150

NEW SOUTH WALES 350 398 890 1412 - 327 1067 4444

Melbourne 100 141 315 290 - 105 268 1219

Monash 99 82 291 206 - 134 145 957

La Trobe 40 13 115 169 - 40 81 458

Deakin - - - - - - - -

VICTORIA 239 236 721 665 - 279 494 2634

Queensland 100 138 282 320 - 98 305 1243

James Cook 17 13 47 54 - 16 47 194

Griffith 8 - 10 14 - 5 5 42

QUEENSLAND 125 151 339 388 - 119 357 1479

Adelaide 70 86 229 160 - 16 204 765

Flinders 43 18 77 80 - 14 46 278

SOUTH AUSTRALIA 113 104 306 240 - 30 250 1043

West. Australia 60 67 185 160 - 96 130 698

Murdoch 14 2 8 17 - 5 9 55

WEST. AUSTRALIA 74 69 193 177 - 101 139 753

Tasmania 33 30 83 83 - 38 32 299

Aust. National 46 54 120 99 - 49 62 430

TOTAL AUSTRALIA 980 1042 2652 3064 - 943 2402 11082

128.

TABLE A9(a)

FULL-TIME EQUIVALENT TEACHING-AND-RESEARCH ACADEMIC STAFF AT AUSTRALIAN UNIVERSITIES, BY UNIVERSITY AND GRADE, 1980

Professor Associate Professor Senior

Lecturer Lecturer Principal Tutor

Senior Tutor

Tutor Total

Sydney 134 171 379 336 20 43 370 1453

New South Wales 128 155 359 432 1 47 287 1409

New England 39 43 122 116 6 4 118 447

Newcastle 42 44 114 109 - 18 29 356

Macquarie 40 42 198 135 - 75 123 614

Wollongong 19 19 48 84 - 16 22 207

NEW SOUTH WALES 402 474 1220 1212 27 203 49 4486

Melbourne 110 148 330 284 13 66 240 1190

Monash 101 97 345 171 10 75 193 992

La Trobe 47 29 184 159 15 27 78 538

Deakin 11 4 63 119 2 8 25 231

VICTORIA 269 278 922 733 40 176 536 2952

Queensland 102 149 314 306 19 78 285 1252

James Cook 17 19 57 60 2 12 53 220

Griffith 13 5 30 69 - 32 24 173

QUEENSLAND 132 173 401 435 21 122 362 1645

Adelaide 70 106 285 83 1 16 182 743

Flinders 51 40 136 46 - 16 38 327

SOUTH AUSTRALIA 121 146 421 129 1 32 220 1070

West. Australia 76 80 198 157 - 91 93 695

Murdoch 19 9 36 63 - 19 38 183

WEST. AUSTRALIA 95 89 234 220 - 110 131 878

Tasmania 37 38 111 78 - 31 18 312

Aust. National 41 68 124 115 - 34 57 439

TOTAL AUSTRALIA 1096 1265 3432 2920 88 707 2274 11782

129

130

TABLE AlO

FULL-TIME TEACHING-AND-RESEARCH ACADEMIC STAFF AT STATE UNIVERSITIES, BY UNIVERSITY AND TYPE OF APPOINTMENT, 1977

Tenured.

Fixed Term/ Contract <2 year

Fixed Term/ Contract > 2 year ami < 2 years

Fixed Term/ Contract >2 years and < 3 years

Fixed Term/ Contract > 3 years Total

Sydney

per cent IS.2

per cent 24.4

per cent 0.2

per cent 0.2

per cent

1,207

New South Wales 79.3 18.1 0.6 1.7 0.3 1,308

New England 71.6 6.7 4.2 17.5 - 423

Newcastle 88.8 2.8 3.1 3.1 2.2 322

Macquarie 72.5 22.0 0.1 5.4 - 589

Wollongong 89.0 9.8 0.6 0.6 - 154

NEW SOUTH WALES 77.4 17.8 1.0 3.5 0.3 4,003

Melbourne 70.6 20.1 0.2 7.8 1.3 1,037

Monash 74.0 21.7 0.9 3.1 0.3 863

La Trobe 74.8 21.8 1.0 2.4 - 491

Deakin 97.6 1.2 - 0.6 0.6 172

VICTORIA 74.4 19.7 6.6 4.7 0.6 2,563

Queensland 73.0 - - 10.1 16.9 1,159

James Cook 75.5 24.5 - - 208

Griffith 67.7 4.8 6.5 21.0 - 124

QUEENSLAND 72.9 3.8 0.6 9.6 23.2 1,491

Adelaide 83.3 15.4 - 0.1 1.2 671

Flinders 83.3 - 0.7 1.6 14.4 305

SOUTH AUSTRALIA 83.3 10.6 0.2 0.6 5.3 976

Western Australia 87.5 6.4 4.9 1.1 0.1 639

Murdoch 61.8 8.1 1.5 28.6 - 136

WESTERN AUSTRALIA 83.0 6.7 4.3 5.9 0.1 775

Tasmania 91.2 1.4 1.4 1.4 4.6 295

TOTAL AUSTRALIA 77.3 14.2 1.0 4.6 2.9 10,103

131.

TABLE A10(a)

FULL-TIME TEACHING-AND-RESEARCH ACADEMIC STAFF AT STATE UNIVERSITIES, BY UNIVERSITY AND TYPE OF APPOINTMENT, 1979

Tenured

Fixed Term/ Contract $ 1 year

Fixed Term/ Contract > 1 year and < 2 years

Fixed Term/ Contract > 2 years and ^ 3 years

Fixed Term/ Contract > 3 years Total

Sydney

per cent 77.2

per cent 22.2

per cent per cent

0.6

per cent

1,257

New South Wales 80.6 17.2 1.8 0.4 ~ 1,282

New England 68.9 11.9 0.4 18.4 - 428

Newcastle 91.2 2.1 0.3 2.3 4.1 342

Macquarie 76.7 18.9 0.4 4.0 - 571

Wollongong 80.1 2.7 2.2 0.6 14.4 181

NEW SOUTH WALES 78.7 16.6 0.8 3.0 1.0 4,061

Melbourne 72.4 6.6 5.4 7.5 8.1 1,030

Monash 76.0 18.6 0.8 3.7 0.9 876

La Trobe 73.6 17.5 1.1 7.8 - 502

Deakin 85.8 8.5 1.0 4.7 - 211

VICTORIA 74.9 12.9 2.7 6.0 3.5 2,619

Queensland 73.9 8.1 8.3 9.7 - 1,162

James Cook 77.0 22.0 0.5 0.5 - 210

Griffith 69.1 5.7 7.6 17.0 0.6 159

QUEENSLAND 73.8 9.8 7.2 9.1 0.1 1,531

Adelaide 84.2 15.8 - - - 654

Flinders 84.6 12.0 0.9 2.5 - 316

SOUTH AUSTRALIA 84.4 14.5 0.3 0.8 - 970

Western Australia 86.1 4.9 4.2 2.9 1.9 637

Murdoch 70.8 3.0 0.6 19.6 6.0 168

WESTERN AUSTRALIA 83.0 4.5 3.4 6.4 2.7 805

Tasmania 94.0 1.7 1.0 - 3.3 299

TOTAL AUSTRALIA 78.6 12.7 2.4 4. 7 1.6 10,285

132.

TABLE All

FULL TIME TEACHING-AND—RESEARCH STAFF AT STATE UNIVERSITIES, BY UNIVERSITY; SENIOR LECTURER AND LECTURER NUMBERS BY SALARY LEVELS,, 1979 (AND TOTALS FOR 1977)

Sydney New South Wales New England Newcastle Macquarie Wollongong

NEW SOUTH WALES Melbourne Monash La Trobe

Deakin VICTORIA Queensland James Cook Griffith

QUEENSLAND Adelaide Flinders SOUTH AUSTRALIA Western Australia Murdoch

WESTERN AUSTRALIA Tasmania____

TOTAL STATE UNIVERSITIES, (1979)_____ (per cent)

TOTAL STATE UNIVERSITIES, (1977) (per cent)

Semor Lecturer Salary Levels JL___ § ____ 4___ 3___ 2 Base Total· Leaturer Salary Levels 6___ 5___ 4 3 2 Base

30 31

20 22

23 16

9

12

13 3

214 25 34 37 33

175 36 30 32 45

74 6 12 9 8

48 14 10 12 11

84 25 20 20 20

15 2 7 5 9

610 108 113 115 126 244 15 17 19 17

198 37 18 30 27

81 19 15 19 19

44 8 6 4 -

567 79 56 72 63

199 32 25 23 19

28 9 2 2 3

8 5 3 4 3

235 46 30 29 25

162 24 14 23 22

56 15 13 14 22

218 39 27 37 44

143 15 11 5 15

6 1 3 5 1

149 16 14 10 16

59 5 11 8 12

17 335 267 52 34

8 117 41 17 14

14 109 52 18 12

13 182 76 17 16

5 43 24 9 7

89 1161 605 148 116 11 323 100 21 35

25 335 72 24 16

19 172 79 19 21

3 65 67 7 9

58 895 318 71 81

19 317 131 23 28

10 54 19 5 6

7 30 10 7 5

36 401 160 35 39

35 280 58 17 4

10 130 30 13 4

45 410 88 30 8

7 196 66 11 24

9 25 17 4 9

16 221 83 15 33

11 106 39 12 5

13 14 8 6 9

10 7 4 2 1

19 9 8 5 5

8 8 9 5 2

111 80 58 39 33

28 20 33 19 17

14 6 14 14 6

16 8 6 5 10

12 8 5 3

70 42 58 41 33

40 16 17 24 22

7 7 8 6 3

12 6 6 8 6

59 29 31 38 32

6 4 2 - 2

3 3 3 1 1

9 7 5 2 3

17 18 7 12 11

13 13 9 7 3

30 31 28 29 24

4 7 3 4 _

1838 293 251 271 286 255 3193 ( 9.2) ( 7.9) ( 8.5) f 9.0) ( 8.0) (100)1 f 1293 310 281 283 196 181 140 114 >6.2) (11.1) (10.1) (1Q.1) ( 7.0) ( 6.5) f 5,n1 f 4 n1

1458 297 286 294 266 257 2859 (51.0) (10.M (tO.0) (10.3) ( 9.3) ( 9.0) (100) 1114 350 335 303 303 239 134 137 (38.2) (12.0) (11.5) (10.4) (10.4) ( 8.2) ( 4.6) ( 4.7)

Total·

308 437 122

106 155 72 1200

270 166 164 111 711 301

61 60

422 93 58 151 166

75

241 74

2795 (100 )

2916 (100)

133.

TABLE A12

FULL-TIME TEACHING-AND-RESEARCH STAFF, AT STATE UNIVERSITIES, BY UNIVERSITY AND AGE GROUP (AS AT 31 DECEMBER OF PREVIOUS YEAR) , 1977 AND 1979

AGE GROUP (YEARS)

20 to 34 35 to i 54 55 and over

1977 1979 1977 1979 1977 1979

Sydney 421 400 670 725 117 132

New South Wales 535 443 723 718 118 121

New England 177 142 222 248 25 38

Newcastle 116 106 180 205 27 31

Macquarie 250 195 313 351 26 25

Wollongong 65 67 82 102 7 12

NEW SOUTH WALES 1,564 1,353 2,190 2,349 320 359

Melbourne 330 294 573 587 134 149

Monash 282 273 523 539 60 65

La Trobe 241 163 239 312 11 28

Deakin 59 61 106 142 7 8

VICTORIA 912 791 1,441 1,580 212 250

Queensland 340 369 633 669 114 124

James Cook 93 85 105 110 11 15

Griffith 73 74 49 83 2 2

QUEENSLAND 506 528 767 862 127 141

Adelaide 210 174 401 412 60 68

Flinders 110 68 186 236 9 13

SOUTH AUSTRALIA 320 242 587 648 69 81

Western Australia 185 168 374 393 61 76

Murdoch 82 85 53 81 1 2

WESTERN AUSTRALIA 267 253 427 474 62 78

Tasmania 99 83 164 179 32 37

TOTAL STATE UNIVERSITIES 3,666 3,249 5,596 6,091 822 945

A P P E N D I X 2

C O N D I T I O N S A T T A C H I N G TO T H E U SE A N D A D M I N I S T R A T I O N OF E Q U I P M E N T A N D S P E C I A L R E S E A R C H G R A N T S

EQUIPMENT GRANTS

Universities are expected to provide for the expenditure of equipment grants in accordance with the following provisions:

1. The grants are not available for the purchase

of consumable items or m a t e r i a l s . The Council acknowledges that it is sometimes difficulty to draw distinctions between these items and equipment and is prepared to accept the current practice of universities.

2. The grants may be used to purchase collections

of library materials and to enable libraries to fill gaps in their holdings which limit scholarly activity.

3. The grants may be used to hire or lease

costly items of equipment such as computers.

4. Proposed programs should be submitted to the

Council for approval annually in advance setting out expenditures in the following broad categories -

. general equipment;

. computing; and

. library materials.

5. Expenditure from the equipment grant should be included in the Annual Statistical Collection by Department together with a list of items costing $100,000 or more. 6

6. General recurrent and special research grants may be used to purchase additional items of equipment but building grants are not available for this p u r p o s e .

134 .

7 . Steps should be taken to rationalise both

internally and in conjunction with other institutions the purchase and use of expensive items of equipment a n d , in p a r t i c u l a r , computing facilities.

SPECIAL RESEARCH GRANTS

Expenditure from Special Research Grants should accord with the following g u i d e l i n e s :

1. Special Research Grants are primarily intended to support -

. promising younger members of academic

staff in developing their research activities to a point where they can

compete effectively for funds from other grant-awarding b o d i e s ;

. those members of academic staff who

have responsibilities for the training of research students;

. post-doctoral fellowships; and

. the encouragement of high quality group

and team research efforts when approp r i a t e .

2. The grants may not be used for stipends for

research students.

3. Universities should continually review the research programs funded f.rom the special research grant and should be prepared to terminate those programs which have ceased to be e ffective. 4

4. Universities are to provide the Council with an

annual report on expenditure from the g r a n t . Such a report should include comment on the particular purposes to which the grant was applied and the mechanism for its allocation.

135.

S E C T I O N B

A D V I C E OF THE ADVANCED E D U C A T I O N C O U N C I L

A u g u s t 10° 1

TERTIARY EDUCATION COMMISSION

ADVANCED EDUCATION COUNCIL

BENJAMIN OFFICES BENJAMIN WAY BELCONNEN AC T 2616

CHAIRMAN: DR H.S. HOUSTON TELEPHONE 64 1133

14 August 1981

Dear Professor Karmel,

We submit to the Tertiary Education Commission our Advice for Volume 2 of the Report for 1982-84 Triennium.

The Advice has been prepared following consultation with the relevant authorities in the States, the Australian Maritime College and the Canberra College of Advanced Education. The Council has given particular

attention to the need to allocate resources, in the national interest, to the fields of applied science, the technologies and to business and commerce. In addition, the Council has had due regard to the Government's policy statements

concerning consolidation.

Industrial problems affecting air travel and postal services contributed to delays in the completion of the Advice. The terms of office of two members of Council were extended by the Minister to ensure their continuing

participation in the preparation of the Advice. As a result of difficulties which have arisen and have been referred to, Mr P.C.E. Cox, as one of these members, was unable to participate in any decision regarding this Volume of the Advice for the 1982-84 triennium.

The Council wishes to record its sincere appreciation to members of the Secretariat for their assiduous efforts in the preparation of this Advice.

Yours sincerely,

H.S. Houston (Chairman) C. D. Blake G. Burniston Norma Ford

D. A. decks G.H. Newstead A. Patching A.W. Wilkinson D. Fooks (Assistant Commissioner)

Professor P.H. Karmel, AC, C B E , Chairman, Tertiary Education Commission, PO Box 18, BELCONNEN ACT 2616

137 .

P O. Box 18, Belconnen A.C.T, 2616 Telex: 62585 Telegrams Tecom Cant>erra

C ON T E N T S

CHAPTER 1 : INTRODUCTION

COUNCIL'S BRIEF TIMETABLE PROGRESS REPORT ON CONSOLIDATION CONSULTATION

CHAPTER 2 : SPECIAL ISSUES

NON-GOVERNMENT TEACHERS COLLEGES Avondale College McAuley College and Signadou College of Education Fees Governing Bodies

Student Residences AUSTRALIAN MARITIME COLLEGE Introduction The Australian Maritime College -

A Brief Background Student Intakes: Expanded and New Requirements Increased Officer Intakes Short Courses Ratings Training The Need for Courses for the

Training of Ratings Funding Summary MASTERS DEGREE PROGRAMS NURSE EDUCATION LIBERAL STUDIES

TWO TIER COURSES SPECIAL INITIATIVES IN TAFE TEACHER EDUCATION

CHAPTER 3 : RECOMMENDATIONS FOR 1982-84

SECTION 1 : 1982-84 TRIENNIUM - OVERVIEW

Student Load Recurrent Funds Equipment Funds Capital Grants

Paragraph numbers

B1.7 - B1.16

B1.17 - B1.19

B 1 .20 - B 1 .22

B1.23 - B1.24

B2.2 - B2.10

B2.ll - B2.12

B2.13 - B2.24

B2.25 - B2.26

B2.2 7 B2.28 B2.29 - B 2 .72

B2.29 - B2.34

B2.35 - B2.42

B2.43 - B2.49

B2.50 - B2.53

B2.54 - B2.55

B 2 .56 - B 2 .58

B 2 .59 - B 2 .69

B2 .70 B2.71 - B2.72

B2.73 - B2.90

B 2 .91 - B 2 .95

B2.96 - B2.99

B 2 .100

B 2 .101

B 3 .5 - B 3 .35

B3.5 - B3.10

B3.ll - B3.18

B 3 .19 - B 3 .26

B3.27 - B3.35

138

Paragraph numbers

SECTION 2 : INSTITUTIONAL ARRANGEMENTS, STUDENT LOAD, AND RECURRENT GRANTS FOR THE 1982-84 TRIENNIUM B3.36 - B3.237

BACKGROUND NEW SOUTH WALES

B3.36 - B3.42

B3.43 - B3.83

Development of the Advanced Education Se ctor Consolidation Proposals Student Load Recurrent Grants Capital Projects VICTORIA B3.84 - B3.116

Development of the Advanced Education Sector Consolidation Proposals Student Load

Recurrent Grants Capital Projects QUEENSLAND B3.117 - B3.135

Development of the Advanced Education Se ctor Consolidation Proposals Student Load

Recurrent Grants Capital Projects SOUTH AUSTRALIA B3.136 - B3.151

Development of the Advanced Education Sector Consolidation Proposals Student Load Recurrent Grants Capital Projects WESTERN AUSTRALIA B3.152 - B3.173

Development of the Advanced Education Sector Consolidation Proposals Student Load

Recurrent Grants Capital Projects TASMANIA B3.174 - B3.185

Development of the Advanced Education Sector Student Load Recurrent Grants Capital Projects CANBERRA COLLEGE OF ADVANCED EDUCATION B3.186 - B3.193

Student Load Recurrent Grants Capital Projects

139.

NORTHERN TERRITORY Development of Advanced Education Student Load Recurrent Grants External Studies Centre AUSTRALIAN MARITIME COLLEGE

Capital Projects NON-GOVERNMENT TEACHERS COLLEGES Student Load

Recurrent Grants STUDENT RESIDENCES RECURRENT GRANTS

SECTION 3 : 1982 EQUIPMENT GRANTS

SECTION 4 : 1982 CAPITAL PROGRAM Review of Continuing Building Projects Minor Works New Construction Projects

B3.194 - B3.208

Paragraph numbers

B3.209 - B3.222

B 3 .223 - B 3 .231

B3.232 - B3.237

B3.238 - B3.240

B3.241 - B3.247 B 3 .242 B 3 .244 B3.247

ATTACHMENT A : LETTER FROM MINISTER REGARDING NEW INITIATIVES AND EXPANSION OF PRESENT COURSES AT THE AUSTRALIAN MARITIME COLLEGE

140 .

T A B L E S

CHAPTER 2 Page

B 2 .1 Enrolments (EFTS) in Masters Degree Programs 179

in Colleges of Advanced Educ a t i o n , by S t a t e , 1981 Preli m i n a r y , 1982 to 1984 Proposed

CHAPTER 3

B3.1 Student Load Planning Ranges for Advanced 190

Education, 1982 to 1984

B3.2 Student Load in Advanced Education, Projects 192

and Preliminary Actual, 1981

B3.3 Equipment Grants for Advanced Education, 197

1979 to 1981

B3.4 Equipment Grants for Advanced Educ a t i o n , by 198

Type of College, 1979 to 1981

B3.5 Capital Funds for Advanced Education, 1978 199

to 1981

B3.6 Proposed Capital Grants for Advanced 200

Education, 1982

B3.7 Student Load in Advanced E ducation, 1981 211

Preliminary, 1982 to 1984 Proposed: New South Wales

B3.8 Recommended Recurrent Grants for Advanced 213

Education, 1982 to 1984: New South Wales

B3.9 Student Load in Advanced E ducation, 1981 223

Preliminary, 1982 to 1984 Proposed: ,

Victoria

B3.10 Recommended Recurrent Grants for Advanced 224

Education, 1982 to 1984: Victoria

B3.ll Student Load in Advanced Education, 230

1981 Preliminary, 1982 to 1984 Proposed: Queensland

B3.12 Recommended Recurrent Grants for Advanced 231

Educ a t i o n , 1982 to 1984: Queensland

141.

Page

B3.13 Student Load in Advanced Education, 234

1981 Preliminary, 1982 to 1984 Proposed: South Australia

B3.14 Recommended Recurrent Grants for Advanced 235

Education, 1982 to 1984: South Australia

B3.15 Student Load in Advanced Education, 240

1981 Preliminary, 1982 to 1984 Proposed: Western Australia

B3.16 Recommended Recurrent Grants for Advanced 241

Education, 1982 to 1984: Western Australia

B3.17 Student Load in Advanced Education, 244

1981 Preliminary, 1982 to 1984 Proposed: Tasmania

B3.18 Recommended Recurrent Grants for Advanced 245

Education, 1982 to 1984: Tasmania

B3.19 Student Load in Advanced Education, 247

1981 Preliminary, 1982 to 1984 Proposed: Canberra College of Advanced Education

B3.20 Recommended Recurrent Grants for Advanced 248

Education, 1982 to 1984: Canberra College of Advanced Education

B3.21 Student Load in Advanced Education, 251

1981 Preliminary, 1982 to 1984 P r o p o s e d : Northern Territory

B3.22 Recommended Recurrent Grants for Advanced 252

Education, 1982 to 1984: Northern Territory

B3.23 Student Load for the Australian Maritime 253

C o l l e g e , 1981 Preliminary, 1982 to 1984 Proposed

B3.24 Recommended Recurrent Grants for the 254

Australian Maritime College, 1982 to 1984

B3.25 Student Load in Non-Government Teachers 257

C o l l e g e s , 1981 Preliminary, 1982 to 1984 Proposed

B3.26 Recommended Recurrent Grants for 259

Non-Government Teachers Colleges, 1982 to 1984

B3.27 Recommended Equipment Grants for Advanced 261

Education, 1982

142.

Page

B3.28 Progress of 1981 Capital Program

B3.29 Recommended Grants for Minor Works and

Services for Colleges of Advanced Education, 1982

B3.30 Recommended Major Building Program, 1982

263

266

268

143.

CHAPT E R 1 : I N T R O D U C T I O N

Bl.l As recently as 1978, teacher education made

up 45 per cent of the activity of the advanced education

sector. Based on a detailed analysis of the supply of and

demand for new teacher graduates, it was estimated that student load in pre-service teacher education courses in the advanced education sector would need to be reduced from approximately 42,000 EFTS to 29,000 EFTS between 1978 and 1984 - a reduction of 13,000 EFTS (30 per cent) in the space

of six y e a r s .

B 1 .2 In its Advice for Volume 1 of the Report for* ·

1982-84 Triennium, the Council canvassed two possible responses to the large projected decline in teacher education:

(a) to scale back in a permanent way the size of the

advanced education sector, or

(b) to maintain educational opportunities - particularly for young people - by encouraging growth in selected study areas using resources released from teacher education.

The Council concluded that:

If the Commonwealth Government places a premium on maintaining opportunities for young people to participate in tertiary education, the strategy that commends itself is to continue to provide alternative

opportunities within the advanced education sector for those who would otherwise have enrolled in pre-serviae teacher education courses.

The circumstances supporting this conclusion are set out in Chapter 5 of the Council's Volume 1 Advice. Also set out

in this Chapter is the basis for the Council's proposal that alternative opportunities should be provided by expansion within applied science, engineering, the technologies and business studies.

B 1 .3 In summary, the strategy formulated by the

Advanced Education Council for the future development of advanced education was based on satisfying the multiple objectives of achieving a reasonable balance between the supply of and demand for new teacher graduates, encouraging

growth in selected course areas consonant with community needs and emerging directions for economic growth, and the preservation of educational opportunity.

144 .

B 1 .4 These principles were endorsed by the Tertiary

Education Commission and, in the Tertiary Education Commission Guidelines 1982-84, accepted by the Commonwealth Government as objectives for the development of the advanced education sector over the forthcoming triennium.

Specifically, in pursuit of these objectives, the Guidelines require:

. The consolidation into larger units of thirty colleges of advanced education for which teacher education is the main activity by their incorpor­ ation into multi-purpose or multi-campus colleges with a single governing body or by integration with neighbouring universities; in this context

the Government has indicated its intention that the consolidation of institutions should result in genuine amalgamations and a real saving of

resources.

. The redirection of effort in advanced education from teacher education to the technologies and business studies, and for resources to be reallocated accordingly.

B1.5 Following the announcements flowing from the

Review of Commonwealth Functions and the recent Guidelines there have been strenuous objections on the part of some institutions affected by the consolidation proposals and a number of special pleas for exemption. The pleas invariably refer to the "unique history" and "special characteristics"

of the institution, frequently to a reduction of educational opportunity in the local region, and to a range of other

reasons against change; almost without exception, however, they neglect to propose alternative solutions to accommodate to the decline in the real level of resources for advanced education and ignore the cost to the community of maintain­

ing inefficient operations. The Council believes that emotive arguments should be put aside and be replaced by a preparedness to bring a greater sense of realism to educational planning in recognition of changing community

attitudes and reductions in available funds. Successful commercial enterprises facing a declining or changing demand for their product adjust accordingly; educational institu­ tions cannot expect to avoid accommodating to changing

community needs and preferences and be sustained in an inefficient mode of operation by public funds; nor can they expect to be insulated from general economic policy.

B1.6 The consolidation proposals announced for the

next triennium will not be achieved without problems for individual institutions and individual staff mem b e r s ; it is to be hoped that disruption to students can be kept to a

minimum. However, the Council is satisfied that the changes

envisaged will produce, by the end of the next triennium, greater efficiency in the use of resources and result in a

sector more attuned to community ne e d s , and better equipped to discharge its educational objectives over the ensuing y e a r s .

COUNCIL'S BRIEF

B 1 .7 The Government's Guidelines set out the limit of

funds available in 1982-84 for recurrent, equipment and capital purposes for universities and colleges of advanced education c o m b i n e d . Other aspects of the Guidelines relevant to advanced education are:

. Funding for the 1982-84 triennium reflects the advent of stabilised enrolments in higher education.

. An amount of $ 5m has been earmarked within general

recurrent grants for advanced education in the years 1982 and 1983 to assist colleges which are

able to expand enrolments in the technologies and business studies.

. Provision has been made for 350 additional basic

nurse training places.

. Certain non-government teachers colleges which currently receive recurrent assistance at rates up to one-half of the recurrent costs of teacher education in colleges of advanced education will,

from 1982, be eligible for full support; these colleges are also to be eligible for consideration for capital grants within the limit of funds available.

. Special provision has been made for the Australian Maritime College which is still in its developmental stage.

B1.8 The Commission met on 3 June 1981 to consider the

Government's Guidelines and on 11 June 1981 requested the Advanced Education Council to provide advice for Volume 2 of the Commission's Report for 1982-84 Triennium having regard to the following:

(a) Student load

Planning should be based on the student load ranges set out in Volume 1, namely 121,000 to

125,000 EFTS for each year of the triennium. The range includes provision for the Australian

146.

Maritime College, advanced education courses conducted by TAPE institutions, and the non-government teachers colleges which qualify for full support from 1982.

(b) Funding

Recurrent grants·. The funds to be available for recurrent purposes (expressed in 1982 outturn prices) are:

1981 198 2 1983 1984

$m $m $m $m

5 88.3 588.6 587.2 5 82.7

These figures:

. include provision for an additional 350 places in basic nurse education courses;

. include temporary development grants of $5m in 1982 and 1983;

. include provision for the previously partially funded non-government teachers colleges;

. exclude provision for the National Institute of Dramatic Art, responsibility for which has been transferred from the Commonwealth Tertiary Education Commission to the

Department of Home Affairs and the Enviro n m e n t . (^ )

. exclude provision for the advanced education institutions in Armidale, Newcastle, Wollongong and Townsville on the assumption that these institutions are to be merged with the neighbouring universities;

. exclude provision for the development of community language courses; the special grant for this purpose is yet to be allocated

by the Commission. 1

(1) While the Guidelines made provision for NIDA, advice was received on 29 June 1981 of the Government's decision to transfer funding responsibility to the Department of Home Affairs and the Environment; in recognition of this a

deduction of $700,000 (1982 outturn prices) was made from the total Guidelines provision for recurrent grants for each year of the triennium.

147 .

Equipment grants·. Funds for equipment purchases are to be increased from $19.9m in 1981 to $21.4m

in 1982 (1982 outturn prices). These figures exclude provision for the four colleges which are proposed for amalgamation with their neighbouring u n i v e rsities.

Capital grants·. The Commission has not yet determined a distribution of available capital works funds but has invited the Council to make

provision for ongoing building projects and to develop proposals for minor works and new design/ construction projects for 1982 w i t h a maximum cash flow requirement of $10.5m.

B1.9 In determining the allocation of funds for the

advanced education sector the Commission has noted that the consolidation of higher education institutions "will produce significant cost savings which will be realised progress­

ively over the t r i e n n i u m " . The Commission has indicated in particular that it expects savings to be achieved in respect of those colleges of advanced education proposed for consolidation in the Government's Guidelines, those colleges in Victoria which are to discontinue engineering courses, and other colleges involved in the consolidation or rationalisation of activities.

B1.10 As mentioned in paragraph B1.8, no provision has

been made within the funds available to the Advanced Education Council for the advanced education activities of the institutions in Armidale, Newcastle, Wollongong and Townsville which, under the Government's Guidelines, are to be merged with the neighbouring universities. In respect of these colleges, including associated halls of residence,

the Commission has made a provisional transfer of funds to the university sector. However, the Commission has made it clear that while funds have been provisionally transferred to the university sector, the associated student load will

continue to be classified as "advanced education" within the totals prescribed ( see paragraph B1.8(a) ).

Bl.ll Against the background set out above, and within

the specified student load and financial parameters, the Commission requested advice from the Council on the following matters:

(a) Recommended recurrent grants for each college of advanced education, the Australian Maritime College, advanced education courses in the Northern Territory, advanced education courses in TAPE institutions, non-government teachers colleges and student residential accommodation for

each year of the 1982-84 t riennium.

148.

(b) Recommended equipment grants for each State, the Canberra College of Advanced Education and the Australian Maritime College for 1982.

(c) Progress towards the achievement of the 1981 capital program and, in relation to 1982, recommendations for:

. funds required to meet ongoing commitments to major building projects;

. minor works;

. the design and construction of new major

building projects.

B1.12 In providing this advice the Commission has

requested the Council to have regard to the following:

(a) That the Council may wish to review student load

levels in view of the overall reduction in available recurrent funds.

(b) That the temporary development grants for 1982 and 1983 w i l l need to be employed in a w a y that the

activities they support can be sustained within the level of recurrent grants available in 1984.

(c) That the policy for redistribution of resources is to be implemented along the lines set out in

paragraphs 8.29 and 8.30 of its Volume 1 Advice; namely that a proper nexus between student load and recurrent funding needs to be restored as soon as possible in respect of those colleges which have declining levels of enrolments.

(d) That the Council should have special regard to

the size, diversity and strength of the large multi-purpose colleges of advanced education in determining the distribution of recurrent grants (see paragraph 8.25 of Part 1 of Volume 1 of

Report for 1982-84 Triennium.

(e ) That, in recommending general recurrent grants, no provision should be made for increases in superannuation costs beyond the amounts applying in 1981 on the basis that the Guidelines indicate that the Government is examining the C o m m i s s i o n ’s

recommendation that additional funds be provided in 1983 and 1984 to higher education institutions for superannuation purposes.

149 .

B1.13 The Commission also requested specific advice on

two other matters:

Small colleges·. Following the consolidation of institutions primarily concerned with teacher education in the advanced education sector, there will remain some other small mono-purpose institutions. The Commission has observed that the advantages of consoli­ dation may also be applicable in these instances, and has requested the Council to advise whether further

consolidation would result in the increased efficiency of the sector.

Non-government teachers colleges: The Guidelines set out the Government's decision to provide full support for the existing partially funded non-government teachers colleges. The Commission has requested advice

from the Council on the implementation of this decision. In so doing, the Commission has noted that, in one instance (Mount Saint Mary College), there is already a proposal to amalgamate the College with two other fully funded non-government teachers colleges in S y d n e y . The Commission regards this proposal to be consistent with the principle of consolidation which the Government has adopted and has requested the Council to consider the longer term development of the other non-government teachers colleges in this context.

B1.14 Following the Commonwealth's Guidelines and the Commission's brief to the Council, the Commonwealth Minister for Education sought advice on two additional matters: an expansion of education and training provision at the Australian Maritime College; and the establishment of an

external studies centre at the Darwin Community College.

B1.15 Australian Maritime College. On 25 June 1981 the Minister wrote to the Commission requesting consider­ ation of three separate proposals for expansion of the activities of the College. These proposals relate to the

introduction of courses for ratings, an expansion of training for officers, and additional short courses for members of the maritime industry. The Minister requested that these proposals be evaluated in the context of

formulating recommendations on the allocation of available funds for the 1982-84 triennium.

B1.16 Darwin Community College. Following consider­ ation of the Commission's Report on the Proposal to Establish a University in the Northern Territory, the Minister advised the Commission that the Government agreed

in principle with the establishment of an external studies centre at the Darwin Community College. The Minister indicated that funds would not be provided in addition to

1 5 0 .

the levels announced in the Guidelines and requested the Commission to make provision for the proposed study centre within these levels of funds.

TIMETABLE

B1.17 The Council regards as completely unrealistic the timetable within which it has been required to provide advice on the distribution of funds for the 1982-84 triennium, especially having regard to the unusual and

difficult circumstances surrounding the future arrangements for funding.

B1.18 The Government's guidelines were issued on 4 June

1981. The Commission's brief to the Council - setting out

the funds available for advanced education and other planning parameters - was received on 11 June with a request that the Council's Advice be submitted by 31 July. The

Council therefore had seven weeks in which to call for submissions from advanced education authorities, analyse the submissions, conduct a full round of consultations with the authorities concerned, and formulate detailed proposals for

the distribution of some $1,800 million.

B1.19 On 30 April 1981 the Prime Minister released a

major statement of Government policy following the Review of Commonwealth Functions. Of particular significance to this Council was the decision to consolidate 30 existing colleges of advanced education into larger units. In particular, the Prime Minister stated that:

"... it is the Commonwealth's intention to reach agreement with each State concerning rationalisation measures by the end of 1981. If this cannot be done, the Commonwealth will not be prepared to continue recurrent funding for the colleges

concerned after the end of 1981 .

The fact that State authorities have until the end of 1981 to develop proposals for the consolidation of nominated institutions adds a further dimension to the difficulty faced by the Council in formulating detailed institution- by-institution proposals for student load and funding by

31 July 1981.

PROGRESS REPORT ON CONSOLIDATION

B1.20 When the Government announced its Review of

Commonwealth Functions decisions, it noted that some action had already been taken in the States on consolidation. Since that announcement, further steps have been taken by some States. In view of the progress which had been made

towards consolidation and the need for the changes to be taken into account in legislation during the 1981 Budget

151.

Sittings, the Government requested the Commission to provide a progress report on consolidation by 30 June 1981. The

report - Progress Report on Consolidation in Advanced Education - was presented to the Minister on 3 July 1981. The Commission's recommendations are reproduced in full below because of their importance in relation to the ambit

and form of the Council's proposals for student load and funding over the 1982-84 triennium.

69. The Commission has supported the arrangements being made or proposed in relation to the consolidation of the institutions listed below, and proposes to make funding arrangements as follows in Volume 2:

Institutions involved Institutions to be

in consolidation funded in Volume 2

NEW SOUTH WALES

* Alexander Mackie CAE )

)

* Guild Teachers College ) )

* Nursery School Teachers ) College )

)

* Sydney Kindergarten )

Teachers College )

)

* Sydney Teachers College )

* Catholic Teachers College ) )

* Folding College )

)

Mount Saint Mary College ) of Education )

* Goulburn College of )

Advanced Education )

)

Riverina College of )

Advanced Education )

Sydney College of Advanced Education

Catholic College of Advanced Education

Riverina College of Advanced Education

* Included in list of 30 CAEs to be consolidated.

152

Institutions involved in consolidation

Institutions to be funded in Volume 2

VICTORIA

* SCV Burwood )

)

* SCV Rusden ) New multi-campus CAE

) (name to be determined)

* SCV Toorak )

)

Prahran College of )

Advanced Education )

* SCV Coburg

* SCV Melbourne

Lincoln Institute of Health Sciences

* SCV Frankston

Caulfield Institute of Technology

* SCV Institute of Catholic Education

QUEENSLAND

* Brisbane Kindergarten Teachers College

* Kelvin Grove College of Advanced Education

* Mount Gravatt College of Advanced Education

North Brisbane College of Advanced Education

New multi-campus CAE * * * (name to be determined)

Caulfield Institute of Technology

Institute of Catholic Education (see para­ graph 42)

)

) )

I Brisbane College of ) Advanced Education )

)

)

)

)

)

* Included in list of 30 CAEs to be consolidated.

* * In a subsequent statement the Victorian Minister for Education indicated that this amalgamation was not to proceed but that SCV Coburg would amalgamate with the Preston Institute of Technology; no firm decision has been taken on

the future of SCV Melbourne or the Lincoln Institute of Health Sciences.

153 .

Institutions involved in consolidation

Institutions to be funded in Volume 2

SOUTH AUSTRALIA

* Hartley College of )

Advanced Education )

)

* Salisbury College of ) South Australian College Advanced Education ) of Advanced Education

)

Adelaide College of the ) Arts and Education )

)

Sturt College of )

Advanced Education ) *

* Included in list of 30 CAEs to be consolidated.

70. Schedule 2 of the Commonwealth Tertiary Education Act, which sets out colleges of advanced education for the purposes of the Act, will need to be amended to reflect the above changes.

71. The above list includes 20 of the 30

consolidated. The Commission has not received meet the Commonwealth Government's criteria in ten listed institutions below:

NEW SOUTH WALES

Armidale College of Advanced Education Milperra College of Advanced Education Newcastle College of Advanced Education Wollongong Institute of Education

VICTORIA

SCV Hawthorn SCV Institute of Early Childhood Development

QUEENSLAND

Townsville College of Advanced Education

WESTERN AUSTRALIA

Claremont Teachers College Mount Lawley Teachers College Nedlands Teachers College

CAEs to be proposals which respect of the

154 .

72. The Commission's recommendations for recurrent funding in Volume 2 will include grants for all individual CAEs other than those listed institutions for which acceptable proposals have not been received. As the Government's Guidelines assume that savings will be made in respect of

institutions which have been or will be consolidated during the triennium, savings will be required in respect of all 30 CAEs to be consolidated. .

73. At this stage there are ten institutions for which acceptable proposals have not been received. If there is still no agreement on consolidation of these institutions by 17 August 1981, the Commission will not make recommendations in respect of these individual institutions but will:

(a) include funds for advanced education in Armidale, Newcastle, Wollongong and Townsville within the grants recommended for the University of New England, University of Newcastle, University of Wollongong and James Cook University of North Queensland respectively, on the assumption that the CAEs in these cities are to be merged with the

respective universities. The procedure outlined in paragraph 67 will apply;

(b) inform the Government of the amount (within the total provided by the Guidelines) which, in the Commission's judgement, will be required to fund the activities of the six other listed institutions if

they were amalgamated;

(c) if the State Governments concerned decide that they wish to retain any of the above ten CAEs as separate institutions and fund them separately, advise the Commonwealth Government on appropriate adjustments.

B1.21 Accordingly, the recommendations for student load and funding set out in Chapter 3 of this Advice make

no specific provision for the 10 colleges listed in paragraph 71 of the Progress Report, nor in respect of SCV Melbourne the future of which is still under consider­

ation by the Victorian Government. However, in respect of four of these colleges - those in Armidale, Newcastle, Wollongong and Townsville - funds are to be included for advanced education activities in the grants recommended by

the Universities Council for the universities in those cities. As a consequence of this approach there remains from within the total of available funds for advanced education in each of the years 1982-1984 a sum which has not

been allocated among States. This sum is held in reserve

for distribution in the event that acceptable proposals are received from the State authorities concerned in relation to the seven institutions, the future development of which

remains unresolved at present.

155 .

B1.22 Both the Government and the Commission have made

it abundantly clear that real savings are expected to accrue from consolidation. Despite the fact that agreement is yet to be reached on the consolidation of a number of the

designated colleges, the Council's financial recommendations for the States concerned are predicated on savings being achieved for these colleges. It should also be noted that

the reserve of unallocated funds should not be regarded as being for the exclusive purpose of supporting the advanced education activities of the seven colleges referred to above in the event that agreement is reached on their consolidation; depending on the form of the consolidation,

it may be necessary· to make adjustments to the recommended grants for other institutions within the State.

CONSULTATION

B 1 .23 Following receipt of the Commission's brief on

11 June 1981, the Council met on 15 June to determine its

procedures for the preparation of its Volume 2 Advice. On 17 June the Council advised all advanced education authorities of the provisional distribution of recurrent funds available over the forthcoming triennium and requested, by 10 July, proposals for the detailed distribu­ tion of grants among institutions. Information was also requested in relation to student load, capital and equipment programs, and a number of associated matters. The Council wishes to register its appreciation for the co-operation

extended by all advanced education authorities and the prompt responses received to requests at short notice on quite complex matters.

B1.24 Discussions were held with Catholic teacher

education authorities in New South Wales, Queensland and the Australian Capital Territory, and with Avondale College. The Council had intended to meet, during the week-ended

31 July 1981, with representatives from State co-ordinating authorities for advanced education, the Northern Territory, the Canberra College of Advanced Education and the Australian Maritime College. Because of industrial disputes

affecting the transport industry, the scheduled meetings were postponed by one week with the result that the Council was unable to finalise its Advice within the timescale set by the Commission. Additional disruptions to air transport prevented the Council from a further scheduled meeting with Catholic teacher education authorities from Queensland.

156.

C H A PT E R 2 ; S P E C I A L I S S U E S

B 2 .1 In this chapter the Council has addressed a number

of special issues which impinge on planning for the 1982-84 triennium.

N o n -G o v e r n m e n t T e a c h e r s C o l l e g e s

B2.2 Under current arrangements, four non-government teachers colleges receive full recurrent funding and are regarded as "colleges of advanced education" for the purposes of the Commonwealth Tertiary Education Commission Act: the colleges are the Institute of Catholic Education

in Victoria and Folding College, the Catholic Teachers College and the Guild Teachers College in New South Wales. The colleges have also had access to State allocations for equipment and minor works, and some small building projects have been funded by the Commonwealth. In 1982 Folding

College and the Catholic Teachers College will be amalgamated within a single Catholic teacher education institution in Sydney and the Guild Teachers College will be included within the Sydney College of Advanced Education.

B2.3 Four other non-government colleges are partially

funded in respect of teacher education courses; the colleges receive Commonwealth support at a level of up to 50 per cent of the recurrent costs of teacher education courses in colleges of advanced education. The colleges

concerned are McAuley College in Queensland, Mount Saint Mary College of Education and Avondale College in New South Wales, and Signadou College of Education in the Australian

Capital T e r r i t o r y . No separate funds have been provided to these colleges for equipment and minor works.

B2 .4 In its Advice for Volume 1 of the Report for

1982-84 Tviennium, the Council reviewed the current funding arrangements for the partially funded non-government colleges and recommended t h a t , from 1982, funds be determined according to assessed needs for recurrent

expenditure against agreed enrolment levels.

B2.5 In its Guidelines for the 1982-84 t r iennium the

Government announced that from 1982 teacher education courses which have been partially funded will be fully supp o r t e d . Also, the Government decided that the non-government teachers colleges should be eligible for consideration for capital grants within the funds available; the partially funded colleges are also to be eligible for grants for equipment within the funds available.

157.

B2.6 The Government has asked for advice on the

implementation of this decision after consultations with State authorities and the institutions c o ncerned. The Commission has sought the Council's advice on this matter and, in the light of the Government's policy on

consolidation, on the longer-term development of the partially funded colleges.

B2.7 Before the introduction of Commonwealth' support for these colleges, the term 'n o n - g overnment' was employed as much to indicate that the institutions did not receive government support as it was to indicate that their primary purpose was to prepare teachers for the private school

system. The first form of usage has been progressively diminished to the point where, fran 1982, it will be no

longer relevant.

B2.8 The Commission has been informed that Mount Saint

Mary College of Education will join with Folding College and Catholic Teachers College to form a Catholic teachers college; the new institution will come into operation in January 1 9 8 2 . The proposed arrangements for Catholic

teacher education in New South Wales are consistent with the Government's policy on consolidation of institutions for which teacher education is the main activity. The Council

supports the position adopted by the Catholic authorities, and has proceeded on the basis that enrolments in the existing courses of Mount Saint Mary College will be fully

supported in 1982-84 through the grants to be provided for the new institution.

B2.9 In its consideration of the long-term development

of the remaining three partially assisted colleges the Council has had regard to the following fac t o r s :

(a) All three colleges are small (enrolments of 200-300 EF T S ) .

(b) The Commission's view that "Opportunities for post-experience courses and the general increase in the number of qualified teachers who are not bonded to particular employers should, in fact, make it possible for the non-government school

sector to meet its workforce requirements satisfactorily without the need for increases in the size of specialist pre-service courses" (Volume 1 , Part 1 , paragraph 6.79).

(c) The Commission's request that, in the context of the principle of consolidation adopted by the Government for institutions where teacher education is the major activity, the Council to

consider the longer-term development of the small non-government teachers colleges.

158 .

B2.10 Against this background, the Council considered three possible lines of development, namely:

. recognition as colleges of advanced education in their own right;

. association with another institution, in a form by which the separate identity and ethos of the religious orientation could be maintained;

. continued separate existence as fully supported institutions without being regarded as a "college of advanced education" for the purposes of the Commission's legislation.

AVONDALE COLLEGE

B2.ll Unlike the partially-funded Catholic teachers colleges, Avondale College is a multi-disciplinary institution offering courses in theology, business s t u d i e s , and nursing as well as in teacher education for persons intending to teach in Seventh Day Adventist schools. Financial support is provided only in respect of the teacher education courses and this arrangement is to c o n t i n u e . The

range of the College's activities, its character and its relatively isolated location lead the Council to conclude that there is no reasonable basis for the rationalisation of teacher education courses at Avondale College. Because of

its size and constitution the Council does not believe that the College should be regarded as a college of advanced education in terms of the Commonwealth Tertiary Education Commission Act.

B2.12 In relation to Avondale College, the Council

considers the term "fully supported" to have the same meaning as applies in the case of recurrent grants for advanced education courses offered in other than colleges of

advanced education; that is, the level of grant recommended in respect of teacher education courses at Avondale College has been derived on the basis that grants are intended to

cover direct teaching costs and a share of the administ­ rative and support costs.

McAULEY COLLEGE AND SIGNADOU COLLEGE OF EDUCATION

B2.13 The Queensland Board of Advanced Education has

advised that it is greatly concerned at the Commonwealth Government's decision to fully support teacher education programs in non-government teachers colleges, and to make

such colleges eligible for consideration for capital grants within the total funds available. The Board further advised that it was unwilling to initiate discussions with McAuley

College with a view to developing student load proposals, appropriate funding provisions to satisfy the condition of

15 9.

full support, and to assess the building needs of McAuley College in relation to the overall priority listing for the State. The Board sees these as matters entirely for

discussion between the Commonwealth Government authorities and those associated with McAuley Col l e g e . The Board has advised also that it would be unwilling to recognise McAuley College in any way as a college of advanced education.

B2.14 The Council considers both McAuley College and

Signadou College to be too small in terms of enrolments and the range of course offerings to be regarded as colleges of advanced education. In addition, the Council supports the views on student load in the non-government colleges as expressed by the Commission ( see paragraph B2.9(b) above). For the forthcoming triennium the Council does not support an increase in the levels of intakes into pre-service teacher education courses in the non-government teachers colleges.

B2.15 McAuley College has indicated that it wishes to

enter the field of secondary teacher education, nursing and welfare. The range of subject specialisations necessary to support courses of secondary teacher education and the resources in terms, for example, of staff, buildings and

library stock required to establish and maintain those courses are such that the Council cannot support such a development within the level of funds available for the 1982-84 triennium. Current policy is to provide financial assistance only in respect of courses of teacher education; any diversification of McAuley College, or any of the other

non-government institutions, into other fields of study would require a specific Government decision.

B2.16 In its consideration of the future development of

these two colleges, the Council has had particular regard to the Government's policy on consolidations and the concern it has stated at the proliferation of separate higher education institutions. Consolidation has been required of colleges

specialising in teacher education which are significantly larger institutions than either non-government college. The Council is conscious that there may be the appearance of some inconsistency, on the one hand, of supporting those consolidations and, on the other hand, of supporting the long-term separate development of these two small colleges.

B2.17 The Council believes that the same educational

benefits to students and the greater efficiency in resource usage expected to result from current consolidations would apply in principle if McAuley College and Signadou College were to associate with larger institutions. While there is

no larger Catholic institution in Queensland with which McAuley College could associate, the Council has raised the possibility of Signadou College becoming part of the multi-campus Catholic college in New South Wales; it

160 .

concluded however that the geographical separation of campuses would limit possible benefits to students and would reduce any advantages to be gained in resource usage. As an

alternative, the Council examined the opportunities open to both colleges to develop a relationship with an existing college of advanced education by the establishment of a "centre for Catholic studies". In the Council's view the benefits of such an arrangement would include the

following:

. a wider range of educational opportunities would be open for students;

. students would have access to the full range of

college facilities such as library, residential, health and counselling services;

. enhanced educational opportunities may, in the longer term, serve to attract a larger number of appropriately trained teachers into service with Catholic schools;

. association with a larger college would facilitate training opportunities for people seeking employment in the Catholic secondary school system.

B2.18 As applied to these colleges, the Council's

perception of the establishment of a centre for Catholic studies would involve the following:

. Both McAuley College and Signadou College would cease to operate as independent institutions.

. A "centre" would be established; in the case of

McAuley College perhaps at Mount Gravatt under the auspices of the Brisbane College of Advanced Education, in the case of Signadou College at the Canberra College of Advanced Education.

. McAuley College and Signadou College enrolments would become enrolments of the host college of advanced education; as such they would be fully funded at the rate appropriate for that co l l e g e .

. The course undertaken by students would be the

course of the host institution, and the award would be the award of that institution.

. There would be elective units within the teacher education award course(s) of the host institution which would be open to persons wishing to seek employment in Catholic schools; these would be

161.

offered at the centre under contract and costs would be met under agreed contract arrangements by the host college of advanced education.

. Ideally the "centre" would be located on the

campus of the host college of advanced education; achievement of this would depend, however, upon the availability of capital funds.

. The details of any such agreement would be a

matter for negotiation between the parties concerned. Any course agreed between the "centre" and the host institution would be the subject of normal accreditation as are the current courses of . the non-government colleges.

B2.19 The Council initiated discussions with the

relevant authorities concerning the acceptability, in principle, of an association of McAuley College with the Brisbane College of Advanced Education and of Signadou College with the Canberra College of Advanced Education in

the form of a "centre for Catholic studies".

B2.20 The governing authorities of the two institutions concerned are opposed in principle to the associations proposed by the Council. The major grounds for opposition rest in the inevitable changes to course structure which would be the natural outcome of combining with a secular college of advanced education. Under present arrangements both McAuley and Signadou Colleges are able to offer self-contained integrated courses; under the proposed arrangement the Catholic authorities believe that the courses would become fragmented and thereby fail to meet their educational objectives. Concern was also expressed about possible implications for loss of autonomy on student

entry requirements, course content and the selection of academic staff.

B2.21 On the basis of these discussions the Council is

persuaded that there would be no useful purpose in pursuing further the concept of a centre for Catholic studies in relation to the 1982-84 triennium. Accordingly, the Council's financial recommendations for McAuley and Signadou Colleges for the years 1982-1984 are based on both continuing to offer courses in teacher education as

free-standing institutions.

B2.22 The Council has sought advice from institutions

and State authorities, and has determined recommendations for recurrent funding on the basis that the term "fully supported" requires the provision of a level of funding which is consistent with the needs and actual teaching costs

162.

of the institutions such that they can achieve a standard of provision akin to that being offered generally in the college sector.

B2.23 All non-government teachers colleges are now to be

eligible for consideration for grants for capital works and for equipment from within the funds available. As there has been some uncertainty concerning the eligibility for capital grants of the fully funded non-government teachers colleges,

the Government's decision clarifies the matter. In the Council's view proposals for grants for these purposes should be considered as for all colleges of advanced education; that is, the relative priority to be accorded

proposals should be assessed against the needs of all colleges of advanced education in, and in the light of funds available to, the relevant State or Territory. The Council, therefore, has asked State co-ordinating authorities to assess the building needs of the non-government teachers

colleges in their States and to indicate the priority attached to any building needs identified within the overall priority listing for the State. Similarly, State co-ordinating authorities have been invited to consider

requests for equipment grants from the non-government colleges as for colleges of advanced education in their States. In the case of McAuley College, the Council has

dealt directly with the College and has sought the views of the Queensland Board of Advanced Education as appropriate.

B2.24 There are three other matters the Council wishes

to address in responding to the Commission's request for advice on the implementation of the Government's decision to fully support the non-government teachers colleges; namely, the charging of fees for tuition, the constitution of governing bodies, and the provision of grants for student

residences.

FEES

B2.25 Avondale College maintains a scale of fees which

has applied to teacher education students on the grounds that the partial Commonwealth assistance in respect of its teacher education courses does not meet their full economic cost.

B2.26 The Council interprets the Government's decision to "fully support" the non-government teachers colleges as requiring the provision of a level of funding which is consistent with the needs and actual teaching costs of the

institutions such that they can achieve a standard of provision akin to those offered generally in the advanced education sector. The Council believes that the continued levying of fees would be inconsistent with the objectives of Commonwealth support for these colleges and with the basis on which recommendations for financial support have been

163.

determined. The Council suggests therefore that grants should be provided in respect of the teacher education courses of the non-government teachers colleges on the condition that they comply with Commonwealth Government policy on the charging of tuition fees for tertiary education.

GOVERNING BODIES

B2.27 In November 1974, the former Commission on

Advanced Education submitted a report - Non-Government Teaehers Colleges - at the request of the Commonwealth Government on financial provision for non-government teachers colleges. In that report the observation was made

that most of the non-government teachers colleges then under consideration were administered by boards which appeared to be narrow in composition and, in many cases, unduly oriented to the needs of the single employer. Subsequently, in

recommending financial assistance for these institutions, the Commission indicated an expectation that widely based governing councils would be set up. These councils, it was stated, should be responsive of the interests of the general community with some positions filled by election and should have the power to appoint staff, control student entry,

approve courses, and control the funds of the college and its property. The Council endorses these views and would expect to see reasonably broadly-based governing bodies for all of the non-government teachers colleges supported through the Commonwealth grants programs.

STUDENT RESIDENCES

B2.28 Collegiate style residences at colleges of

advanced education are eligible for Commonwealth recurrent financial support. The Council has already indicated that it interprets the Government's decision to "fully support" the non-government teachers colleges to require the provision of a level of support such that they can achieve

standards akin to those in the advanced education sector. The Council believes that it would be consistent with the Government's decisions that the non-government teachers colleges should be eligible for consideration for recurrent assistance for student residences. The Council suggests therefore that student residences of non-government teachers colleges, which provide collegiate accommodation, should be eligible for consideration for financial assistance on the same conditions and at the same rates applying to those of colleges of advanced education.

164 .

A u s t r a l i a n M a r i t i m e C o l l e g e

INTRODUCTION

B2.29 In late April 1981 the Australian Maritime College

proposed to the Advanced Education Council a threefold development of its academic program which would involve:

. an expansion of present officer training provisions to meet the estimated needs of the industry;

. the provision of courses to meet new training

requirements specified in international maritime conventions to which Australia is a signatory;

. the introduction of ratings t r a i n i n g .

The proposals arose out of requests made to the College by

the National Maritime Industry Training Committee (N M I T C ), the peak organisation responsible for manpower development and training for the shipping industry.

B2.30 If adopted, the proposals would constitute a

significant development of the level and range of the College's activities upon which its planning has thus far been based and, if fully implemented, would require significant additional resources. The proposals,

foreshadowed earlier by the College, were the subject of a supplementary submission which was received following the completion of the Council's Advice for Volume 1 on the needs of the advanced education sector for the triennium.

B2.31 Following discussions with representatives of the maritime industry and the College in late J u n e , the Commonwealth Minister for Education wrote to the Commission asking that the proposals be considered on their merits in making recommendations on allocations for the triennium,

even though they had been made too late for consideration in the context of Volume 1. That is, the Commission was

asked to consider the proposals within the funds made available under the Guidelines for the 1982-84 triennium. The Minister's letter is set out at Attachment A.

B2.32 The Minister also asked that the Commission have

regard to the views of the Minister for Transport on the

relative priority of the requirements of the industry for such additional training; highest priority was accorded by the Minister for Transport to the introduction of ratings training, second priority to training to meet the

requirements of international conventions, and third priority to increasing provisions for officer t r a ining.

165 .

I

B2.33 The Minister further asked that the Commission

give consideration to the feasibility and comparative costs of the location of rating training in a number of locations

in the States as compared with the location of this training at Launceston.

B2.34 The Commission has asked the Council for advice on

the matters raised in the Minister's letter.

THE AUSTRALIAN MARITIME COLLEGE - A BRIEF BACKGROUND

B2.35 The Report on Training Requirements for Sea-Going Personnel (the Summers Report, 1974), concluded that training for sea-going personnel was inadequate and recommended establishment of a maritime college; the

Commonwealth Government accepted the major findings of the Inquiry and announced in 1975 that the Australian Maritime College would be established within the advanced education sector as a national centre to provide training for the maritime and fishing industries in Australia.

B2.36 Under its legislation, the Australian Maritime College is to provide '... such maritime and maritime-

related education and training as the Council, with the approval of the Minister, determines, or as the Minister requires, being principally tertiary education for persons who wish to become, or are, officers on merchant or fishing

vessels or who wish to become, or are otherwise engaged in

connection with shipping or the fishing i n d u s t r y 1. It may also conduct on behalf of the Commonwealth short courses of maritime training and examinations and assessments for marine competency in accordance with the Navigation Act

1912.

B2.37 Thus far, planning of the College's educational

program has been based upon the provision of courses in the fields of nautical science, marine engineering and radio­ communications for trainee officer entrants to the maritime industry, and in fisheries operations and technology for entrants to the fishing industry, fishing-boat skippers and

for fisheries technologists. The College already offers courses at a range of levels not normally characteristic of colleges of advanced education; advanced education level award courses, award courses of a type normally offered in TAPE colleges and a comprehensive range of short intensive non-award vocational training courses of a specialist,

refresher or updating nature are taught. This range of courses, however, is fully consistent with the College's charter and is supported by the Council.

B2.38 The College is established on two sites. The main

13.25 hectare campus is at Newnham, Launceston, and is adjacent to the Tasmanian College of Advanced Education. A Seamanship and Fisheries Practical Training Centre is

166.

located at Beauty Point, some 50km north of Launceston near the mouth of the Tamar River and on the west b a n k . The

development of the College's facilities, has been given high priority by the Government; construction began in 1978 at Beauty Point and in 1979 at Newnham; the objective is to

complete the initial College development by 1984.

B2.39 Facilities at Beauty Point were substantially completed at the end of 1979. There are two buil d i n g s ; the

practical training centre is on a riverside site and a residential b l o c k , with 40 single-study bedrooms, is on a nearby raised site overlooking the river. The centre is adjacent to the wharf which provides berthing facilities for the seamanship training vessel "Wyuna", the fisheries

training vessel "Bluefin" and the work-boat "Investigator". The wharf is equipped with a derrick and winch, and a

life-boat and davits, for seamship training p u r poses.

B2.40 At the Newnham campus, work has been completed on

the Navigation, Engineering and Administration building, and the thermodynamics b u i l d i n g . Amongst the facilities to be provided for the College are a ship-towing tank which is nearing completion; simulators for radar and engine-room

operations are currently being installed. A survival training centre, ship-handling and cargo-handling simulators, and a building for the School of Fisheries housing a net-testing flume tank are p l a n n e d . As a joint

venture with local industry, a fire-fighting facility is under development at Bell Bay, on the eastern shore of the

Tamar River, approximately opposite Beauty Point.

B2.41 The College believes that residence on campus,

with experience of communal living and appropriate maritime discipline, is necessary for the creation of an atmosphere similar to that of life at sea. In addition to the 40-bed

facility at Beauty Point, a 130-bed facility for cadets has been completed at Newnham and an existing building has been refurbished to provide an additional 30 b e d s . Planning for Newnham is aimed to provide, by 1984, 290 bed-studies for

cadets and 50 for senior officers.

B2.42 With the completion of the physical facilities

descibed above, and the additional facilities planned for acquisition or construction in the coming triennium, the major part of the development of the College will have been

completed by 1984. Also by 1984, the College will be

reaching its full-operational level of student l o a d .

STUDENT INTAKES: EXPANDED AND NEW REQUIREMENTS

B2.43 Planning for the College has been based on current

intakes of cadets into the shipping industry, that is, 30 each of nautical and engineering cadets increasing to 40 in 1984, and 20 radio trainees increasing to 25 in 1984. The

167.

Commission has also made provision for the equivalent of 50 EFTS annually to cover overheads associated with the provision of short (non-award) courses.

B2.44 The NMITC has advised the College that the

shipping industry plans to increase its intake of nautical and engineering cadets from 1983 requiring an increase in output from each diploma course from 30 to 55 per annum. The College estimates an annual requirement of around 70 places for entrants to each of the nautical science and marine engineering courses from 1983. An increase in the intake of radiocommunication and electronic trainees to

service government departments and instrumentalities and the marine electronics industry is also anticipated. These numbers represent an increase in student load of between 150 and 300 EFTS in advanced education award courses in 1984 and

a requirement for an extra 30 residential places at Beauty Point and an extra 100 places at Newnham.

B2.45 The College also proposes an increase of 16 EFTS

in short courses to 84 EFTS by 1984. As noted above short

courses are intensive vocational non-award courses directed to providing appropriate training for:

. mandatory pre-requisites for entry to Department of Transport Certificate of Competency examinations;

. revalidation of certificates of competency, a new requirement stemming from the International Convention on Standards of Training, Certification and Watchkeeping for Seafarers (STCW), 1978;

. specialist endorsements, as in chemical tanker safety, which also flow from STCW;

. non-mandatory short courses which, while not compulsory for certificates of competency are of value to the shipping and fishing industries.

T h e College has not provided information of the effect of the proposed increase in short course provisions on requirements for residential accommodation. The Council has noted, however, that short courses may be scheduled to take advantage of available accommodation.

B2.46 The NMITC has also asked the Australian Maritime

College to provide training for ratings, which would be a new activity for the College. The NMITC has prepared a

detailed analysis of the manpower requirements of the maritime industry over the next five years showing a need for annual intakes of:

168 .

. 80 deck ratings

. 80 catering ratings . 40 engineroom ratings.

The Department of Transport has approved NMITC proposals for training and sea-service programs for deck and engineroom ratings, involving a three-week pre-sea course for both groups, followed by a 13 -weeks vocational course after a period at sea of approximately 12 m o n t h s . Catering ratings would undertake only the three-week pre-service course at

the Australian Maritime College; their vocational training is undertaken at technical colleges. Having regard to numbers and courses, the College has projected enrolments for 1982 of 40 EFTS and for 1983 and 1984 of 60 EFTS.

B2.47 The College has indicated that in order to provide

rating training it would require additional classroom space and some 70 additional residential places and associated facilities at Beauty Point, 6 additional staff and

additional equipment at an estimated cost of $93,000.

B2.48 Overall, the College estimates the principal effects of the three proposed developments would be:

For residential places:

Previous requirement New total

Hewnham 1983 182 307

1984 246 375

Beauty Point 1983 40 140

1984 40 140

For additional staf f :

Academic staff Vessel staff

Original New Original New

1983 51 65 10 12

1984 56 83 10 12

B2.49 Clearly the total requirement additional to that considered by the Council and the Commission in relation to planning for the 1982-84 triennium is substantial. However, as each proposal is subject to different considerations they

are discussed separately below.

169.

INCREASED OFFICER INTAKES

B2.50 The level of academic as well as professional

education available at the Australian Maritime College to trainee officer entrants to the maritime industries is not available elsewhere in Australia. The establishment of the college was intended, in part, to release Australians from the necessity of seeking such education abroad and to reduce

the dependence of the Australian industry on recruitment abroad of suitably trained officers. Courses directed to the preparation of candidates for examinations for certificates of competency conducted by the Department of Transport are currently offered by the TAFE Division of the Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology and by the Sydney Technical College. New diplomates in nautical science and engineering from the Australian Maritime College are

exempted from major parts of the certificates of competency examinations. The demand for certificate preparation courses in TAFE institutions is therefore expected to decline with the emergence of the diploma courses at the Maritime College.

B2.51 The Minister for Transport has commented that

because the proposal to increase officer training intakes rests on the turn of future events - including an expected doubling of the Australian fleet and an expected reduction in availability of trained officers from traditional sources - he would at this stage rate the proposal as a third

p r i o r i t y .

B2.52 The Council has not been provided with evidence

that the proposed increase in officer cadet intakes is necessary and has not had an opportunity to investigate fully the need for such an increase. Before any such

proposed development could be considered the Council would require further evidence on the demand from appropriately motivated and qualified entrants; in addition it would wish to have more information about the extent to which training opportunities are being duplicated by TAFE institutions. The Council notes that a committee under the chairmanship of

Sir Joh n Crawford has been examining the Australian maritime industry and its report, expected in the near future, may provide additional information.

B2.53 The Council has had regard also to the limited

resources available to the advanced education sector. In the light of this and the considerations outlined above, the Council cannot support the substantial increase in the level of resources for the Australian Maritime College required by the proposal to increase intakes of officer-cadet entrants to the maritime industry. However, the Council would not object if the College was able to effect a small increase in

intakes to officer courses, in response to student demand, within the levels of recurrent funding determined for the triennium and the availability of capital facilities.

170.

SHORT COURSES

B2.54 The Minister for Transport has accorded second

priority to the need for increased capacity at the College to provide these courses. He noted that the new Certificate of Competency structure for deck and engineer officers will commence on 1 January 1982 and will include a requirement

for revalidation of officers' qualifications every five years. Although these requirements will be voluntary for officers who have recent sea-going experience, they will be the only effective and practical way for officers without

such recent experience to qualify for revalidation.

B2.55 In the Council's view the College may offer such

additional short courses which are of high priority provided they can be accommodated within available resources, including residential accommodation, staff and equipment. It takes this view on the following grounds:

(i) The Commission recognised the College's special role in the provision of the courses outlined above by building into its student load and funding parameters an allowance of 50 EFTS to cover the administrative overheads of such

c ourses. The Minister has approved a scale of

fees for short courses proposed by the College and designed to recoup actual teaching costs. As students pay for their courses, the students load allowance for a base level of staff and overheads provides an adequate margin for overhead e x p enses. The principal limiting factor therefore will be

the availability of residential accommodation. If necessary, suitable accommodation may need to be found off campus.

(ii) The Council understands that RMIT and Sydney Technical College have a capacity to assist the industry in their States in the provision of certain classes of short courses, particularly in

relation to statutory certification requirements. It notes, moreover, that it is intended that the Australian Maritime College complement rather than supplement short-course offerings in the

State TAFE institutions. The Council would wish to have further details of this avenue of provision for short courses before considering the allocation of further advanced education resources to such activities.

(iii) While the Council is not prepared to recommend the provision of additional accommodation, particul­ arly for senior officers, over and above existing

171.

and planned provisions, it notes that the College may explore other sources of funding for its perceived needs.

RATINGS TRAINING

B2.56 The Summers Report found that existing provisions

for ratings training were inadequate and that some ratings received virtually no training. Summers recommended that among its functions the Maritime College should 'guide and co-ordinate1 courses offered elsewhere by technical colleges

for deck and engineroom ratings and for maritime or familiarisation aspects of other grades such as cooks, stewards and shipwrights. He suggested that the Maritime College should offer ratings and other training for the State in which it is located, the inference being that ratings training was to be offered in TAFE institutions in other States.

B2.57 Ratings training has been basically an on-the-job

type of training: seamen served prescribed periods of qualifying sea-service before being entitled to be rated as ordinary seamen, able seamen, firemen or greasers. There has been no statutory requirement for formal training and,

until recently, there was no requirement for ratings in Australian ships to obtain certificates or formal qualifications. The Department of Transport now requires a Steering Certificate based on 10 hours practical experience

at sea. Pre-sea training has been provided by a company

representative of ship-owners which ran a course in conjunction with Newcastle Technical College, but which the Council understands has not now operated for two years

mainly because of a lack of adequate facilities.

B2.58 The NMITC has advised the Council that it has

identified the following problems with on-the-job training and with the previous course for ratings:

. lack of facilities for practical steering instruction and experience;

. no practical training in essential safety topics of fire-fighting, survival and first-aid (including resuscitation);

. general irrelevance of training to duties on modern ships;

. unsuitable accommodation arrangements for the young people undergoing training.

172.

THE NEED FOR COURSES FOR THE TRAINING OF RATINGS

B2.59 The Minister for Transport advised that in the

near future ratings in watchkeeping positions and those holding specialist petroleum, chemical and gas tanker positions will be required to be trained for their work in

accordance with the requirements of the International Convention on Standards of Training, Certification and Watchkeeping for Seafarers, 1978, which subject to the necessary ratification is expected to come into force in

1982. No such requirements have existed pr e v i o u s l y . Accordingly, the Minister for Transport has accorded the highest priority to the training of ratings.

B2.60 The industry, through the NMITC, states that there

is a need for ratings training to cover all ratings (deck, engineroom, catering):

. to provide a sound practical training in fire­ fighting, survival and first-aid;

. to provide vocational training meeting the requirements of the Standards of T r a i n i n g , Certification and Watchkeeping for Seafarers, 1978;

. to allow total involvement of trainees in conditions which simulate, as far as possible, life on board ship; this would include supervised residential accommodation.

The Advanced Education Council considers that the case for modern, practical training of ratings is compelling.

B2.61 The Council has sought the advice of the TAFE

Council on the feasibility and comparative costs of the location of ratings training in a number of locations in the States as compared with the location of this training in Launceston. In the time available the TAFE Council has not

yet been able to respond in detail. In order to provide

advice for Volume 2, the Council has proceeded on the basis of information and estimates supplied by the NMITC and the AMC .

B2.62 The provision of courses to satisfy the

requirements of the Department of Transport would require specialist staff, equipment and physical facilities. The latter would include:

. training vessels and general seamanship training facilities;

. marine engineering workshop facilities;

173 .

survival training facilities;

. fire-fighting facilities meeting STCW requirements;

. adequate teaching space and support facilities;

. suitable residential accommo d a t i o n .

B2.63 In order to provide an adequate course for the

number of ratings envisaged, regardless of the location of the course, the AMC has assessed staff requirements as being six teaching staff, including a residential warden, and four technical and support staff. Staff to operate the training

vessel would depend on the size of vessel and mode of

operation: the College estimates that for operation within offshore limits a crew of five would be n e c e s s a r y .

B2.64 Equipment needs would be substantial and would

include steering simulators, derricks, life-boats, lifting gear, tools, engineroom m a c h i n e r y , tank for safe entry training, survival craft, stowage and servicing facilities, cargo containers and securing devices.

B2.65 The College is not able to provide detailed costs

of setting up ratings training in an institution with no relevant specialist facilities but estimates that funds of the order of $3m-$4m would be required. The College

comments further that such facilities would be less comprehensive than those of the A M C ; the costs given

compare with an estimated capital cost of $ l m - $ l .4m of providing the necessary facilities at AMC.

B2.66 The Council understands that the courses offered

by the TAFE institutions have been directed to:

. preparation of candidates for certificate of competency examinations at "foreign-going" and lower levels;

. short courses for the industry (the TAFE Division of the Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology reports that it provides courses for Radar Observers and Survival T r a i n i n g );

. recreational purposes.

The NMITC advises that it has held discussions with representatives of the Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology and Sydney Technical College who stated they would be unable to provide the training in the foreseeable

future and would require funds for capital equipment and

174 .

additional staff; neither could they consider the provision of residential accommodation. Thus the high costs of establishment of courses at these centres would be compounded by lengthy lead times.

B2.67 The Council is also informed that ratings are

drawn from each State, mainly from the major ports. Training in a number of centres would require recruits from at least three States and the Territories to move either to

Sydney or Melb o u r n e . Moreover, training in a number of centres would require the duplication of facilities, equipment and staffing and therefore would not be cost effective.

B2.68 The Council has concluded that, should the

Commonwealth Government wish to adopt a major improvement in the training of ratings as an objective, it would be

preferable to centralise the provision of courses at the Australian Maritime College on the following grounds:

(a) The number of ratings requiring training now and for the foreseeable future does not warrant duplication of expensive, specialist facilities which in major part already exist or are planned

for the AMC.

(b) Rating training would be consistent with the specialist maritime nature of the AMC. In this regard the Council accepts the NMITC view that additional educational and social benefits would accrue to both officer cadets and ratings if the two groups were to live and study alongside one

another.

(c) The introduction of ratings training would increase the utilisation of facilities at the AMC and hence improve their cost effectiveness.

B2.69 Before the introduction of ratings training at

the AMC were considered the actual costs in recurrent expenditure, equipment and capital wor k s would need detailed examination. At this stage, however, the Council considers that funding for six academic staff, $93,000 for equipment and approximately $1.0m-$1.4m for student accommodation and

classroom facilities at Beauty Point would offer a reasonable measure of the likely costs. The Council considers that the costs of establishment elsewhere, let alone in more than one place, would be substantially greater and thus unacceptable. The Council has already indicated that it considers the educational and social benefits to all

levels of entrants to the maritime industries and to the industry itself are significant considerations. 3

3 75 .

FUNDING

B2.70 The Council believes that there is a weight of

evidence to support improved ratings training in Australia and, in this c ontext, has noted the high priority accorded to this development by the Minister for Transport. If the responsibility for training is to be regarded as a Commonwealth responsibility, the Council is persuaded that the most cost-effective means of providing appropriate courses would be by the centralisation of activities at the Australian Maritime College. However, the capacity to mount a course for ratings at the Australian Maritime college is

contingent upon the availability of capital funds for residential accommodation and a small addition to teaching space; the Council is unable to provide the necessary funds from within the total available for capital works in 1982. The projects which the Council is to support for the College

in 1982 will absorb almost half of the total of funds

available for new works in universities and colleges. In terms of the needs and reasonable expectations of other areas of the sector, the sum required is simply not

available from the sector's resources.

SUMMARY

B2.71 The proposals put forward by the Australian

Maritime College to meet the requests of the maritime industry as expressed by the NMITC would require a substantial development of the College beyond the student load and capital development parameters considered in relation to planning for the sector for the 1982-84 triennium.

B2.72 In response to the Minister's request, the Council

has considered the proposals on their merits within available funds. The Council's views are as follows:

(a) Expanded intakes of officer-cadets: It has not yet been established that increased intakes of the order proposed by the College are justified; however, the Council would not object to small

increases in intakes, in response to student demand, within the funds to be provided for the 1982-84 triennium.

(b ) Increased provision of short courses: As fees charged for such courses are designed to cover direct costs, the Council does not consider that additional recurrent funds are necessary. The Council is not prepared at this time to support the provision of additional residential or teaching facilities to provide for short courses.

176.

(c) The establishment of ratings training·. The Council has noted that the Minister for Transport attaches a high priority to this development. If adopted as an objective of the Commonwealth

Government, the Council:

. believes that provision for ratings training should be concentrated in one centre;

. considers that for reasons of educational benefit to trainees and of cost, the AMC is

the most appropriate location and that the provision of ratings training is consistent with its multi-level course offerings;

. considers that funds additional to those available under the Guidelines would be required for the establishment of ratings training at the AMC in the 1982-84 triennium - amounts of the order of $200,000 a year

would be required for additional staff, $100,000 for equipment, and $1.0m-$1.4m for capital purposes.

M a s t e r s D e g r e e P r o g r a m s

B2.73 In Volume 1 of its Report for 1982-84 Triennium the Commission set out revised policy guidelines and new implementation arrangements (paragraphs 6.66 and 6.67) for the provision of masters degree programs in colleges of

advanced education. These guidelines were endorsed by the Government in its Guidelines for the 1982-84 triennium.

B2.74 The Commission has included six colleges of

advanced education in an initial list of colleges which m a y , within enrolment limits, offer masters degree programs consistent with the policy guidelines and which are approved by the appropriate State co-ordinating authority. It has

also included the Canberra College of Advanced Education which has its programs approved by the Minister for Education. The initial list of 'designated' colleges is:

New South Wales Institute of Technology Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology Victorian College of Pharmacy Queensland Institute of Technology

South Australian Institute of Technology Western Australian Institute of Technology Canberra College of Advanced Education

177 .

B2.75 The Council notes that this is an "initial" list

and supports its revision periodically with a view to expanding it. Colleges which are not included in the list

of designated colleges are not precluded from offering masters degree programs and awarding degrees, within enrolment limits, but proposals for new programs must be

referred to the Commission for consideration. The Council maintains that special consideration should be given to the provision of masters degree programs in certain specialist colleges; for e xample, Cumberland College of Health Sciences in New South Wales and the Lincoln Institute in Victoria are the only higher education institutions in those

States offering courses in the therapies. The Council also notes that consideration will need to be given to those new institutions formed by the amalgamation of a number of colleges in 1982 which propose to offer masters degree p r o g r a m s .

B2.76 The Commission proposed in Volume 1 that

enrolments in masters degree programs in colleges for the 1982-84 triennium should be limited to 800 EFTS in 1982 and 900 EFTS for each of 1983 and 1984 .(-*-) It suggested that the Council, in consultation with State co-ordinating authorities should determine the levels within those figures

for the designated colleges, allowing for some enrolments in other institutions where appropriate.

B2.77 Following an analysis of enrolments in advanced

education masters degree programs in 1981, and consultations with State co-ordinating authorities, the Council has determined a distribution of enrolments in masters degree programs for each year of the 1982-84 triennium; the distribution is set out in Table B2.1.

(1 ) It is not possible at this stage to assess the impact

of the reintroduction of tuition fees from 1982 for new enrolments in masters degree programs in colleges of advanced education. However, the Council's preliminary assessment is that the total number of enrolments in these programs is likely to be unaffected because of the small

number of available places relative to the demand.

178 .

TABLE B2.1

ENROLMENTS (EFTS) IN MASTERS DEGREE PROGRAMS IN COLLEGES OF ADVANCED EDUCATION, BY STATE, 1981 PRELIMINARY, 19 82 TO 19 84 PROPOSED

1981(a) 1982 1983 1984

New South Wales 1 19 150 175 175

Victoria 189 2 25 265 265

Queensland 39 55 80 80

South Australia 54 65 75 75

Western Australia 133 165 165 165

Tasmania 16 20 20 20

Australian Capital Territory 117 120 120 120

667 800 900 900

(a) Sourae: CTEC Annual Statistical Collection. The 1981 enrolment figures exclude second semester enrolments, details of which are not yet available.

B2.78 The proportion of advanced education student load

in masters degree programs is lower in New South Wales and Queensland than the other States and the Australian Capital Territory. It was decided, therefore, to allow some growth in masters degree programs in these two States. The New

South Wales Higher Education Board requested an increase from 119 EFTS in 1981 to 200 EFTS in 1982. The Council did

not consider this level of growth to be appropriate within the total enrolment limit. The Queensland Board of Advanced Education also requested further growth.

B2.79 In order to allow for growth in Queensland and New

South Wales, the allocations for Victoria, South Australia and Western Australia were made on the basis of no growth or

minimal growth in intakes to advanced education masters degree p r o g r a m s . The Tasmanian College of Advanced Education has not requested an increase in its intake level to masters of education programs over the 1981 level, nor has it

proposed new programs. The allocations for the Canberra College of Advanced Education take account of the relatively high level of provision for masters degree programs at the College in recent y e a r s .

82.80 South Australia has not proposed masters degree

programs at colleges of advanced education other than the South Australian Institute of T e c h nology. The Western Australian Institute of Technology is the only college in

179.

Western Australia offering masters degree p r o g r a m s . One of its programs is offered through the Western Australian School of Mines which is to become part of the Western

Australian School of Mines and Further Education (WASMAFE). The Council considers it appropriate for staff of the new institution to supervise students engaged in masters degree work related to the mining industry but considers that the

award should be that of a designated college of advanced education or a university.

B2.81 Queensland has proposed a student load of 23 EFTS

in existing masters degree programs at the Capricornia Institute of Advanced Education and the proposed Brisbane College of Advanced Education in 1982.

B2.82 The New South Wales Higher Education Board

proposed a 1982 allocation of 134 EFTS for the New South

Wales Institute of Technology, 13 EFTS in existing programs of Cumberland College of Health Sciences and 53 EFTS in colleges which have not previously offered masters degree programs. Proposals for new programs will be considered by the Council but the total allocations for New South Wales will not exceed those set out in Table B2.1.

B2.83 Arrangements for the provision of masters degree

programs in Victorian colleges are different from those applying in other States. The Commission is aware of this inconsistency and is to consult with the Victorian

Post-Secondary Education Commission (VPSEC) about the arrangements.

B2.84 In 1981, 9 non-designated colleges formerly

affiliated with the Victoria Institute of Colleges offered masters degree programs by research; the student load was 67 EFTS. The former Victoria Institute of Colleges

approved individual research programs rather than approving an institution to offer particular programs; the awards were those of the Victorian Institute of Colleges. The VPSEC has established a committee which recommends approval

of individual research programs and individual degrees are awarded under an Order-in-Council. These arrangements apply to the Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology and the Victorian College of Pharmacy, which are designated colleges, as well as to the non-designated colleges. The VPSEC maintains that the controls imposed at State level are adequate to ensure the provision of high quality programs; this remains one of the main thrusts of the Commission's policy guidelines.

B2.85 In addition to research programs, a masters degree

coursework program is offered by each of the Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology and Melbourne State College. Orders-in-Council enable the institutions to award the degrees.

180.

B2.86 The Vict o r i a n Post-Secondary Education Commission maintains that the coursework program in business administration offered by the Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology has a considerable second semester intake and has proposed an EFTS of 287 for the State in 1982. The Council

is unable to allocate this level of student load within the

800 EFTS limit set by the Commission.

B2.87 The Commission considers that it would be

appropriate, under the revised policy guidelines, for certain staff of non-designated colleges to supervise students enrolled in another higher education institution. The Council considers that arrangements under which masters degree students in non-designated colleges are enrolled in

universities or designated colleges, while working in their own college facilities under joint supervision, should be made at the State or local level. Such students will be

counted in the student load of the institutions awarding the degree.

B2.88 The Council considers that it may be difficult for

the more isolated colleges to make appropriate arrangements with universities or designated colleges and is concerned that this may limit the extent to which students resident in the region served by the college may undertake research

programs. The Council believes that, because of the small numbers qualified and seeking to undertake work at the masters level in such centres, study by coursework is not usually the most effective use of resources.

B2.89 The Council accepts that the primary

responsibility of colleges of advanced education is in teaching of the undergraduate and postgraduate diploma levels and accordingly supports the imposition of student load limits on masters degree programs. In the interest of

maintaining the quality and standing of masters degree programs it does not support the proliferation of these programs in the advanced education sector,· hitherto, the Council has, in fact, rejected proposals considered to

represent unnecessary duplication or proliferation of masters level work. The Council recognises, however, that considerable specialist resources and staff expertise reside in CAEs and expects the policy guidelines to be implemented

in a way that recognises acknowledged areas of excellence. The Council is concerned to ensure the adequate provision of opportunities for students and staff of colleges of advanced education to undertake masters degree work and considers

that, under the revised guidelines, this will be dependent to a large extent on the willingness of universities and designated institutions to co-operate in the implementation of the arrangements. The Commission has stated that it

expects universities to co-operate in the implementation of its policy by admitting college staff and college graduates to higher degrees and by participating in joint supervision.

181.

The Council notes, however, that there is little incentive for universities to participate in joint supervision arrangements.

B2.90 As the initial guidelines were not fully

implemented before revisions occurred, the Council considers it essential that the revised guidelines be operational for a reasonable period before further changes are m a d e . It p r o p o s e s , however, to monitor the effects of the revised

guidelines and the implementation arrangements on the sector.

N u r s e E d u c a t i o n

B2.91 In October 1980 the Government announced that it

would provide funds for an additional 350 places in pilot courses in basic nurse education in colleges of advanced education. Within the additional 350 places provision was made for the establishment of new pilot courses in basic nurse education at the Queensland Institute of Technology and in T a s m a n i a . The Government was prepared to provide

funds to enable both courses to commence in 1981; neither

the Queensland Institute of Technology nor the Tasmanian College of Advanced Education was able to introduce the courses at such short notice. Subsequently, the Government

agreed to provide $100,000 in 1981 for costs associated with the establishment of the courses which will be introduced in 1982. The intakes to the courses in Queensland and Tasmania are limited to 50 and 30 respectively; this will account

for some 215 of the 350 places as the courses become fully

operational over the triennium. The Canberra College of Advanced Education proposed a new basic nursing course for introduction in 1982, it was not supported by the Minister

for Education.

B2.92 The remaining 135 places, which will allow

additional annual intakes of about 50, were intended to provide for some expansion in existing pilot courses. Victoria and New South Wales elected to increase their intakes to basic nursing courses in 1981 within available resources. South Australia did not request an increase in

intakes to the basic nursing course at Sturt College of Advanced Education which already has an intake of some 100. Western Australia requested an increase in 1982. In Volume 1 of its Report for 1982-84 Triennium (paragraph 6.52) the Commission suggested a distribution of these intakes on the basis of the 1980 level of enrolments in

existing courses and the relatively low provision in New South Wales.

182.

B2.93 Following receipt and analysis of 1981 intake and

enrolment data in respect of basic nursing courses in colleges of advanced education, the distribution of the intake of 50 suggested by the Commission was reviewed. Part

of the reason for the review was the fact that in some

cases, particularly in New South Wales, the colleges offering the basic nursing courses are having difficulty in attracting and retaining student nurses because of more attractive financial arrangements offering in hospital

schools of nur s i n g . Taking into account this redistribution and the fact that Victoria and N e w South Wales had increased their intakes to basic nursing courses in 1981, funds will be provided in respect of the following additional places over the triennium:

19 82 1983 1984

Cumberland College of Health ) Sciences )

) 38 55 55

Riverina College of Advanced ) Education )

Lincoln Institute of Health )

Sciences )

) 38 55 55

Preston Institute of )

Technology )

Queensland Institute of Technology 50 95 135

Western Australian Institute of Technology 10 19 25

Tasmanian College of Advanced Education 30 57 80

166 281 350

94 By 1984 all courses will be

intakes remain constant, the total fully number operational

of places and in

basic nursing courses in colleges of advanced education will be 1,100. Also, there will be at least one college course

in each State which will provide a basis for comparative evaluation of college-based and hospital-based nur s i n g . Both the Report of the Committee of Inquiry into Nurse Education and Training (Sax R e p o r t ) and the Report of

the Commission of Inquiry into the Efficiency and Administration of Hospitals (Jamison R e p o r t ) recommended comparative evaluations of this type.

183 .

B2.95 Three studies into basic nurse education in

Victoria are already being funded under the Commission's Evaluative Studies Program; two are in final report stage; the third is scheduled for completion in 198 2 / 8 3 . The

studies involved are the Evaluation of a College-based. Basie Course in Nursing, a follow-up to this (the third study), and the Evaluation of College-based and Hospital- based Basie Nurse Education in Victoria. In addition, a study in Western Australia into college-based basic nurse training is being partially-funded under the Commission's Evaluative Studies Program and two further studies in other States where pilot programs are offered are being considered by the Evaluative Studies Steering Committee for partial

funding. Under the Guidelines for the 1982-84 triennium the Government has provided an additional amount of $50,000 for the Evaluative Studies Program to support the expansion of the evaluation of basic nurse training.

L i b e r a l S t u d i e s

B2.96 The Commission has affirmed that it will not

support the introduction of degree level liberal studies courses at colleges of advanced education for which teacher education is the main activity (paragraph 5.25, Volume 1 , Report for 1982-84 Triennium). This is consistent with Council policy; such courses have only been supported in multi-purpose regional colleges. The Council stated in its

Volume 1 Advice (paragraph 6.56) that any proposals for the establishment of further liberal studies courses - that is, non-vocational courses of the arts/general studies type - at the associate diploma level would be considered in the

light of more detailed advice from State authorities about successive intakes and student progress within the courses which are operating on a pilot basis at Mount Gravatt College of Advanced Education, Milperra College of Advanced Education and Mount Lawley College.

B2.97 On the basis of preliminary information the

Council has assessed that the main objective of these courses and of similar courses offered by Hartley College of Advanced Education and North Brisbane College of Advanced Education, is to broaden the educational experience and knowledge of students rather than to provide vocational

preparation. In its Volume 1 Advice the Council reiterated principles which describe advanced education in terms of its vocational and applied orientation. The Commission supports this orientation and stated that it

1 would be prepared to support only a strictly limited development of liberal studies courses of sub-degree level in colleges of advanced education and then only in response to clearly demonstrated n e e d ' ( Volume 1, Rep,ort for

1982-84 Triennium, paragraph 5.26) . This policy has been endorsed by the Government in the Guidelines for the 1982-84 triennium.

184 .

B2.98 The Council has decided to approach State

co-ordinating authorities with a view to having existing UG3 level liberal studies courses evaluated under the Commission's Evaluative Studies Program. It is expected that such a study would examine, inter alia, the structure

and content of the courses, the need for the courses, particularly in terms of meeting identifiable vocational purposes, the nature of student demand and whether such demand could be more appropriately satisfied by alternative

arrangements.

B2.99 Pending evaluation of UG3 liberal studies courses, the Council has determined that:

(a) enrolments in the pilot programs should continue to be limited to 50 EFTS;

(b) intakes to the courses offered by North Brisbane College of Advanced Education and Hartley College of Advanced Education should be no higher than the 1981 levels;

(c) consideration of further courses of this type in metropolitan colleges will be deferred.

The Council will, however, be prepared to consider proposals for UG3 level courses which have been developed from the existing units of vocational courses and which are designed to develop identified skills and knowledge relevant to the w o r k f o r c e .

T w o - T ie r C o u r s e s

B2.100 In paragraph 6.51 of its Volume 1 Advice, the

Council recommended the introduction, on a trial basis, of two-tier courses in selected colleges of advanced education. The Commission, in paragraph 6.56 of Volume 1 of its Report for 1982-84 Triennium supported the concept of

three or four-year programs which have a common first two years and provide more specialist study over a further one or two years, leading to specific vocational opportunities. It requested the Council to discuss the development of such

courses with State authorities. The Council plans to take up this issue with State authorities in the coming m o nths.

S p e c i a l I n i t i a t i v e s in T A F E T e a c h e r E d u c a t i o n

B2.101 In its Advice for Volume 2 of the Report for

1979-81 Triennium the Council recommended funds for a program of special initiatives in TAFE teacher education for 1979 and 1980 with the aim of stimulating and enhancing the existing provisions for the initial preparation of teachers

185 .

for the TAFE sector (paragraphs C45 to C47). The program, which was accepted by the Government, was extended to cover the three years of the triennium and is now in its final

stages; a total of $1.lm has been made available under the

program for the years 1979 and 1980, and $600,000 remains for use in 1 9 8 1 .

B2.102 The program has been co-ordinated by the TAFE

Staff Development Committee, which includes representatives of both the Advanced Education and the TAFE Councils as well as several experienced TAFE staff development officers. The Council considers that the projects funded under the program have provided resources for the improvement of TAFE teacher education programs. The development of TAFE teacher education curricula, of associated curricular-materials and teaching aids, the development of specialised courses and the improvement of access to TAFE teacher education for TAFE teachers in non-metropolitan areas have already been accomplished. In the longer term, the Council expects the total strategy for the qualitative improvement of teaching in technical and further education to have been influenced by this initiatives program.

B2.103 The Council is concerned to ensure that the

benefits of particular projects supported under the special initiatives program will be available as widely as possible to institutions involved in TAFE teacher education. In this regard funds have been provided to trial curriculum materials developed under special initiatives projects and to assist with the costs of two national conferences of TAFE teachers. The Council supports the Committee's proposal that a report be prepared on the program to include a

comprehensive description of its objectives and of the guidelines within which proposals have been considered, as well as details of all projects funded under the program. The Committee has suggested that, in due course, a formal

evaluation be made of the special initiatives program under the Commission's Evaluative Studies Program; the Council supports this p r o p o s a l .

186 .

CHA PT ER 3 : R ECOMM ENDAT I ONS FOR 1 9 8 2 - 8 4

B3.1 This Chapter has been prepared in four sections.

In the first section the Council has set out an overview of

student load and financial provision for 1982-84 against the background of the Government's Guidelines for the triennium.

B3.2 In Section 2 the Council has provided commentaries

on the development of advanced education in the States and in respect of other institutions for which the Council has statutory responsibility. This Section also includes the Council's recommendations for recurrent grants for advanced

education and sets out the student load parameters upon which the recommendations are based. Some commentary is also included on the capital needs of the sector; the

Council's recommended capital program for 1982 is set out in Section 4.

B3.3 Section 3 details the Council's recommended

equipment grants for 1982.

B3.4 Before proceeding, the Council wishes to draw

attention to two points in relation to recurrent grants for the 1982-84 triennium.

(i) From within the total of recurrent funds provided under the Government's Guidelines for universities and advanced education, the Commission has allocated certain amounts for each year of the triennium for advanced education purposes (see paragraph B 1 .8 (b) ). For reasons set out in paragraphs B1.21-B1.22, and further elaborated

later in this Chapter, not all of these funds have

been allocated; the unallocated balances are (1982 outturn prices):

1982 1983 1984

$'000 $ 1000 $'000

45,695 43,296 41,001

These funds have been held in reserve for distri­ bution in the event that acceptable proposals are received from State authorities in relation to those institutions listed by the Commonwealth Government for consolidation but for which proposals have not yet been submitted. The

unallocated balance also includes:

187.

. provision for Orange Agricultural College, further discussions about the consolidation of which are still to take place with the New

South Wales authorities;

. a provisional allocation of the temporary- development grant for 1982 for Western Australia, the distribution of which is contingent upon proposals for consolidation

of colleges within that State;

. provision for the establishment of an

external studies centre at the Darwin Community College (see paragraphs B3.206 to B 3 .208).

The reserve of unallocated funds should not be regarded as being for the exclusive purpose of supporting the advanced education activities of the colleges referred to above in the event that agreement is reached on their consolidation; depending on the form of the consolidation, it may be necessary to make adjustments to the recommended grants for other institutions within the State.

(ii) While the Government's Guidelines make provision for a temporary development grant of $ 5m for each of the years 1982 and 1983, the Council has

recommended a distribution of these funds in respect of 1982 only; the Council would wish to

delay its recommendations on the distribution of the 1983 grant until Volume 3 of the Report for 1982-84 Triennium so that an assessment can be made of the 1982 temporary development grant

program.

Some State proposals for applying the temporary development grants in 1982 involve the development of new courses. Such proposals will need to

comply with the general requirements for Commiss­ ion assessment of new teaching developments; the Council's support for a particular allocation of the temporary development grant is therefore qualified to this extent.

188.

S E C T I O N 1 : 1 9 8 2 - 8 4 T R I E N N I U M - O V E R V I E W

STUDENT LOAD

B3.5 In its Advice for Volume 1 , Table 8.6, the

Council proposed student load levels for the triennium which were directed at maintaining opportunities for entry to advanced education courses while securing an overall continuing decline in resources devoted to teacher

education; a modest growth in science, engineering, the technologies and business studies; and consolidation within social science/humanities-based courses.

B3.6 The Council's student load figures were endorsed

by the Commission and formed the basis of the range of

121,000 to 125,000 equivalent full-time students (EFTS) specified in the Commission's Brief to the Council for the 1982-84 triennium. That range includes enrolments at the Australian Maritime College, in advanced education courses

conducted by TAFE institutions and in the non-government teachers colleges which, from 1982, will be fully supported by the Commonwealth.

B3.7 In advising advanced education authorities of the

student load parameters to be applied over the 1982-84 triennium, the Council identified four major categories of study:

Category A: Pre-service teacher education courses -providing basic preparation for early childhood, primary, secondary and TAFE t e a chers.

Category B: Post-service teacher education courses -including both specialist courses and general upgrading courses for teachers who have previously completed their initial

teacher training.

Category C: Science-based courses - including agriculture, engineering, technology, para-medical, architecture, surveying, building and computer science c o u r s e s .

Category D: Commerce/social science/humanities courses - including business studies, social w o r k , librarianship, general studies, music and art and design courses.

The student load planning ranges conveyed to advanced education authorities are set out in Table B3.1. They are in accordance with the Council's previously recommended student load for each State, having been increased for the

189 .

TABLE B3.1

STUDENT LOAD PLANNING RANGES FOR ADVANCED EDUCATION, 1982 TO 19 84

1982 1983 1984

New South Wales

Teacher education 9,500 9,500 9,500

Science-based courses Commerce/social sciences/ 7,000- 7,600 7, 000- 7,600 7,000- 7,600 humanities-based courses 9,500-10,100 9,500-10,100 9,500-10,100

TOTAL 26,000-27,200 26,000-27,200 26,000-27,200

Victoria

Teacher education 13,000-12,000 13,000-1 2,000 13,000-12,000 Science-based courses Commerce/social sciences/ 12,900-14,300 12,900-14,300 12,900-14,300

humanities-based courses 15,600-15,700 15,600-15,700 15,600-15,700

TOTAL 41,500-42,000 41,500-42,000 41,500-42,000

Queensland

Teacher education 5,300 5,300 5,300

Science-based courses Commerce/social sciences/ 5,000- 5,500 5,000- 5,500 5,000- 5,500 humanities-based courses 6,200- 6,300 6,200- 6,300 6,200- 6,300

TOTAL 16,500-17,100 16,500-17,100 16,500-17,100

South Australia

Teacher education 5,300- 5,000 5,300- 5,000 5,300- 5,000

Science-based courses Commerce/social sciences/ 3,000- 3,300 3,000- 3,300 3,000- 3,300 humanities-based courses 3,400- 3,700 3,400- 3,700 3,400- 3,700

TOTAL 11,700-12,000 11,700-12,000 11,700-12,000

Western Australia

Teacher education 5,500 5,500 5,500

Science-based courses Commerce/social sciences/ 3,200- 3,300 3,200- 3,300 3,200- 3,300 humanities-based courses 5,500- 5,700 5,500- 5,700 5,500- 5,700

TOTAL 14,200-14,500 14,200-14,500 14,200-14,500

190

TABLE B3.1 (continued)

1982 1982 1984

Tasmania

Teacher education 800 800 80 0

Science-based courses Commerce/social sciences/ 2 00- 300 200- 300 200- 300

humanities-based courses 600- 700 600- 700 600- 700

TOTAL 1,600- 1,800 1,600- 1,800 1,600- 1,800

Australian Capital Territory

Teacher education 1,100 1,100 1,100

Science-based courses Commerce/social sciences/ 1 ,300- 1 ,400 1,300- 1,400 1 ,300- 1 ,400 humanities-based courses 1,700- 1,800 1,700- 1,800 1,700- 1,800

TOTAL 4,100- 4,300 4,100- 4,300 4,100- 4,300

Total

Teacher education 40 ,500-39,200 40,500-39,200 40,500-39,200 Science-based courses Commerce/social sciences/ 32,600-35,700 32,600-35,700 32,600-35,700

humanities-based courses 42,500-44,000 42,500-44,000 42,500-44,000

TOTAL 115,600-118,900 115,600-118,900 115,600-118,900

Northern Territory 500- 700 500- 700 500- 700

Australian Maritime College 280- 300 380- 420 380- 420

TOTAL 116,380-119,900 116,480-120,020 116,480-120,020

NOTE: (1) Science-based courses - including engineering, technology, architecture, paramedical and computer science courses.

Commerce/social ecience/humanities courses - including business studies, social work, librarianship, general studies, music, and art and design courses.

(2) The figures do not include student load in respect of institutions to be merged with universities for which a separate provision of 4,500-4,700 EFTS has been made. 3

(3) The figures do include: (i) provision for advanced education in other than colleges of advanced education; (ii) additional places in basic nurse education; (iii) previously partially assisted non-government teachers

colleges in New South Wales, Queensland and the Australian Capital Territory.

191.

previously partially funded non-government teachers colleges and reduced on account of the four colleges of advanced education which are proposed to merge with neighbouring

universities.

B3.8 While the ranges are virtually constant for the

triennium, internal shifts in student load will facilitate the modest growth suggested by the Council in the science, technology and business studies/commerce based fields of study.

B3.9 Since determining the student load planning ranges

the Council has had an opportunity to study preliminary enrolment data for 1981. Table B3.2 shows the preliminary figures received by the Council for actual 1981 enrolments together with the projected enrolments used for initial p l a n n i n g .

TABLE B3.2

STUDENT LOAD IN ADVANCED EDUCATION, PROJECTED AND PRELIMINARY ACTUAL, 1981

Student load (EFTS)(a)

State

Projected Preliminary Variation

New South Wales 25,837 26,231

per cent

+ 1 .5

Victoria 42,460 42,569 +0.3

Queensland 15,894 16,108 + 1 .3

South Australia 12,024 12,346 +2.7

Western Australia 14,210 14,364 + 1 . 1

Tasmania 1,450 1,520 +4.8

Australian Capital Territory 3,870 3,675 -5.0

TOTAL 115,745 116,813 +0.9

(a) The figures do not include student load in respect of institutions to be merged with universities (4,649 projected, 4,835 preliminary).

B3.10 It should be noted that the enrolment data in

Table B3.2 may not be compared with the planning ranges set out in Table B3.1 (a) because of the exclusion from Table B3.1 of enrolment provision for the four colleges to be merged with universities and (b) because of the exclusion

from the projected figures in Table B3.2 of enrolments in the partially assisted non-government teachers colleges. Notwithstanding differences between planning and actual enrolments data for 1981, the Council has concluded that no

192.

variations should be made to the student load parameters established for the 1982-84 triennium. Ultimately, the student load levels that are achieved will be conditioned by the limit of available f u n d s . However, within the range of

student load specified for each State, the Council would wish to extend some flexibility to State authorities to adjust intakes into various fields of study in response to emerging circumstances provided:

(a) the level of student load specified for teacher

education is not exceeded;

(b) there is no increase in intakes into courses of

the arts/general studies type (see paragraph B2.99);

(c) standards for entry to courses are maintained at an appropriate level.

RECURRENT FUNDS

B3.ll The recurrent funds to be provided for advanced

education in each year of the 1982-84 triennium represent a significant reduction from the level recommended by the Council in its Advice for Volume 1 :

1982 outturn prices

1982 1983 198 4

$m $m $m

Council Advice(a) 622.7 627.1 6 34.0

Actual grants(a) 588.6(b) 5 8 7 .2 (b) 582.7

(a) The amounts for each year do not include $0.7m in

respect of the National Institute of Dramatic Art responsibilitity for which has transferred to the Department of Home Affairs and the Environment.

(b) Including $ 5m in 1982 and 1983 for provision of

additional resources for selected colleges of advanced education which are able to expand their effort in the technologies and business studies.

B3.12 For the reasons outlined by the Council in its

Advice for Volume 1 (paragraph 8.27) there has been in recent years a gradual but steady decline in the level of

recurrent grants per student in the advanced education sector. It is estimated that this level has fallen by at

least 2 to 3 per cent between 1978 and 1981 and the

Council's recommendations for 1982-84 reflected an attempt to offset the increasing financial pressures on the s e c t o r .

193.

The reduction in funding from 1981 to 1984, coupled with a

continued demand for places in advanced education, will lead to a further decline in average expenditure per student over the coming triennium.

B3.13 These pressures inevitably have an effect on the

quality of education offered within the sector. Given the lower funding level, and the shift from teacher education into relatively high cost science and technologically based courses, there will be a progressive fall in standards through the triennium unless total student load is reduced. Education authorities and administrators throughout the

advanced education system will therefore have to choose, in the course of the next triennium, between a further diminution of the standard of educational provision or reduction of educational opportunities.

B3.14 The Council emphasised (paragraph 5.24(b) of its Advice for Volume 1 ) that any further decline in the real level of recurrent funds for the advanced education sector in the 1982-84 triennium - even if student load were to fall - would remove the capacity to adjust to changes in

community preferences for courses and emerging labour market demands· It also stressed (paragraphs 8.29-8.30) that the level of funds recommended for recurrent expenditure in the triennium would only be sufficient to accommodate the proposed growth in the technology/science/business studies

fields if the necessary structural adjustments were undertaken by the States as quickly as possible and if resources were redistributed to the nominated areas of expansion.

B3.15 The Government's action towards consolidation of institutions within the sector and between colleges and neighbouring universities will encourage rationalisation; the Council believes that in the longer term these moves will lead to a more efficient use of resources. It must

be emphasised, however, that the proposed adjustments and consolidations will not be achieved without short term c o s t s ; nor is it realistic to expect that the full extent of

savings will be achieved by 1984. As the Council pointed out in its Advice for Volume 1 (Summary of Conclusions and Recommendations, page xv) the redeployment of resources, involving as it does human resources, can only be achieved on a gradual basis.

B3.16 The Council stated clearly in its Volume 1

Advice that there are costs attached to the adjustment process. Natural staff attrition is the preferred means of adjusting staff numbers to accommodate to declining enrolments but the Council recognises that, for some institutions, the magnitude of adjustment will be such that staff redundancies will be inevitable. In these circum­ stances liability for relatively large unforeseen payments

194 .

are incurred for superannuation and long-service leave entitlements. As a consequence no immediate savings are realised frctn staff reductions; in fact it may take some years for individual institutions to eliminate accumulated

annual deficits arising from unavoidable commitments, a situation which the Council regards with a great deal of concern. In the Council's view, the funds provided under the Government's Guidelines for the 1982-84 triennium do

not take proper account of the real and unavoidable costs associated with adjustment and consolidation. The inadequacy of financial provision highlights the need for

State authorities to develop appropriate mechanisms for coping with the problems of staff displaced in the process of reallocating resources.

B3.17 On 17 June 1981 the Council advised all advanced

education authorities of provisional levels of recurrent grants and student load ranges for the triennium and requested proposals for the distribution of recurrent grants and student load among individual institutions within the planning parameters. These submissions and subsequent

consultations form the basis of the Council's recommended distribution of recurrent grants for the 1982-84 triennium. In the light of consultations and other emerging circumstances, the recommended grants differ in some cases

from the provisional allocations notified on 17 June 1981.

B3.18 When requesting proposals from advanced education authorities, the Council indicated a number of principles to be taken into account in formulating proposals for the distribution of recurrent grants. The principles, which

formed the basis of the Council's consideration of State proposals, are:

(a) that in 1982 and 1983 there may be departures from

the established nexus between student load and recurrent funds for individual institutions because of consolidation and rearrangement of resources; appropriate relativities between

student load and recurrent funds should be re-established not later than 1984;

(b) that resources be redistributed among institutions in accordance with the principles set out in paragraphs 8.29 and 8.30 of the Council's Advice for Volume 1, i.e. that additional resources be provided to developing activities, with as little

delay as possible, by the release of resources from activities with declining enrolments;

(c) that States have regard to the view expressed by

the Commission in paragraph 8.25 of Volume 1, Part 1 and recognise the special position of the large, multi-purpose colleges;

1 9 5 .

(d) that the funding and student load proposals for the colleges, to be formed by the consolidation of two or more existing colleges, demonstrate real savings by 1984 from the consolidation.

The grants proposed for individual institutions in Section 2 of this Chapter reflect the net effect of a range of inter­

acting factors such as those set out above.

EQUIPMENT FUNDS

B3.19 The Government's Guidelines for 1982-84 provide an increase in equipment funds for universities and colleges of advanced education from $62.9m in 1981 to $67.lm for 1982 (in 1982 outturn prices) to assist institutions in replacing outdated equipment and in responding to needs arising from technological change. When announcing the Guidelines the Minister indicated the need for a redirection of effort in

advanced education away from teacher education to technologies and business studies.

B3.20 The Commission has advised Council that equipment funds available for advanced education will be $21.4m in 1982 compared with $20.5m in 1981 (both amounts at 1982 outturn prices); the 1982 figure excludes provision for the four colleges listed for amalgamation with universities. It has indicated that it expects Council to implement its policy of directing resources away from teacher educa­ tion and into the technologies and business studies. Additionally attention should be given to the special position of the large multi-purpose institutions.

B3.21 In a departure from previous years practice the

Guidelines have specified the amount provided for higher education equipment as a separate provision from capital funds. The Council therefore is precluded from any assess­ ment of the relative priority in the use of available funds as between equipment and capital purposes.

B3.22 Equipment grants for advanced education in the

1979-81 triennium are shown in Table B3.3. They reflect a 9 per cent decline in the real level of grant between

1979 and 1981. The allocations to individual States in each year reflect changes in course offerings and the need to provide for ad hoc major purchases, particularly computer

installations.

196.

TABLE B3.3

EQUIPMENT GRANTS FOR ADVANCED EDUCATION, 1979 TO 1981 (1982 outturn prices)

1979 1980 1981

$'000 $'000 $'000

New South Wales 5,339(a) 4,210 4 ,67 1

Victoria 8,226(a) 6,710 7,437

Queensland 3,206(a) 3,157 2,889

South Australia 1,813 1,841 2,028

Western Australia 2,091 2,105 2,274

Tasmania!b) 307 3 29 2 18

Australian Capital Territory 699 593 614

Australian Maritime College!c) 878(c) -(c) 369

AUSTRALIA 22,559 18,945 20,500

(a) Includes special provision for major computer purchases.

(b) Grant to Tasmania in 1981 was affected by the rationalisation of higher education in that State.

(c) Expenditure by the Australian Maritime College on equipment in 1979-80 was from funds provided for recurrent and equipment purposes.

B3.23 Although comparisons of expenditure over a short

period of time may be distorted by individual major expendi­ ture items. Table BS.4 compares the amounts provided for equipment, in accordance with State expenditure proposals, to the various types of colleges over the 1979-81 triennium. While differences will occur between individual institutions

and States, the Council notes the declining share allocated to the multi-purpose colleges. In accordance with the Commission's request, the Council will be asking States to have regard to the special position of these institutions in

respect of equipment funding for the coming triennium and to other selected institutions for which enrolment growth is projected.

197.

TABLE B3.4

EQUIPMENT GRANTS FOR ADVANCED EDUCATION a) , BY TYPE OF COLLEGE, 1979 TO 1981 (1982 outturn prices)

1979 1980 1981

$'0 00 per cent $'000 per cent $'000 per cent

Teacher education 3,634 17 3,580 19 3,929 20

Multi-purpose 13,427 62 10,816 57 1 1 , 187 55

Specialised 1,761 8 1,702 9 1,961 10

Regional 2,859 13 2,847 15 3,055 15

21,681 100 18,945 100 20,132 100

(a) Excluding the Australian Maritime College.

B3.24 The needs of the colleges consist of replacing

obsolete and worn out items and purchasing equipment incorporating new technology. The State co-ordinating authorities have highlighted the need to provide additional equipment grants so that purchases can be made of new equipment; at the moment much of the grant is absorbed by

replacement requirements. The problem is most pressing in relation to major computer purchases.

B3.25 The Council expects a shift in the pattern of

equipment expenditure following the rationalisation of teacher education. Amalgamations should reduce the need to duplicate some major items of teaching equipment and administrative equipment thereby allowing more efficient utilisation of existing stock and redirection of funds to areas of growth in the sector.

B3.26 The Council's recommendations for equipment grants to the States in 1982 are set out later in this Chapter

(Table B3.27). In accordance with the Government's decision to fully support those non-government teachers colleges now receiving partial support the Council is also recommending that a small amount be set aside to cover the equipment needs of the three colleges which will in 1981

remain outside the advanced education sector; that is, Avondale College in New South Wales, McAuley College in Queensland and Signadou College in the Australian Capital Territory. Within the time available the Council has not been able to undertake a detailed assessment of the equipment needs of these institutions. It therefore proposes that the amount recommended be set aside pending such an assessment which will need to be completed in time

to enable the inclusion of amounts in legislation for 1982.

198.

CAPITAL GRANTS

B 3 .2 7 In its Advice for Volume 1 of the Report for

1982-84 Triennium (paragraph 4.18 and Appendix B ), the Council included an inventory of outstanding capital needs in the s e c t o r . It concluded that, despite progress in the

last decade towards the provision of capital facilities for advanced education, the level of capital grants in 1981 precluded any possibility of making a substantial impact on the backlog of priority building projects. Table B3.5 outlines (in constant price terms) the grants provided for advanced education capital programs since 1978. The figures highlight the extent of the decline in real funding levels. This decline is even more significant for advanced education

in the States and the Australian Capital Territory because of the need to fund development of the Australian Maritime College from within advanced education capital funds. Of the $1 5m made available for new advanced education building projects since 1979, over one-quarter has been applied to Australian Maritime College projects.

TABLE B3.5

CAPITAL FUNDS FOR ADVANCED EDUCATION, 19 78 TO 1981 ( 1982 outturn prices)

Ongoing aommitments

Comnena errent of new buildings Design Minor works Total $m $m $m $m $m

1978 39.7 35.7 0.8 8.7 84.9

1979 34.2 9.6 1 .1 8.5 53.4

1980 22.6 3.9 0.8 7.3 34.6

1981 19.6 3.3 0.2 7.5 30 .6

B3.28 The Council recommended that $123m (in 1982

outturn prices) be made available for advanced education capital works in approximately equal amounts for the three years of the 1982-84 triennium. In contrast with the recommended average rate of $41m per year for advanced

education building projects alone, the Commonwealth Guidelines provide a total of $34.8m for advanced education and university capital works combined.

B3.29 While a precise distribution of the 19 82 capital

provision between the university and advanced education sectors is yet to be determined by the Commission, the amount for advanced education is likely to be in the order of $19m to $20m, or less than half the amount recommended by

the Council. The effect of this reduction on the sector's

1 9 9 .

ability to reduce the backlog of outstanding priority capital needs is illustrated in Table B3.6 which compares the recommended and actual capital allocations for 1982 in terms of commitment and amounts available for new projects.

TABLE B3.6

PROPOSED CAPITAL GRANTS FOR ADVANCED EDUCATION, 1982 (1982 outturn prices)

Proposed grant

Commitment to ongoing projects and to minor works

Balance for new projects in 1982

$m $m $m

Advanced Education Council recommendation 41.0 18.1 22.9

Estimated advanced education component of Commonwealth Tertiary Education Commission rec crimen dation 3 1.0 18.1 12.9

Guidelines allocation 19.0 to

20.0

18.1 0 .9 to

1.9

B3.30 Amounts shown in Table B3.6 for commitments to

ongoing projects and to minor works do not include amounts reguired for the commencement of projects at the Australian Maritime College within the college's initial development program. The Council believes that it is not possible to

defer any significant part of the College's development without jeopardising the viability of the entire college; it accepts the continued development of the College as a first call on available capital funds notwithstanding that this may preclude provision for high priority projects in 1982 in the advanced education sector.

B3.31 The Council considered the option of scaling back

the provision for minor works in 1982 in order to increase the capacity to commence high priority building projects. It decided against this option because of an expected extraordinary demand for minor works funds generated by the rationalisation processes occurring in all States and also in view of an expected increase in the upper limit

of the value of minor works projects. In its Advice for

Volume 1, paragraph 8.46, Council suggested that the existing upper limit for a minor work project of $125,000 be increased to $200,000 and be adjusted regularly thereafter for future general cost increases.

2 0 0 .

B3.32 Council does not expect the rationalisation

processes now occurring, or about to occur, to create a significant requirement for major building projects; however, they are likely to generate exceptional needs for minor works funds over the next 2-3 y e a r s . Rationalisation

in the use of buildings will necessarily involve minor structural changes - for example, to convert from one teaching purpose to another or from teaching to administ­ ration use - the use of minor works funds for these purposes

would be facilitated by the suggested increase in the upper limit for individual projects.

B3.33 Continuation of the historical decline in the

level of capital funds available for advanced education means that there cannot be sensible forward planning under the staged approach required by the Commission's building pr o c e d u r e s . Essential to this approach is the maintenance of a queue of project proposals which have been planned and

designed and are ready for construction. Two important tenets in this process are the regular provision of funds for the design of approved new projects and minimal delays between project design and the start of construction in

order that detailed planning does not become out of date. Although the Council has approved a number of priority projects at the concept stage, it is not practicable to

allocate funds for project design from within the amount available in 1982 for the advanced education capital program.

B3.34 In the course of planning for the 1982-84

triennium the Council received proposals from the States, the Australian Capital Territory and the Australian Maritime College for the commencement of more than sixty major

buildings, almost forty of which were put forward to commence in 1982 involving expenditure in that year of $2 9m (in average 1982 cost levels). The proposals include a substantial number of urgently required priority projects which, because of the low level of capital funds available,

the Council is unable to support. Details of individual projects are included in the State-by-State commentaries elsewhere in this Chapter.

B3.35 In summary, the Council reiterates its earlier

advice that existing levels of capital grants make it impossible to attack the backlog of priority building projects. Funds to be available in 1982 will permit only limited provision for the commencement of new major projects and will seriously disrupt orderly planning for advanced

education capital facilities. It would be simplistic in the extreme to infer that the stabilisation of enrolments in the advanced education sector implies that further funds for capital development are not required.

2 0 1 .

S E C T I O N 2 : I N S T I T U T I O N A L A R R AN G E ME N T S , S T UD E N T LOAD AND RECURR EN T GRANTS FOR THE 1 9 8 2 - 8 4 T R I E N N I U M

BACKGROUND

B3.36 Since the inception of advanced education as a

separate sector of tertiary education in the mid-1960s, there has been a series of mergers and consolidations which resulted in the number of colleges of advanced education in 1981 standing at 68. Had these mergers not taken place, the

number of colleges would have been over 100.

B3.37 The advanced education system developed princip­ ally from the existing tertiary elements of the technical college system, agricultural colleges, paramedical colleges and schools of art. Between the mid-1960s and mid-1970s these institutions experienced a period of rapid growth

which was coupled with consolidation of a number of the specialist institutions, either by incorporation into technological institutions or by the merger of a number of

specialist schools.

B3.38 In the 1970-72 triennium teacher education courses were funded in multi-disciplinary colleges of advanced education in Canberra, Hobart, Launceston, Bathurst, Wagga Wagga, Rockhampton and Toowoomba. The real impact of the entry of teacher education into the advanced education

sector occurred in July 1973 when thirty-nine former State teachers colleges and pre-school teachers colleges were included under advanced education funding arrangements; in 1974 these arrangements were extended to six non-government teachers colleges.

B3.39 The former teachers colleges entered the sector

during its period of most rapid growth. Not only did this

development add over 30,000 students to the sector but it altered the nature of the sector in two significant ways: it added a large number of small single-purpose institu­ tions; and the balance of the sector was changed from being

predominantly technologically based. Of the 45 teachers colleges which entered the sector, only a few had enrolments of over 1,000. The problems inherent in this situation of a

large number of small autonomous single-purpose institutions have been exacerbated by the decline in teacher education since the late 1970s.

B3.40 In 1973 the Government stated that it favoured the

provision of teacher education in multi-purpose institutions and there have been moves towards this objective; the moves have been more pronounced in some States than o t hers. The consolidations of former teachers colleges have involved:

2 0 2 .

(a) amalgamation with other colleges of advanced education; for example, in Ballarat and Bendigo;

(b) the development of multi-purpose institutions from a base which included a former teachers college; for example, Nepean College of Advanced Education;

(c) amalgamation to form multi-campus institutions; for example, Adelaide College of the Arts and Education.

Even though at least 16 such consolidations have taken place since 1973, there are, in 1981, some 30 colleges of advanced education for which teacher education is a major activity. It should be noted, however, that some States had accepted consolidation proposals in respect of a number of these

colleges prior to the Review of Commonwealth Functions.

B3.41 The proposed consolidations in the 1982-84

triennium are seen by the Council as a continuation of the process of consolidation, and of the integration of teacher education within multi-purpose institutions, which has been characteristic of the development of the advanced education sector. In the clamour following the Review of Commonwealth Functions there has been a tendency to over­

look the fact that the further consolidation of institutions is in effect the extension of a process that has been

occurring since the inception of the sector. Nevertheless the extent of the consolidation and the proposed pace of change hav e prompted the Council to report in detail on provisions within each State.

B3.42 Accordingly, in order to provide funding

recommendations in context, the changes which have occurred, or which are planned to occur, in the State advanced

education systems are set out in the following sections. These commentaries also indicate the colleges in respect of which funds are to be recommended for the 1982-84 triennium.

N e w S o u t h W a l e s

DEVELOPMENT OF THE ADVANCED EDUCATION SECTOR

B 3 .43 In 1981 there were twenty-three colleges of

advanced education in New South Wales; fourteen in metro­ politan Sydney and nine in country areas. Eight of the

metropolitan colleges and four country colleges have a major commitment to teacher education. The New South Wales

203 .

Institute of Technology is the only technological institution in New South Wales,· it has been funded under advanced education arrangements since 1967, as have the Hawkesbury Agricultural College, the New South Wales State Conservetorium of Music and the paramedical schools which were subsequently subsumed within the New South Wales College of Paramedical Studies (now the Cumberland College

of Health Sciences).

B3.44 There are three multi-disciplinary regional colleges in New South Wales. The Mitchell College of

Advanced Education was established in 1970 at Bathurst and the Riverina College of Advanced Education was established in 1972 at Wagga Wagga. Each took over the functions and

buildings of a State teachers college. The Wagga Agricultural College became a School of Agriculture of the Riverina College of Advanced Education in 1976. A third regional college, the Northern Rivers College of Advanced Education, was established at Lismore in 1973; it incorporated the former Lismore Teachers College.

B3.45 In July 1973, seven metropolitan teachers

colleges, and the State teachers colleges in Armidale, Goulburn, Newcastle and Wollongong, were included in the advanced education sector. The Committee of the former Australian Commission on Advanced Education which

recommended the funding of these teachers colleges also recommended funds for the establishment of a new institution in the Milperra (South-Western) region of Sydney. The Milperra College of Advanced Education was established in 1975; initially it offered teacher education alone but it now offers some courses in other areas such as social

welfare.

B3.46 Kuring-gai College of Advanced Education and

Nepean College of Advanced Education were established as multi-purpose institutions; each incorporated a metropolitan teachers college as a school of education.

B3.47 The following former teachers colleges have

remained as a single purpose teacher education institutions in metropolitan Sydney:

Nursery School Teachers College Sydney Kindergarten Teachers College Sydney Teachers College

B3 .48 The colleges of advanced education at Goulburn,

Armidale, Newcastle and Wollongong have continued to provide teacher education as a major activity. The downturn in teacher education coupled with the abolition of State Government teacher training scholarships have had major

repercussions for these institutions.

2 0 4 .

B3.49 In 1974 the Commonwealth decided to provide

support for the Guild Teachers College, the Catholic Teachers College, the Catholic College of Education and Good Samaritan Teachers College; the latter two colleges amalgamated in 1980 to form Folding College.

B3.50 The Report Art and Design Education in New South Vales (September 197 3) recommended that responsibility for tertiary art and design courses in New South Wales should be transferred from the National Art School of the Department of Technical and Further Education to corporate colleges of advanced education. The fine art component was transferred to the Alexander Mackie College of Advanced Education, which had developed from a teachers college, and the Sydney

College of the Arts, which was established in 1975, took over the design component in 19 76. In 19 7 7 a visual arts

program w a s commenced.

B3.51 The Orange Agricultural College was established as

a college of advanced education within the New South Wales Department of Agriculture in 1973.

CONSOLIDATION PROPOSALS

B3.52 In the context of the Government's decision

following the Review of Commonwealth Functions, the following colleges in New South Wales were listed for consolidation:

Metropolitan

Alexander Mackie College of Advanced Education Catholic Teachers College Guild Teachers College Milperra College of Advanced Education Nursery School Teachers College

Polding College Sydney Kindergarten Teachers College Sydney Teachers College

Non-met ropo lit an

Armidale College of Advanced Education Goulburn College of Advanced Education Newcastle College of Advanced Education Wollongong Institute of Education.

B3.53 With the exception of Milperra College in the

metropolitan group, and the colleges at Armidale, Newcastle and Wollongong in the non-metropolitan group, all the listed colleges are the subject of consolidation proposals which have been supported by the Commission in its Progress

Report on Consolidation in Advanced Education. These are detailed below.

2 0 5 .

B3.54 The New South Wales Government in 1979 decided to

amalgamate the following inner city colleges of advanced education to form the Sydney College of Advanced Education:

Alexander Mackie College of Advanced Education Nursery School Teachers College Sydney Kindergarten Teachers College Sydney Teachers College.

The Guild Teachers College has subsequently been accepted for inclusion within the new institution. The Sydney College of Advanced Education is expected to take over the functions of these five colleges as from 1 January 1982. It

will have five teaching institutes under the control of one council with a centralised administration and other non-academic services. The Council’s recommendations include grants in respect of the proposed Sydney College of Advanced Education.

B3.55 The Catholic teachers colleges in Sydney,

including Mount Saint Mary College of E d u c ation,” ) are to amalgamate to form a single teachers college in 1982. The Council's recommendations include grants in respect of the proposed Catholic teachers college.

B3.56 In December 1980 the New South Wales Minister for

Education announced that the Goulburn College of Advanced Education would be amalgamated with the Riverina College of Advanced Education to form a single institution having campuses at A l b u r y , Wagga Wagga and Goulburn. There will be no further intakes to pre-service teacher education courses at Goulburn; the campus will be developed as a centre for

the administration of external studies and the training of personnel of government bodies, including in-service teacher training. It is expected that the amalgamation will be effected by the beginning of 1982. The level of grants

recommended for the Riverina college of Advanced Education reflects the proposed amalgamation with the Goulburn College of Advanced Education.

B 3 .57 The University of Wollongong and the Wollongong

Institute of Education have agreed to a merger under a single governing b o d y . The proposal is before the New South Wales Government.

B 3 .58 The New South Wales Government has indicated that

it is opposed to the merger of the colleges of advanced

education in Armidale and Newcastle with the universities in those cities. 1

(1) Mount Saint Mary College of Education, currently in receipt of partial assistance, is to be fully supported from 1982.

2 0 6 .

B3.59 The Armidale College of Advanced Education is

basically a primary teacher education institution which also offers post-basic nursing courses in education and administration by external studies. The University of New England, which is some 6 kms from the College, complements the College in its teacher education offerings; these

include secondary teacher education.

B3.60 The University of Newcastle and the Newcastle

College of Advanced Education are adjacent. The offerings of the former include Diploma of Education courses for primary and secondary teachers and a post-graduate Bachelor of Education course; the latter offers a wide range of

teacher education courses as well as courses in fine arts, medical radiography, social welfare and post-basic nursing.

B3.61 The Council supports the Commission in pressing

for the integration of the higher education institutions in Armidale and Newcastle and in its decision not to support expansion of advanced education programs in these cities under present arrangements (Progress Report on

Consolidation in Advanced Education, paragraph 65). The Council is aware of the large industrial developments proposed for the Hunter Valley Region and, following consolidation, would support the development of advanced

education courses in the Region to meet the needs of

industry as they become defined.

B3.62 As indicated in paragraph B 1 .8 and B1.10, no

provision has been made within the funds available to the Council for the colleges in Armidale, Newcastle and Wollongong. On the assumption that arrangements will be made to merge these institutions with neighbouring universities, a level of funds for the advanced education

activities of the new institution has been included by the Universities Cou n c i l , on the advice of the Advanced Education Council, in the recurrent grants of those

institutions.

B3.63 With regard to the Milperra College of Advanced

Education, the New South Wales Government is opposed to its amalgamation with any other institution. The Council recognises the need for an advanced education presence in the south-western region of Sydney but it does not consider

that, at this stage, Milperra College of Advanced Education is fully meeting the needs of the region. The Council

supports the Commission's view that "there appears to be options available for consolidation which would be consist­ ent with the Commonwealth Government's requirements and with improved provision for higher education in the south-western

207 .

region of Sydney" (Progress Report on Consolidation in Advanced Education, paragraph 24). In the Council's view, there is a need to provide business studies, science and technology-based courses in the region but it considers that, these should be provided through an institution which is already established in these activities, at least for the next two triennia. The Council has not recommended grants for the Milperra College of Advanced Education.

B 3 .64 As requested by the Commission (see paragraph

B 1 .13), the Council has considered the future of small colleges not included in the Review of Commonwealth Functions list of thirty colleges of advanced education. Of the New South Wales colleges considered, the Council does not see the need for any change in the institutional

arrangements in respect of:

Hawkesbury Agricultural College New South Wales State Conservatorium of Music Northern Rivers College of Advanced Education

Sydney College of the Arts

B3.65 The Council has also considered the future of

Orange Agricultural College which was established in 1973 as a college of advanced education within the New South Wales Department of Agriculture to provide courses related to farming and the rural industry. If offers associate diploma level courses in farm management and farm secretarial

studies as well as joint courses at the associate diploma level in environmental control and horse management with Mitchell College of Advanced Education and Hawkesbury Agricultural College respectively. In 1981, the student

load in the two courses offered entirely by the College was 222 EFTS, while the enrolments in the joint courses amounted to 32 EFTS.

B3.66 The former Commission on Advanced Education had

reservations about the status of the College as a free­ standing college of advanced education almost since its establishment. Positive action has, however, been deferred because of the advice from the New South Wales authorities that action was in train to transfer responsibility from the Minister for Agriculture to the Minister for Education. This transfer is, apparently, no longer contemplated and

the Minister for Agriculture announced in March 1981 the formation of a Board of Management for Orange Agricultural College to replace the former Advisory Council and with increased responsibilities in the operation and development of the College.

2 0 8 .

B3.67 Orange Agricultural College is in close proximity

to Mitchell College of Advanced Education which is a relatively large regional college. Over recent years the New South Wales Higher Education Board has encouraged the offering of joint courses and sharing of administrative

services between the two Colleges. With respect to the latter, external courses offered by the Orange College are now administered through the well-developed external studies machinery of the Mitchell College. Recently the Board has

concluded that the differences in the academic profiles of the two Colleges limit the areas in which joint academic programs can be offered; however, one course - in environ­ mental control - has been introduced. The Board has also

concluded that no further benefits would be achieved by increased sharing of service functions and facilities.

B3.68 Academic links have also been established with the

Hawkesbury Agricultural College through the joint offering of an associate diploma course in horse management. The Board does not, however, support amalgamation between the two agricultural colleges because of their different academic orientations and the distance between the c a m p u s e s .

B 3 .69 The Board considers the Orange Agricultural

College to be a successful college of advanced education and does not support any immediate change in the existing arrangements for its administration and funding.

B3.70 Having regard to a number of factors, the Council

is reluctant to continue to accord the Orange Agricultural College the status of a free-standing college of advanced education. In reaching this conclusion, a contributing factor which influenced the Council's attitude was the

Commonwealth Government's policy of consolidation of small single-purpose institutions. Also, the Council has noted the low level of enrolments (254 EFTS) at the College and

that it offers courses only at the associate diploma level. The Council does not consider that the College has the potential to be other than a "small" college and it will

not, therefore, be in a position to develop the degree of

dive r s i t y , flexibility and economy characteristic of large institutions. The Council has also taken account of the fact that the College is administered by the New South Wales Department of Agriculture through a Board of Management and does not have the degree of autonomy generally character­

istic of colleges of advanced education. The Council will be consulting further with the New South Wales Higher Education Board in relation to the future development of the

2 0 9 .

college in the cctning weeks. In the meantime, the Council is not prepared to recommend grants in respect of the Orange Agricultural College: however, as stated in paragraph B3.4, provision has been made within the unallocated balance of funds for the support of the College's courses.

STUDENT LOAD

B3.71 The Council accepts the State's proposed enrolment levels for the triennium which are consistent with the Council's suggested planning range in its advice for Volume 1. The New South Wales Higher Education Board projects a decline in teacher education enrolments over the triennium, growth in science-based courses and consolidation

of commerce/social science/humanities-based courses. The development proposed for individual institutions does not necessarily coincide with the overall trend for the State; for example, the Board proposes a period of consolidation

for the New South Wales Institute of Technology preferring that growth in science and business courses be concentrated in the outer-metropolitan and non-metropolitan institutions.

B3.72 The student load levels upon which the Council's

recommended recurrent grants are based for the 1982-84 triennium are set out in Table B3.7· Provisional allocations for Orange Agricultural College and the Milperra College of Advanced Education have been included pending resolution of the future development of these institutions. While Table B3.7 excludes provision for Armidale and Newcastle Colleges of Advanced Education and the Wollongong

Institute of Education, the Universities Council has been advised that, subject to acceptable proposals on the merger of these institutions with the neighbouring universities, advanced education student load should be set at 3,755, 3,775 and 3,835 EFTS for 1982-84 respectively to cover advanced education provision in the merged institutions.

2 1 0 .

TABLE B3.7

STUDENT LOAD IN ADVANCED EDUCATION, 1981 PRELIMINARY, 1982 TO 1984 PROPOSED: NEW SOUTH WALES

1981 1982 1983 1984

BY INSTITUTION

Combined Catholic College 1 ,556 1 ,542 1 ,542 1 ,542

Cumberland College of Health Sciences 1,253 1 ,290 1 ,290 1,330

Hawkesbury Agricultural College 788 828 833 838

Kuring-gai College of Advanced Education 2,334 2,2 10 2,190 2,232

Mitchell College of Advanced Education 2,621 2,523 2,523 2,528

Nepean College of Advanced Education 1,093 1,128 1,148 1 , 188

NSW Department of Technical and Further Education 898 965 975 1,015

NSW State Conservetorium of Music 427 440 448 453

Northern Rivers College of Advanced Education 886 818 82 3 833

Orange Agricultural College 254 298 305 310

Riverina College of Advanced Education 3,153 3,177 3,176 3, 197

Sydney College of Advanced Education 4,200 4,3 28 4,308 4,293

Sydney College of the Arts J 730 650 655 66 5

The Milperra College of Advanced Education 658 690 695 710

The New South Wales Institute of Technology 5,380 5,188 5,198 5,258

TOTAL(a ) 26,231 26,075 26,109 26,392

BY CATEGORY

Teacher education 9,415 9,254 9,242 9,170

Science-based courses 6,607 6,986 7,050 7,212

Commerce/social science/humanities- based courses 10,209 9,835 9,817 10,010

TOTAL (a ) 26,231 26,075 26,109 26,392

(a) In addition to the figures set out above, , student load of 3,755 EFTS in 1982, 3,775 EFTS in 1983, and 3,835 EFTS in 1984 has been allocated for the advanced education courses to be conducted by the merged institutions at Armidale, Newcastle and Wollongong (see paragraph B3.72 ).

2 1 1 .

RECURRENT GRANTS

B3.73 The Council accepts the distribution of recurrent grants proposed for 1982-84 by the New South Wales Higher Education Board with the exception of those proposed for the Orange Agricultural College ( see paragraph B3.70), the Milperra College of Advanced Education (see paragraph B3.63) and the Sydney College of Advanced Education.

B3.74 The background to the establishment of the Sydney

College of Advanced Education was set out earlier in this Chapter ( see paragraph B3.54). The New South Wales Higher Education Board has proposed a level of recurrent funds for the College which would reduce the average cost per student by 7 per cent from approximately $5, 320/EFTS in 1981 to

$ 4 ,950/EFTS in 1984. In general terms this is consistent with the requirement imposed by the Commonwealth Government that real savings are to be achieved in institutions listed for consolidation. Notwithstanding the achievement of savings of this order, the Council has observed that the proposed level of funding for the College is of the order of

$675/EFTS or 16 per cent higher than the rates applying to similar colleges in a number of other States. Discussions have been held with the Higher Education Board and while recognising that there are cost differences between States, and between institutions within States, the Council is still

not satisfied that the grants proposed for the College represent an appropriate relationship between student load and funding. The Council is therefore recommending a lower

level of grant for the College based on what it regards as a

more appropriate average level of funding per student. The difference between the funds recommended by the Council and those proposed by the Board has been included in the total balance of unallocated funds for the State. Should the New South Wales Higher Education Board wish to submit further information to clarify and elaborate upon the justification for the proposed level of grant for the Sydney College of Advanced Education, the Council will be prepared to consider further the recurrent grant for the three years of the triennium.

B3.75 The Board submitted proposals to utilise funds

from the $ 5m temporary development for 1982 which involved expenditure of substantially more than the sum provisionally allocated to New South Wales. Following consultations with the Board the Council has accepted a distribution of the

temporary development grant for 1982 as set out in Table B3.8. Proposals to allocate funds from the temporary development grant to Orange Agricultural College and the Milperra College of Advanced Education have been deferred pending resolution of the future development of these colleges; the funds involved have been included in the unallocated balance of funds for 1982 ( see paragraph B 3 .4(i) ).

2 1 2 .

B 3 .76 The Council recommends recurrent grants for advanced education purposes in New South Wales for the 1982-84 triennium as follows:

TABLE B3.8

RECOMMENDED RECURRENT GRANTS FOR ADVANCED EDUCATION, 1982 TO 1984: NEW SOUTH WALES (19 82 outturn prices)

1981

Grant

1982 Temporary develop­ ment grant

Total

19 83 1984

$'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $ Ό00 $'000

Combined Catholic College 5,949 6,305 6,305 6,357 6,369

Cumberland College of Health Sciences 7,290 6,983 100 7,083 7,008 7,200

Hawkesbury Agricultural College 6,765 6,486 90 6,576 6,373 6,369

Kuring-gai College of Advanced Education 9,285 9,128 85 9,213 9,335 9,572

Mitchell College of Advanced Education 10 ,899 10,609 185 10,794 10,716 10,689

Nepean College of Advanced Education 4,700 4,916 30 0 5,216 5,032 5,173

NSW State Conservatorium of Mus ic 2,741 2,696 2 ,696 2,740 2 ,763

Northern Rivers College of Advanced Education 3,674 3,72 1 75 3,796 3,776 3,812

Riverina College of Advanced Education 16,347 16,396 105 16,501 16,406 16,289

Sydney College of Advanced Education 22,344 21,706 _ 2 1 ,706 20 ,500 19,275

Sydney College of the Arts 3 ,765 4 ,056 60 4,116 4,127 4,172

The New South Wales Institute of Technology 26,301 26,107 135 26,242 26,438 26,698

Unallocated 387 488 - 488 1,422 2,165

Sub-total 120,447 1 19,597 1,135 120,732 120,230 120,546

NSW Department of Technical and Further Education 2,997 3,084 30 3,114 3,152 3,236

TOTAL 123,444 122,681 1 , 165 123,846 123,382 123,782

2 1 3 .

CAPITAL PROJECTS

B3.77 Three major building projects are being funded in

the New South Wales advanced education sector in 1981 . The student/staff facilities building at the Cumberland College of Health Sciences will be completed this year. The other two projects continue into 1982 and beyond: the New South Wales Institute of Technology building for joint use with

the Sydney Teachers College, and Stage 1 of the relocation of the Northern Rivers College of Advanced Education on a new campus. The NSWIT 1 Joint U s e 1 building is expected to commence construction in October 1981 and will generate a

forward commitment of $15.6m over the 1982-84 triennium with completion expected in 1984. Stage 1 of the relocation of the Northern Rivers College to a flood-free site is progressing satisfactorily with completion expected early in

1982 .

B3.78 The major building projects supported by the State

for commencement in the 1982-84 triennium have not varied significantly from those considered by the Council in its Volume 1 Advice. Apart from the NSWIT 'Joint U s e 1 building, which represents the State's first priority, the highest priority projects in New South Wales are:

. Northern Rivers College of Advanced Education - Relocation on new campus, Stage 2 (estimated to cos t $3.3m).

. Sydney College of the Arts - Rehousing of the

College facilities to a new campus at Ryde (estimated to cost $10.1m for the total relocation program, and $4.3m for the first stage).

. Nepean College of Advanced Education -Construction of a teaching building for business studies courses at the Westmead campus (estimated to cost $1.6 m ) .

B3.79 The Northern Rivers College of Advanced Education is presently housed in buildings in the central business district of Li snore which were originally constructed for high school purposes. The buildings, which are overcrowded and unsatisfactory for advanced education purposes, are

subject to flooding. Following protracted negotiations between the College, State and Commonwealth authorities, agreement was reached in 1978 for the provision of new college facilities at a flood-free site at East Lismore. The first stage of the four-stage plan to relocate the College was commenced in 1980 and is scheduled for complet­

ion early in 1982. This stage will provide a total of 584

student places for laboratory and general teaching, as well as student facilities. The two-level building proposed for Stage 2 is to house the Information Resources Centre and College administration.

214 .

B3.80 In its Volume 1 Advice for the 1982-84 triennium

Council noted that the Sydney College of the Arts project to relocate its facilities from several locations in Sydney to a new campus at Ryde was a high priority project planned for

commencement during the current triennium.

B3.81 This project is similar to the Northern Rivers

project in that it is a proposal to relocate an entire

col l e g e , by stages, on a new campus. Under the current

arrangements for capital programs, and assuming continuation of current levels of funding for new capital p r o jects, Council believes it to be inadvisable to recommend the commencement of a project of this nature implying, as it

does, large forward commitments over a number of years.

B3.82 The Nepean College of Advanced Education is

located in new facilities at Kingswood; the Westmead campus, 2 kms from the Parramatta business centre, is retained because of the strong growth in the demand for courses in business studies in that area. Student load in

the College's School of Business has grown from 227 EFTS in 1977, when the first teacher education courses were transferred to the new Kingswood campus, to 590 EFTS in 1981. Further growth proposed for the forthcoming triennium will attract the largest single allocation from the

temporary development grant available to New South Wales in 1982. The high demand for courses in the School of Business

has outstripped the available teaching accommodation on the campus, some of which consists of temporary buildings and some relocatable buildings on loan from the State Education De p a r t m e n t . This proposal is for a two-level building which will provide new lecture and tutorial facilities for 334

students, and by rehousing the campus library in the new building, provide 148 reader places. Relocation of the library will permit the existing library space to be reconverted to classrooms for a further 150 students.

B 3 .83 There are compelling arguments in favour of

supporting each of the three projects discussed above; however, the overall availability of capital funds does not permit this course of action. The Council has already indicated its view that it would be inadvisable within the

current funding climate to commence a multi-stage project such as that proposed for the Sydney College of the A r t s . With respect to the Northern Rivers project, it is obviously desirable to proceed to the construction of Stage 2 with as

little delay as possible. While there is a high degree of

interdependence between Stage 1 and Stage 2 of this project. Stage 1 is a viable teaching unit in its own right. Having

regard to the constraints which are affecting capital development, the Council believes that the most compelling claim on the limited funds available is in respect of the Westmead project of the Nepean College of Advanced

Education. This project will solve a problem of gross

215 .

overcrowding coupled wit h sub-standard accommodation and will improve educational provision in the fast-developing western suburbs of S y d n e y , a region with one of the highest

priorities in Australia for the further development of tertiary education opportunities. Accordingly, provision has been made for the commencement of construction of this project in the recommended capital program for 1982 set out in Table B3.S0.

V i c t o r i a

DEVELOPMENT OF THE ADVANCED EDUCATION SECTOR

B3.84 By the mid-1960s Victoria had a well developed

higher technical education system. The advanced education sector evolved from a very strong base of technological institutions and specialist colleges. The Victoria Institute of Colleges (VIC) was established in 1965 to co-ordinate the activities of these colleges. In the early 1970s the advanced education system in Victoria became a bipartite system with colleges affiliated with either the VIC or the State College of Victoria (SCV); the latter was

established in 1972 to co-ordinate the activities of the former teachers colleges which were included in the advanced education sector in July 1973. The Victorian Post-Secondary Education Commission (VPSEC) was established in 1978 under the Post-Secondary Education Act 1978 which provided for the progressive repeal of the legislation which established the SCV and the VIC. The SCV and the VIC ceased to function

as separate authorities after 8 December 1980 with the result that the advanced education system in Victoria is now a single entity comprising autonomous colleges of advanced education, the details of which are summarised below.

B3.85 Metropolitan colleges developed from a technical base· The following technological institutions have been funded as colleges of advanced education since 1 9 6 7 :

Caulfield Institute of Technology Footscray Institute of Technology Preston Institute of Technology Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology

Swinburne Institute of Technology.

Prahran College of Technology - later renamed Prahran College of Advanced Education - was established in 1970.

B3.86 Metropolitan specialist colleges. The Victorian College of Pharmacy has been funded under advanced education arrangements since 1967. The paramedical colleges which have since amalgamated to form the Lincoln Institute of

216 .

Health Sciences were also funded under advanced education arrangements from 1967. The Victorian College of the Arts was established in late 1972.

B3.87 Metropolitan teacher eduaation institutions. SCV Burwood, Coburg, Frankston, Hawthorn, Institute of Early Childhood Development, Melbourne, Rusden and Toorak, were formed from the teachers colleges in Melbourne which, in

1973, were included in the advanced education sector. The Institute of Catholic Education was subsequently affiliated with the SCV and funded by the Commonwealth in respect of

Mercy College (Ascot Vale), Christ College (Oakleigh) and Aquinas College (Ballarat). All of these colleges have continued to have teacher education as their major activity. Some, and in particular SCV Frankston, have experienced

major reductions in their level of enrolments over recent y e a r s .

B3.88 Regional colleges. The four former VIC colleges at Ballarat, Bendigo, Warrnambool and in Gippsland, all originated from a base of technical courses. The Gippsland and Warrnambool colleges introduced teacher education

courses in the mid-1970s. They are both acknowledged by the Victorian Post-Secondary Education Commission as major providers of off-campus education. The Ballarat Institute

of Advanced Education and SCV Ballarat merged in 1976 to form the Ballarat College of Advanced Education. At the same time, the Bendigo Institute of Technology merged with SCV Bendigo to form the Bendigo College of Advanced Education.

B3.89 Deakin University was established in 1977

incorporating the Gordon Institute of Technology and SCV Geelong.

B 3 .90 A number of changes have taken place in Victoria

which are not reflected a b o v e ; for example, the Emily McPherson College of Domestic Economy amalgamated with RMIT in 1977, the School of Forestry, C r e s w i c k , is now part of

the University of Melbourne, and the Training Centre, for Teachers of the D e a f amalgamated with SCV Burwood in 1974.

B3.91 While the former teachers colleges in the

metropolitan area were part of the federation of the State College of Victoria, it was difficult for them to form associations with colleges in the former VIC system. In 1981, however, SCV Toorak and Prahran College of Advanced Education formed an association which was planned to lead to

amalgamation. Furthermore, a board of inquiry was set up to investigate and report on the future structure of post­ secondary education in Frankston and its region. It was also proposed that SCV Melbourne and SCV Coburg should

217 .

consolidate their teaching activities and that Lincoln Institute of Health Sciences should partly relocate on the SCV Melbourne campus; this proposal subsequently lapsed.

CONSOLIDATION PROPOSAL'S

B3.92 The following nine Victorian colleges of advanced

education appeared in the Commonwealth's consolidation list of 30 April 1 9 8 1 :

SCV Burwood SCV Coburg SCV Frankston SCV Hawthorn

SCV Institute of Catholic Education SCV Institute of Early Childhood Development SCV Melbourne SCV Rusden SCV Toorak

B3.93 In its Progress Report on Consolidation in Advanced Education, the Commission reported that it had received proposals which it supported in respect of:

(a) SCV Burwood, SCV Rusden, SCV Toorak - amalgama­ tion of the three Colleges and the Prahran College of Advanced Education in 1982 to form a new

multi-campus multi-disciplinary college of advanced education to be eventually located on three campuses;

(b) SCV Frankston - the Council is to be dissolved and the Caulfield Institute of Technology will be requested to establish a campus at Frankston in 1982;

(c) SCV Coburg, SCV Melbourne - amalgamation with the Lincoln Institute of Health Sciences.

Since the preparation of the Progress Report, the Council has been advised that the latter amalgamation is not to proceed. The Council has recommended grants in respect of the institution to be formed by the amalgamation of Prahran College of Advanced Education and Burwood, Rusden and Toorak State Colleges. The level of grants recommended for the Caulfield Institute of Technology reflect the proposed

e stablishme nt of a campus at Frankston· The Victorian Minister for Education has advised that the following proposals replace the proposal to amalgamate SCV Melbourne and Coburg with the Lincoln Institute of Health Sciences:

218.

(a) SCV Coburg is to amalgamate with Preston Institute of Technology;

(b) SCV Melbourne and the Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology are to consult about the possibility and extent to which the current and planned academic activities and facilities of SCV

Melbourne can be merged with the Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology; and

(c ) the Victorian Enquiry into the Allied Health Sciences is to give early consideration to the long-term accommodation problems of Lincoln Institute of Health Sciences.

B3.94 The Council supports the proposal in respect of

SCV Coburg and the Preston Institute of Technology and has recommended, grants in respect of Preston Institute of Technology which reflect the amalgamation with SCV Coburg; the grants also reflect the phasing out of engineering

courses at Preston Institute. No grants have been recommended in respect of SCV Melbourne as no firm consolidation proposal has been received·

B3.95 The Council will be consulting further with VPSEC

regarding the long-term accommodation problems of the Lincoln Institute of Health Sciences.

B3.96 The Commission in its Progress Report on Consolidation in Advanced Education has indicated that it will make funding recommendations for the Institute of Catholic Education on the understanding that the Council of

the Institute will give a formal assurance that the proposed revised constitution will establish that the Institute is a multi-campus college of advanced education with a single governing body responsible for the management of the

Institute's resources. The Council has recommended funds for the Institute of Catholic Education. It does, however, consider that there are educational and resource advantages to be gained in a closer relationship between the Ballarat

Institute of Advanced Education and Aquinas College which constitutes the Ballarat campus of the Institute of Catholic Education.

B3.97 The Victorian Government is not prepared to

propose consolidation arrangements in respect of SCV Hawthorn and the SCV Institute of Early Childhood Development. The Council supports the Commission's view on these institutions, which is that there are benefits to be

gained by consolidation with other colleges of advanced education. The Council has not recommended grants in respect of SCV Hawthorn and the SCV Institute of Early Childhood Development.

219.

B3.98 As noted earlier, the Council has considered the

future of small colleges not included among the 30 colleges listed for consolidation in the Review of Commonwealth Functions. In this context, the Council considered the following colleges in Victoria:

The Victorian College of the Arts Warrnambool Institute of Advanced Education Victorian College of Pharmacy.

B3.99 The Council saw no purpose in developing

consolidation proposals for the first two of the above institutions. With respect to the Victorian College of P h a r m a c y , the Council sought advice from VPSEC on the possible consolidation of the College with another Victorian

institution or institutions. VPSEC has advised that this matter is likely to be considered in the context of the

Enquiry into the Allied Health Sciences established by VPSEC. As it would not wish to pre-empt any conclusions of

the Enquiry, VPSEC has not made any consolidation proposals regarding the Victorian College of Pharmacy. However, VPSEC will be reviewing the level of funding for the College in

the light of the results of the Enquiry. The Council will

be consulting further with VPSEC following the completion of the Enquiry into the Allied Health Scien c e s . In the

meantime, however, it has recommended grants in respect of the Victorian College of Pharmacy as proposed by VPSEC.

B3.100 In the context of its decisions on the Review of

Commonwealth Functions, the Government announced that the engineering schools at Bendigo College of Advanced Education and Preston Institute of Technology were to be phased out and that the future role of the engineering school at Caulfield Institute of Technology was to be examined. VPSEC has advised that the engineering school at Preston Institute

of Technology is being phased out; no new students were

admitted in 1981. It has also advised that it has initiated

discussion between Caulfield Institute of Technology and Monash University about ways in which their professional engineering activities might complement each other.

B3.101 In relation to engineering at the Bendigo College

of Advanced Education, the Tertiary Education Commission, in its Progress Report on Consolidation in Advaneed Education, indicated that it proposes to recommend funding in Volume 2 on the basis that there will be no new

enrolments to the engineering school at Bendigo and that the school will be progressively phased out. The Commission also stated that it did not support the proposal that the first two years of the professional engineering course offered by the Footscray Institute of Technology be taught by the Bendigo College. The Commission considered, however, that it would not be inconsistent with the Government's

220 .

objectives if a major metropolitan engineering school were to establish a branch at Bendigo. Under these arrangements one or two years of the course offered by the metropolitan

institution would be taught at the Bendigo campus by staff of the metropolitan institution. The students would be enrolled in the institution granting the award.

B3.102 The Council understands that the school of

engineering will be phased out in Bendigo and that the Footscray Institute of Technology and the Bendigo College of Advanced Education have reached agreement in principle for the provision of the Footscray engineering courses at

Bendigo in terms of the arrangements suggested by the Commission. Grants have been recommended for the Bendigo College of Advanced Education on the basis that there will be no new enrolments in its professional engineering

courses.

B3.103 In 1981, advanced education funds were provided

in respect of 22 colleges of advanced education; funds for 1982 w ill be recommended in respect of 14 colleges of advanced education. Five of these are technological institutions, three are specialist institutions, one is a

multi-purpose metropolitan institution, four are multi­ purpose regional institutions and one is a mono-purpose teacher education institution.

B3.104 In its Advice for Volume 1 (paragraph 8.68)

the Council expressed a view that Victoria was without a strategy for optimising the use of advanced education resources in that State. The Council supports the subsequent steps taken by Victoria towards consolidation; the reallocation of funds among individual institutions over the 1982-84 triennium, represent substantial progress

towards an appropriate balance between the allocation of resources and the provision of advanced education within the S t a t e .

B3.105 The Council advised the Victorian authorities in

1980 of the necessity to establish a proper relationship between student load and recurrent funds by the end of the forthcoming triennium. The extent of adjustment and

consolidation required in Victoria to achieve this objective is of a much larger scale than in other States, basically

because almost two-thirds of the total reduction which will occur in pre-service teacher education in Australia over the next triennium will take place in Victoria. The impact of this will be felt throughout the advanced education system

in Victoria and for some individual institutions will be severe; it also reflects the recency of the steps being

taken to bring teacher supply and demand into better balance in this State. The Council expects that some redundancies may result in particular institutions predominantly involved

221.

in teacher education. The Commission has indicated that this is a matter to be resolved by State authorities and

institutions. VPSEC has requested a special grant of $ 5-10m to ease the adjustment process over the next triennium; however, the Council is unable to meet this request within the limit of the total funds available.

STUDENT LOAD

B3.106 The Council accepts the enrolment targets proposed by the Victorian Post-Secondary Education Commission for the 1982-84 triennium. The targets are generally in accordance with the Council's planning ranges suggested for Victoria in

its Advice for Volume 1 .

B3.107 The student load levels upon which the Council's

recommended recurrent grants are based for the 1982-84 triennium are set out in Table B3.9. Allocations for SCV Melbourne, SCV Hawthorn and SCV Institute of Early Childhood Development, which have been nominated by the Commonwealth Government for consolidation, have been included on a provisional basis pending resolution of the

future development of these institutions.

RECURRENT GRANTS

B3.108 There has been extensive consultation between the Council and VPSEC on the range of issues which will

materially affect the restructuring of the advanced education sector in Victoria. The Council now accepts the distribution of recurrent grant proposed for 1982-84 by VPSEC, including the distribution of $ 1 .4m temporary development grants for 1982.

222.

TABLE B3.9

STUDENT LOAD IN ADVANCED EDUCATION, 1981 PRELIMINARY, 1982 TO 1984 PROPOSED: VICTORIA

1981 1982 1983 1984

BY INSTITUTION

Ballarat College of Advanced Education 1 ,495 1 ,550 1 ,570 1 ,585

Bendigo College of Advanced Education Caulfield Institute of Technology/ 1,495 1 ,520 1,525 1,525

SCV Frankston 4,132 4,330 4,480 4,600

Footscray Institute of Technology 2 ,302 2,410 2 ,535 2,610

Gippsland Institute of Advanced Education 1,4 10 1,530 1,540 1,540 Lincoln Institute of Health Sciences 1 ,479 1 ,580 1 ,600 1 ,600

Preston Institute of Technology/SCV Coburg 3,072 3,420 3,430 3,430 Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology SCV Burwood/Toorak/Rusden/Prahran College 8,252 7,960 7,980 8,000

of Advanced Education 5,956 5,360 5,005 5,000

SCV Hawthorn 1 ,544 1,400 1,400 1,400

SCV Institute of Catholic Education SCV Institute of Early Childhood 1,295 1 ,250 1 ,250 1,250

Development 712 650 600 600

SCV Melbourne 3,425 2,975 2,635 2,310

Swinburne Institute of Technology 3 ,880 3,985 4,110 4,170

The Victorian College of the Arts 496 500 530 550

Victorian College of Pharmacy 379 380 380 380

Warrnambool Institute of Advanced Education 92 5 930 930 950

Agricultural Colleges(a) 320 320 320 320

TOTAL 42,569 42,050 41 ,820 41,820

BY CATEGORY

Teacher education 14,818 13,145 12,400 12 ,000

Science-based courses Commerce/social science/humanities-11 ,852 13,255 13,735 14,100 based courses 15,899 15,650 15,685 15,720

TOTAL 42,569 42,050 41,820 41 ,820

(a) These institutions advanced education are not colleges of advanced education but provide some level courses in addition to TAPE courses.

223 .

Λ

B3.109 The Council recommends recurrent grants for advanced education purposes in Victoria for the 1982-84 triennium as follows:

TABLE B3.10

RECOMMENDED RECURRENT GRANTS FOR ADVANCED EDUCATION, 1982 TO 1984: VICTORIA ( 1982 outturn prices)

1981

Grant

1982 Temporary develop­ ment grant

Total

1983 1984

Ballarat College of

$'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000

Advanced Education Bendigo College of

8,879 8,558 12 8,570 8,330 8,095

Advanced Education Caulfield Institute of 9,940 9,150 9, 150 8,396 7,640

Technology Footscray Institute of 20,814 21,090 195 21,285 20,261 21,085

Technology Gippsland Institute of 9,561 11,021 199 1 1,220 1 1,525 12,305

Advanced Education Lincoln Institute of

6,558 7,226 34 7,260 7,300 7,340

Health Sciences Preston Institute of

9,042 9,360 9,360 9,470 9,470

Technology/SCV Coburg Royal Melbourne Institute 14,549 15,377 333 15,710 15,692 16,020

of Technology SCV Burwood/Toorak/Rusden/ Prahran College of

39,777 40, 105 275 40,380 40,384 41,025

Advanced Education SCV Institute of Catholic 27,235 23,732 13 23,745 22,330 2 1 , 180

Education Swinburne Institute of 5,527 5,470 5,470 5,420 5,38 0

Technology The Victorian College of 18,024 18,639 324 18,963 19,364 20,405

the Arts Victorian College of

2,927 3,100 3,100 3,290 3,420

Pharmacy Warrnambool Institute of 2,826 2,710 2,710 2,610 2,590

Advanced Education 4,315 4,435 15 4,450 4 ,424 4,525

Unallocated - - - - 547 858

Sub-total 179,974 179,973 1 ,400 181,373 179,343 181,338

Agricultural Colleges 1,352 1,347 1,347 1,347 1 ,347

TOTAL 181,326 181,320 1 ,400 182,720 180,690 182,685

224

CAPITAL PROJECTS

B3.110 Five major building projects are being funded in

the Victorian advanced education sector in 19R 1 : two of these projects commenced construction in 1979, two commenced in 1980 and the remaining project is to commence in 1981.

Three of these continuing projects have been completed and the remaining two will be completed from funds made avail­ able in 1982. The two continuing projects are both at the

Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology; Stage 1 of the renovations to Buildings 5, 7 and 9 are scheduled for

completion in December 1982, and the Student Union Building is due for completion early in 1982.

B3.111 The major capital expenditure sought by Victoria

for the 1982-84 trienniurn is not directly related to the rationalisation and reorganisation of colleges. Based on the most recent advice, the highest three priorities in Victoria are:

. Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology - Stage 2 of renovations to Buildings 7 and 9 (estimated to cost $1.4 m ) ;

. Gippsland Institute of Advanced Education -Construction of a technology building (estimated to cost $ 5.2m) ;

. Preston Institute of Technology - Construction of Library Resource Building (estimated to cost $4.0m) .

B3.112 The Council supports the Victorian Post-Secondary Education Commission's highest priority for 1982 for the second stage of Renovations to Buildings 7 and 9 at the

Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology and has provided for the commencement of the project within the recommended capital program for 1982 set out in Table B3.30.

B3.113 The condition of a number of buildings on the

Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology campus represents some of the most inadequate accommodation in the advanced education sector. Many of the buildings require alterations and refurbishment to effect compliance with safety standards

and to provide adequate teaching facilities. The Council has supported a staged renovations program at Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology estimated to cost $4.8m.

The first two stages will complete the planning renovations to Buildings 5, 7 and 9; renovations to Buildings 6, 15, 22

and 24 will form Stage 3 of the program. The Stage 2

renovations to Buildings 7 and 9 to commence in 1982 will

allow upgrading of a net area of 2 ,638m^.

225 .

B3.114 Present engineering facilities at the Gippsland Institute of Advanced Education are shared with TAPE students in a building at Newborough, some 30 kms from the

main campus at Churchill. The proposed new technology building is to consolidate all teaching operations of the college on the one campus while providing modest upgrading of engineering laboratory facilities for the teaching of applied science c o u r s e s . The space subsequently released at Newborough is urgently required for TAPE operations at the Yallourn Technical College for which growth is projected in

response to technical expansion in the region.

B3.115 Although the Council supports the need for an

early commencement of the proposed Technology Building at the Gippsland Institute of Advanced Education, it is not possible to allocate design funds for this project within the funds available in 1982 for capital p u r p o s e s .

B3.116 The Council also noted the high priority given by

the State for a new library building for the Preston

Institute of Technology.

Q u e e n s l a n d

DEVELOPMENT OF THE ADVANCED EDUCATION SECTOR

B3.117 Institutes of technology in Brisbane, Toowoomba and Rockhampton, the Queensland Agricultural College and the Queensland Conservatorium of Music were first funded under advanced education arrangements in 1967. The institutes of technology in Toowoomba and Rockhampton subsequently became

the Darling Downs Institute of Advanced Education and the Capricornia Institute of Advanced Education respectively. Teacher education courses were introduced to these institutions in the early 1970s.

B3.118 In 1973, five teachers colleges, which later

became the following colleges of advanced education, were included in the advanced education sector:

Brisbane Kindergarten Teachers College North Brisbane College of Advanced Education Kelvin Grove College of Advanced Education Mount Gravatt College of Advanced Education Townsville College of Advanced Education

B3.119 The first four are in metropolitan Brisbane; all

but the North Brisbane college of Advanced Education remained as basically teacher education institutions. The North Brisbane College of Advanced Education operates on the campus of the former Kedron Park Teachers College and a new

226 .

campus at Carseldine, some 10 km north of the city centre; it offers business studies, teacher education, community studies and liberal studies.

B3.120 The provision of advanced education in the more

heavily populated regions of Queensland is now reasonably adequate except for Townsville w h e r e there may be scope for the further provision of technically oriented courses. The more sparsely populated areas are also reasonably well serviced by external studies, provided especially through

the Darling Downs Institute of Advanced Education and the Capricornia Institute of Advanced Education. There app e a r s , however, to be some scope for the development of advanced education courses in TAPE institutions in some of the more

isolated centres. The Queensland Board of Advanced Education has proposed such a development in the 1982-84 triennium.

CONSOLIDATION PROPOSALS

B3.121 All the colleges which developed from former

teachers colleges, except for the North Brisbane College of Advanced Education, were included in the 30 colleges of advanced education listed for consolidation by the Commonwealth Government in the context of its decisions on

the Review of Commonwealth Functions. Following the R e v i e w , the Queensland Government announced that the three Brisbane metropolitan colleges - Brisbane Kindergarten Teachers College, Kelvin Grove College of Advanced Education and Mount Gravatt College of Advanced Education - together with North Brisbane College of Advanced Education would

form a new multi-purpose, multi-campus college of advanced education to be known as the Brisbane College of Advanced Education. It is expected that the new College will commence operations on 1 January 1982. Both the Carseldine and Kedron Park campuses of the North Brisbane College of Advanced Education and the Kelvin Grove and Mount Gravatt campuses will be utilised for teaching purposes; the

Brisbane Kindergarten Teachers College campus will provide accommodation for the central administration. In its Progress Report on Consolidation in Advanced Education, the Commission noted that the Queensland Board of Advanced Education expects that progressive savings will accrue over the triennium and supported the proposal. The Council has

recommended grants in respect of the proposed Brisbane College of Advanced Education·

B3.122 The remaining college included on the list of 30

colleges of advanced education is Townsville College of Advanced Education. The College and the James Cook University of North Queensland are on adjoining campuses; the College offers primary teacher education and the

227.

University offers secondary teacher education. In Volume 1 of its Report for 1982-84 Triennium (paragraphs 5.51 and 5.52), the Commission supported the integration of these two institutions. The Queensland Government has rejected such a relationship on the grounds that pre-school and primary teacher education are not appropriate areas of activity for the university sector, and that such integration would produce no savings. The Commission, in its Progress Report,

reaffirmed its support for integration of the higher education institutions in Townsville.

B3.123 The Council supports the Commission's view

regarding integration of the two institutions in Townsville. However, it considers that the North Queensland region may have been better served by a technologically-based multi-disciplinary college of advanced education in Townsville rather than a university with an advanced

education component.

B3.124 As indicated in paragraphs B1.8 and B1.10, no

provision has been made within the funds available to the Counail for Townsville College of Advanced Education· On the assumption that arrangements will be made to merge the College with the James Cook University of North Queensland,

funds for the advanced education activities of the new institution have been included by the Universities Council, on the advice of the Advanced Education Council, in the recurrent grants of that institution.

B3.125 As noted earlier, the Council has considered the

future development of a number of small colleges not included in the Review of Commonwealth Functions list of 30 colleges. In this context it noted that the Queensland Conservatorium of Music is adjacent to the Queensland

Institute of Technology and requested the Queensland Board of Advanced Education to give advice on the relationship between the two institutions. The Board does not consider that the near proximity of the institutions is sufficient

reason for consolidation in view of the differences in course offerings and styles of management. The Council has recommended grants in respect of the Queensland Conservatorium of Music·

STUDENT LOAD

B3.126 The State's proposed student load targets for

teacher education and science-based courses in the 1982-84 triennium fall within the Council's planning ranges. The proposed targets for Commerce/Social Sciences/Humanities- based courses (Category D) range from 6,307 in 1982 to 6,476

in 1984 which are above the Council's upper planning limit of 6,300. The Council has no objection to the proposed

228 .

higher limit for Category D courses on the understanding that the increase will be achieved within the principles enunciated earlier in this Chapter (see paragraph B3.10) in relation to variations in student load planning ranges.

B3.127 As the Council noted in its Advice for Volume 1

(paragraph 8.79) early action by Queensland has prevented the need for a rapid reduction in pre-service teacher education courses; this factor, together with the need to maintain opportunities for teachers to upgrade qualific­ ations, will obviate the need for a decline in teacher education enrolments in the 1982-84 triennium.

B3.128 The student load levels upon which the Council's

recommended recurrent grants are based for the 1982-84 triennium are set out in Table B3.ll. However, the Council would wish the Queensland Board of Advanced Education to consider the possibility of some further growth

in student load at the Queensland Agricultural College within the level of funds to be provided in 1982-84. While

Table BZ .11 excludes provision for the Townsville College of Advanced Education, the Universities Council has been advised that, subject to an acceptable proposal on the merger of the College with James Cook University of North Queensland, advanced education student load should be set at 810, 840 and 865 EFTS for 198 2-84 respectively to cover

advanced education provision in the merged institution.

229.

TABLE B3.1 1

STUDENT LOAD IN ADVANCED EDUCATION, 1981 PRELIMINARY, 1982 TO 1984 PROPOSED: QUEENSLAND

1981 1982 1983 1984

BY INSTITUTION

Brisbane College of Advanced Education 5,423 5,436 5,525 5,602

Capricornia Institute of Advanced Education 1 ,559 1 ,500 1 ,535 1,553

Darling Downs Institute of Advanced Education 2,490 2,510 2,550 2,580

Queensland Agricultural College 797 780 808 859

Queensland Conservatorium of Music 227 234 240 240

Queensland Institute of Technology 5,200 5,330 5,456 5,525

TAPE Institutions 412 500 545 610

TOTAL(a ) 16,108 16,290 16,659 16,969

BY CATEGORY

Teacher education 5,077 4,887 4,909 4,978

Science-based courses 5,005 5,096 5,344 5,515

Commerce/social science/humanities- based courses 6,026 6,307 6,406 6,476

TOTAL(a ) 16,108 16,290 16,659 16,969

(a) In addition to the figures set out above. student load of 810 EFTS in 1982, 840 EFTS in 1983 and 865 EFTS in 1984 has been allocated for the advanced education courses to be conducted by the merged institution at Townsville (see paragraph B3.128).

RECURRENT GRANTS

B3.129 The Council accepts the distribution of recurrent grants proposed for 1982-84 by the Queensland Board of Advanced Education in respect of advanced education; it also accepts the Board's proposal that the temporary

development grant of $900,000 allocated to Queensland for 1982 be distributed to individual colleges in accordance with proposed growth at each college in science-based and business studies courses.

B3.130 The Council recommends recurrent grants for advanced education purposes in Queensland for the 1982-84 triennium as set out in Table B3.12.

230 .

TABLE B3.12

RECOMMENDED RECURRENT 1982 TO (1982

GRANTS FOR ADVANCED 1984: QUEENSLAND outturn prices)

EDUCATION,

1981

Grant

1982 Temporary develop­ ment grant

Total

19 83 1984

Brisbane College of

5 '000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $ Ό00 $ Ό00

Advanced Education Capricornia Institute 27,641 26,481 163 26,644 26, 142 25,741

of Advanced Education Darling Downs Institute 8,815 8,614 75 8,689 8,651 8,653

of Advanced Education Queensland Agricultural 12,464 12,726 196 12,922 12,858 12,892

College Queensland Conservatorium 6,604 6,625 89 6,714 6,641 6,703

of Music Queensland Institute of 1 ,636 1 ,650 1,650 1 ,673 1,671

Technology 25,545 25,919 377 26,296 26,980 27,160

Unallocated 60 250 - 250 50 50

Sub-total 82,765 82,265 900 83,165 82,995 82,870

TAFE institutions 1,199 1 ,750 - 1 ,750 1 ,905 2,130

TOTAL 83,964 84,015 900 84,915 84,900 85,000

CAPITAL PROJECTS

B3.131 The Business Studies Building under construction at the Queensland Institute of Technology is the only project receiving funds in Queensland in 1981 and is

expected to be completed early in 1982.

B3.132 As reported in its Volume 1 Advice the capital development proposed for Queensland over the 1982-84 triennium consisted of a number of relatively small projects. The two highest priorities were for:

. Capricornia Institute of Advanced Education - Construction of biology laboratories (estimated to cost $ 0 .59m)

. Brisbane College of Advanced Education - Renovation to I Block, Kelvin Grove Campus (estimated to cost $ 0 .47m).

231.

B3.133 Although the State has not reordered its priori­

ties for 1982 it has brought forward from 1983 to 1982 a

small renovations project at Ke lvin Grove which will assist in the rationalisation of advanced education in Brisbane and the establishment of the Brisbane College of Advanced Education. The combined project, estimated to cost $ 0 ,72m,

is for renovations to I Block and A Block at the Kelvin

Grove camp u s ; the project is supported by the Council and has been included in the recommended capital program for 1982 (see Table 3.30).

B3.134 The campus at Kelvin Grove has had considerable

investment made in new buildings in recent years but a number of its older buildings require renovations to make them effective for teaching purposes. As part of the State's rationalisation of its Brisbane Colleges, the Board of Advanced Education has proposed that the School of Librarianship at the Queensland Institute of Technology be merged with the Kelvin Grove Department of Librarianship and relocated to that campus. To enable this relocation the

first floor accommodation in I Block is to be renovated to provide a library cataloguing and reference laboratory, lecture areas and space for electronic data processing training equipment. Renovations to the 50 years old A Block are also proposed to enable relocation of the Commercial Studies Department from its various scattered locations on the campus.

B3.135 The Board of Advanced Education in Queensland

expects the amalgamation of existing colleges in Brisbane to increase the State's normal demand for minor works by an estimated $0.5m in 1982. The principal requirement for additional minor works funds will be the conversion of existing spaces to facilitate establishment of the Brisbane College of Advanced Education. Council recognises that additional minor works may be required to assist in the amalgamation of Colleges. However, given the limited funds available for capital purposes in 1982, the Council is unable to recommend additional minor works funds.

S o u t h A u s t r a l i a

DEVELOPMENT OF THE ADVANCED EDUCATION SECTOR

B3.136 The South Australian Institute of Technology and the South Australian School of Art were the first colleges of advanced education in South Australia. The South Australian School of Art and Western Teachers College

amalgamated in 1973 to form the Torrens College of Advanced Education.

B3.137 The Roseworthy Agricultural College has been funded under advanced education arrangements since 1970; it became an autonomous college in 1974.

232.

B3.138 In July 1973 the Adelaide College of Advanced

Education, the Adelaide Kindergarten Teachers College, Murray Park College of Advanced Education, Salisbury College of Advanced Education and Sturt College of Advanced Education, which were previously teachers colleges, were

included under advanced education funding arrangements. The Adelaide Kindergarten Teachers College subsequently became the Kingston College of Advanced Education.

B3.139 In 1979 the following amalgamations o c c u r r e d :

Torrens College of Advanced Education ) Adelaide College of Advanced Education) )

Adelaide College of the Arts and

Education

Kingston College of Advanced Education) Murray Park College of Advanced )

Education )

Hartley College of Advanced Education

CONSOLIDATION PROPOSALS

B3.140 With the continued decline in enrolments in

teacher education the Tertiary Education Authority of South Australia (TEASA) gave consideration to proposals for the further rationalisation of advanced education resources in South Australia. In late 1980, the South Australian Government announced that Hartley College of Advanced

Education, Salisbury College of Advanced Education, Adelaide College of the Arts and Education and Sturt College of Advanced Education were to be amalgamated. The latter two colleges offer a range of courses, including teacher education, whereas Hartley College of Advanced Education and

Salisbury College of Advanced Education are predominantly teacher education institutions. They were included in the Commonwealth Government's list of colleges to be consolid­

ated in the context of its decisions on the Review of

Commonwealth Funotione. Under the new arrangements the four colleges will be amalgamated under a single council to form a new multi-campus institution to be known as the South Australian College of Advanced E ducation. The new college will commence operations fran 1 January 1982. It is

proposed that the College will adopt common academic programs and administrative structures to enable a rationalisation of resources to be undertaken. The Council has recommended grants in respect of the proposed South Australian College of Advanced Education·

B3.141 In the 1982-84 triennium, funds for advanced

education in South Australia will be provided for three colleges of advanced education; the South Australian College of Advanced Education, the South Australian Institute of Technology and Roseworthy Agricultural College. The Council considers that the new arrangements will provide an appropriate framework for the effective management of

233 .

reduced teacher education enrolments and the general development of advanced education in South Australia, including studies in the technologies, applied sciences and business. In this regard, it should be noted that a School of Business is to be established at the Underdale campus of the South Australian College of Advanced Education in 1982.

STUDENT LOAD

B3.142 The State has proposed enrolment levels for the triennium which marginally exceed the planning range suggested by the Council for South Australia. The proposed increase reflects higher estimated enrolments in applied science, engineering and commerce/business courses than was anticipated. The Council would have no objection to an increase in the upper limit of the student load planning range for South Australia in 1982-84 from 12,000 to 12,350 on the understanding that the principles relating to

increases in Category C and Category D enrolments (para­ graph B3.10) are followed.

B3.143 The student load levels upon which the Council's recommended recurrent grants are based for the 1982-84 triennium set out in Table B3.13.

TABLE B3.13

STUDENT LOAD IN ADVANCED EDUCATION, 1981 PRELIMINARY, 1982 TO 1984 PROPOSED: SOUTH AUSTRALIA

1981 1982 1983 1984

BY INSTITUTION

South Australian College of Advanced Education 7,815 7,651 7,577 7,524

South Australian Institute of Technology 4,132 4,290 4,345 4,398 Roseworthy Agricultural College 399 409 428 428

TOTAL 12,346 12,350 12,350 12,350

BY CATEGORY

Teacher education 5,820 5,385 5,148 5,0 16

Science-based courses Commerce/social science/humanities-3,154 3,400 3,490 3,528

based courses 3,372 3,565 3,712 3 ,806

TOTAL 12,346 12,350 12,350 12,350

234 .

RECURRENT GRANTS

B3.144 The recurrent grants recommended for the three colleges in South Australia are in accordance with the Council's objective of achieving an appropriate nexus between student load and recurrent funds by 1984. The Council notes that the level of grants proposed for the new South Australian College of Advanced Education reflects the

real savings achieved by rationalisation of advanced education resources in the State. The small unallocated grant in each year has been set aside by the State for planning purposes during the triennium.

B3.145 The recurrent grants for each institution in 1982 include a temporary development grant of $600,000 which has been allocated between colleges in accordance with the proposed increases in enrolments for applied science,

engineering and commerce/business courses.

B3.146 The Council recommends recurrent grants for advanced education purposes in South Australia for the 1982-84 triennium as set out in Table B3.14.

TABLE B3.14

RECOMMENDED RECURRENT GRANTS FOR ADVANCED EDUCATION, 1982 TO 1984: SOUTH AUSTRALIA ( 1982 outturn prices)

1981

Grant

1982 Temporary develop­ ment grant

Total

1983 1984

$'000 $ Ό00 $'000 $'000 $'000 $ '00 0

South Australian College of Advanced Education 35,605 34, 1 10 130 34,240 32,570 32,060

South Australian Institute of Technology 21,401 20,770 390 21,160 21,470 21,720

Roseworthy Agricultural Co liege 3,358 3,320 80 3,400 3,410 3,420

Unallocated - 100 - 100 250 100

TOTAL 60,364 58,300 600 58,900 57,700 57,300

CAPITAL PROJECTS

B3.147 One major building project is being supported for construction in 1981 and this project, which will allow the upgrading of fire protection at the Kintore Avenue campus of the Adelaide College of the Arts and Education, is expected

to be completed in December 1982.

235 .

B3.148 The Tertiary Education Authority of South

Australia has recently reviewed its capital program for the 1982-84 triennium and has allocated its highest priorities to:

. Roseworthy Agricultural College - Construction of Agricultural Building (estimated to cost $ 0.98 m )

. South Australian Institute of Technology -Continuation of upgrading at the North Terrace campus (estimated to cost § 1 ,45m).

B3.149 These two projects are the highest priority of

twelve projects submitted for the 1982-84 triennium; the next five projects are concerned with the upgrading of facilities at Roseworthy Agricultural College and are principally concerned with the removal/improvement of facilities which are held to be unsafe and/or seriously overcrowded.

B3.150 The Roseworthy Agricultural College has experi­ enced a doubling of student load and a marked growth in the

number of courses offered during the period from 1973 to 1980. Available accommodation has become overcrowded and inefficient. There are a number of old buildings on the

site which require demolition or major refurbishing; the Tertiary Education Authority of South Australia has allocated its highest priority in the 1982-84 triennium to the construction of a replacement agricultural building. The present building is approaching the stage where it will be unfit for use; part of the building has had to be

vacated because of broken service pipes and falling masonry due to structural faults. The agricultural building is intended to provide accommodation for the School of Agriculture, laboratory, lecture and seminar spaces and

represents the first stage of the proposed upgrading of the Col l e g e .

B3.151 The Council accepts the need for extensive new

and upgrading works required at the Roseworthy Agricultural College and accords a high priority to the design and construction of the proposed Agricultural Building. However, having regard to relative priorities within the

limit of available funds, the Council is unable to support inclusion of the project in the advanced education capital program for 1982.

W e s t e r n A u s t r a l i a

DEVELOPMENT OF THE ADVANCED EDUCATION SECTOR

B3.152 The advanced education sector in Western Australia originally comprised the Western Australian Institute of T e c h nology, the Western Australian School of Mines, the

Royal Perth Hospital School of Occupational Therapy and the

236.

School of P h y s i o t h e r a p y . The latter three institutions were subsequently incorporated into the Western Australian Institute of Technology as was the Muresk Agricultural

College.

B3.153 In July 1973 the former Perth Kindergarten

Teachers College in Perth was incorporated into the Institute which has since introduced a range of teacher education courses. The Institute is a large college which provides a wide range of advanced education courses in

eight schools; namely, applied science, business and administration, engineering and surveying, health services, mining and mineral technology, social sciences, teacher education and the arts and design.

B3.154 Five former teachers colleges were included in the

advanced education sector as constituent colleges of the Western Australian Teacher Education Authority in July 1973. The Partridge Committee, in its Report Post-Secondary Education in Western Australia (1976) proposed inter alia

that the Western Australian Teacher Education Authority be disbanded, that the former teachers colleges be reorganised as a multi-campus institution and that Graylands Teachers College be phased out. This proposal was referred to the

Western Australian Post-Secondary Education Commission (WAPSEC) which was established following the Partridge Report. It recommended, and the State Government accepted, that the Western Australian Tertiary Education Authority be

abolished, that Graylands Teachers College be phased out and that the other four former teachers colleges be established as autonomous institutions rather than as a multi-campus

institution. The Colleges concerned are:

Churchlands College Claremont Teachers College Mount Lawley College Nedlands College

B3.155 Churchlands College offers courses in teacher education and business studies. The other three colleges have remained principally teacher education institutions although there has been some diversification at Mount Lawley

College and the Nedlands College. The Western Australian Academy of Performing Arts has recently been established as part of the Mount Lawley College and is to offer courses at

TAPE and advanced education levels; a liberal studies course is also offered by the College in addition to primary teacher education. Nedlands College offers courses in recreation, library studies and secretarial studies as well as in secondary teacher education.

CONSOLIDATION PROPOSALS

B3.156 Claremont Teachers College, Mount Lawley College and Nedlands College were included in the Commonwealth Government's list of colleges to be consolidated. As

237 .

indicated in the Commission's Progress Report on Consolid­ ation in Advanee d Education, the Western Australian Post-Secondary Education Commission has presented to the Commission a detailed statement opposing the amalgamation

of the three colleges. It has proposed the establishment of a Colleges' Planning and Review Board to satisfy the Commonwealth's requirements in relation to consolidation. The board's function would be the rationalisation of resource usage between Churchlands College and the three listed colleges. The Commission does not consider this approach to be consistent with the Commonwealth Government's requirement that 'the consolidation of institutions should result in genuine amalgamation with one governing body and a real saving of resources' {Guidelines for 1982-84 triennium). It supports amalgamation of at least the three listed Colleges, and possibly the Churchlands College, along the lines proposed by the Partridge Committee {see Progress Report, paragraphs 56 and 62). The Council supports this approach and has not recommended grants in respect of Claremont Teachers College, Mount Lawley College or Redlands College.

B3.157 The Western Australian Government has decided to create the Western Australian School of Mines and Further Education (WASMAFE) by the amalgamation of the Western Australian School of Mines and the Eastern Goldfields Technical College of the Education Department. The new

institution will be established as a college of advanced education under the Western Australian Colleges Act 1978; WAPSEC has requested that it be regarded by the Commonwealth as a college of advanced education for the purposes of Commonwealth legislation.

B3.158 WAPSEC has advised that enrolments at WASMAFE in

1982 are expected to comprise 200 EFTS in advanced education award courses of the College and 1,700 TAFE students of whom 100 are likely to be full-time students. WAPSEC has predicted that advanced education student load will increase

to some 230 EFTS by 1984. The existing advanced education courses of the Western Australian School of Mines include a Masters degree in mineral processing, a Graduate Diploma in extractive metallurgy. Bachelors degree courses in

extractive metallurgy, mining geology and mining engineering and an Associate Diploma course in mining and mineral technology. As indicated in paragraph B2.80, the Council does not consider that WASMAFE should be the awarding body

for masters degrees; however, it has no objection in principle to the supervision of masters candidates at WASMAFE by the staff of the former School of Mines. In

addition to the courses listed above, it is expected that WASMAFE will contract to provide tuition in Kalgoorlie for the first year of an engineering course and for units of a

Bachelor of Business course which are offered by the colleges in P e r t h . Some 40 EFTS per year are expected under

these contractual arrangements.

238 .

B3.159 The Council notes from advice provided by WAPSEC

that the activities of WASMAFE will be co-ordinated through WAPSEC and that the School will have many of the character­ istics of the institutions classified as colleges of advanced education for the purposes of States grants

legislation. However, the Council considers that the ratio of advanced education student load to TAPE student load is such that it cannot regard the School as being a college of

advanced education. Accordingly the Council is not prepared to support recognition of WASMAFE as a college of advanced education for the purposes of Commonwealth legislation.

B3.160 Where advanced education operations of an institu­ tion share administrative and other support facilities provided for the TAPE operations of the institution, the Commission's policy is that the Commonwealth should not

meet all the overhead costs which might theoretically be allocated to the advanced education co u r s e s . This policy is already applied in relation to advanced education courses offered in other States by institutions not classified as

colleges of advanced education; e.g. Sydney Technical College, the agricultural colleges in Victoria, and the Darwin Community College. The level of grants recommended by the Council for WASMAFE for the 1982-84 triennium are

consistent with this p o l i c y .

B3.161 The population growth projected for Western Australia appears to warrant an increased provision of advanced education over the 1982-84 triennium; however, WAPSEC has projected only modest increases in advanced

education load because of the perceived desirability of assisting the further development of Murdoch University.

B3.162 The Council considers that, as the Western

Australian higher education institutions are relatively isolated from higher education systems in other States, they should regard themselves as forming a mutually supporting system; development in one part of the system necessarily

affects the rest of the system. With this in mind, the

Council is prepared to accept the strategy proposed by WAPSEC; n a m e l y , to reduce participation rates in advanced education in order to provide an opportunity for Murdoch

University to achieve more viable levels of student load. The Council believes, however, that the strategy should be reviewed in the light of developments over the forthcoming triennium.

B3.163 The Council is also aware of the Government's

directive that the assessment of grants for the University of Western Australia and Murdoch University are to be based on a greater sharing of resources and collaboration between these two institutions. The Council considers that there

is scope in Western Australia for a greater sharing of resources and collaboration between all the higher education institutions and that this is particularly so in relation to

239 .

the universities and the Western Australian Institute of Technology. The Council considers that an effective and efficient system of higher education, at both the under­ graduate and post-graduate levels, can only be provided

in Western Australia by co-operation between all the institutions which provide higher education.

STUDENT LOAD

B3.164 The Council accepts the State's proposed student load targets which fall within the suggested overall planning range. The internal shift in the balance of course provision proposed by WAPSEC, which would increase the level of science-based student load by 200 and reduce the load for

social science and humanities-based courses by the same amount, is in accordance with the Council's objective of facilitating growth in the science and technology based fields of study. Teacher education enrolments have stabilised following the State's earlier action in bringing enrolments into line with the needs of the school system.

B3.165 The student load levels upon which the Council's recommended recurrent grants are based for the 1982-84 triennium are set out in Table B3.15.

TABLE B3.1b

STUDENT LOAD IN ADVANCED EDUCATION, 1981 PRELIMINARY, 1982 TO 1984 PROPOSED: WESTERN AUSTRALIA

1981 1982 1983 1984

BY INSTITUTION

Churchlands College 1,965 2,020 2,026 2,072

Claremont Teachers College 903 912 925 93 3

Mount Lawley College 1,449 1,469 1,488 1,508

Nedlands College 1,552 1,50 1 1,510 1,530

Western Australian Institute of Technology 8,495 8,121 8,141 8,145 Western Australian School of Mines and Further Education(a) - 200 217 230

TOTAL 14,364 14,223 14,307 14,418

BY CATEGORY

Teacher education 5,559 5,462 5,441 5,430

Science-based courses 3,336 3,449 3,522 3,568

Commerce/social science/humanities-based courses 5,469 5,312 5,344 5,420

TOTAL 14,364 14,223 14,307 14,418

(a) Included in data for Western Australian Institute of Technology in 1981.

240.

RECURRENT GRANTS

B3.166 The Council accepts the distribution of grants proposed for 1982-84 by the Western Australian Post­ Secondary Education Commission in respect of the Western Australian Institute of Technology, Churchlands College

and the Western Australian School of Mines and Further Education.

B3.167 The Council made a provisional allocation of $300,000 to Western Australia from the temporary development grant available in 1982 . The Western Australian Post­ Secondary Education Commission has put the view to the

Council that it would be inappropriate to propose a distribution of the temporary development grant before the conclusion of discussions on the consolidation of colleges.

The Council accepts this position and has included the provisional allocation of the temporary grant within the unallocated balance of funds for advanced education purposes (see paragraph B3.4).

B3.168 The Council recommends recurrent grants for advanced education purposes in Western Australia for the 1982-84 triennium as set out in Table B3.16.

TABLE S3.16

RECOMMENDED RECURRENT GRANTS FOR ADVANCED EDUCATION, 1982 TO 1984: WESTERN AUSTRALIA ( 1982 outturn prices)

1981 1982 1982 1984

$ Ό00 $'000 $'000 S'000

Churchlands College 8,546 8,600 8,600 8,650

Western Australian Institute ) of Technology ) 40,900 40,600 40,300

)

Western Australian School of ) Mines and Further Education )

43,699

1,400 1,470 1,550

Unal located 200 180 200

TOTAL 52,245 51,100 50,850 50,700

241.

CAPITAL PROJECTS

B3.169 Capital funds are being made available in 1981 for

a new technology building at the Western Australian School of Mines at Kalgoorlie. The School is to be amalgamated

with other institutions to form the Western Australian School of Mines and Further Education. While the Council is not prepared to regard the new institution as a "college of advanced education" for the purposes of States grants

legislation (see paragraphs B3.157 to B3.160), the intention is to finance completion of the existing School of Mines project from within the funds available in 1982 for advanced education building projects.

B3.170 The Western Australian Post-Secondary Education Commission has submitted three projects for funding during the 1982-84 triennium:

. Claremont Teachers College - General facilities building (estimated to cost $ 1 .lm)

. Churchlands College - New library (estimated to cost $ 2 .5m)

. Western Australian Institute of Technology - Science technology building (estimated to cost $ 1 .7m).

B3.171 Claremont Teachers College is one of the colleges

listed for consolidation in the Commonwealth Government's Guidelines. The Progress Report on Consolidation of Colleges of Advanced Education indicates (paragraph 57) that the Western Australian Post-Secondary Education Commission opposes the consolidation proposed by the Commonwealth Government; the Report also indicates that the Commonwealth Tertiary Education Commission is not prepared

to make financial recommendations in respect of those listed colleges for which acceptable proposals for consolidation are not received by 17 August 1981. The Council is there­

fore prevented from formally considering the State's top priority project; quite apart from this formal injunction, the Council is not placed to assess the priority of the

Claremont project in the absence of a clear indication of the future arrangements for the provision of higher education in metropolitan Perth.

B3.172 The State's second-highest priority is for a new

library building at Churchlands College. This former teachers college diversified into business studies in 1976 and now has over 1,200 students (800 EFTS) in its School of

Business Studies. The College's library has expanded its holdings to match the diversification of courses and growth in enrolments. Space for the expanded book stock has been achieved at the expense of student reader p l a c e s . The

242.

library is now inadequate for the demands placed on it. The proposal is for a new library building which will accommodate up to 135,000 volumes, 3 50 reading spaces, and teaching and mathematics laboratories.

B3.173 While the Council accords a high priority to a new

library building at Churchlands College, it believes that there are more compelling claims upon the limited funds available for the design and construction of new buildings in 1982. The Council has noted the proposal to construct a

science technology building at WAIT.

T a s m a n i a

DEVELOPMENT OF THE ADVANCED EDUCATION SECTOR

B3.174 Prior to 1 January 1981, the Tasmanian College

of Advanced Education operated on a Hobart campus and a Launceston campus. From that date, courses in teacher education, and librarianship and music were transferred from the Mt. Nelson campus in Hobart to the University of

Tasmania. The remaining advanced education courses are being phased out in Hobart and transferred to the Newnham campus in Launceston except for the final years of the environmental design courses and the legal practice course.

B3.175 The Tasmanian College of Advanced Education is now

considered to be a one campus multi-purpose institution in Launceston. Its role is to provide higher education for the north and north-west of Tasmania. It is, therefore, concerned to meet local community needs in Launceston as well as providing off-campus studies for residents of the

north and north-west regions.

STUDENT LOAD

B3.176 The State has indicated an enrolment target for

1984 of 1,800 EFTS which is consistent with the planning range proposed by the Council. Total load in 1982 is within

the range set by the Council, and includes provision for the new initiatives proposed in nurse education.

B3.177 Teacher education enrolments are to remain stable over the triennium, but included in these are enrolments in new courses in TAPE teacher education commencing with 30 EFTS in 1982 and increasing to 80 EFTS by 1 9 8 4 .

B3.178 The College is proposing growth in Category D

courses, principally an expansion of its commerce and business studies programs. As the College is redeveloping in a location where it previously had only limited facilities, the Council has allowed for 20 per cent growth

in Category D courses. Growth to the total level of student

243 .

load proposed by 1984 is dependent on expansion in both science-based courses (including nurse education) and commerce/social sciences/humanities-based courses.

B3.179 The student load levels upon which the Council's

recommended recurrent grants are based for the 1982-84 triennium are set out in Table B3.17.

TABLE B3.17

STUDENT LOAD IN ADVANCED EDUCATION, 1981 PRELIMINARY, 1982 TO 1984 PROPOSED: TASMANIA

1981 1982 1983 1984

Tasmanian College of Advanced Education 1 ,520 1 ,685 1 ,740 1 ,800

BY CATEGORY

Teacher education 766 800 800 800

Science-based courses Commerce/social science/humanities-159 235 260 280

based courses 595 650 680 720

TOTAL 1 ,520 1,685 1,740 1 ,800

RECURRENT GRANTS

B3.180 A temporary development grant of $200,000 has been

allocated to the Tasmanian College of Advanced Education for 1982. The College proposes to use this grant for the

development of new programs in nursing and business studies and other applied science and technology programs. The initiatives to which the temporary development grant is to be applied are in conformity with the Commission's statement on the use of these grants.

B3.181 The Council recommends recurrent grants for advanced education purposes in Tasmania for the 1982-84 triennium as set out in Table B3.18.

244 .

TABLE B3.18

RECOMMENDED RECURRENT GRANTS FOR ADVANCED EDUCATION, 1982 TO 1984: TASMANIA (1982 outturn prices)

1981

Grant

1982

Tempo vary develop­ ment grant Total

1983 1984

$ Ό00 $'000 $'000 $ Ό00 $ ΌΟΟ $'000

Tasmanian College of Advanced Education 8,485 8,600 200 8,800 8,750 9,000

CAPITAL PROJECTS

B3.182 New engineering facilities at the Tasmanian College of Advanced Education were completed in early 1981. The capital development initially preposed by the College for commencement in 1982 consisted of three projects

accorded equal priority by the College:

. Physical education facilities (estimated to cost $ 0 .84m)

. Building for School of Nursing (estimated to cost $ 1 .lm)

. Extension for School of Environmental Design, and Craft in Education (estimated to cost $1.4 m ) .

B3.183 In considering the State's proposals the Council took the view that the College could make more intensive use of existing facilities to meet some of the perceived accommodation requirements. The Council also noted that

basic nurse training is being established at the College on a pilot basis and concluded that it would be inappropriate to contemplate a separate building for the School of Nursing at this stage.

B3.184 The Council accepts that the College has a need for additional specialist facilities in relation to the pilot nursing course and the environmental design, and craft in education courses, and invited the College to submit an

amended proposal which made full use of existing under­ utilised general teaching areas and provision for essential specialist facilities.

245.

B3.185 The Council has now received and is considering

the College's revised p r o p o s a l . However, in the context of Australia-wide priorities for capital works, the Council is not prepared to support this proposal for inclusion in the recommended capital program for 1982.

C a n b e r r a C o l l e g e of A d v a n c e d E d u c a t i o n

B3.186 The Canberra College of Advanced Education is one

of the few colleges of advanced education which have been established other than from an existing base. It was established in the late 1960s and occupied its present campus in 1970. The College offers a wide range of courses

in areas such as applied science, mathematics, administ­ ration, 1 ibrarianship, secretarial studies, teacher education, computing, communications, architecture, industrial design, post-basic nursing, conservation of materials and language studies.

STUDENT LOAD

B3.187 The College has submitted student load projections for 1983 and 1984 which are within the ranges proposed by

the Council; the 1982 projection is below the minimum of

the Council's range.

B3.188 The level of recurrent grants provided to the

Canberra College of Advanced Education for the 1979-81 triennium was based on growth in student load which was not achieved in any year of the t r i e n n i u m . Enrolment

data for 1981 was not available to the Council, when it determined 1982-84 planning ranges for the College. Based on actual enrolment data for the current triennium, the Council believes the enrolment projections proposed by the College for the 1982-84 triennium to be too h i g h . In

reaching this decision the Council was also mindful of the recently announced changes in study leave provisions for Commonwealth employees, who form a large proportion of enrolments at the Canberra College of Advanced Education; these changes in study leave provisions are likely to result

in fewer Commonwealth public servants enrolling in courses at the College.

B3.189 For the reasons set out above, the Council has

determined to scale back the levels of student load proposed by the College for the next triennium. The student load

levels upon which the Council's recommended recurrent grants are based for the 1982-84 triennium are set out in Table B3.19.

246 .

TABLE B3.19

STUDENT LOAD IN ADVANCED EDUCATION, 1981 PRELIMINARY, 1982 TO 1984 PROPOSED: CANBERRA COLLEGE OF ADVANCED EDUCATION

1981 1982 1983 1984

BY INSTITUTION

Canberra College of Advanced Education 3,675 3,800 3,840 3,870

BY CATEGORY

Teacher education 818 85 0 810 78 0

Science-based courses 1,175 1,330 1,381 1,397

Commerce/social science/humanities- based courses 1 ,682 1 ,620 1 ,649 1 ,693

TOTAL 3,675 3,800 3,840 3,870

RECURRENT GRANTS

B 3 .190 The level of recurrent grants recommended by the

Council for the College for the 1982-84 triennium recognises reduced prospects for growth in student load and reflects the general decline in the availability of recurrent funds for the advanced education sector as a whole.

B3.191 The Council is proposing a temporary development grant of $300,000 for the College in 1982 which is to be

applied to development in science and business studies in advance of the release of resources as enrolments in teacher education decline.

B3.192 The Council recommends recurrent grants for advanced education purposes at the Canberra College of Advanced Education for the 1982-84 triennium as set out in Table B3.20.

247 .

TABLE B3.20

RECOMMENDED RECURRENT GRANTS FOR ADVANCED EDUCATION, 1982 TO 1984: CANBERRA COLLEGE OF ADVANCED EDUCATION (1982 outturn prices)

1982

1981

Grant

Temporary develop­ ment grant Total

19 83 1984

$'000 $'000 $'000 $ Ό00 $ Ό00 $'000

Canberra College of Advanced Education 20,667 20,000 300 20,300 19,900 19,800

CAPITAL PROJECTS

B3.193 As stated in its Volume 1 Advice, the Canberra

College of Advanced Education offers substantial programs in computing and information science which have been provided in response to the high demand from both the public and

private sector. The College's existing computer is reaching the end of its useful life and is planned to be replaced

early in the next triennium. The present computer is housed in inadequate temporary space which does not have adequate fire protection and can no longer cope with the high student

demand. The proposed Stage 1 of the information sciences building is to house the replacement computer, and provide associated operations, laboratory and teaching areas at the estimated cost of $2.8m. The Council accords a high priority to this project; despite this, however, the overall availability of funds prevents the Council from

including the design stage of the project in the recommended capital program for 1982.

N o r t h e r n T e r r i t o r y

DEVELOPMENT OF ADVANCED EDUCATION

B3.194 The Darwin Community College (DCC) was established in the early 1970s as a multi-level, multi-purpose institu­ tion to meet the post-secondary educational needs of the people of Darwin and the Northern Territory generally. Advanced education courses offered by the college are in the fields of education, business studies, fine arts and welfare studies; the proportion of enrolments in advanced education courses is, however, small compared with the proportion of enrolments in technical and further education courses.

248 .

B3.195 Prior to 1 July 1979, the D a rwin Community College

was funded through the Commonwealth Department of Education. From that date, the Northern Territory Government assumed responsibility for education in the Territory.

B3.196 The Council stated in its Volume 1 Advice that

plans originally provided by the Northern Territory Depart­ ment of Education for the development of advanced education in the Territory were set aside pending consideration of the proposal by the Territory's Chief Minister to establish a

university in the Northern Territory. Since that time the Commission has submitted its Report on the Proposal to Establish a University in the Northern Territory (June 1981) and the Commonwealth Government has announced that it

will not provide funds for a university in the Northern Territory in the 1982-84 triennium.

B3.197 The Commission's Report also includes the

following recommendations in relation to the development of advanced education in the Northern Territory:

(a) In order not to pre-empt the ultimate development of university work in the T e r r i t o r y , advanced education courses provided at the Darwin Community College should relate to existing courses in education, business studies, fine arts, and welfare studies. No further degree or diploma

level courses leading to awards of the College should be introduced but the College may introduce additional associate diploma courses which are acceptable to the Commission.

(b) Funds should be provided to establish an external studies centre at the Darwin Community College to improve access to both university and advanced education courses for residents of the Northern T e r r i t o r y .

B3.198 The Council accepts the Commission's parameters for the development of advanced education courses to be provided by the Darwin Community College and will be considering the new courses proposed by the College in the

light of these p a r a meters.

B3.199 The Council also supports the desirability of

improved access to higher education courses in the Northern Territory. Under current arrangements, advanced education funds may only be used in respect of advanced education

courses provided by the College itself. For this reason, the Commission has recommended funds which may be utilised in respect of students enrolled externally in courses of other institutions. It suggests that the funds might be

used for:

249 .

(a) the appointment of

studies;

a co-ordinator of external

(b) the provision of tutorial assistance, appropriate; where

(c) the use of college

reso u r c e s .

library facilities and teaching

It should be noted that the Darwin Community College already provides tutorial services in relation to courses offered externally by the University of Queensland.

B3.200 The Commission has suggested in its Report

(paragraph 4.12) that access may also be improved by the College enrolling students in units of existing courses for which credit would be given in courses of other

institutions.

B3.201 The Council considers that a third way of

improving access would be for higher education institutions to contract with the Darwin Community College so that certain students enrolled in these institutions could be taught at the Darwin Community College. The award would be that of the institution enrolling the students; it would also fund the teaching of the programs provided under contract by the Darwin Community College. The College has proposed that it offer the first year of the Macquarie University degree course in science. Such a program could not be funded under advanced education arrangements but it would be appropriate for the College to teach the first year

under contract with the Macquarie University.

STUDENT LOAD

B3.202 The College has proposed an enrolment growth of

130 per cent between 1981 and 1984 which is substantially higher than that suggested by the Cou n c i l . The student load planning ranges proposed by the Council are designed to allow for some growth in existing courses and for the

introduction of new courses within the parameters set by the Commission. Having regard to the base of courses from which the advanced education component is developing, and the general availability of funds, the student load levels set out in Table B3.21 provide reasonable capacity for the development of the Darwin Community College over the forthcoming triennium.

250 .

TABLE B3.21

STUDENT LOAD IN ADVANCED EDUCATION, 1981 PRELIMINARY, 1982 TO 1984 PROPOSED: NORTHERN TERRITORY

1981 1982 1983 1984

BY INSTITUTION

Darwin Community College 410 550 630 700

BY CATEGORY

Teacher education 137 173 196 22 2

Science-based courses - - - -

Commerce/social science/humanities- based courses 273 377 434 478

TOTAL 410 550 630 700

RECURRENT GRANTS

B3.203 In considering the appropriate levels of support for advanced education courses at the College, the Council has had regard to the following factors:

(a) that the College offers a wider spread of

disciplines than would normally be supported for a student body of similar size - in this respect it

can be compared with a small regional college;

(b) that the advanced education and TAFE operation of the College share administrative and support facilities - in this situation, Commission policy is that the level of recurrent grants should reflect that there is a sharing of overheads between the advanced education and TAFE components;

(c) that the level of funding currently provided for the advanced education activities of the Farwin Community College is relatively high because of small class numbers and it should be possible therefore for the College to increase its

enrolments in advanced education courses in 1982 without an increase in the level of funds.

251.

B3.204 The D a r w i n Community College has requested an

allocation of funds from the temporary development grant for 1982. The purpose of the temporary development grant is to provide interim funding to support growth in applied science, the technologies and business studies in advance of resources being released as enrolments in teacher education decline. In the case of the Darwin Community College, no

decrease is proposed in teacher education over the forth­ coming triennium; moreover, the growth in enrolments in fields other than teacher education is comprehended in the basic level of recurrent grants proposed by the Council for the College in each year of the 1982-84 triennium. For

these reasons the Council has not supported the request by the Darwin Community College for a temporary development grant.

B3.205 The Council recommends recurrent grants for

advanced education purposes in the Northern Territory for the 1982-84 triennium as follows:

TABLE B3.22

RECOMMENDED RECURRENT GRANTS FOR ADVANCED EDUCATION, 1982 TO 1984: NORTHERN TERRITORY (1982 outturn prices)

1981 1982 1983 1984

$ ' 0 00 $'000 $'000 S O 00

Darwin Community College 3,884 3,900 4,100 4,400

EXTERNAL STUDIES CENTRE

B3.206 As stated in paragraph B3.199, the Council

supports the establishment of an external studies centre at the Darwin Community College along the lines set out in paragraphs 4.11 to 4.14 of the Commission's Report on the Proposal to Establish a University in the Northern Territory· Although the Government accepted the Commiss­ ion's recommendation regarding the establishment of an external studies centre, it did not provide funds additional to those announced in the Guidelines for 1982-84. The Commission was advised of this decision on 14 July 1981.

B3.207 In the time available there has not been the

opportunity to hold detailed discussions with Northern Territory authorities regarding the external studies c e ntre. If an acceptable proposal is developed by the Northern Territory authorities, the Council would be prepared to

252.

recommend the allocation of funds up to the following amounts for the establishment of an external studies centre at the D a r w i n Community College.

19 82 19 83 19 84

$90,000 $140,000 $180,000

B3.208 Pending the receipt of a firm p r o p o s a l , these

funds have been included in the unallocated funds for advanced education (see paragraph B 3 .4 ) .

A u s t r a l i a n M a r i t i m e C o l l e g e

B3.209 In Chapter 2 (see paragraphs B2.29 to B2.72) the

Council set out in some detail the progress that has been

achieved in the development of the Australian Maritime College, and the further developments proposed for the forthcoming triennium. In particular, the Council set out its views on proposals by the College to expand officer training, expand the provision of short courses and to

commence the provision of ratings train i n g . These proposals were received by the Council well after the planning processes had commenced for the 1982-84 triennium. Apart from the reservations indicated in Chapter 2 about the

individual proposals submitted by the College, the resources are not available to proceed beyond the stage of development of the College which has formed the basis of planning since its inception. The major development of the College will have been substantially completed by the end of the 1982-84

triennium.

B3.210 The student load levels proposed in Table B3.23 accord with these planning parameters.

TABLE B3.23

STUDENT LOAD( a) FOR THE AUSTRALIAN MARITIME COLLEGE, 1981 PRELIMINARY, 1982 TO 1984 PROPOSED

1981 1982 1983 1984

Australian Maritime College 189 295 392 420

(a) In its Advice for Volume 1 (paragraph 8.100) the Council indicated that it wished to defer the development of an appropriate measure of student load for the Australian Maritime College until it had reached normal operating level. However, because it is necessary to specify

student load parameters for the 1982-84 triennium, the Council has adopted an interim procedure for calculating student load which accords different weightings for students attending the College, those at sea under guided study, and those enrolled in TAPE level courses and extended "short" courses.

253 .

B3.211 Because the College is still in its developmental

stage, there may be some capacity to increase student numbers above those proposed in Table 3.23 within the funding levels to be provided. As stated in Chapter 2

(see paragraph B2.53) the Council would not object if the College were to exceed, by a small margin, the planned level of student load as set out above in response to student

demand. Any significant expansion in enrolments, however, is limited by the availability of student residential accommod­ ation and, as outlined earlier, the Council is not in a

position to support any additional student accommodation beyond that already planned for the triennium.

B3.212 The Council recommends recurrent grants for the

Australian Maritime College for the 1982-84 triennium as set out in Table B3.24.

TABLE B3.24

RECOMMENDED RECURRENT GRANTS FOR THE AUSTRALIAN MARITIME COLLEGE, 1982 TO 1984 (1982 outturn prices)

1981 1982 1983 1984

$ Ό00 $'000 $'000 $'000

Australian Maritime College 3,297 4,200(a) 4,300 4,600

(a) The recurrent grant recommended for 1982 includes a component to cover small equipment items necessary to equip buildings recently completed or nearing completion.

B3.213 The average grant per student for the Australian

Maritime College is high in comparison with the general level of grants for the advanced education sector. However, the average $ /EFTS for the College reflects the fact that the College is still in its developmental stage and that there are high operating costs associated with some aspects of its operation; for example, the operating costs for training vessels would be of the order of $800,000-$900,000 per annum.

CAPITAL PROJECTS

B3.214 The initial capital development of the Australian Maritime College continues to demand a high proportion of capital funds for the advanced education sector. The approved capital works program for the AMC for 1981

254 .

represented some 22 p e r cent of the capital funds available to the sector. In 1981 the capital grant for the Australian

Maritime College has facilitated the:

. completion of two major academic buildings - the Navigation Engineering and Administration Building - the Ship Operations School;

. refitting the previously purchased general purpose vessel, WYUNA;

. launchina of the fisheries training vessel, BLUE FIN;

. purchase of radar and engine-room simulators for installation in the Ship Operations School;

. completion of Stages 1 and 1A, and commencement of

Stage II of student residences at Newnham; and

. commencement of construction on the College's Communal Centre.

In order to meet the timetable for the development of capital facilities at the College, it will be necessary to provide $ 1 .8m for new capital works in 1982; this amount is

47 per cent of the total of funds available for new works in

universities and colleges. Funds will be provided in 1982 to enable construction to continue on Stage 2 of the student residentials and the Communal Centre, and allow the following projects to commence:

B3.215 Ship handling simulator (estimated to cost $3.245m). Operational training on simulation equipment has, since inception of the College, been accepted as an essential teaching function. Certain aspects of simulator

training have, through national and international legislation, become mandatory prior to the issue of marine qualifications.

B3.216 The acquisition of a ship handling simulator, for

delivery in 1984, will provide 1 hands o n 1 experience to both serving and cadet officers in the navigation and control of ships in confined quart e r s . Such simulators incorporate advanced computer technology, particularly for the control

and generation of imagery. Theoretical aspects of training can, therefore, be exercised safely in a variety of situations, and at a comparatively low cost. Cadet training on the ship handling simulator would be supplementary to

practical training on the College's training vessel. Access to the simulator enables the extension of such practical training to larger commercial vessels in areas having higher traffic density than available in Tasmania.

255.

B3.217 School of Fisheries and flume tank (estimated to cost $2.53m). The School of Fisheries at the Australian Maritime College consists of two departments - Fisheries Science and Fisheries O p e r a t i o n s . The School now has its own fisheries training vessel, BLUEFIN.

B3.218 Courses are currently held in facilities at the

Newnham campus. This proposal is for a building to

accommodate teaching and laboratory space for the School of Fisheries and for a flume tank. The flume tank is a

36 metre long facility that will enable students to observe and participate in the many different netting techniques considered necessary for deep sea fishing in Australian waters.

B3.219 With the aid of scaled-down nets the flume tank

allows training in the use of various net configurations and allows the study of net behaviour and net design under

a wide range of maritime conditions. Commencement of construction cannot be delayed as the College's first intake into its Fisheries Technology diploma course commenced in July 1981.

B3.220 Survival Training Centre (estimated to cost $0.98 m ). Training in survival techniques is a mandatory requirement for marine certificates of competency. In 1982, the Department of Transport requirement for regular revalid­ ation of certificates of competency will be introduced and a Survival Training Centre is considered essential for the College's training activities. The proposed building will

house a 25 metre x 15 metre pool, life raft, packing and

testing areas, an elevated launching platform for simulated helicopter ditching, a wave-maker, and ancillary spaces such as drying areas, toilets, showers and plant room. The facility has incorporated features that also permit its use by physical education students at the adjoining Tasmanian College of Advanced Education. Training in survival techniques at the Newnham campus is supplemented by practical facilities at the Beauty Point campus.

B3.221 Student residences - Stage III (estimated to cost $ 1 .04m). The Government's decision to locate the Australian Maritime College at Launceston in Tasmania necessitated an extensive provision of student residential accommodation. The student load determined for the College requires that a total of 380 residential places be provided,

fifty of these being for officer accommodation. To date 212 residential places have been funded. This proposal - Stage III - provides a further 64 places which must be available by late February 1983 to house the C o l l e g e ’s intake for 1983.

B3.222 The projects proposed for the College in 1982 are

included in the recommended capital program detailed in Table B3.30.

256.

N o n -G o v e r n m e n t T e a c h e r s C o l l e g e s

B3.223 The Commonwealth Tertiary Education Commission Guidelines 1982-84 specified that from 1982 those non-government teachers colleges currently receiving partial assistance would be fully supported by the Commonwealth. General policy issues in relation to this decision by the Government have been addressed by the Council in Chapter 2

(see paragraphs B2.2 to B2.28).

B3.224 There are at present four such colleges; Mount

Saint Mary College of Education and Avondale College in New South Wales, McAuley College in Queensland and Signadou College of Education in the Australian Capital Terr i t o r y . Mount Saint Mary, McAuley and Signadou are solely involved

in teacher education while Avondale is a multi-discipline institution offering courses in t h e ology, business studies and nursing as well as teacher education. Mount Saint Mary College is to be incorporated with Catholic Teachers College and Folding College in 1982; grants for Mount Saint Mary

have therefore been included in the amounts recommended for the new institution.

STUDENT LOAD

B3.225 The Council has adopted the Commission's policy on

enrolments in the non-government colleges as expressed in paragraph 6.79 of Part 1, Volume li

Opportunities for post-experience courses and the general increase in the number of qualified teachers who are not bonded to particular employers should, in fact, make it possible for the non-government school sector to meet its workforce requirements

satisfactorily without the need for increases in the size of specialist pre-service courses.

In accordance with this policy the Council has not supported any increase in the levels of intakes into the non-government teachers colleges. Preliminary student load

figures for 1981 and those to be supported throughout the 1982-84 triennium are set out in Table BS .25 below:

TABLE B3.25

STUDENT LOAD IN NON-GOVERNMENT TEACHERS COLLEGES, 1981 PRELIMINARY, 1982 TO 1984 PROPOSED

1981 1982-84

Avondale 267 270

McAuley College 306 300

Signadou College of Education 2 12 220

257.

RECURRENT GRANTS

B3.226 In the Council's view, the application of the

principle of full support for these colleges requires the provision of a level of funding which is consistent with the needs and actual teaching costs of the institutions such that they can achieve a standard of provision akin to that

being offered generally within the college s e c t o r . In this context the Council has taken into account the student/staff ratios and patterns of expenditure generally applicable to teacher education and such other arrangements that condition the level of Commonwealth support for advanced education courses. Account has also been taken of the fact that

religious staff are paid stipends at rates less than standard academic salary rates for the equivalent classification.

ES3.227 Avondale College. The Council included funds for Avondale College within the provisional recurrent grant allocations for New South Wales for 1982-84 and invited the State to recommend funding levels for the college within proposals for the distribution of available recurrent funds

for the State.

B3.228 As teacher education forms only a part of the

activities of Avondale College, the Council advised the New South Wales Higher Education Board that the concept of full support was held to have the same meaning as applied to

assessing recurrent grants for advanced education courses in other than colleges of advanced education; that is, grants are not intended to cover all costs which might theoretic­ ally be attributed to the courses on the basis that

administrative and support services are shared with other courses of the institution.

B3.229 The New South Wales Higher Education Board has

proposed grants for Avondale College of $874,000, $882,000 and $882,000 for the years 1982-84 respectively; the Council accepts these grants as being in accordance with the above principles.

B3.230 McAuley College and Signadou College of Education ■ The Council has determined recurrent grants for McAuley and Signadou within the principles that they should be able to achieve (a) a student/staff ratio appropriate to a teacher education institution within the advanced educa­

tion sector and (b) a level of recurrent expenditure on other than academic salary expenses which approximates to the proportion of expenditure for these purposes within the advanced education sector generally.

258.

B3.231 Within these principles, after making allowance for the levels of remuneration paid to religious staff, the Council has proposed recurrent grants as set out in Table B3.26.

TABLE B3.26

RECOMMENDED RECURRENT GRANTS FOR NON-GOVERNMENT TEACHERS COLLEGES, 1982 TO 1984 (1982 outturn prices)

1981 1982 1983 1984

$ Ό 0 0 $'000 $'0 00 $'0 00

Avondale College 642 874 882 882

McAuley College 676 1,100 1 ,200 1 ,300

Signadou College of Education 504 850 850 850

S t u d e n t R e s i d e n c e s R e c u r r e n t G r a n t s

B3.232 Annual grants are provided to colleges of advanced

education, in respect of halls of residence, and to affili­ ated private residential colleges from within the total amount available for advanced education recurrent purpo s e s . The grants are intended to assist such institutions with the

costs of administration and of providing tutorial assistance to the resident students.

B3.233 The total amount paid to colleges of advanced

education for assistance with student residences and to affiliated colleges amounted to $ 1 .3m in 1982 outturn prices for each year of the 1979-81 triennium.

B3.234 In Part 1, Volume 1 of its Report for 1982-84

Triennium (paragraphs 6.81 to 6.84), the Commission expressed concern that anomalies were arising in relation to the relative degree of support for student residences in the two higher education sectors. The Commission observed that these anomalies arose from the difficulty in determining if

a particular residence should be deemed "collegiate" for the purposes of the legislation. In order to facilitate such determinations the Commission adopted a set of criteria

proposed by the Universities Council (see Part 2, Volume 1 , paragraph 7.120) and suggested that Councils give some attention to the extent to which institutions providing student accommodation meet the criteria.

259.

B3.235 In the coming months the Council will be under­

taking a review of student residences currently receiving a grant in order to assess the extent to which they are

providing "collegiate" accommodation. This review is not expected to significantly alter the list of recipient halls and affiliated colleges.

B3.236 The Council recommends that recurrent assistance for those halls of residence and affiliated residential colleges which provide collegiate-style accommodation continue in 1982-84 at the same real level as in the 1979-81

triennium. It recommends that $1.4m (1982 outturn p r i c e s ) be provided in each year of the triennium for this purpose.

B3.237 The amount recommended includes provision for planned new residential accommodation during the triennium, e.g. at the Australian Maritime College. It does not include provision for halls of residence at the Armidale College of Advanced Education and Townsville College of Advanced Education which are to be merged with neighbouring

universities. As recurrent funds for the new consolidated institutions are to be provided from within the amount available for the university sector a transfer to the university sector has been effected in respect of these colleges.

S E C T I O N 3 : 1 9 8 2 E Q U I P M E N T GRANT S

B3.238 The general situation with regard to the provision

of equipment funds for 1982 was set out earlier in this

Chapter (see paragraphs B3.19 to B3.26). The distribution of available funds for 1982 is set out in Table B3.27. in

due course, the Council will be seeking proposals from advanced education authorities for the detailed distribution of grants among institutions. In this context. State authorities will be invited to employ equipment funds in accordance with the Commission's policy; n a m e l y , that special attention should be given to equipment needs in the technologies and business studies areas, and to the position of the large multi-purpose institutions.

B3.239 The Council recommends the distribution of the

grant available for equipment purchases in 1982 as set out in Table B3.27.

260 .

TABLE B3.27

RECOMMENDED EQUIPMENT GRANTS FOR ADVANCED EDUCATION, 19 82 (1982 outturn prices)

1982 $'00 0

New South Wales 4,580

Victoria 7,640

Queensland 2,920

South Australia 2,055

Western Australia 2,430

Tasmania 245

Australian Capital Territory 730

Australian Maritime College 750

Non-government teachers colleges ____ 50

21 ,400

B3.240 The distribution includes an amount for those

partially funded non-government teachers colleges w h i c h , from 1982, will be fully supported by the Commonwealth (see paragraph B 3 .2 6 ) .

S E C T I O N 4 : 1 9 8 2 C A P I T A L PROGRAM

B3.241 In its Brief for Volume 2 the Commission

requested the Council to:

. Report on progress towards the achievement of its 1981 capital program and advise any revisions which may be proposed in respect of annual cash flow for continuous projects.

. In relation to proposed capital programs for 1982 set out the grants for:

(a) minor works;

(b) design of new major building projects; and

(c) the construction of major building projects, all within the $10.5m limit specified by the Commission.

261.

REVIEW OF CONTINUING BUILDING PROJECTS

B3.242 Major building projects in the sector's 1981

capital program ( see Table B3.28) are progressing satisfactorily; no under-expenditures or major variations to scheduled commencement or completion dates are expected. A contract for the sector's largest project, the New South Wales Institute of Technology building for joint use with

Sydney Teachers College, is expected to be placed in October 1 9 8 1 . The Council has been assured that the Institute's grant of $l.lm for this project in 1981, the major proport­ ion of which will be for consultants' fees, will be fully

expended in 1981. Two of the sector's ten major building

projects continuing into 1982 (RMIT Student Union and Northern Rivers Stage 1) are well ahead of schedule and would have the capacity to absorb additional funds in 1981.

B3.243 The Council estimates that $10.7m will be

required in 1982 for the seven continuing projects in the States and by three ongoing projects of the Australian Maritime College; this requirement is $0.3m above the $10.4m estimated by the Commission for ongoing projects. Funds required for each of the projects are shown in

Table B3.28.

262.

TABLE B3.28

PROGRESS OF 1981 CAPITAL PROGRAM ( 1982 outturn prices)

Maximum Commonwealth Cash flow

Inetitution/project aontribution toward eost of project

Prior to 1981 (actual) 1981

(estimated) 1982 (planned)

Beyond 1982 (planned)

$ Ό00 $'000 $'000 $'000 $ Ό 00

NEW SOUTH WALES

Cumberland College of Health Sciences

. Student/staff facilities 250 2 50

Northern Rivers College of Advanced Education

. Relocation on new campus, Stage 1 3,942 362 2,221 1,359

New South Wales Institute of Technology

. Building for joint use with Sydney Teachers College 15,868 211 1,129 3,134 11,394

NEW SOUTH WALES 20,060 573 3 ,600 4,493 11,394

VICTORIA

Bendigo College of Advanced Education

. Library/union, St age 2 4,076 3,164 912

Footscray Institute of Technology

. Refurbishing of existing building 1,262 350 912

Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology

. Erection of Union 6,161 1,826 3,020 1,315

. Renovations to Buildings 5, 7 and 9, Stage 1 1,291 - 4 56 835

The Victorian College of the Arts

. Academic building 5,498 4,928 570

VICTORIA 18,288 10,268 5,870 2,150 .

263 .

TABLE B3.28 (continued)

Institution/project

Maximum Commonwealth Cash flow

contribution Prior to Beyond

toward cost 1981 1981 1982 1982

of project (actual) (estimated) (planned) (planned)

QUEENSLAND

S'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000

Queensland Institute of Technology

. Business studies building 4,331 549 3,421 361 -

QUEENSLAND

SOUTH AUSTRALIA

Adelaide College of the Arts and Education

. Fire protection -

4,331 549 3,421 361 -

Kintore Avenue campus 640 - 285 3 55

SOUTH AUSTRALIA 640 - 285 355 -

WESTERN AUSTRALIA

Western Australian Institute of Technology

. Technology building at School of Mines, Kalgoorlie 2,251 126 456 1,669 -

WESTERN AUSTRALIA 2,251 126 456 1,669 -

TASMANIA

Tasmanian College of Advanced Education

. Engineering facilities 908 669 239 -

TASMANIA 908 669 239 - -

264 .

TABLE B3.28 (continued)

Maximum Commonwealth Cash flow

Insfotu^on/project contribution Prior to Beyond

toward cost 1981 1981 1982 1982

of project (actual) (estimated) (planned) (planned) $ '000 S'0 00 $'000 $'000 $'000

AUSTRALIAN MARITIME COLLEGE

Initial Capital Development

Student Facilities

. Student residences - Stage 1 1,525 1,240 285 - -

- Stage 1a 29 9 90 2 09 - -

- Stage 2 664 - 50 614 -

. Navigation/engineering/ administration building 4,374 2,954 1,420

. Ship Operations School 916 124 792

. Radar and engine room simulators 1,159 345 81 4

. Communal Centre and lecture theatre 1,395 - 200 977 2 18

Vessels

. Wyuna refit 773 390 383

. Fisheries training vessel 2,625 622 1 ,919 84 -

AUSTRALIAN MARITIME COLLEGE 13,730 5,765 6,072 1 ,675 218

TOTAL AUSTRALIA 60,208 17,950 19,943 10,703 11,612

265 .

MINOR WORKS

B3.244 Despite the fact that there is likely to be

increased demand for minor works in 1982 arising from the rationalisation and diversification programs already commenced, or about to commence, the Council is not able to provide for any increase in minor works funds beyond the

level available in 1981. The Council is therefore proposing minor works funds for 1982 at the same level in real terms as applied in 1981. The allocations set out in Table B3.29 exclude provision for the four colleges planned to be merged with universities at Armidale, Wollongong, Newcastle and Townsville, but include a provision for the Australian Maritime College.

TABLE B3.29

RECOMMENDED GRANTS FOR MINOR WORKS AND SERVICES FOR COLLEGES OF ADVANCED EDUCATION, 1982 (1982 outturn prices)

Amount for 1982 $'000

New South Wales 1,770

Victoria 3,010

Queensland 1,030

South Australia 80 0

Western Australia 600

Tasmania 150

Australian Capital Territory 150

Australian Maritime College 140

Non-government teachers colleges 50

AUSTRALIA 7,700

B3.245 In accordance with the Government's decision to fully support those non-government teachers colleges currently receiving partial support, the Council also recommends that an amount of $50,000 be provided in 1982 for minor works at Avondale College, New South Wales, McAuley College, Queensland, and Signadou College in the Australian Capital Territory.

B3.246 In the time available the Council has been unable to undertake a detailed assessment of the needs of these colleges for minor building funds. It therefore proposes that the amount recommended be set aside pending an

investigation into the needs of the non-government teachers colleges for minor building funds. It is also proposed

266.

that, following a decision on distribution of the funds, they be provided under the same conditions as now apply to

grants to the States for minor works at colleges of advanced education.

NEW CONSTRUCTION PROJECTS

B3.247 The capital needs of each State, the Canberra

College of Advanced Education and the Australian Maritime College were included in commentaries set out earlier in this Chapter. The new building projects recommended for commencement in 1982 are set out in Table B3.30. The

Council is recommending the commencement of seven new projects in 1982, four of which are at the Australian Maritime College. Because of the limited funds available, only relatively small grants are provided for most projects;

this will cause undesirable delays in the commencement of some projects, for example, those at the Australian Maritime College which are required for the orderly development of the College to its normal operating level by 1984, and the

Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology Renovations program, which desirably should be phased into Stage 1 of the

project.

267 .

TABLE B3.30

RECOMMENDED MAJOR BUILDING PROGRAM, 1982 (1982 outturn prices)

Maximum Balance of Commonwealth Commonwealth Grant

State/Inetitution Project contribution contribution recommended toward cost at 1 January for 1982 of project 1982 $'0 00 $ Ό00 $'000

CONTINUING PROJECTS

New South Wales

Northern Rivers Relocation on new College of Advanced Education campus, Stage 1 3,942 1,359 1,359

New South Wales Building for joint Institute of use with Sydney

Technology Teachers College (a) 15,868 14,528 3,134

Total - New South Wales 19,810 15,887 4,493

Victoria

Royal Melbourne Institute of Erection of Union 6,161 1,315 1,315

Technology Renovation of Build­

ings 5, 7 and 9, Stage 1 1 ,291 835 835

Total - Victoria 7,452 2,150 2,150

Queensland

Queensland Business studies

Institute of Technology

building 4,331 361 36 1

Total - Queensland 4,331 361 361

South Australia

Adelaide College Fire protection -of the Arts and Kintore Avenue

Education (b) campus 640 355 355

Total - South Australia 640 355 355

2 6 8 .

TABLE B3.30 (continued)

State/Institution Project

Maximum Commonwealth contribution toward cost

of project

Balance of Commonwealth contribution at 1 January

1982

Grant recommended for 1982

$ Ό00 $'0 00 $'000

CONTINUING PROJECTS (continued)

Western Australia

Western Australian Institute of Technology

Technology building, School of Mines - Kalgoorlie 2,251 1 ,669 1 ,669

Total - Western Australia 2,251 1 ,669 1 ,669

Australian Maritime College

Student residences, Stage II 664 614 614

■ Communal Centre/ lecture theatre 1,395 1, 195 977

Fisheries training vessel 2,625 84 84

Total - Australian Maritime College 4,684 1 ,893 1 ,675

TOTAL - CONTINUING PROJECTS 39,168 22,315 10,703

NEW PROJECTS

New South Wales

Nepean College of Advanced Education

Teaching building 1,650 1,550 300

Total - New South Wales 1 ,650 1,550 300

Victoria

Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology

Renovations to Buildings 7 and 9, Stage II 1 ,400 1 ,400 400

Total - Victoria 1 ,400 1 ,400 400

269 .

TABLE B3.3 0 (continued)

Maximum Balance of Commonwealth Commonwealth Grant

State/Institution Project contribution contribution recommended toward cost at 1 January for 1982 of project 1982 $ Ό00 $ Ό00 $'000

NEW PROJECTS (continued)

Queensland

Kelvin Grove Renovations to

College of Advanced I and A Blocks Education (c) 720 720 300

Total - Queensland 720 720 30C

Australian Maritime College

Ship handling simulator 3,250 3,250 120

School of Fisheries and flume tank 2,530 2,530 4 00

Survival Training Centre 980 980 98 0

Student residences, Stage 3 1 ,040 1 ,040 300

Total - Australian Maritime College 7,800 7,800 1 ,800

TOTAL - NEW PROTECTS 1 1,570 1 1,470 2,800

TOTAL - CONTINUING AND NEW 50,738 33,785 13,503

(a) Sydney Teachers College is to become part of the proposed Sydney College of Advanced Education in 1982.

(b) Adelaide College of the Arts and Education is to become part of the proposed South Australian College of Advanced Education in 1982.

(c) Kelvin Grove College of Advanced Education is to become part of the proposed Brisbane College of Advanced Education in 1982.

270 .

AT TACHME NT A

MINISTER FOR EDUCATION

PARLIAMENT HOUSE

CANBERRA A C T.

Dear Professor Karine 1,

You will be aware that the Australian Maritime College has brought forward a number of proposals that would involve an expansion of education and training provision at the College. These proposals involve the introduction of

ratings training at the College, an expansion of the present officer training provisions to meet the estimated future needs of the industry and the provision of courses to meet new training requirements specified in an international maritime convention to which Australia is a signatory.

I understand that these proposals were submitted to the Advanced Education Council after the Tertiary Education Commission had completed its assessment of requirements for the 1982-84 triennium. While it is to be

regretted that the proposals were not submitted in time for them to be evaluated by the Commission in planning for the 1982-84 triennium, I would like the Commission to consider the proposals on their merits in making recommendations to me on allocations for the 1982-84 triennium.

To assist the Commission in its consideration of priorities in relation to these proposals, I have enclosed a copy of a letter that I have received from the Minister for

Transport concerning these proposals.

You will see that Mr Hunt would accord the highest

priority to the provision of ratings training, the second priority to the provision of courses directed to revalid­ ation requirements that will now pertain to officers' qualifications, and the lowest priority to an expansion of

the cadet-officer intake to the diploma courses at the College from 1983. In its consideration of these proposals, I would like the Commission to have regard to the priorities

indicated by the Minister for Transport. I would also like the Commission to have regard to the proposed courses for ratings being TAPE level courses and to give consideration to the feasibility and comparative costs of the location of ratings training in a number of locations in the States as

compared with the location of this training in Launceston.

271.

I have let the Chairman of the Australian Maritime College Council know that the proposals are being examined in the context of the financial guidelines to the Tertiary Education Commission for the 1982-84 triennium.

Yours sincerely,

WAL. FIFE

Emeritus Professor P.H. K a r m e l , A.C., C.B.E., Chairman, Tertiary Education Commission, P.O. Box 18, BELCONNEN A.C.T. 2616

272 .

S E C T I O N C

A D V I C E O F T H E T E C H N I C A L A N D F U R T H E R E D U C A T I O N C O U N C I L

August 1981

TERTIARY EDUCATION COMMISSION

TECHNICAL AND FURTHER EDUCATION COUNCIL

BENJAMIN OFFICES BENJAMIN WAY BELCONNEN A C T. 2616

CHAIRMAN: MR. Η, K. COUGHLAN TELEPHONE 64 1133

11 August 1981

Dear Professor Karmel,

We submit Volume 2 of our Advice for the

1982-84 Triennium.

The Advice has been prepared after consultation with those responsible for technical and further education in the States and Territories.

Yours sincerely,

Η K Goughian, Chairman H Hauenschild L C C Hodsdon

J F Limbrick

W J Menz

J R Niland

J A Rickard

P E Seitz

M A Watson D G Robinson, Acting Secretary

Professor P H Karmel, A.C., C.B.E., Chairman, Commonwealth Tertiary Education Commission, Benjamin Offices, Benjamin Way, BELC O N N E N , ACT 2616

274 .

P.O. Box 18, Belconnen A .C .T. 2616 Telex: 62585 Telegrams: Tecom Canberra

C O N T E N T S

Paragraph Numbers

CHAPTER O N E : INTRODUCTION

GRANTS AVAILABLE FOR 1982

RELATIONSHIP OF COMMONWEALTH GRANTS AND STATE EXPENDITURE

STATE EFFORT

NEW DEVELOPMENTS IN TAFE Impact on TAFE of the Transition Program

EXPENDITURE PROGRAMS

CHAPTER TWO: RECURRENT GRANTS PROGRAM

INTRODUCTION

GENERAL PURPOSE GRANTS

GRANTS TO IMPROVE THE QUALITY AND EFFECTIVENESS OF TAFE

SPECIAL PURPOSE RECURRENT GRANTS

STAFF DEVELOPMENT

IMPROVEMENT OF DATA COLLECTION AND PROCESSING SYSTEMS

PARTICULAR PURPOSE RECURRENT GRANTS

GRANTS FOR NON-GOVERNMENT ADULT EDUCATION

CHAPTER THREE: SUPPLEMENTARY EQUIPMENT GRANTS

CHAPTER FOUR: TAFE BUILDING PROGRAM

REVIEW OF 1981 PROGRAM C 4 .1 - C4.2

THE PROPOSED 1982 PROGRAM C 4 .3

CRITERIA FOR ALLOCATING GRANTS TO PROJECTS C 4 .4 - C4.6

RECOMMENDED CAPITAL EXPENDITURE PROGRAMS FOR 1982 C 4 .7 - C4.ll

NEW SOUTH WALES: NEW CONSTRUCTION PROJECTS C 4 .12 - C4.18

VICTORIA: NEW CONSTRUCTION PROJECTS C 4 .19 - C4.23

DESIGN PROJECTS C 4 .24 - C4.25

Cl.l - C l . 6

C l . 7 - C l . 9

C l . 10 - C l . 13

C l . 14 - C l . 18

C l . 16 - Cl.18

C l . 19

C2.1 - C2.5

C2.6 - C2.7

C2.8 - C2.10

C2.ll - C2.13

C2.14 - C2.20

C2.21 - C2.24

C 2 .25 - C 2 .29

C2.30 - C2.33

275 .

QUEENSLAND: NEW CONSTRUCTION PROJECT

DESIGN PROJECTS

SOUTH AUSTRALIA: NEW CONSTRUCTION PROJECTS

WESTERN AUSTRALIA: NEW CONSTRUCTION PROJECTS

DESIGN PROJECT

TASMANIA: NEW CONSTRUCTION PROJECTS

DESIGN PROJECT

NORTHERN T E R R I T O R Y : NEW CONSTRUCTION PROJECT

C4.26

C4.27 - C4.28

C4.29 - C4.30

C4.31 - C4.33

C4.34

C4.35 - C4.36

C4.37

C4.38

276.

T A B L E S

CHAPTER 1 Page

Cl.l Grants for TAPE, 1981 and 1982 278

C l . 2

CHAPTER 2

Summary of Recommended G r a n t s , by Category of Grant, by State, 1982 287

C2.1 Recommended General Purpose Recurrent

G r a n t s , 1982

290

C2.2 Recommended Special Purpose Recurrent

Grants for Staff Development, 1982 293

C2.3 Recommended Special Purpose Recurrent

Grants for the Development of Information Collection and Processing Systems, 1982

295

C2.4 Recommended Particular Purpose Recurrent Grants, 1982 296

C2.5

CHAPTER 3

Recommended Recurrent Grants for Non­ Government Adult Education Programs, 1982 297

C3.1

CHAPTER 4

Recommended Grants for the Procurement of Equipment in 1982 299

C4.1 Progress of 1981 Capital Expenditure

Program

301

C4. 2 Recommended Capital Grants for 1982 312

C4. 3 Commitments Flowing from Recommendations on Building Projects 313

C4.4 Recommended Building Program 1982 : New

South Wales

314

C4. 5 Recommended Building Program 1982 : Victoria 319

C4. 6 Recommended Building Program 1982:

Queensland

324

C4. 7 Recommended Building Program 1982 : South

Australia

327

C 4 .8 Recommended Building Program 1982 : Western

Australia

329

C4.9 Recommended Building Program 1982 : Tasmania 332

C4.10 Recommended Building Program 1982 : Northern Territory 334

277.

CHA PT ER 1 : I N T R O D U C T I O N

GRANTS AVAILABLE FOR 1982

Cl.l The Government announced in the Guidelines that

Commonwealth funds totalling $206.8m will be available for TAPE in 1982, an increase of $11.7m on 1981. The grants to

be made available in 1982, compared with the corresponding grants provided for 1981, are shown in Table Cl.l.

t a b l e C1.1

GRANTS FOR TAPE, 1981 AND 1982 (Amounts expressed on 1982 outturn basis)

Grants available for 1981

Amounts recommended in Vol. 1 of TEC Report

for 1982

Amounts approved by Government for 1982

$m $m $m

Recurrent

- General purpose 56.6 59.4 59.4

- Other recurrent

Speeial purpose Staff development 3.6 4.6

Data collection 0.8 0.9

Particular purpose 16.0 18.8

Voluntary adult education 0.7 0.9

sub-total 21.1 25.2 25.2

Total recurrent 77.7 84.6 84.6

Equipment - 12.3 10.1

Capital 117.4 1 17.4 112.1

TOTAL GRANTS 195.1 214.3 206.8

Cl.2 The Government agreed to the case put by the

Council and the Commission for an increase in recurrent grants. The additional sums available as special or particular purpose grants will enable increased effort by way of staff development and other guality improvement programs. The grant of $10.lm for equipment will be used to meet urgent needs arising from technological development and changes in the nature of the task imposed on T A P E .

278 .

C l .3 Council draws attention to the fact that the

increase applied to TAPE recurrent grants to bring them from December 1980 prices to the 1982 outturn prices used in the

Government's Guidelines is at a lower rate than that applied in the other sectors. Council was not consulted on the

index used for this purpose but knows of no reason why it

should differ from that applied to Commonwealth Schools Commission grants, for example. The apparent anomaly results in TAPE recurrent grants in 1982 totalling about $ 2m

less than would have occurred if the same rate of increase

to that used for schools had applied. Council has framed

its recommendations for 1982 within the money amounts set out in the Guidelines but urges that the anomaly be removed as soon as possible.

Cl.4 The decline of $5.3m in capital grants from 1981

to 1982 does cause considerable concern when Council relates this to the demands being placed on the TAPE systems, not

least as the result of Commonwealth policies. The amounts of Commonwealth capital grants which have been provided in recent years have permitted the achievement of a significant increase in capacity of T A P E . Without this increase there would not have been adequate facilities for apprentice

numbers to reach their present high levels, nor for Common­ wealth supported school-to-work transition programs within TAPE to be undertaken. In the 1981 teaching year, 24

additional sets of facilities built with Commonwealth funds became available for apprentice training, pre-employment p r o grams, and courses in secretarial studies, catering, h a i r d r e s s i n g , business studies, horticulture, and rural and

timber studies.

C l .5 While effective use has been made of the capital

grants for TAPE, additional loads are being placed on the systems by policies which significantly increase the numbers undertaking vocational education and t r a i n i n g . Moves to expand and accelerate trade training, in order to reduce the shortage of tradesmen forecast by the Departments of Labour

Advisory Committee (DOLAC), account for part of the load. The Commonwealth-initiated transition programs, designed to increase the number of young people undergoing vocational education, also have a major impact. If the number of

students taking full-time transition courses grows as is envisaged under that program, there will be a requirement for several thousand places in TAPE additional to those required to cope with normal growth. Several States have

already reported that the growth of pre-vocational courses will be curtailed unless additional suitable accommodation is provided. A summary of the effects of the transition

program on TAPE operations is set out below.

Cl.6 The Guidelines state that of the capital grant of

$112.lm, $21.4m includes the final instalment under the Government's supplementary grant of $50m provided over the

279 .

period 1979-82. Council believes that there is ample evidence to support its view that the total capital grant reached in the past two years (including the supplementary grant) represents an appropriate base for the long-term program required if TAPE capital facilities are to be

adequate for the load being placed on the system. A

Commonwealth capital program of the same size in real terms as that provided in 1981 should operate for at least two

triennia, 1982-84 and 1985-87.

RELATIONSHIP OF COMMONWEALTH GRANTS AND STATE EXPENDITURE

C l .7 Commonwealth grants to the States for TAPE are

directed to specified areas of activity. The Commonwealth does not meet the running costs of TAPE colleges; these are

borne by the States. The Commonwealth's largest contri­ bution is its funding of the construction of new and

enlarged colleges, thereby creating a requirement for their manning and operation. The increase of $4.1m in grants for special and particular purposes and for programs of

non-government adult education, and the new supplementary equipment grant of $10.lm for 1982, will assist the State systems to expand their basic infrastructure and develop their educational programs. The general purpose recurrent

grant reimburses States the cost of abolition of tuition fees and is not an addition to State expenditure on TAPE; the increase of $2.8 m in this grant for 1982 reflects the

increase in teaching effort and student numbers. Since late 1980, when the Council prepared its Advice for 1982-84, student numbers and teaching effort have increased at the rate projected in that Advice. In 1980-81, State expendi­ tures on TAPE were an estimated $530m for recurrent purposes

and $ 5 2m for capital.

C l . 8 The present Commonwealth-State financial arrangements applying to TAPE grants, under which the Commonwealth largely supports the expansion of the State systems through its building grants while the States meet the consequent running costs, must result in increased State financial obligations if the TAPE system is to carry out its envisaged t a s k . This is occurring at a time when the State

Governments are restraining their expenditures. The Council obtains assurances that adequate staff for Commonwealth- funded accommodation facilities will be provided by the States before a building grant is recommended. It is unrealistic to expect, however, that in meeting this condition within present funding constraints the capacity of States to improve in other ways the delivery of

educational services is not restricted.

Cl.9 Procedures for co-operative planning of Common­

wealth and State expenditures are needed if agreed programs are to be put into effect with the least dislocation to the

systems. This need arises not only from the necessity to

280 .

integrate projects and programs funded on the advice of the TAPE Council with activities funded by the States, but also because there are several sources of Commonwealth grants for T A P E . While grants recommended by the Council are the main

source of Commonwealth funds, other Commonwealth funds flow to TAPE under the school-to-work transition program, various manpower programs and programs directed to specific groups like Aboriginals and migrants. These programs reflect

specific Commonwealth objectives in the achievement of which TAPE is a suitable agency. It is therefore appropriate that the funding be by mechanisms other than the States Grants (Tertiary Education Assistance) Act through which the TAPE

Council operates. States are entitled to have available to them, however, an overall picture of Commonwealth funding to TAPE which delineates matters important for their planning, such as the relationship between the different grants and

their likely duration. By the same token, the Commonwealth should be provided with information on h o w State responses to these initiatives fit into the total program of TAPE

development.

STATE EFFORT

Cl.10 In its Volume 1 Advice the Council proposed that,

in making recommendations on the allocation of Commonwealth grants, it should take into account the efforts of individ­ ual States in support of their own TAPE s ystems. This

proposal was endorsed by the CTEC and by the Government in

its Guidelines for 1982 which requested that the distri­ bution of Commonwealth funds take account of expenditure by States of their own funds on equipment and capital facilities and on other quality improvement programs in TAPE.

C l .11 The Council recognises that the concept of 1 State

e f f o r t ' is open to a variety of interpretations, and that analysis of this issue should have regard not only to statistical indicators and data on TAPE expenditures but also to the general economic and budgetary conditions applying in the different States. Council has therefore

examined the levels of State-financed expenditure on T A P E , both capital and recurrent, in relation to a wide range of

measures, including State shares of adult population and TAPE teaching effort, the combined expenditures of the Commonwealth and the States on T A P E , total State expendi­ tures on education, and overall State budget expenditures.

On the basis of this examination it is satisfied that, taking into account the general restrictions on public expenditure in recent years, the States to date have generally maintained their efforts in support of T A P E .

Cl.12 The continued rapid development of TAPE required

by community demands for its services could, however, be jeopardised by a shortfall in the financial contributions of

281.

State Governments to meeting the realistic needs of the sector. In this context. Council lists the following examples in which its analysis suggests that there is cause for concern or improvement in individual States:

(a) The considerable gap between Queensland's popula­ tion share and its corresponding shares of TAPE teaching effort and expenditure. The Council believes that this gap reflects both the short­

fall of TAPE middle-level course provision in Queensland and the relative lack of TAPE facilities in provincial population centres of a size which in other States would attract a TAPE

facility. The Council notes that the State is embarking on a building program to provide colleges in these centres but believes that present policies which restrict the range of

middle-level courses place Queenslanders at a significant disadvantage in the acquisition of those middle-level skills which are of increasing importance in a balanced workforce.

(b) The stagnation during the past two years in TAPE

expenditure in South Australia. State-financed capital expenditure on TAPE has fallen from an average of $ 9.4m in the two years 1977-78 and

1978-79 to an average of $4.6m in the latest two

y e a r s , while recurrent funds for TAPE have grown more slowly than in any other State. The Council

notes that T A P E 1s share of the total education budget in recent years does not appear to reflect the pressures for growth in TAPE as compared with other sectors of education. The search of State authorities for maximum efficiency is to be supported, but proposals by the Council for Commonwealth support of the development and

expansion of TAPE must be matched by evidence that such development and expansion is a high priority for the S t a t e . The Council would be particularly concerned if new capital facilities for TAPE in South Australia funded by the Commonwealth did not attract the necessary level of State recurrent funds and staffing to make these facilities fully operational and effective.

(c) The continued low level of State capital contri­ bution to TAPE in Victoria. This is particularly surprising given that Victoria has greater difficulty than any other State in providing acceptable TAPE training for all apprentices and

282.

has an inadequate distribution across the State of appropriate facilities. This suggests that an increased effort to overcome the backlog of capital provision in that State is r e q uired. The Council would be unwilling to recommend a greater share of available Commonwealth funds for Victoria

unless State capital expenditure is increased.

(d ) T h e recent downturn in the level of State capital

spending on TAPE in Western Australia. While peaks and troughs in capital spending in the smaller systems are to be expected, the Council will need to report next year on whether the

present trend represents a reduced priority for TAPE in this State.

(e ) T h e Council has noted the growth of New South

Wales State expenditures on TAPE in recent years and the allocation in 1980-81 of an additional $4m to provide TAPE accommodation and equipment associated with training needs in the mining and power generation industries in the Hunter Valley. This injection of funds raises the State's capital contribution to TAPE to a level which provides a

sound base for future development. Council hopes that future State expenditures build on this base.

Cl.13 In recommending on the allocation of grants for

1982 among the six States and the Northern T e r r i t o r y , the Council has had regard to need, to the quality of State

proposals for expenditure of Commonwealth grants, and to the broader assessment of the level of contribution to TAPE from State resources described above.

NEW DEVELOPMENTS IN TAPE

C l . 14 Certain developments which are occurring in TAPE are having already a major effect on the State systems. Prominent among these is the school-to-work transition program. Another is the pressure to devise new arrangements

for off-the-job training which will replace certain elements of training provided at present by employers. There is also the growing importance of the relationship between TAPE and schools, exemplified in the need for an effective

intermeshing of certain activities of senior secondary education a n d TAPE, some overlap in the functions of each sector in providing compensatory education and the need to clarify the roles of each in vocational education.

Cl.15 A brief account of certain effects on TAPE of the

transition program is set out below. The changing interface between TAPE and industry and the policy implications of proposals to establish different kinds of training centres and arrangements will be canvassed in a paper Council

283 .

intends to issue within the next few months. Council

believes there is a need for a discussion paper also on

the relationship between TAPE and secondary education. Arrangements have been made for a joint meeting of the Commonwealth Schools Commission and the TAPE Council at which the issues can be discussed.

Cl.16 Impact on TAFE of the Transition Program. In Volume 1 of its Advice for 1982-84 Council welcomed the Commonwealth Government's announcement in November 1979 that it would provide additional grants of $ 1 50m over 5 years for transition programs, with half of the amount to be used in the TAFE sector to provide an expanded range of

pre-vocational courses. Council noted that TAPE will be expected both to expand full-time training for young people entering the trades and to develop comprehensive programs for those seeking less skilled occupations. Since the

Volume 1 Advice was prepared, the effects of the transition program on TAFE have become more apparent.

C l . 17 In the first year of the program, 1980, the

Commonwealth approved State programs totalling $9.4m which was used to expand some existing courses and to develop new courses and so provide for additional students. Approved programs for 1981 total over $ 1 2m. TAFE, by definition, has always been concerned with transition education; hence Council's welcome of the Commonwealth initiative which provides an opportunity for TAFE to fill major gaps in vocational education opportunities in all States. The size of the grants in the first year and the lack of time to gear

up for the expanded programs has produced, however, certain stresses in the systems, particularly in accommodation and staff training. The program has yet to be fully integrated with other TAFE operations, not only because it is virtually

a new program, but more importantly because it is concerned with students who are 'at r i s k ' and require a more complex approach and a different variety of offerings than other TAFE entrants. The pressure points of the program vary

between the States but comments provided to the Council describe the following phenomena common to most States.

Students·. The range of motivations and abilities is extremely variable. Many of those who have been unemployed have low morale, social problems and are poorly motivated. Some, on the other hand, have demonstrated abilities and motivation at least

comparable to those of intakes to normal courses. Weakness of students in English expression and mathematics is a common comment.

Curriculum·. States and colleges have responded in different ways to the variable quality of the student groups. In some places, particular students have been

2 8 4 .

moved from one class to another in an endeavour to

provide the most suitable transition program. Other States or colleges prefer to avoid transfer of students, relying upon a flexible syllabus which teachers are expected to adapt to the abilities of each

group. The syllabus of many transition programs will need to be flexible and teachers will require freedom to adapt teaching methods to their particular group of s t u d e n t s .

Counselling·. There is a shortage of counsellors. Teachers have had to become the first point of contact

on both vocational problems and matters of pastoral care, with reference to specialist counsellors occurring only in more difficult cases.

T e a c h e r s : At a time of strong demand for certain

categories of skills, it is proving difficult to recruit full-time t e a c h e r s , particularly those with the necessary qualities for transition education. The teacher of traditional TAFE students can make assumptions as to student motivation and the starting point for the learning process which are inappropriate

for many transition students. Particular account must be taken of student background, and of the need to

impart elements of social education such as personal development and self-esteem, communication skills, and career orientation, before skills teaching can commence.

S t a f f d e v e l o p m e nt: F r o m what has been said above,

the importance of inservice courses will be crucial in enabling teachers to develop appropriate teaching techniques for these new kinds of student. While such

staff development helps teachers of all TAFE students, it will be of particular benefit to teachers of

transition students.

E q u i p m e n t: Because courses are frequently in manipulative skills, the intensity of equipment usage and h ence breakage and wear is greater than for other

c o u r s e s . The high replacement rate, accentuated by the absence of work experience, is leading in some States to a modification of policy on equipment purchase.

Accomm o d a t i o n : Transition courses are frequently b e s t provided in different kinds of settings within a college, which are less institutional in character and easily adaptable. Few colleges have such space

available. In some instances rented accommodation has

285 .

been adapted for workshop purposes but the provision of the necessary services has proved very costly. All but the most recently constructed colleges were designed for a part-time student population and have inadequate facilities for the full-time transition students. No college has suitable recreation areas.

Cl.18 The transition program is still in the process of

being established. One conclusion proffered by those participating is that high priority must be given to integ­ rating transition courses with general college operations. Another is that the program has been introduced so quickly

that those involved have difficulty in standing back to consider the effectiveness of what they are doing. Thus, evaluation of their performance, which is being supported with transition funds, is a necessary step in making the program more effective. The Council welcomes the decision to allocate funds for continuing evaluation and wishes to

co-operate whenever appropriate in measures designed to ensure the effectiveness of this very important initiative. It will continue to monitor the changes occurring in TAPE as it broadens its offerings of vocational education.

EXPENDITURE PROGRAMS

C l .19 Table Cl .2 summarises the expenditure grants recommended by the TAPE Council for 1982. Details of these grants are contained in the chapters which follow.

286.

2 8 7 .

TABLE C1.2

SUMMARY OF RECOMMENDED GRANTS, BY CATEGORY OF GRANT, BY STATE, 1982 ($m 1982 outturn price levels)

Category of grant

New South Vales Victoria Queensland South Australia

Western Australia Tasmania northern Territory Unallocated Total

RECURRENT

General purpose 23.093 16.047 5.710 5.641 6.256 1.995 0.658 - 59.400

Special purpose

Staff development 1.560 1 . 140 0 .640 0.500 0.500 0.20 0 0.050 0 .060 4.650

Data collection/ processing 0.269 0.200 0.146 0.110 0.100 0.050 0.030 - 0.905

Particular purpose 7.082 4.691 2.499 1 .70 5 1 .835 0.642 0.191 0.100 18.745

Voluntary adult education 0.332 0.249 0.145 0.085 0.055 0.034 0.900

TOTAL RECURRENT GRANTS 32.336 22.327 9.140 8.041 8.746 2.921 0.929 0.160 84.600

EQUIPMENT 3.880 2.760 1.040 0.940 1.020 0.360 0.100 - 10.100

CAPITAL 44.799 26.774 13.304 8.878 10.231 3.92 2 4.192 - 1 12.100

TOTAL ALL GRANTS 81.015 51 .861 23.484 17.859 19.997 7.203 5.221 0.160 206.800

CHA PT ER 2 : RECURR ENT GRANTS PROGRAM

INTRODUCTION

C 2 .1 As a result of the Government's agreement to

recommendations of the Council and the Commission in Volume 1, there will be an increase in recurrent grants to the States for 1982. For the first time in a number of

years there will be additional Commonwealth funds, equivalent in outturn prices to about $4m, to devote to pressing needs of quality improvement in TAPE systems.

C2.2 In Volume 1 of its Report, the CTEC emphasised

that triennial funding arrangements were necessary if efficient planning was not to be extremely difficult. It recommended that triennial funding apply to TAPE recurrent grants as it does already to universities and advanced education. In the event, the Government has not agreed to a triennial program of funding for TAPE. It must be

recognised that the recommended level of funds in 1982 is but a necessary first step in the achievement of the program of qualitative improvements in TAPE which Council and its predecessor bodies have argued is required if the sector is to discharge its expanding responsibilities. An indication of Commonwealth Government commitment to the continued support of such a program of quality improvement would be a major contribution to the planning of TAPE authorities.

C 2 .3 Council's objective in allocating funds is to

achieve the most urgent priorities and to ensure that grants will be managed by TAPE systems in the most effective way. It will be helped in this by the Government's agreement that the allocation of special and particular purpose grants

in 1982 should take account of the States' intentions and performance in sustaining their own efforts and in using Commonwealth grants to achieve desirable changes in their TAPE systems.

C2.4 The Council's priorities for special and

particular purposes were set out in its Volume 1 Advice. In summary, the Council sees a need for urgent action by the

States in the areas of:

. staff development, especially with regard to the two major tasks of maintaining the technical competence of vocational teachers in TAPE and developing senior staff in TAPE?

. data collection and processing systems, particul­ arly for the achievement by each State of statistical collections in the new nationally agreed format; and

288.

. programs focusing on improving planning, curriculum development and delivery services of each TAFE a u t h o r i t y .

C2.5 As in previous y e a r s , Council recommends that

Commonwealth grants for recurrent purposes should comprise three types:

(a) general purpose grants to reimburse States for TAFE fee receipts forgone;

(b) specific purpose grants to improve the quality and effectiveness of TAFE p r o g r a m s , designated either special or particular purposes;

(c) assistance for programs in non-government adult education.

GENERAL PURPOSE GRANTS

C2.6 Under an agreement negotiated between the

Commonwealth and the States, tuition fees for vocational and preparatory courses conducted by TAFE institutions were abolished from the beginning of 1 9 7 4 . General purpose recurrent grants are provided to reimburse the States for the fees revenue they have forgone. In 1982, 70.2 per cent

of Commonwealth recurrent grants will be devoted to this objective, reversing a trend in recent years for this grant to require an increasing proportion of the total funds available. The Council considers that the $59.4m provided

in the Guidelines for distribution among the States for fee reimbursement in 1982 should, as previously, be distributed in accordance with a formula based on the relative TAFE teaching efforts of the States on vocational and preparatory

courses.

C 2 .7 The Council recommends:

that the following general purpose recurrent expendi­ ture grants he made available for use in TAFE by the States in 1982:

289 .

TABLE C2.1

RECOMMENDED GENERAL PURPOSE RECURRENT GRANTS, 1982

State $m

New South Wales 23.093

Victoria 16.047

Queensland 5.710

South Australia 5.641

Western Australia 6.256

Tasmania 1.995

Northern Territory 0.658

ALL STATES 59.400

GRANTS TO IMPROVE THE QUALITY AND EFFECTIVENESS OF TAPE

C2.8 In recommending allocation of special and

particular purpose grants for 1 9 8 2 , the Council has attempted to take account of State performance in the activities to be supported with these grants, and, for certain categories of grant, the quality of each State's proposed programs for 1 9 8 2 . Close consideration has been given to factors such as:

. the relative reliability of statistics, given the States have achieved varying rates of progress in improving them;

. the different responsibilities of TAPE in each State;

. the performance of individual States over a period in using funds for recurrent purposes;

. the areas of the TAPE sector where best value can

be obtained from Commonwealth grants.

The Council recognises that no one measure of a State's TAPE performance is entirely reliable or satisfactory, and that a broad judgement using a variety of criteria is necessary.

C2.9 This method of determining grants for specific

purpose programs has resulted in States receiving allocations different to those they would have if the formula of previous years had been applied. The change in emphasis may result in some programs previously supported from Commonwealth funds receiving less support unless States are prepared to increase their own financial responsibility.

2 9 0 .

C 2 .10 T h e Council's recommendations for the two special

purpose grants and for particular purpose grants in 1982 have been developed after discussion with States, and an examination of State proposals on the two special purpose areas of staff development, and data collection and

processing. The previous administrative arrangements for special and particular purpose grants have been otherwise r e t ained. Each State will be invited to submit for approval later this year a detailed program for the expenditure of grants allocated to it. The Council will be expecting that

in that detailed program due attention will be paid to comments it has set out below or will be passing directly to

TAPE authorities. As appropriate, other TAPE providing bodies in a State may participate in programs relevant to them.

SPECIAL PURPOSE RECURRENT GRANTS

C2.ll Special purpose grants are directed to areas of

national concern where substantial action is required in TAPE in all States. Staff development and the improvement of data collection and processing systems are the two areas currently supported under this category of grant.

C2.12 The Council has examined broad program proposals

from each State. For each category of staff development activity proposed, and for the data collection and processing program, States presented brief outlines of: the objectives of the program; activities to be supported; benefits for participants, colleges and TAPE systems;

evaluation procedures to be followed; intended follow-up activities; and proposed expenditure.

C2.13 Council developed its recommendations on the level of funds to be allocated to each special purpose for each

State TAPE system after considering the priority of each type of activity and the quality of programs proposed by each State, and having regard to the principles of allocation of funds enunciated in paragraph C 2 .8.

STAFF DEVELOPMENT

C2.14 The characteristics of TAPE staffing, the changing nature of courses and the increasing demands placed on the sector all mean that staff development remains crucial in the quality improvement program of the Commonwealth.

C2.15 In its Volume 1 Advice, the Council reviewed two

papers prepared by the TAPE Staff Development Committee. One paper canvassed measures to maintain the technical competence of vocational teachers in TAPE; the other dealt with the development of senior TAPE staff.

291.

C2.16 The Council continues to support the views

expressed in those p a p e r s . In recommending grants to the States for 1982 particular attention has been paid to the way in which States have taken up the recommendations of the reports.

C 2 .17 State programs for staff development are expected

to comprise an appropriate balance from among the following:

. training staff to conduct staff development activities

. initial courses of teacher education

. professional development (teaching skills, etc.)

. curriculum implementation training

. technical competence (including industrial release)

. personal development

. college renewal (organisational development)

. staff exchanges and study tours

. senior staff development

. part-time teacher training

. support staff training

. staff development research and evaluation

. administrative costs of staff d e velopment.

C2.18 In 1981 a sum of $50,000 (in December 1979 cost

levels) was reserved from the staff development allocation for a pilot program of senior executive development. The program was conducted at the Institute of Administration of the University of New South Wales and twenty-three people,

drawn from all States, the Northern Territory and the ACT, attended. The emphasis of the program was on the develop­ ment of senior management skills of particular relevance to the growth of TAPE responsibilities. The indications are that the program was worthwhile and that it broadened the perspectives of the majority of participants and provided a

stimulus to a number whose experience outside their own system had been limited. The need continues for special measures to improve management skills in the senior levels

of TAPE and the Council believes that a program similar to

292 .

this year's, b u t improved to take account of experience gathered from that first course, should be mounted in 1982. The reservation of $60,000 for this purpose is therefore recommended.

C2.19 Having reviewed staff development needs and

programs proposed by the States, the Council recommends an amount of $4,650 million for staff development in 1982, a substantial increase on the funds available in 1981.

C2.20 The Council recommends:

that the following special purpose recurrent expendi­ ture grants for approved staff development programs be made available to the States in 1982:

TABLE C 2 .2

RECOMMENDED SPECIAL PURPOSE RECURRENT GRANTS FOR STAFF DEVELOPMENT, 1982

State

New South Wales 1.560

Victoria 1.140

Queensland 0.640

South Australia 0.500

Western Australia 0.500

Tasmania 0.200

Northern Territory 0 .050

Unallocated 0.060

TOTAL 4.650

IMPROVEMENT OF DATA COLLECTION AND PROCESSING SYSTEMS

C2.21 Since 1977, special purpose assistance has been

provided under Commonwealth grants to foster the development of modern statistical and management information systems in TAFE. The primary objective of this grant has been to

improve the quality of the planning and management base available to TAFE authorities themselves. A closely related objective has been to enhance the qua l i t y , range and comparability of the statistical data collected for use by

institutions, State and national authorities. With the assistance of this grant, all TAFE authorities have now made considerable progress in their efforts to improve the quality of their statistical data. The results of these

293 .

efforts will be evident in the new national collection of TAPE statistics developed by the Joint Committee on TAPE Statistics and being introduced in 1981.

C2.22 To assist it in preparing its recommendations on

the allocation of this grant for 1982, the Council sought from each State, under the headings listed in paragraph C2.12, broad program proposals for Commonwealth support next year. In general, the Council was disappointed at the lack

of evidence in most States' proposals of further develop­ mental progress in relation to statistical and management information systems. In few cases did proposals give a clear statement of overall objectives, strategy and time­ table, nor was the level of detail provided generally sufficient for Council to make a comprehensive assessment of program proposals. The Council was particularly concerned

at two aspects of the proposals of certain States:

(a) the proposal that the Comironwealth should finance the purchase of the computer hardware required to implement the information systems under develop­ ment by TAPE authorities; .

(b) the proposal that Commonwealth funds should be used to finance the maintenance of existing effort in data collection and processing.

C2.23 The Council emphasises that, consistent with the nature of Commonwealth support for TAPE, this special purpose grant is essentially developmental in focus, and should not be used merely to sustain an existing level of

data collection effort in a State. Similarly, the Council would regard it as a clear responsibility of the State, not the Commonwealth, to purchase computer hardware required for statistical and administrative applications. It considers that, if the development of appropriate systems for use by TAPE authorities is being hampered in some States by inadequate access to computer facilities, the provision of

further Commonwealth recurrent expenditure support should be dependent on a resolution of this problem by the States concerned. The Council will seek assurances on this and other matters when later in 1981 it seeks detailed programs

for expenditure of this grant in 1982.

C2.24 The Council has taken specific account of these

matters in its recommendations on the allocation of this special purpose grant for 1 9 8 2 . It recommends:

that the following special purpose recurrent expendi­ ture grants for approved programs of development of information collection and processing systems be made available to the States in 1982:

294 .

TABLE C2.3

RECOMMENDED SPECIAL PURPOSE RECURRENT GRANTS FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF INFORMATION COLLECTION AND PROCESSING SYSTEMS, 1982

State $m

New South Wales 0.269

Victoria 0.200

Queensland 0.146

South Australia 0.110

Western Australia 0.100

Tasmania 0.050

Northern Territory 0.030

ALL STATES 0.905

PARTICULAR PURPOSE RECURRENT GRANTS

C2.25 The particular purpose recurrent grants complement the special purpose grants because they enable States to undertake quality improvement programs which reflect particular priorities of individual States but which could

not be mounted without Commonwealth support.

C2.26 Consistent with its Volume 1 Advice, the Council

recommends that these grants be made available under five major h e a d i n g s :

(a) curriculum research and development;

(b) the provision of services and facilities that are supplementary to courses of technical and further education;

(c) the taking of measures that assist in making

technical and further education more generally accessible, especially through preparatory and remedial programs;

(d) the development of procedures which improve the provision and assessment of courses available in technical and further education institutions;

(e) the improvement of management services for technical and further education institutions.

C2.27 The detailed list of purposes for which this grant

may be used in 1982 is set out in Council's Volume 1 Advice.

The Council believes that support under these grants should continue to be available for the development of preparatory

295 .

and bridging courses and link programs although, to an increasing extent, expansion of such activities which involve 15 to 19 yea r olds will be funded fran the

Commonwealth Transition Program. There will continue to be other groups of potential students for whom TAPE should be prepared to make such provision.

C2.28 There continues to be a need to foster

co-operation between two or more States in activities like curriculum development and making TAPE programs more accessible and relevant. The establishment of the TAPE National Centre for Research and Development should foster

such co-operation but its functions will not embrace all activities in which joint effort should be encouraged. The Council recommends that $100,000 be reserved for subsequent allocation to co-operative projects in 1982 which will bring about improvement in TAPE operations.

C2.29 The Council recommends:

that the following particular purpose recurrent expenditure grants be made available in 1982:

TABLE C2.4

RECOMMENDED PARTICULAR PURPOSE RECURRENT GRANTS, 1982

State $m

New South Wales 7.082

Victoria 4.691

Queensland 2.499

South Australia 1.705

Western Australia 1.835

Tasmania 0.642

Northern Territory 0.191

Unallocated 0.100

TOTAL 18.745

GRANTS FOR NON-GOVERNMENT ADULT EDUCATION

C2.30 The Council proposes that grants for programs of

non-government adult education be significantly increased in 1982. A review conducted at the end of 1979 indicated that

the program is proving a most valuable supplement to the activities of major TAPE providers by promoting access for groups whose needs are not adequately met by the formal system and by enabling rapid response to new and emerging n e e d s .

296.

C2.31 Information gathered over the past year indicates

a healthy growth of the program in terms of the number of

grants disbursed, the range of groups applying for grants and the variety of programs supported. All States report a need for increased grants to satisfy a justified and

increasing demand for support under the program. Council proposes that the maximum level of individual grants remain at $2,500 in 1982 and that the arrangement continue by which an authority appointed by the Minister in each State

administers the program according to agreed guidelines.

C2.32 The grant recommended for each State in 1982 has

been determined using a formula which takes account of the State's population aged 15 years and over. The grants have then been adjusted slightly after discussions with State authorities about their capacity to spend funds effectively. Following discussions with TAPE authorities in the Northern Territory it has been decided that it would be inappropriate

to include the Territory in the program at this stage.

C2.33 The Council recommends:

that the following recurrent expenditure grants for programs of non-government adult education he made available in 1982:

TABLE C 2 .5

RECOMMENDED RECURRENT GRANTS FOR NON-GOVERNMENT ADULT EDUCATION PROGRAMS, 1982

State

New South Wales 0.332

Victoria 0.249

Queensland 0.145

South Australia 0.085

Western Australia 0 .055

Tasmania 0.034

ALL STATES 0.900

297 .

CHART ER 3 : S U P P L E M E N T A R Y E Q U I P M E N T GRANTS

C3.1 Following a review made in its Volume 1 Advice of

the equipment requirements in TAPE, Council recommended the introduction of a special purpose recurrent grant for equipment commencing in 1982. Council argued that an equipment grant was necessary because of technological and other changes in the kind of equipment coming into use in

industry and increasing rates of usage by students in the growing numbers of full-time courses. The Government accepted the Council's advice and has allocated $10.lm for a TAPE equipment program in 1982.

C3.2 In supporting the Council's proposal in Volume 1,

the Commonwealth Tertiary Education Commission argued that the grant must be regarded as supplementary to the States' own expenditure programs and as such should be subject to scrutiny by the TAPE Council of the use of the grant, and

the extent of the States' own efforts in replacing obsolete components and improving the quality of the general stock of equipment in T A P E .

C 3 .3 The new grant is in addition to funds recommended

by the Council for the purchase of equipment as part of

Commonwealth supported building projects. As discussed with the States, the purposes for which the new grant is to be

applied are:

. items which introduce a new technology, or represent a technological change in processes or materials used by industry, and do not merely introduce a model change from previous similar

items;

. items required to mount new training progr a m s ;

. items required for a State-wide or national facility providing a particular course;

. expenditure associated with the design and manufacture of equipment to be used specifically for teaching purposes in TAPE colleges;

. leasing of items which fall within the above

categories.

C3.4 The Council has also consulted with the States on

course areas which have the greatest need for equipment in terms of the above criteria. It is clear that there is a

widespread need for advanced equipment, particularly items associated with computer technology. The States will be requested to submit by the end of the year their firm

proposals for approval within the sums being recommended.

298 .

C 3 .5 In determining the allocation of the $10.1m among

the States for 1982, the Council firstly satisfied itself that all States were in one way or another making a reason­

able contribution to their equipment requirements. It then adopted measures of relative teaching effort as the basis for distribution, giving additional weight to those streams of study which make most use of equipment. The Council will

have available to it a base level of State expenditure on

equipment when determining allocations in future years; variations in the States' expenditure levels will be monitored and will be taken into account in determining future allocations.

C3.6 At the request of the Commission the Council has

taken up with the States the need for recording their

equipment stocks in a form which will permit better assess­ ment of their needs, replacement rates and costs. Moves towards the development of appropriate equipment registers are already advanced in a number of States, while others are in the process of devising them. The Council proposes to

monitor the States' progress in the preparation of central registers and will take account of their capacity to manage their equipment stocks in an economic way when considering future grants. It notes that South Australia wishes to

develop a computer-based asset control system which allows for identifying, maintenance and costing details to be included. The system is capable of adaptation to most computers and the experience gained might be of benefit to other States. The Council has taken this into account when recommending the South Australian grant.

C3.7 The Council recommends;

that the following grants for approved programs of equipment procurement be made available in 1982:

TABLE C3.1

RECOMMENDED GRANTS FOR THE PROCUREMENT OF EQUIPMENT IN 1982

State $m

New South Wales 3.880

Victoria 2.760

Queensland 1.040

South Australia 0.940

Western Australia 1.020

Tasmania 0.360

Northern Territory 0.100

ALL STATES 10.100

299 .

C H A PT E R A : T A PE B U I L D I N G PROGRAM

R e v i e w of 1981 P r o g r a m

C4.1 The progress being made towards the achievement of

the 1981 capital program being financed by the Commonwealth is shown in the following table. In 1981 , 70 projects are

in course of construction, of which 19 are being completed during the year. The State and Northern Territory TAPE authorities have advised that they expect to expend the total amount available to them in 1981 on work undertaken during the year on approved projects. Victoria will, however, need to take special measures to achieve this

objective: delays in completing the design of the project at Wangaratta, which was due to be commenced in early 1981, will result in underexpenditure which the Victorian authorities propose to offset by accelerating other projects

and, if practicable, by bringing forward into 1981 the construction of urgently required extensions to Yallourn college.

C 4 .2 For those projects completing in 1981, the grant

shown for each project for 1981 is the estimate of the

total cash required to complete the project. For projects continuing into 1982 and following years, the amounts shown for the planned expenditure in 1982 and following years include a prospective allowance to take account of forecast cost increases during the 1982 funding period.

3 0 0 .

TABLE C4.1

PROGRESS OF 1 981 C A P I T A L EXPENDI TURE PROGRAM

( B a s e d on I n f o r m a t i o n s u p p l i e d t o 2 4 . 6 . 8 1 )

Max Imum

Co mmonweal t h Cash f 1 ow

Co l l e g e a n d p r o j e c t c o n t r I b u t I on

t o w a r d c o s t

o f p r o j e c t

P r i o r t o

1981

( a c t u a 1)

1981

( e s t i m a t e d )

1982

( p 1a n n e d )

B e y o n d

1982

( p I a n n e d )

$ ' 0 0 0 $ ' 0 0 0 $ ' 0 0 0 $ ' 0 0 0 $ ' 0 0 0

CONSTRUCTION PROJECTS

NEW SOUTH WALES

B a u l k h a m H I I Is - S t a g e 1,

B u i l d i n g s f o r s e c r e t a r i a l ,

f a s h i o n and home s c i e n c e

c o u r s e s , l i b r a r y a n d

c o l l e g e a d m i n i s t r a t i o n 4 , 7 0 7 906 2 , 0 0 0 1 , 8 0 1

B 1a c k t o w n - S t a g e I I I ,

R e c o n s t r u c t i o n o f f a c t o r y

f o r a u t o m o t i v e , c a r p e n t r y

a n d s e c r e t a r i a l c o u r s e s a n d

s t u d e n t s e r v i c e s 6 , 9 2 5 1 , 1 0 0 2 , 8 3 5 2 , 9 9 0

B r o o k v a l e - S t a g e s 1 1 a n d

I I I , B u i l d i n g s f o r t r a d e

a n d f a s h i o n c o u r s e s 6 , 7 4 3 1 , 5 2 0 3 , 8 5 0 1 , 3 7 3

-

C a m p b e l I t o w n - B u i l d i n g f o r

s e c r e t a r i a l , f a s h i o n a n d

t r a d e c o u r s e s 5 , 8 4 9 5 , 3 6 7 4 82 -

F o r b e s - S t a g e 1 1, E x t e n s i o n

t o e x i s t i n g b u i l d i n g f o r

s e c r e t a r i a l a n d f a s h i o n

c o u r s e s a n d s t u d e n t

s e r v I c e s

1 , 2 1 2 - 6 3 0 5 8 2 -

G l e n d a l e - B u i l d i n g s f o r

e n g i n e e r i n g a n d e l e c t r i c a l

t r a d e s a n d c o m m e r c i a l

c o u r s e s 1 0 , 3 8 9 7 , 5 4 9 2 , 2 5 0 5 9 0

G y m e a - S t a g e I V , R e p l a c e ­

m e n t b u I 1 d l n g s f o r

a u t o m o t i v e a n d e n g i n e e r i n g

t r a d e s 3 , 3 6 4 71 2 2 , 2 5 0 4 0 2

301.

TABLE C4.1 (continued)

Max Imum

Co mmonweal t h

C o l l e g e a n d p r o j e c t c o n t r i b u t i o n

t o w a r d c o s t

_____________________________________________o f p r o j e c t

$'000

NEW SOUTH WALES ( c o n t i n u e d )

H o r n s b y - B u i l d i n g s f o r

a u t o m o t i v e a n d e l e c t r i c a l

t r a d e s and s t u d e n t

s e r v I c e s 2 , 7 1 2

M i l l e r - S t a g e I I , B u i l d i n g

f o r m e t a l f a b r i c a t i o n

c o u r s e s 927

M o u n t D r u l t t - S t a g e I I ,

B u i l d i n g s f o r a u t o m o t i v e

a n d c o m m e r c i a l c o u r s e s 6 , 6 4 9

M o u n t D r u i t t - S t a g e I I I ,

B u i I d i n g f o r m e t a l

f a b r i c a t i o n c o u r s e s 919

N e w c a s t l e ( T i g h e s H i I I) -

S t a g e X , B u i l d i n g f o r

e l e c t r i c a l t r a d e s c o u r s e s 7 , 9 2 0

N o r t h S y d n e y - S t a g e V,

B u i l d i n g f o r t r a d e c o u r s e s 3 , 8 5 2

P a d s t o w - B u i l d i n g s f o r

a u t o m o t i v e , c o m m e r c i a l a n d

h o r t i c u l t u r e c o u r s e s 4 , 4 8 3

P e t e r s h a m - S t a g e I I I ,

B u i l d i n g f o r s e c r e t a r i a l

a n d h a i r d r e s s i n g c o u r s e s ,

I I b r a r y a n d s t u d e n t

s e r v i c e s 4 , 8 9 5

S h e l I h a r b o u r - S t a g e I I ,

B u i l d i n g s f o r t r a d e a n d

c o m m e r c i a l c o u r s e s a nd

s t u d e n t s e r v i c e s 6 , 3 3 0

____________________ C a s h f l o w _________________ _________

P r i o r t o B e y o n d

1981 1981 1 9 8 2 1 9 8 2

( a c t u a l ) ( e s t i m a t e d ) ( p l a n n e d ) ( p l a n n e d )

$ ' 0 0 0 $ ' 0 0 0 S ' 0 0 0 S ' 0 0 0

2 , 6 0 5 1 07

5 4 7 3 8 0

5 , 3 5 9 1 , 0 5 0 2 4 0

5 0 9 4 1 0

- 6 8 0 2 , 7 0 0 4 , 5 4 0

3 , 7 6 7 8 5 - -

3 , 7 6 3 7 2 0

1 , 9 3 0 2 , 3 0 0 6 6 5

2 , 2 6 6 2 , 7 5 0 1 , 3 1 4

302

TABLE C4.1 (continued)

Max imum

Commonwea 11 h

C o l l e g e a n d p r o j e c t c o n t r i b u t i o n

t o w a r d c o s t

o f p r o j e c t

C a s h f l o w

P r i o r t o B e y o n d

1981 1981 1982 1982

( a c t u a l ) ( e s t i m a t e d ) ( p l a n n e d ) ( p l a n n e d )

$ ' 0 0 0

NEW SOUTH WALES ( c o n t i n u e d )

$ ' 0 0 0 $ ' 0 0 0 $ ' 0 0 0 $ ' 0 0 0

S y d n e y T e c h n i c a l C o l l e g e -

S t a g e I I , B u i l d i n g f o r

b u s i n e s s and a d m i n i s t r a t i v e

s t u d i e s 7 , 0 8 5 6 , 7 6 5 3 2 0 - -

S y d n e y T e c h n i c a l C o l l e g e -

R e c o n s t r u c t i o n o f B u i l d ­

i n g 1 3 ; a d m i s s i o n s a n d

i n f o r m a t i o n c e n t r e 2 , 6 6 3 1 , 4 0 6 1 , 0 0 0 25 7 -

S y d n e y T e c h n i c a l C o l l e g e -

B u i l d ! n g s 38 a n d 39

S t a g e 1: R e c o n s t r u c t i o n f o r

b u s i n e s s , e n g i n e e r i n g a n d

n a v i g a t i o n s t u d i e s 2 , 4 1 0 1 , 9 4 0 4 7 0 - -

S y d n e y T e c h n i c a l C o l l e g e -

S t a g e 1 1 1 A, Bu 1 1 di ng f o r

l i b r a r y , g e n e r a l s t u d i e s

a n d c h i r o p o d y 9 , 3 0 3 1 , 4 3 0 3 , 9 2 0 2 , 8 0 0 1 , 1 5 3

S y d n e y T e c h n i c a l C o l l e g e -

B u i 1d i n g s 38 a nd 39

S t a g e 1 1 : R e c o n s t r u c t i o n

f o r s e c r e t a r i a l s t u d i e s and

g e n e r a l c l a s s r o o m s 3 , 3 5 2 - 1 , 8 5 0 1 , 5 0 2 -

T a m w o r t h - S t a g e I V ,

B u i l d i n g f o r s t u d e n t

s e r v i c e s a n d m e t a l

f a b r i c a t i o n c o u r s e s 2 , 7 9 4 5 2 0 1 , 9 0 0 ■ 374 -

T a m w o r t h - S t a g e V,

B u i l d i n g s f o r p l u m b i n g ,

p l a n t m e c h a n i c s and g e n e r a l

c 1 a s s r o o m s 2 , 9 7 4 - 270 2 , 0 0 0 7 0 4

Wagga Wagga - S t a g e I V,

B u i l d i n g f o r p a n e l - b e a t i ng

a n d s p r a y - p a i n t i n g

w o r k s h o p s 2 , 7 8 0 - 1 , 0 7 0 1 , 6 1 3 9 7

303 .

TABLE C4.1 (continued)

Maxi mum

Commonwea 11 h C a s h f I ow

C o l l e g e a n d p r o j e c t c o n t r I b u t I on

t o w a r d c o s t

o f p r o j e c t

P r i o r t o

1981

( a c t u a 1)

1981

( e s t i m a t e d )

1982

( p 1a n n e d )

B e y o n d

1982

( p 1a n n e d )

NEW SOUTH WALES ( c o n t i n u e d )

$ ' 0 0 0 $ ' 0 0 0 $ ' 0 0 0 $ ' 0 0 0 $ ' 0 0 0

W e t h e r I 1 1 P a r k - B u i l d i n g s

f o r t r a d e c o u r s e s , c o l l e g e

s e r v i c e s a n d a d m i n i s t r a t i o n 3 , 0 6 1 1 , 3 8 0 1 , 3 5 0 331 .

W o l l o n g o n g - S t a g e V I ,

B u i l d i n g f o r f o u n d r y a nd

1a b o r a t o r i e s 4 , 2 0 8 4 , 0 0 8 2 0 0

Wo 1 l o n g o n g - S t a g e VI 1,

B u i l d i n g f o r s e c r e t a r i a l

s t u d i e s a n d e x t e n s i o n t o

u n i o n b u i 1d i n g 2 , 7 7 6 5 0 0 1 , 4 5 0 826

W o l l o n g o n g - S t a g e V I I I ,

B u i l d i n g f o r p a n e 1- b e a t I n g

a n d s p r a y - p a i n t i n g

w o r k s h o p s 2 , 9 1 1 6 5 0 2 , 2 6 1

Wy o n g - S t a g e 1, B u i l d i n g s

f o r p l u m b i n g , s e c r e t a r i a l ,

home s c i e n c e a n d f a s h i o n

c o u r s e s , s t u d e n t s e r v i c e s

a n d c o l l e g e a d m i n i s t r a t i o n 5 , 2 3 5 2 , 0 0 0 2 , 5 0 0 7 3 5

T O T A L , NEW SOUTH WALES _________________ 1 2 9 , 4 2 8

V I C T O R I A

B a I I a r a t S c h o o l o f M i n e s -

S t a g e I , B u i l d i n g s f o r

t r a d e c o u r s e s an d s t u d e n t

s e r v i c e s 3 , 5 1 9

B e n d i g o - S t a g e I , B u i l d i n g s

f o r t r a d e , f a r m m e c h a n i c s ,

a r t a n d d e s i g n c o u r s e s 7 , 0 8 7

B o x H i l l - S t a g e I I , B u 1 1 d -

i ng f o r h u m a n i t i e s a nd

s c i e n c e s t u d i e s , f o o d

c a t e r i n g c o u r s e s and

s t u d e n t s e r v i c e s 9 , 1 3 9

51 , 9 1 3

1 , 7 0 0

200

4 , 7 8 5

3 6 , 0 3 0 __________2 8 , 8 0 0 ________ 1 2 , 6 8 5

1 , 4 4 9 370

8 7 0 2 , 4 0 0 3 , 6 1 7

3 , 1 7 8 1 , 1 7 6

304

TABLE C4.1 (continued)

Max i mum

Co mmonweal t h Cash f l o w

C o l l e g e a n d p r o j e c t c o n t r i b u t i o n

t o w a r d c o s t

o f p r o j e c t

P r i o r t o

1981

( a c t u a 1)

1981

( e s t i m a t e d )

1982

( p 1a n n e d )

B e y o n d

1982

( p 1a n n e d )

V I CT O R I A ( c o n t i n u e d )

$ ' 0 0 0 $ ' 0 00 S ' 0 0 0 S ' 0 0 0 $ ' 0 0 0

B o x H i l l - S t a g e I I I ,

B u i l d i n g f o r t e c h n i c i a n

c o u r s e s 4 , 3 3 1 1 , 4 5 6 2 , 3 2 5 5 5 0

F o o t s c r a y - S t a g e 1 1,

B u i l d i n g f o r e n g i n e e r i n g ,

h u m a n i t i e s a n d s o c i a l

s c i e n c e c o u r s e s , l i b r a r y ,

s t u d e n t s e r v i c e s a n d

c o l l e g e a d m i n i s t r a t i o n 1 1 , 3 6 2 1 , 5 2 0 3 , 4 0 0 6 , 4 4 2

C o l l e g e s o f Ha I r d r e s s i n g ,

P a i n t i n g a n d D e c o r a t i n g ,

a n d F o o d S t u d i e s ( L a T r o b e

S t r e e t ) - S t a g e 1, B u i l d i n g

f o r l i b r a r y , c o m p u t e r

c e n t r e , s t u d e n t s e r v i c e s

a n d c o l l e g e a d m i n i s t r a t i o n 4 , 6 2 3 2 3 0 1 , 3 0 1 1 , 8 0 0 1 , 2 9 2

M c M i l I a n R u r a l S t u d i e s

C e n t r e - S t a g e 1, B u i l d i n g s

f o r b a s e f a c i 1 f t y

c o n t a i n i n g t e a c h i n g a r e a s ,

l i b r a r y , c o l l e g e a d m i n i s t ­

r a t i o n , a n d s u b s i d i a r y

t e a c h i n g c e n t r e s 4 , 0 6 4 2 7 0 2 , 8 3 4 9 6 0

R o y a l M e l b o u r n e I n s t i t u t e o f

T e c h n o l o g y - S t a g e 1 I B ,

B u i l d i n g f o r e n g i n e e r i n g

s t u d i e s 1 3 , 2 3 9 2 , 4 6 5 4 , 2 6 1 3 , 9 0 1 2 , 6 1 2

S u n r a y s i a - S t a g e 1,

B u i l d i n g s f o r c o m m e r c i a l ,

a p p l i e d s c i e n c e , f o o d a n d

t r a d e c o u r s e s 6 , 8 2 5 8 5 6 3 , 0 1 7 1 , 6 9 2 1 , 2 6 0

W a n g a r a t t a - S t a g e 1 1 ,

B u i l d i n g s f o r b u s i n e s s

s t u d i e s , s c i e n c e an d a r t

c o u r s e s , l i b r a r y a n d

s t u d e n t s e r v i c e s 6 , 3 4 6 1 50 981 1 , 5 0 0 3 , 7 1 5

305.

TABLE C4.1 (continued)

Max imum

C o l l e g e a n d p r o j e c t

C o m m o n w e a l t h C a s h f l o w

c o n t r i b u t i o n P r i o r t o B e y o n d

t o w a r d c o s t 1981 1981 1982 1982

o f p r o j e c t ( a c t u a l ) ( e s t i m a t e d ) ( p l a n n e d ) ( p l a n n e d )

V I C T O R I A ( c o n t i n u e d )

$ ' 0 0 0 $ ' 0 0 0 $ ' 0 0 0 $ ' 0 0 0 $ ' 0 0 0

Y a l 1 o u r n - B u i l d i n g s f o r

t r a d e c o u r s e s 5 , 2 9 1 1 , 5 5 0 2 , 8 6 8 8 7 3 -

T O T A L , V I CT O R I A 7 5 , 8 2 6 1 3 , 6 6 2 2 4 , 6 0 4 1 8 , 6 2 2 1 8 , 9 3 8

QUEENSLAND

B a l d M i l Is - S t a g e 1,

B u i l d i n g s f o r s c h o o l o f

t e c h n o 1o g y 9 , 6 8 6 9 , 0 3 6 6 5 0 - -

B a l d Η I 1 Is - S t a g e I I I ,

B u i l d i n g s f o r c a t e r i n g

a n d s c i e n c e c o u r s e s a nd

1 i b r a r y 4 , 2 4 1 1 , 6 2 2 2 , 2 6 0 3 5 9 -

C o l l e g e o f C a t e r i n g a n d

H o s p i t a l i t y S e r v i c e s

( C o o r p a r o o ) - S t a g e 1 1 ,

E x t e n s i o n t o p r o v i d e

a d d i t i o n a l p r a c t i c a l a n d

d e m o n s t r a t i o n k i t c h e n s 6 4 7 - 6 4 7 - -

C o l l e g e o f H o s p i t a l i t y and

T o u r i s m ( S o u t h B r i s b a n e ) -

S t a g e 1 , B u I 1 d i ng f o r

s c h o o l o f c a t e r i n g a n d

h o s p i t a l i t y s e r v i c e s 1 0 , 4 6 2 - 7 0 0 3 , 0 0 0 6 , 7 6 2

G 1 a d s t o n e - S t a g e 1 ,

B u i l d i n g s f o r t r a d e a n d

c o m m e r c i a l c o u r s e s , l i b r a r y

a n d s t u d e n t s e r v i c e s 5 , 4 9 0 9 9 8 2 , 5 5 0 1 , 9 4 2 -

G o l d C o a s t - S t a g e 1,

B u i 1d i n g f o r t o u r I s t

I n d u s t r y , b u s i n e s s a n d

g e n e r a l s t u d i e s c o u r s e s ,

l i b r a r y a n d s t u d e n t a n d

s t a f f s e r v i c e s 6 , 2 6 3 1 , 8 8 3 2 , 2 4 0 2 , 1 4 0 -

306.

TABLE C4.1 (continued)

C o l l e g e a n d p r o j e c t

Max imum

Co mmonweal t h

c o n t r i b u t I on

t o w a r d c o s t

o f p r o j e c t

P r I o r t o

1981

( a c t u a I )

Cash

1981

( e s t i m a t e d )

f 1 ow

1982

( p I a n n e d )

B e y o n d

1982

( p 1a n n e d )

$ ' 0 0 0 $ ' 0 0 0 $ ' 0 0 0 $ ' 0 0 0 $ ' 0 0 0

QUEENSLAND ( c o n t i n u e d )

G o l d C o a s t - S t a g e 1 1 ,

B u i l d i n g s f o r a u t o m o t i v e ,

e l e c t r i c a l and b u i l d i n g

t r a d e s 2 , 9 7 8 1 , 3 5 0 1 , 6 2 8

I p s w i c h - S t a g e 1, B u i l d i n g

f o r t r a d e c o u r s e s 5 , 2 8 8 4 , 6 1 3 675 - -

I p s w i c h - S t a g e I I , B u i l d i n g

f o r c o m m e r c i a l s t u d i e s ,

a r t s and c r a f t s c o u r s e s and

1 i b r a r y 4 , 3 9 9 3 , 8 9 9 500

M o u n t G r a v a t t - S t a g e s 111

an d I V , B u I 1 d i n g s f o r

a p p l i e d s c i e n c e , f o o d

c o u r s e s , com m e r e ! al

s t u d i e s , a r t s a n d c r a f t s

c o u r s e s , l i b r a r y , s t u d e n t

s e r v i c e s a n d c o l l e g e

adm I η I s t r a t i o n 9 , 0 6 1 441 1 , 3 4 6 2 , 7 9 2 4 , 4 82

T O T A L , QUEENSLAND 5 8 , 5 1 5 2 2 , 4 9 2 1 2 , 9 1 8 1 1 , 8 6 1 1 1 , 2 4 4

SOUTH AUSTRALI A

E l i z a b e t h - S t a g e I I I ,

B u i l d i n g f o r b u s i n e s s

s t u d i e s c o u r s e s , c a f e t e r i a

a n d s t a f f a n d s t u d e n t

s e r v i c e s 2 , 4 5 8 1 , 9 6 6 34 2 150

G i l l e s P l a i n s - S t a g e 1,

B u i l d i n g s f o r p a r a d e n t a l ,

a p p l i e d s c i e n c e , c o m m e r c i a l

a n d b u i l d i n g c o u r s e s 1 0 , 9 8 5 1 0 , 8 4 9 1 36

G i l l e s P l a i n s - S t a g e 1 1,

B u i l d ! ng f o r b u i l d i n g

t r a d e s c o u r s e s 1 , 5 72 1 , 4 8 9 83

307 .

TABLE C4.1 (continued)

C o l l e g e a n d p r o j e c t

Max imum

Commonwea 11 h

c o n t r i b u t i o n

t o w a r d c o s t

o f p r o j e c t

P r i o r t o

1981

( a c t u a 1)

C a s h

1981

( e s t 1 m a t e d )

1982

( p 1a n n e d )

B e y o n d

1982

( p 1a n n e d )

$ ' 0 0 0 $ ' 0 0 0 $ ' 0 0 0 $ ' 0 0 0 $ ' 0 0 0

SOUTH AU STRALI A ( c o n t i n u e d )

M a r l e s t o n - S t a g e 1,

R e c o n s t r u c t i o n o f c o l l e g e

f o r b u i I d I n g t r a d e s 4 , 8 0 8 1 16 1 , 2 0 0 2 , 1 0 0 1 , 3 9 2

N o a r 1u n g a - S t a g e 1 ,

C o n s t r u c t i o n o f

m u l t i - p u r p o s e c o l l e g e 1 2 , 5 1 8 4 , 6 9 2 3 , 7 1 9 2 , 8 7 4 1 , 2 3 3

P o r t A d e l a i d e - S t a g e 1,

R e c o n s t r u c t i o n o f b u i l d i n g

f o r b u s i n e s s and c o m m e r c i a l

s t u d i e s , 1 I b r a r y a n d

c o l l e g e a d m i n i s t r a t i o n 961 844 1 17

R e g e n c y P a r k - S t a g e V,

B u i l d i n g f o r p 1u m b l n g

t r a d e s 3 , 2 6 9 200 2 , 8 7 1 198

R l v e r l a n d ( L o x t o n ) - S t a g e 1 ,

M u l t i - p u r p o s e f a c i l i t y

f o r c o m m e r c i a l , r u r a l and

t e c h n l e a l s t u d ! e s 709 3 147 5 5 9

S o u t h E a s t C o m m u n i t y C o l l e g e

- S t a g e I I , B u i l d i n g f o r

r u r a l an d t i m b e r s t u d i e s

c o u r s e s 92 6 8 6 7 59 - -

T O T A L , SOUT H A U S T R A L I A 3 8 , 2 0 6 2 0 , 1 8 2 9 , 4 0 1 5 , 9 9 8 2 , 6 2 5

WESTERN A U S T R A L I A

A l b a n y - S t a g e V I , E x t e n s i o n

t o e x i s t i n g a u t o m o t i v e

w o r k s h o p 27 5 2 7 5

B e n t l e y - S t a g e I V ,

B u i l d i n g s f o r f o r e s t r y ,

h o r t 1 c u I t u r e , a n i m a l c a r e

a n d f a s h i o n s t u d i e s c o u r s e s 4 , 0 0 6 3 , 7 1 2 2 9 4

308

TABLE C4.1 (continued)

Max imum

Commonwe al t h Ca s h f 1 ow

C o l l e g e a n d p r o j e c t c o n t r I b u t I on

t o w a r d c o s t

o f p r o j e c t

P r i o r t o

1981

( a c t u a 1)

1981

( e s t 1 m a t e d )

1982

( p 1 an n e d )

B e y o n d

1982

( p I a n n e d )

$ ' 0 0 0 $ ' 0 00 $ * 0 00 $ Ό 0 0 $ Ό 0 0

WESTERN AUS T R A L I A ( c o n t i n u e d )

C a n i n e - S t a g e I I , B u i l d i n g s

f o r c a t e r i n g t r a d e s a n d

a r t s and c r a f t s c o u r s e s 2 , 2 5 5 2 , 0 3 8 217 „

H e d l a n d C o m m u n i t y C o l l e g e -

S t a g e 1 , B u i l d i n g s f o r

e l e c t r i c a l , a u t o m o t i v e ,

m e t a 1 t r a d e s , c o m m e r c i a l ,

s c i e n c e a n d a r t c o u r s e s 7 , 6 5 4 2 2 2 1 , 6 8 7 3 , 7 0 0 2 , 0 4 5

R o c k i n g h a m - S t a g e 1 1,

B u i l d i n g s f o r f i t t i n g a n d

m a c h i n i n g a n d a u t o m o t i v e

s t u d i e s a n d s t u d e n t

s e r v I c e s 5 , 6 9 6 1 , 7 5 9 3 , 4 5 2 4 8 5

T e c h n i c a l E x t e n s i o n S e r v i c e

- S t a g e I I , B u i l d i n g t o

a c c o m m o d a t e t e a c h i n g s t a f f 3 , 0 5 5 1 0 0 2 , 3 8 3 5 72

T h o r n 1 i e - S t a g e 1 , B u i l d ­

i n g s f o r e l e c t r i c a l a n d

m e t a l t r a d e s a n d h e a v y

p l a n t a n d e q u i p m e n t

m a i n t e n a n c e c o u r s e s 7 , 1 3 6 6 , 1 3 6 85 1 1 4 9

T h o r n 1 I e - S t a g e I I , B u i l d ­

i n g s f o r f u r n i t u r e a n d

b u i l d i n g t r a d e s c o u r s e s

a n d a p u m p t e s t f a c i l i t y 3 , 2 3 4 1 , 3 9 1 1 , 7 5 4 8 9

T O T A L , WESTERN A U S T R A L I A 3 3 , 3 1 1 1 3 , 9 6 7 1 0 , 5 5 0 6 , 6 6 0 2 , 1 3 4

309 .

TABLE C4.1 (continued)

C o l l e g e a n d p r o j e c t

Max Imum

Commonwea 11 h

c o n t r i b u t i o n

t o w a r d c o s t

o f p r o j e c t

P r i o r t o

1981

( a c t u a 1)

C a s h

1981

( e s t I m a t e d )

1982

( p 1a n n e d )

B e y o n d

1982

( p 1a n n e d )

$ ' 0 0 0 $ ' 0 0 0 $ ' 0 0 0 $ ' 0 0 0 $ ' 0 0 0

TASMAN 1A

H o b a r t - S t a g e I I , B u i l d i n g

f o r t e c h n i c a l a n d g e n e r a l

c o u r s e s 1 1, 4 6 1 6 , 0 3 4 4 , 7 8 0 6 4 7

T O T AL , TASMANI A 1 1 , 4 6 1 6 , 0 3 4 4 , 7 8 0 6 4 7

NORTHERN TERRI TORY

D a r w i n - E x t e n s i o n s t o t h e

s c h o o l o f t r a d e s 2 , 5 79 62 2 1 , 7 8 8 1 69

S a t c h e l o r - R e p l a c e m e n t

o f A b o r i g i n a l t e a c h e r

e d u c a t i o n c e n t r e 4 , 7 6 4 515 1 , 7 7 7 2 , 3 4 3 1 29

T O T AL , NORTHERN TERRI TORY 7 , 3 4 3 1 , 1 3 7 3 , 5 6 5 2 , 5 1 2 1 29

TOTAL CONSTRUCTION PROJECTS,

AU STRALI A 3 5 4 , 0 9 0 1 2 9 , 3 8 7

5

7 5 , 100 4 7 , 755

DESI GN PROJECTS 1

1 , 2 3 3

40 0

107

V I c t o r I a

Q u e e n s I and

Tasman I a

T O T A L , DESI GN PROJECTS 1 , 7 4 0

T h e P r o p o s e d 1 9 8 2 P r o g r a m

C 4 .3 The Government's financial guidelines provide $112.lm for TAPE capital grants for 1982 . Of the $112.Ira, $75.lm w ill be required for projects commenced prior to 1982

and still under construction or being completed in 1982. The remaining $37.Om has been allocated to new projects to be commenced in 1982, and to projects being designed in 1982 for commencement of construction in 1983.

CRITERIA FOR ALLOCATING GRANTS TO PROJECTS

C4.4 The Council has been asked by the Government and

the Commission to take into account the States' own efforts towards the provision of capital facilities in TAPE when preparing its detailed recommendations for the allocation of building grants. The Council has examined various

indicators of State effort both in relation to capital and recurrent expenditures. Its comments are given in the introduction to this advice.

C4.5 The proposed capital programs of each State and

the Northern Territory have been discussed with the authorities concerned. In all States the programs proposed are in response to urgent needs for accommodation, needs which have become more pressing because of the growth of

full-time youth transition progr a m s , increased numbers of apprentices and the demand for special measures to overcome skill shortages. The educational objectives of individual projects within these programs have been examined and Council believes that the grants it is recommending will increase the provision of facilities which meet the

selection criteria referred to in its advice in Volume 1. In summary, projects are intended to promote one or more of the following objectives:

(i) the provision of increased opportunities for persons to obtain vocational education of a kind they wish to acquire;

(ii) an increase in the provision of skills most in

demand, including skills essential for national resource development projects;

(iii) the balanced expansion of the number of teaching places in locations where they attract the largest numbers of students, including country areas, which may be achieved by either:

. extension of existing colleges where to do so does not lessen access to T A P E ; or

. development of new colleges in areas not

yet adequately served by TAPE;

311.

(iv) the reconstruction of some existing colleges where it enables better delivery of course p r o g r a m s ;

(v ) the development of facilities within a college which are appropriate for a larger population of full-time students.

C 4 .6 The effectiveness of the capital grants made

available by the Commonwealth depends to a large degree on the staffing of the new facilities. If TAPE is to achieve

the substantial increase in activities demanded of it, the States must provide adequate teaching and other staff to ensure that full use is made of the new facilities. The

present partnership of Commonwealth and State in developing TAPE depends on this happening. Until this year there have been no cases where Council felt concern about the speed or level of staffing of new facilities. In recent months, however, there have been one or two delays in such staffing

that could be of concern. Such delays can arise for two

main reasons. As TAPE seeks to expand its training effort in areas of skill shortage, so it will find difficulty in

recruiting appropriate staff; in such instances delays in making full use of new facilities must be tolerated. What Council could not support, however, would be delays and gaps in staffing arising from a refusal of a State to employ the

additional staff required. Nor would Council regard staffing of a new facility at the expense of existing colleges as consistent with the thrust of Commonwealth support for the development of TAPE. Council will monitor this staffing position closely.

RECOMMENDED CAPITAL EXPENDITURE PROGRAMS FOR 1982

C4.7 The grants for each State for the projects

recommended by the Council are set out in Table C4.2.

TABLE C4.2

RECOMMENDED CAPITAL GRANTS FOR 1982

State

Allocations for continuing projects

Allocations for new construction projects

Allocations for design projects Total grant

$m $m $m Sm

New South Wales 28.800 15.999 - 44.799

Victoria 18.622 7.592 0.56 0 26.774

Queensland 1 1.861 1.318 0.125 13.304

South Australia 5.998 2.880 - 8.878

Western Australia 6.660 3.371 0.200 10.231

Tasmania 0.647 3.034 0.24 1 3.922

Northern Territory 2.512 1 .680 - 4.192

75.100 35.874 1 . 126 112.100

3 1 2 .

C4.8 The Government announced in the Guidelines its

decision to discontinue the present practice by which programs are supplemented retrospectively for cost increases: that is, the provision in mid-year of a cost supplementation amount, in the form of an 'additional g r a n t 1

to bring the approved grants to the value applying at the

beginning of the program year, will not occur in 1982. Thus, any variations sought to the level of grants for approved projects within 1982, m ust be contained within the aggregate grant for each State as provided for in the

legislation appropriating the 1982 grants.

C4.9 The commitments remaining after 1982 on projects

commenced before that year, and on the commitments generated by the expenditure on new projects to be commenced in 1982, are estimated to be:

TABLE C4.3

COMMITMENTS FLOWING FROM RECOMMENDATIONS ON BUILDING PRQJECTS(a)

1982 1984 and

after

Total commitment

$m $m $m

Commitments arising from:

Projects commenced before 1982 Projects to be commenced in 1982 36.405 44.697

11.350 27.091

47.755 71 .788

Total commitments 81.102 38.441 119.543

(a) The commitments shown in this table are calculated on a different basis from that used in preparing the equivalent table in previous reports.

C4.10 The building programs which are represented by the

recommended grants contained in Table C4.2 are set out in Tables C4.4 to C4.10. The approved project cost shown for each building project includes, as appropriate, the cost of site development, provision of services, furnishings and

equipment necessary to complete the project as a functioning unit. The program recommended for each State is followed by a brief description and justification of the new construct­ ion and design projects proposed for 1982. Projects

commenced prior to 1982 are described in previous reports. The building costs per square metre which are quoted relate to the gross floor area; they include the cost of building

work, together with fixed equipment, only.

C4.ll Recommended building programs for each State follow.

313 .

TABLE C4.4

RECOMMENDED B U I L D I N G PROGRAM 1982

NEW SOUTH WALES

Co 1 l e g e P r o j e c t

Max I mum

C om mo n we a 11 h

c o n t r i b u t I o n

t o w a r d c o s t

o f p r o j e c t

B a l a n c e o f

C om mo n we a 11 h

c o n t r i b u t I o n

a t 1 J a n u a r y

1982

G r a n t

r e c o m me n d e d

f o r 1982

$ ' 0 0 0 $ 100 0 $ ' 0 0 0

CONTINUI NG CONSTRUCTION PROJECTS:

B a u 1kh am H i l l s S t a g e 1: B u i l d i n g s f o r s e c r e t a i —

i a l , f a s h i o n an d home s c i e n c e

c o u r s e s , l i b r a r y a n d c o l l e g e

a d m i n i s t r a t I o n 4 , 7 0 7 3 , 8 0 1 2 , 0 0 0

B 1a c k t o w n S t a g e I I I : R e c o n s t r u c t i o n o f

f a c t o r y f o r a u t o m o t i v e , c a r p e n t r y

a n d s e c r e t a r i a l c o u r s e s and

s t u d e n t s e r v i c e s 6 , 9 2 5 5 , 8 2 5 2 , 8 3 5

B r o o k v a l e S t a g e s I I a n d I I I : B u i l d i n g s f o r

t r a d e an d f a s h i o n c o u r s e s 6 , 7 4 3 1 , 3 7 3 1 , 3 7 3

F o r b e s S t a g e 1 1: E x t e n s i o n t o e x i s t i n g

b u i l d i n g f o r s e c r e t a r i a l an d

f a s h i o n c o u r s e s and s t u d e n t

s e r v i c e s 1 , 2 1 2 582 5 8 2

G l e n d a l e B u i l d i n g s f o r e n g i n e e r i n g a n d

e l e c t r i c a l t r a d e s an d c o m m e r c i a l

c o u r s e s 1 0 , 3 8 9 590 5 9 0

Gymea S t a g e I V: R e p l a c e m e n t b u i l d i n g s

f o r a u t o m o t i v e and e n g i n e e r i n g

t r a d e s 3 , 3 6 4 402 4 0 2

M o u n t D r u l t t S t a g e 1 1: B u i l d i n g s f o r a u t o ­

m o t i v e and c o m m e r c i a l c o u r s e s 6 , 6 4 9 24 0 240

N e w c a s t 1 e

( T i g h e s H i l l )

S t a g e X : B u i l d i n g f o r e l e c t r i c a l

t r a d e s c o u r s e s 7 , 9 2 0 7 , 2 4 0 2 , 7 0 0

P e t e r s h am S t a g e I I I : B u 11 d l n g f o r s e c r e t a i —

i a l and h a i r d r e s s i n g c o u r s e s ,

1 i b r a r y a n d s t u d e n t s e r v i c e s 4 , 8 9 5 2 , 9 6 5 2 , 3 0 0

S h e l l h a r b o u r S t a g e 1 1 : B u i l d i n g s f o r t r a d e a n d

c o m m e r c l a l c o u r s e s and s t u d e n t

s e r v I c e s 6 , 3 3 0 1 ,31 4 1 ,31 4

3 1 4 .

TABLE C4.4 (continued)

Col l e g e P r o j e c t

M a x i mu m

Commonweal t h

c o n t r I b u t 1 on

t o w a r d c o s t

o f p r o j e c t

B a l a n c e o f

Co mmonweal t h

c o n t r I b u t i o n

a t 1 J a n u a r y

1982

Gr a n t

r e c o m m e n ded

f o r 1982

CONTINUI NG CONSTRUCTION PROJECTS ( c o n t i n u e d )

S ' 0 0 0 $ Ό 0 0 $ Ό 0 0

S y d n e y R e c o n s t r u c t i o n o f B u i l d i n g 1 3 ;

a d m i s s i o n s and i n f o r m a t i o n c e n t r e 2 , 6 6 3 2 5 7 25 7

S t a g e I M A : B u i l d i n g f o r l i b r a r y ,

g e n e r a l s t u d i e s a n d c h i r o p o d y 9 , 3 0 3 3 , 9 5 3 2 , 8 0 0

B u i l d i n g s 38 a n d 3 9 , S t a g e I I :

R e c o n s t r u c t i o n f o r s e c r e t a r i a l

s t u d i e s a n d g e n e r a l c l a s s r o o m s 3 , 3 5 2 1 , 5 0 2 1 , 5 0 2

T amwor +h S t a g e I V : B u i l d i n g f o r s t u d e n t

s e r v i c e s and m e t a l f a b r i c a t i o n

c o u r s e s 2 , 7 9 4 37 4 37 4

S t a g e V: B u i l d i n g s f o r p l u m b i n g ,

p l a n t m e c h a n i c s and g e n e r a l

c 1 a s s r o o m s 2 , 9 7 4 2 , 7 0 4 2 , 0 0 0

Wagga Wagga S t a g e I V : B u i l d i n g f o r p a n e l ­

b e a t i n g and s p r a y - p a i n t i n g

w o r k s h o p s 2 , 7 8 0 1 ,71 0 1 ,61 3

W e t h e r I 1 1 P a r k B u i l d i n g s f o r t r a d e c o u r s e s ,

c o l l e g e s e r v i c e s and

a d m i η I s t r a t i o n 3 , 0 6 1 331 331

Wo 1 1o n g o n g S t a g e V I I : B u i l d i n g f o r s e c r e t a i

i a l s t u d i e s and e x t e n s i o n t o

u n i o n b u l l d i n g 2 , 7 7 6 826 82 6

S t a g e V I I I : B u i l d i n g f o r p a n e l ­

b e a t i n g and s p r a y - p a i n t i n g

w o r k s hop s 2 , 9 1 1 2 , 2 6 1 2 , 2 6 1

Wyo ng S t a g e 1: B u i l d i n g s f o r p l u m b i n g ,

s e c r e t a r i a l , home s c i e n c e and

f a s h i o n c o u r s e s , s t u d e n t s e r v i c e s

and c o l l e g e a d m i n i s t r a t i o n 5 , 2 3 5 3 , 2 3 5 2 , 5 0 0

S U B - T O T A L , CONTI NUI NG CONSTRUCTION PROJECTS 2 8 , 8 0 0

315 .

TABLE C4.4 (continued)

C o l l e g e P r o j e c t

Max Imum

Commonweal t h

c o n t r I b u t I on

t o w a r d c o s t

o f p r o j e c t

B a l a n c e o f

Commonweal t h

c o n t r I b u t I on

a t 1 J a n u a r y

19 8 2

G r a n t

r eco mme n d e d

f o r 1982

$ ' 0 0 0 $ ' 0 0 0 $ Ό 0 0

NEW CONSTRUCTION PROJECTS:

M e a d o w b a n k S t a g e I V : B u i l d i n g f o r m e c h a n i c a l

e n g i n e e r i n g , h a I r d r e s s I n g ,

f a s h i o n , b u s i n e s s and home

s c i e n c e c o u r s e s 6 , 9 9 6 6 , 9 9 6 2 , 8 4 0

N e w c a s t l e ( Wood

S t r e e t )

S t a g e X I : B u i l d i n g f o r c a t e r i n g

t r a d e s , b u t c h e r y and home s c i e n c e

c o u r s e s 9 , 0 6 0 9 , 0 6 0 2 , 9 1 2

N o r t h S y d n e y S t a g e VI 1: B u i l d i n g f o r f i l m a n d

t e l e v i s i o n , h a i r d r e s s i n g and

g e n e r a l s t u d i e s c o u r s e s 8 , 0 2 0 8 , 0 2 0 2 , 5 7 6

O r a n a ( D u b b o ) S t a g e 1: B u i l d i n g s f o r r u r a 1

s t u d i e s and c e r a m i c s c o u r s e s ,

1 I b r a r y , s t u d e n t s e r v i c e s a n d

c o l l e g e a d m i n i s t r a t i o n 7 , 0 4 5 7 , 0 4 5 2 , 2 4 0

S y d n ey B u i l d i n g s 38 a n d 3 9 , S t a g e I I I :

R e c o n s t r u c t i o n f o r g e n e r a l

c l a s s r o o m s and s t u d e n t s e r v i c e s 1 , 9 7 8 1 , 9 7 8 1 , 2 0 0

Wagga Wagga S t a g e V: B u i l d i n g f o r a u t o m o t i v e ,

w e l d i n g a n d b o I l e r m a k I n g c o u r s e s 3 , 7 9 9 3 , 7 9 9 1 , 471

W e t h e r 1 1 1 P a r k S t a g e 1 1 : B u i l d i n g s f o r p l a n t

m e c h a n i c s and f i t t i n g and

m a c h i n i n g c o u r s e s 4 , 2 4 2 4 , 2 4 2 2 , 7 6 0

S U B- T O T AL , NEW CONSTRUCTION PROJECTS 1 5 , 9 9 9

T O T AL , NEW SOUTH WALES 4 4 , 7 9 9

316.

N ew S o u t h W a l e s

C4.12 Meadowbank Technical College. The project will provide additional and replacement facilities for courses in mechanical engineering, hairdressing, home science, fashion and business studies in a four-level building. Meadowbank, which is a regional college for the population along the

Parramatta River, still conducts many of its courses in war-time temporary buildings, now beyond repair. The estimated building cost is $65 7/m2 .

C4.13 Newcastle Technical College (Wood Street). A three-level building is to be constructed on the Wood Street campus of the college in the central area of Newcastle. The

intention is to establish a specialist food and home science complex with teaching kitchens, practice dining rooms, food science laboratories, meat cutting rooms, general classrooms and central facilities such as library, student services and

college administration. The new facilities will permit the introduction of two mid-level courses in catering super­ vision and home economics, enable the expansion of existing trade and pre-employment courses in butchery, commercial

cooking and pastry cooking, and allow the college to widen its range of home science and short duration special courses for food and catering. The college trains people for the whole of northern New South Wales and is the only specialist

food school between Sydney and Brisbane. The new school will replace existing limited accommodation consisting of one kitchen and a butchery workshop at the Tighes Hill campus and home science facilities housed in two old

cottages. The estimated building cost is $ 947/m2 , reflecting the high equipment and servicing costs of practical areas which are in keeping with required standards for food preparation and meat inspection.

C4.14 North Sydney Technical College. A five-level building will house a film studio and associated production support areas for film technician courses, a salon and testing laboratory for hairdressing courses, general lecture

rooms and science laboratories for general studies, and student services. The building will in part replace some war-time huts which are now quite ineffective for teaching purposes. The expanded facilities will permit the college to fulfil its role both as the State centre for film and

television training and as the regional college for the North Shore-Warringah area. The estimated building cost is $769/m2 .

NEW CONSTRUCTION PROJECTS

317 .

C4.15 Ovana Community College (Dubbo Campus). The central campus of the newly constituted Orana Community College, the State's first multi-campus community college, is to be developed in Dubbo. Six single-level buildings housing rural studies and ceramics courses, general lecture

rooms, a library, student services and college administration are to be added to the existing workshop buildings of Dubbo Technical College. Dubbo will provide the specialist courses for the region, while other colleges and centres in the community college network will offer a more limited range. The proposed rural studies centre will allow the college to offer courses in farm technology. The estimated building cost is $768/m ^ , which includes an allowance of 9 per cent over the cost of similar structures in Sydney.

C4.16 Sydney Technical College, Buildings 38 and 39. The nine floors of a 70 year old former department store are

being reconstructed in five stages as part of the overall redevelopment of Sydney Technical College. The third stage of the upgrading will provide classrooms and staff and student services. The first two stages, accommodating courses in civil engineering, navigation, business and secretarial studies, are expected to be completed in June 1981 and May 1982 respectively. The estimated conversion cost of the third stage is $ 456/m2.

C4.17 Wagga Wagga Technical College. As a further stage in the development of Wagga Wagga as the regional college for the northern and western Riverina, extensions in a partly single-level and partly two-level block will provide for courses in automotive engineering, welding and boilermaking. The expanded practical areas will ensure separate and safe workshops for the various trades and

sufficient space for the college to offer concurrently day-release and block-release apprenticeship courses in the automotive trades. It will also permit the college to introduce courses in metal fabrication and pre­

apprenticeship courses for the vehicle trades. The estimated building cost of $784/m^ includes a 10 per cent country location cost.

C4.18 Wetherill Park Technical College. Two single­ level buildings will provide new facilities for plant mechanics and fitting and machining courses. This is the second stage in the development of Wetheril1 Park as a major college in the outer south-western suburbs of S y dney. Apart

from serving the needs of the population of the Fairfield district, the college will be the second in the metropolitan area to provide courses in plant and heavy vehicle mechanics. The initial stage of the college, commenced in

1980, will provide for automotive and welding trades and a library. The estimated building cost of the second stage is $513/m2.

318 .

TABLE C4.5

RECOMMENDED B U I L D I N G PROGRAM 1 9 82

V I CT O R I A

Co 1 l e g e P r o j e c t

Ma x i mu m

C om mo n we a 11 h

c o n t r i b u t i o n

t o w a r d c o s t

o f p r o j e c t

B a l a n c e o f

C om mo n we a 11 h

c o n t r I b u t i o n

a t 1 J a n u a r y

1 98 2

G r a n t

r e c o mme nd e d

f o r 1982

CONTINUING CONSTRUCTION1 PROJECTS:

$ ΌΟΟ $ Ό 0 0 $ ' 0 0 0

B a l l a r a t S t a g e 1: B u i l d i n g s f o r t r a d e

c o u r s e s a n d s t u d e n t s e r v i c e s 3 , 5 1 9 370 3 7 0

B e n d i g o S t a g e 1: B u i l d i n g s f o r t r a d e ,

f a r m m e c h a n i c s , a r t an d d e s i g n

c o u r s e s 7 , 0 8 7 6 , 0 1 7 2 , 4 0 0

Box H i l l S t a g e I I : B u i l d i n g f o r ·

h u m a n i t i e s and s c i e n c e s t u d i e s ,

f o o d c a t e r i n g c o u r s e s a n d s t u d e n t

s e r v i c e s 9 , 1 39 1 , 1 7 6 1 , 1 7 6

S t a g e I I I : B u i l d i n g f o r

t e c h n i c i a n c o u r s e s 4 , 3 3 1 55 0 5 5 0

F o o t s c r ay S t a g e I I : B u i l d i n g f o r

e n g i n e e r i n g , h u m a n i t i e s and

s o c i a l s c i e n c e c o u r s e s , l i b r a r y ,

s t u d e n t s e r v i c e s and c o l l e g e

a d m l η i s t r a t 1 on 1 1 , 3 6 2 9 , 8 4 2 3 , 4 0 0

Co 1 1e g e s o f H a i l —

d r e s s i n g , P a i n t i n g

and D e c o r a t i n g , a n d

F oo d S t u d i e s

( La T r o b e S t r e e t )

S t a g e 1: B u i l d i n g f o r l i b r a r y ,

c o m p u t e r c e n t r e , s t u d e n t s e r v i c e s

a n d c o l l e g e a d m i n i s t r a t i o n 4 , 6 2 3 3 , 0 9 2 1 , 8 0 0

M c M i 1 1 an S t a g e 1: B u i l d i n g s f o r b a s e

f a c i l i t y c o n t a i n i n g t e a c h i n g

a r e a s , l i b r a r y , c o l l e g e

a d m i n i s t r a t i o n , and s u b s i d i a r y

t e a c h i n g c e n t r es 4 , 0 6 4 96 0

96 0

R o y a 1 Mel b o u r n e

1 n s t i t u t e o f

T e c h n o l o g y

S t a g e 1 I B: B u i l d i n g f o r

e n g i n e e r i n g s t u d i e s 1 3 , 2 39 6 , 5 1 3

3 , 9 0 1

S u n r a y s 1 a S t a g e 1: B u i l d i n g s f o r

c o m m e r c i a l , a p p l i e d s c i e n c e ,

f o o d a n d t r a d e c o u r s e s 6 , 8 2 5 2 , 9 5 2

1 , 6 9 2

319 .

TABLE C4.5 (continued)

Co I l e g e

Maxf mum B a l a n c e o f

Co mmonweal t h Co mmonweal t h G r a n t

P r o j e c t c o n t r I b u t I on c o n t r I b u t i o n r e c o m m e n deb

t o w a r d c o s t

o f p r o j e c t

a t 1 J a n u a r y

1982

f o r 1982

S ' 0 0 0 $ ' 0 0 0 $ ' 0 0 0

CONT I N UI NG CONSTRUCTION PROJECTS ( c o n t i n u e d )

W a n g a r a t t a S t a g e I I : B u i l d i n g s f o r b u s i n e s s

s t u d i e s , s c i e n c e a n d a r t c o u r s e s ,

l i b r a r y a n d s t u d e n t s e r v i c e s 6 , 3 4 6 5 , 2 1 5 1 , 5 0 0

Ya I I o u r n B u i l d i n g s f o r t r a d e c o u r s e s 5 , 2 9 1 8 73 8 7 3

S U B - TO T A L , CONTI NUI NG CONSTRUCTION PROJECTS 1 8 , 6 2 2

NEW CONSTRUCTION PROJECTS:

D a n d e n o n g

F r a n k s t o n

G o r d o n

Shepparton

Y a I I ou r n

S t a g e I I : B u i l d i n g s f o r f i t t i n g

a n d m a c h i n i n g , b u i l d i n g , a r t a n d

c o m p u t e r c o u r s e s and g e n e r a l

s t u d i e s 9 , 1 7 2

S t a g e I : B u i l d i n g f o r f i t t i n g a n d

m a c h i n i n g , e l e c t r i c a l and b u i l d ­

i n g c o u r s e s and r e c o n s t r u c t I o n

f o r c l a s s r o o m s and c o l l e g e

a d m i n i s t r a t i o n 8 , 4 2 0

S t a g e I : B u i l d i n g s f o r

e l e c t r i c a l , a r t and d e s i g n ,

h a i r d r e s s i n g , s c i e n c e a n d c h i l d

c a r e c o u r s e s , l i b r a r y and g e n e r a l

c I as s r o o m s 6 , 7 3 7

S t a g e I : B u i l d i n g s f o r r u r a I

s t u d i e s , e l e c t r i c a l , b u i l d i n g ,

met a I f a b r i c a t i o n , f i t t i n g and

m a c h i n i n g and a u t o m o t i v e c o u r s e s 6 , 4 3 1

S t a g e I I : B u i l d i n g s f o r f i t t i n g

a n d m a c h i n i n g , e l e c t r i c a l ,

i n s t r u m e n t a t i o n , m e t a l f a b r i c ­

a t i o n a n d b u i l d i n g c o u r s e s a n d

r e f u r b i s h i n g o f w o r k s h o p s f o r

t r a d e c o u r s e s . 5 , 6 5 6

8 , 8 0 3

7 , 9 2 0

6 , 4 8 7

6 , 157

5 , 6 5 6

SUB- TOTAL, NEW CONSTRUCTION PROJECTS

1 , 5 6 8

1 , 6 8 0

1 , 1 7 6

1 ,668

1 , 5 0 0

7 , 5 9 2

3 2 0 .

TABLE C4.5 (continued)

Col l e g e P r o j e c t

Max imum

Commonweal t h

c o n t r I b u t I on

t o w a r d c o s t

o f p r o j e c t

B a l a n c e o f

Commonweal t h

c o n t r 1 b u t I o n

a t 1 J a n u a r y

19 8 2

G r a n t

r e c o m m e n ded

f o r 1982

$ ' 0 0 0 $ ' 0 0 0 $ ' 0 0 0

DESIGN PROJECTS:

B r oa d meadows D e s i g n o f m u l t i - p u r p o s e c o l l e g e ( 9 , 5 8 1 ) ( a ) 39 2

F o o t sc r a y S t a g e I I I : D e s i g n o f b u i l d i n g s

f o r a p p l i e d s c i e n c e , m a t h e m a t i c s ,

c h i l d c a r e and a p p l i e d a r t

c o u r s e s a n d r e f u r b i s h m e n t f o r

b u s i n e s s s t u d i e s ( 3 , 5 2 4 ) ( a ) 168

S U B - TO T A L , DESI GN PROJECTS 56 0

T O T A L , V I CT O R I A 2 6 , 7 7 4

( a ) P r e l i m i n a r y e s t i m a t e , b e f o r e p r e p a r a t i o n o f s k e t c h p l a n s .

321

V i c t o r i a

C4.19 Dandenong College of TAFE. The second stage of the college will contain new and replacement facilities for bricklaying, carpentry and joinery, plumbing and drainlaying, fitting and machining, painting and decorating, and applied art courses in five single-level buildings and one two-level building. These courses are linked to the construction and manufacturing industries in the Dandenong Valley, which are continuing to grow as firms from inner Melbourne relocate to larger sites. Population growth is

estimated to increase at a higher rate than the Victorian average. Part of the new facilities will replace short-life accommodation designed for technical education at the secondary level. The estimated building cost is $653/m ^ .

C4.20 Fvanketon College of TAFE. Following the acquisition of land adjacent to the existing college which is on a restricted but convenient site, major extensions are proposed. The first stage comprises a new single-level

trade block for fitting and machining, electrical and electronics, carpentry and joinery, cabinet making and plumbing and gas fitting courses, together with the conversion of an existing building for classrooms and

college administration. The intention is to establish the college as the centre for engineering and building trades in the Mornington Peninsula and Westernport areas. Students are at present housed in short-term accommodation which

includes leased factory and commercial premises. Enrolment quotas apply in most departments and new courses cannot be introduced. The estimated building cost is $570/m2 for the new work and $242/m^ for the refurbished area.

C4.21 Gordon College of TAFE. The departure of Deakin University from part of the campus permits the redevelopment of the college, which has some good buildings and some whose effective life is long past. The first stage in the

reconstruction of the campus, which is bisected by a railway line, will be a three-level complex providing replacement and expanded facilities for electrical, science, hairdress­ ing, art and design, and child care courses, general classrooms and the library. A pedestrian bridge will link the two sections of the college. The student population is supported by a number of large manufacturing companies in the district, in transport equipment, textiles, basic metal products and chemicals. The estimated building cost is

$ 6 5 0 / , including the pedestrian walkway.

NEW CONSTRUCTION PROJECTS

322 .

C4.22 Sheppavton College of TAFE. The project comprises one single-level building and a combination single-level and two-level structure for building, electrical and electronics, metal, automotive and rural

studies courses. The facilities will be constructed on the Fryers Street campus which will become the centre for TAFE activities in the Goulburn Valley. The college is at

present located in accommodation shared with a technical school, in buildings designed for school purposes. The estimated building cost of $684/m^ includes an 8 per cent country location allowance.

C4.23 Yallourn College of TAFE. Additions to the college will consist of three single-level extensions to existing buildings, a new two-level structure and the refurbishment of two old workshops. This accommodation is

to be for metal fabrication, fitting and machining and electrical instrumentation courses, together with training programs in scaffolding, rigging and plant operation. The project also includes a centre providing work experience for

young people to enhance their employment opportunities. The additional places will directly help to meet skill requirements in the La Trobe Valley, particularly for power generation. The estimated building cost is $627/m^.

DESIGN PROJECTS

C4.24 Bvoadmeadows College of TAFE. A new college will be established at Broadmeadows in the northern area of Melbourne. There is at present no technical college in this area of major population growth and the nearest college, at Preston, is not conveniently located for many of the

students to be served by the new college. The major

employers in the region are manufacturing industry (fabricated metal products and transport equipment) and the wholesale, retail, and community service sectors. The demand for trade training and for commercial and managerial

skills is strong. The proposed college will provide access to educational opportunities appropriate to the needs of the area, with initial emphasis on basic vocational courses in

b u i lding, engineering, clothing, textiles, food and business studies, and on transition programs to prepare people for the workforce.

C4.25 Footsoray College of TAFE. The project will house courses in applied science, business studies, applied art, child care, general studies, compensatory and access p r o grams. This is the second stage in the redevelopment of

the college, with the objective of making it the regional college for western Melbourne.

323 .

TABLE C4.6

RECOMMENDED B U I L D I N G PROGRAM 1982

QUEENSLAND

C o 1 l e g e P r o j e c t

Ma x i mum

C o mm o n w e a 1t h

c o n t r I b u t i o n

t o w a r d c o s t

o f p r o j e c t

B a 1a n c e o f

C om mo n we a 11 h

c o n t r i b u t I o n

a t 1 J a n u a r y

19 8 2

G r a n t

r e c o m m e n d e d

f o r 1982

$ ' 0 0 0 $ ' 0 0 0 $ ' 0 0 0

CONTI NUI NG CONSTRUCTION PROJECTS:

B a l d H i l l s S t a g e I I I : B u i l d i n g s f o r c a t e r i n g

and s c i e n c e c o u r s e s and l i b r a r y 4 , 2 4 1 3 59 35 9

C o l l e g e o f H o s p i t ­

a l i t y a n d T o u r I sm

( S o u t h B r 1 s b a n e )

S t a g e 1: B u i l d i n g f o r s c h o o l o f

c a t e r i n g a n d h o s p i t a l i t y s e r v i c e s 1 0 , 4 6 2 9 , 7 6 2 3 , 0 0 0

G 1 a d s t o n e S t a g e 1: B u i l d i n g s f o r t r a d e and

c o m m e r c i a l c o u r s e s , l i b r a r y a n d

s t u d e n t s e r v i c e s 5 , 4 9 0 1 , 9 4 2 1 , 9 4 2

Go 1d C o a s t S t a g e 1: B u i l d i n g f o r t o u r i s t

i n d u s t r y , b u s i n e s s a n d g e n e r a l

s t u d i e s c o u r s e s , l i b r a r y and

s t u d e n t a n d s t a f f s e r v i c e s 6 , 2 6 3 2 , 1 4 0 2 , 1 4 0

S t a g e I I : B u i l d i n g s f o r

a u t o m o t i v e , e l e c t r i c a l and

b u i l d ! n g t r a d e s 2 , 9 7 8 1 , 6 2 8 1 , 6 2 8

M o u n t G r a v a t t S t a g e s I I I & I V : B u i l d i n g s f o r

a p p l i e d s c i e n c e , f o o d c o u r s e s ,

c o m m e r c i a l s t u d i e s a n d a r t s a n d

c r a f t s c o u r s e s , l i b r a r y , s t u d e n t

s e r v i c e s a n d c o l l e g e

a d m I n i s t r a t I o n 9 , 0 6 1 7 , 2 7 4 2 , 7 9 2

SU B - TO T A L , CONTI NUI NG CONSTRUCTION PROJECTS 1 1 , 86 1

NEW CONSTRUCTION PROJECT:

A y r - H o m e N i l I C o n s t r u c t i o n o f m u l t i - p u r p o s e

c o l l e g e 6 , 4 0 5 6 , 4 0 5 1 , 3 1 8

S U B- T O T AL , NEW CONSTRUCTION PROJECT 1 318

324 .

TABLE C4.6 (continued)

MaxI mum B a l a n c e o f

Commonweal t h Com monweal t h Gr a n t

Col l e g e P r o j e c t c o n t r i b u t 1 on c o n t r 1 b u t 1 on r ec o m me n ded

t o w a r d c o s t a t 1 J a n u a r y f o r 1982

o f p r o j e c t 1982

S ' 0 0 0 S ' 0 0 0 S ' 0 0 0

DESI GN PROJECTS:

Bu n d a b e r g

G r ov e I y

D e s i g n o f b u i l d i n g f o r b u s i n e s s

s t u d i e s , a u t o m o t i v e , f a s h i o n an d

a r t and c r a f t c o u r s e s , l i b r a r y ,

c o l l e g e a d m i n i s t r a t i o n an d

s t u d e n t s e r v i c e s ( 4 , 4 3 7 ) ( a )

D e s i g n o f b u i l d i n g s f o r

h o r t 1c u 1 1 ur a I c o u r s e s ( 3 , 2 0 1 ) ( a )

SUB- TOTAL, DESI GN PROJECTS

T O T A L , QUEENSLAND

80

___ 45_

1 23

1 3 , 3 0 4

( a ) P r e l i m i n a r y e s t i m a t e , b e f o r e p r e p a r a t i o n o f s k e t c h p l a n s .

325

Q u e e n s l a n d

C4.26 Ayv-Home Hill College of TAFE. The provision of TAFE colleges in Queensland to date has largely been confined to the larger cities and towns, a contributing factor to the lower proportion of the population enrolled in TAFE courses than in other States. A pilot project for a

college which is designed to provide course units for a number of disciplines in smaller towns is to be located at Home Hill on the Burdekin River. The college will consist of eight single-level buildings to accommodate trade courses in building and engineering, trade-based pre-vocational courses, vocational courses in business, fashion and office education and further education activities, together with

a library, staff and student services and college administration. The estimated building cost of $651/m^ includes a country location allowance of 16 p e r cent.

DESIGN PROJECTS

C4.27 Bundaberg College of TAFE. The project will provide expanded and replacement workshop and classroom facilities, a library, student services and college administration. Pressure on entry to existing courses warrants expansion and there is community support for the

introduction of new pre-vocational and apprenticeship courses in farming, sugar technology and farm machinery.

C4.28 Gvovely College of TAFE. A teaching centre for the horticultural industry and associated activities of soil conservation, forestry, animal care and pest control at the operator level is proposed in north-western Brisbane. There

is no formal training yet available in the State at the trade level.

N E W CONSTRUCTION PROJECT

326.

TABLE C4.7

RECOMMENDED B U I L D I N G PROGRAM 19 82

SOUTH AU STRALI A

Co 11e g e P r o j e c t

Max I mum

C om mo n we a 11 h

c o n t r i b u t i o n

t o w a r d c o s t

o f p r o j e c t

B a l a n c e o f

Common we a I t h

c o n t r I b u t I o n

a t 1 J a n u a r y

1 98 2

G r a n t

r e c o m m e n d e d

f o r 1982

CONTI NUI NG CONSTRUCTION PROJECTS:

$ ' 0 0 0 $ Ό 0 0 $ Ό 0 0

E 1 i z a b e t h S t age 1 I I : B u i l d i n g f o r b u s i n e s s

s t u d i e s c o u r s e s , c a f e t e r i a an d

s t a f f and s t u d e n t s e r v i c e s 2 , 4 5 8 1 50 1 50

M a r 1 e s t o n S t a g e 1: R e c o n s t r u c t i o n o f

c o l l e g e f o r b u i l d i n g t r a d e s 4 , 8 0 8 3 , 4 9 2 2 , 1 0 0

N o a r 1un ga S t a g e 1: C o n s t r u c t i o n o f m u l t i -

p u r p o s e c o 1 1e g e 1 2 , 5 1 8 4 , 1 07 2 , 8 7 4

P o r t A d e l a i d e S t a g e 1: R e c o n s t r u c t i o n o f

b u i l d i n g f o r b u s i n e s s a n d

c o m m e r c i a l s t u d i e s , l i b r a r y and

c o l l e g e a d m i n i s t r a t i o n 961 1 17 1 1 7

R e g e n c y P a r k S t a g e V: B u i l d i n g f o r p l u m b i n g

t r ad e s 3 , 2 6 9 1 9 8 198

R i v e r 1 and ( L o x t o n ) S t a g e 1: M u l t i - p u r p o s e f a c i l i t y

f o r c o m m e r c i a l , r u r a l a n d

t e c h n i c a l s t u d i e s 7 0 9 5 59 5 5 9

S U B - TO T A L , CONTI NUI NG CONSTRUCTION PROJECTS 5 , 9 9 8

NEW CONSTRUCTION PROJ E CTS :

E 1 i z a b e t h S t a g e I V : B u i l d i n g f o r c l a s s r o o m s

a n d r e c o n s t r u c t I on o f w o r k s h o p s

f o r b u i l d i n g , e n g i n e e r i n g ,

e l e c t r i c a l a n d m e t a l t r a d e s 4 , 6 3 1 4 , 6 3 1 1 , 8 8 0

P a n o r a m a B u i l d i n g s f o r c l a s s r o o m s , l i b r a r y

a n d s t u d e n t s e r v i c e s and

r e c o n s t r u c t I on o f w o r k s h o p s f o r

e n g i n e e r i n g and m e t a l t r a d e s 5, 164 5 , 1 6 4 1 , 0 0 0

S U B - TO T A L , NEW CONSTRUCTION PROJECTS 2 , 8 8 0

TOTAL, SOUTH AUSTRALI A 8 , 8 7 8

327

S o u t h A u s t r a l i a

C4.29 Elisabeth Community College. The college is being expanded and reconstructed to increase its provision for automotive, building and furnishing, metal fabrication and welding, mechanical engineering, electrical and

electronics courses. Three single-level workshop extensions and one two-level building will be built. The college serves the northern districts of Adelaide. The project will increase the college's capacity to expand its pre-vocational programs in the metal and electrical areas, and will enable the planned increases in apprentice intakes in the metal, building and electrical trades which have the greatest demand for skilled m a n power. It will also allow the intro­ duction of post-trade courses. The estimated building cost is $645/m2 .

C4.30 Panorama Community College. Existing workshops are to be reconstructed and a new single-level and three inter-linked two-level buildings are to be built to house courses in metal fabrication, welding, mechanical engineering, optical mechanics, as well as a library, student services and college administration. It is intended to develop the school of technical studies into the State centre for higher level and specialist industrial training in the metal trades and welding, mainly through post-trade and special short courses such as tool making for the car

industry and welding programs for structural inspectors, and to introduce pre-vocational courses within the specialist metal fabrication p r o g r a m s . The estimated building cost of $709/m2 for the new work reflects the specialised nature of sections of the facilities.

NEW CONSTRUCTION PROJECTS

328 .

TABLE C4.8

RECOMMENDED B U I L D I N G PROGRAM 19 82

WESTERN AUSTRALI A

Co 1 l e g e P r o j e c t

Max I mum

C om mo n we a 11 h

c o n t r I b u t I o n

t o w a r d c o s t

o f p r o j e c t

B a l a n c e o f

C om mo n we a I t h

c o n t r i b u t I o n

a t 1 J a n u a r y

1982

G r a n t

r e c o m m e n d e d

f o r 1982

CONTI NUI NG CONSTRUCTION PROJECTS:

$ ' 0 0 0 1 $'000

H e d1 a nd Stage 1: B u i l d i n g s f o r

e l e c t r i c a l , a u to m o tiv e , meta 1

t r a d e s , c o m m e rc ia l, s c ie n c e and

a r t courses 7,654 5,74 5 3,700

Rock I ngh am S tage I I : B u i l d i n g s fo r f i t t i n g

and m achining and a u to m o tiv e

s t u d i e s and s tu d e n t s e r v ic e s 5,696 485 485

Tech nlea l

Serv I ce

E x te n s io n Stage I I : B u i l d i n g to accommodate

teach Ing s t a f f 3,055 5 72 5 72

Thorn 1 Ie Stage 1: B u ild in g s f o r

e l e c t r i c a l , metal t ra d e s and

heavy p l a n t and equipm ent

m aintenance courses 7,136 149 149

Stage I I : B u ild in g s fo r f u r n i t u r e

and b u i l d i n g tra d e s c o u rs e s and a

pump t e s t fa c I 11 ty 3,234 1 ,843 1 ,754

SUB-TOTAL, CONTINUING CONSTRUCTION PROJECTS 6,660

NEW CONSTRUCTION PROJECTS :

A I ba ny

F remantI e

Thorn I I e

Stage VI I : B u i l d i n g fo r c a t e r i n g

t ra d e s and computer s t u d ie s 2,418

Stage I: B u i l d i n g f o r l i b r a r y and

e x te n s io n s to meta I t ra d e s and

r u r a l s tu d ie s workshops 2,322

St age I I I : B u I I d l n g f o r

h a i r d r e s s i n g , c o m m e r c i a l ,

a c c o u n t i n g , m a n a g e m e n t and

s c i e n c e c o u r s e s 2 , 8 1 4

2 , 4 1 8

2 , 3 2 2

2 , 8 1 4

S U B - T O T A L , NEW CONSTRUCTI ON PROJECTS

95 5

1 , 5 5 4

86 2

3 , 3 7 1

329.

TABLE C4.8 (continued)

C o l 1e g e P r o j e c t

MaxI mum

Commonweal t h

c o n t r 1 b u t i o n

t o w a r d c o s t

o f p r o j e c t

B a l a n c e o f

Commonweal t h

c o n t r i b u t I o n

a t 1 J a n u a r y

1982

G r a n t

r ec o m me n ded

f o r 1982

$ ' 0 0 0 $ ' 0 0 0 $ ' 0 0 0

DESI GN PROJECT:

T h o r n 1 I e S t a g e I V : D e s i g n o f b u i l d i n g s f o r

1 I b r a r y a n d s t u d e n t s e r v i c e s ( 2 , 8 4 9 ) ( a ) 2 0 0

S U B - TO T A L , DESIGN PROJECT 2 0 0

T O T AL , WESTERN AUSTRALI A 1 0 , 2 3 1

( a ) P r e l i m i n a r y e s t i m a t e , b e f o r e p r e p a r a t i o n o f s k e t c h p l a n s .

3 3 0

W e s t e r n A u s t r a l i a

C4.31 Albany Technical College. A two-level building will contain facilities for courses in catering and hotel management, for cooking apprentices and for short courses for others employed in the industry. Tourism has become an

important source of employment in the Albany region. The estimated building cost of $787/m2 includes a 16 per cent country location cost.

C4.32 Fremantle Technical College. A reconstruction program for the college will provide additional space for plumbing, fitting and machining, computer studies and rural studies in six single-level extensions to existing workshops. The project also includes a new library and

lecture theatre in a two-level building, and student services in a converted undercroft. The reconstruction is directed towards the two objectives of increasing student capacity in the metal trades and making the college the

State centre for studies associated with the wool industry. The estimated building cost is $499/m2.

NEW CONSTRUCTION PROJECTS

C4.33 Thornlie Te ahnical College. A two-level building will accommodate facilities for building and furniture trades, ladies h a i r d ressing, commercial, accounting and management studies, and science c o u r s e s . This project is the penultimate stage in the establishment of a major college in the south-eastern area of Perth.

It will enable the transfer of commercial studies from Leederville and hairdressing from Mount Lawley, permitting these colleges to expand their own areas of specialisation. The estimated building cost is $526/m 2 .

DESIGN PROJECT

C4.34 Thornlie Technical College. A two-level library and lecture theatre block will complete the college.

3 3 1 .

TABLE C4.9

RECOMMENDED B U I L D I NG PROGRAM 19 82

TASMANI A

C o 1 l e g e P r o j e c t

Max I mum

Commonwea 1 t h

c o n t r I b u t I o n

t o w a r d c o s t

o f p r o j e c t

B a 1 a n c e o f

Commonwea I t h

c o n t r i b u t l o n

a t 1 J a n u a r y

19 8 2

G r a n t

r e c o m m e n d e d

f o r 1982

S ' 0 0 0 $ ' 0 0 0 $ ' 0 0 0

CONTI NUI NG CONSTRUCTION PROJECT:

H o b a r t S t a g e I I : B u i l d i n g f o r t e c h n i c a l

an d g e n e r a l c o u r s e s 1 1 , 46 1 6 4 7 6 4 7

S U B - TO T A L , CONTI NUI NG CONSTRUCTION PROJECT 6 4 7

NEW CONSTRUCTION PROJECTS:

A 1 a nva 1 e B u i l d i n g f o r e l e c t r i c a l and

e l e c t r o n i c s c o u r s e s 2 , 5 1 5 2 , 4 0 8 2 , 0 4 4

B u r n l e B u i l d i n g f o r s e c o n d p h a s e o f

s t u d e n t r e s i d e n c e 1 , 0 4 9 1 , 0 4 9 99 0

S U B - TO T A L , NEW CONSTRUCTION PROJECTS 3 , 0 3 4

DESI GN PROJECT:

A 1 a nva 1 e D e s i g n o f b u i l d i n g f o r s c h o o l o f

m e t a l f a b r i c a t i o n ( 2 , 5 6 3 ) ( a ) 241

SUB- TOTAL, DESIGN PROJECT 241

TOTAL, TASMANIA 3 , 9 2 2

( a ) P r e l i m i n a r y e s t i m a t e , b e f o r e p r e p a r a t i o n o f s k e t c h p l a n s .

332

T a s m a n i a

C4.35 Alanvale Community College. Alanvale in north­ east Launceston, is being established as the regional centre for trade courses through the phased transfer of these facilities from Launceston College in the central c i t y . Construction of Alanvale is being met from both State and Commonwealth f u n d s . A two-level building to provide facili­

ties for pre-trade, apprenticeship and post-trade courses in the electrical, radio, television and electronics fields, is proposed for Commonwealth support. The estimated building cost of the stage three is $ 6 6 4/ m^ .

C4.36 Burnie Community College. The existing student residence is to be duplicated. Forty-eight bed-sitters will be provided in three interlinked two-level buildings. The expansion of the residence will increase access to the

college for students from the west and from the Bass Strait islands and give better utilisation of the college's exist­ ing facilities. The estimated building cost is $63 S / m ^ .

DESIGN PROJECT

C4.37 Alanvale Community College. A further stage of the college will house metal fabrication and welding c o u r s e s .

NEW CONSTRUCTION PROJECTS

333 .

TABLE C4.10

RECOMMENDED B U I L D I N G PROGRAM 1982

NORTHERN TERRI TORY

Co I I e g e P r o j e c t

Max I mum

Commonwea I t h

c o n t r i b u t I o n

t o w a r d c o s t

o f p r o j e c t

B a I a n c e o f

C om mo n we a I t h

c o n t r i b u t i o n

a t 1 J a n u a r y

1982

G r a n t

r e c o m m e n d e d

f o r 1982

$ ' 0 0 0 $ Ό 0 0 S ' 0 0 0

CONTI NUI NG CONSTRUCTION PROJECTS:

D a r w i n E x t e n s i o n s t o t h e s c h o o l o f

t r a d e s 2 , 5 7 9 169 169

B a t c h e l o r R e p l a c e m e n t o f A b o r i g i n a l t e a c h e r

e d u c a t i o n c e n t r e 4 , 7 6 4 2 , 4 7 2 2 , 3 4 3

SUB- TOTAL, CONTI NUI NG CONSTRUCTION PROJECTS 2 , 51 2

NEW CONSTRUCTION PROJECT:

D a r w i n B u i l d i n g s f o r s c h o o l s o f b u s i n e s s

and m a n a g e m e n t and g e n e r a l

s t u d i e s 4 , 2 7 0 4 , 2 7 0 1 , 6 8 0

SU B- TOTAL , NEW CONSTRUCTION PROJECT 1 , 6 8 0

TOTAL, NORTHERN TERRI TORY 4 , 192

3 3 4

N o r t h e r n T e r r i t o r y

C4.38 Darwin Community College. The Schools of Business and Management and General Studies are to be transferred from leased premises in a warehouse at Winnellie to the main campus at Casuarina. The project is a single­

level building to house general classrooms, a lecture theatre, a computer, teaching areas for secretarial studies and staff accommodation.

N E W CONSTRUCTION PROJECT

335 .