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Australian Electoral Office - Report - Year - 1980-81


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The Parliament of the Commonwealth of Australia

A U S T R A L IA N ELECTO RAL O FFICE

Annual Report

1980-81

Presented by Command 22 September 1981

Ordered to be p rin te d 24 September 1981

Parliamentary Paper No. 193/81

ANNUAL REPORT 1980-81 USTRALIAN LECTORAL FFICE AUSTR LIAN EL CT RAL OFFICE AUSTRALI N LECTORAL FFICE f USTRALIAN EL CTORALI FFICE

AUSTRALI N E L CT RAL OFFICE AUSTR LIAN LECTORAL FFICE

AUSTRALIAN ELECTORAL OFFICE

ANNUAL REPORT FOR 1980-81

AUSTRALIAN GOVERNMENT PUBLISHING SERVICE CANBERRA 1981

© Commonwealth of Australia, 1981

Printed by Graphic Services Pty Ltd, 516-518 Grand Junction Road, Northfield, S A. 5085

Australian Electoral Office Wales Centre Akuna Street Canberra City, A.C.T, 2600

September 1981

Dear Minister, I am pleased to submit to you the annual report of the Australian Electoral Office for the year ended 30 June 1981,

Yours sincerely,

(K. W. Pearson)

Chief Australian Electoral Officer

The Hon. Kevin Newman, M.P. Minister for Administrative Services Parliament House Canberra, A.C.T. 2600

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CONTENTS

Introduction 1

Organisation and Functions 2

Legislation 5

18 October 1980— General Election 7

By-elections 10

Other Electoral Activities 11

Electoral Information, Education and Research 13

Staffing and Finance 15

Appendix A — Statutory office holders employed under the Australian Electoral Office Act 1973 16

Appendix B — Acts administered by the Australian Electoral Office under the direction of the Minister for Administrative Services 17

Appendix C — Number of Electors Enrolled — States and Territories as at 30 June 1977-81 (a) 18

Appendix D — Section 170 of the Conciliation and Arbitration Act 1904 — Industrial Elections: Number referred by Industrial Registrar for conduct by Australian Electoral Office during years ended 30 June 1977-81 19

Appendix E — Publications 20

iv

INTRODUCTION

Australia has had an Electoral Office since 1902. Initially a branch of the Department of Home Affairs, the Office functioned for the next seventy years as a branch of various Commonwealth departments— from 1916, the Department of Home Affairs and Terri­ tories; from 1932, the Department of the Interior; and from 1972, the Department of Services and Property.

In 1973, the Australian Electoral Office Act established the Office as a statutory authority responsible to the Minister for Services and Property (since 1975, the Minister for Administrative Services). The Act provides for eight Statutory Officers— the Chief Australian Electoral Officer, the Deputy Chief Australian Electoral Officer and an Australian Electoral Officer for each of the six States (see Appendix A)— and for staff to

be employed under the provisions of the Public Service Act 1922. The Chief Australian Electoral Officer is responsible to the Minister for the control of the Australian Electoral Office. He has all the powers of a Permanent Head under the Public Service Act 1922 in relation to the staff of the Office.

1

ORGANISATION AND FUNCTIONS

Together, the Commonwealth Electoral Act 1918 and the Australian Electoral Office Act 1973 provide the Australian Electoral Office with a three-tiered organisation for the administration of Commonwealth electoral legislation.

Chief Australian Electoral Officer

The Australian Electoral Office maintains a Central Office in Canberra. The Chief Australian Electoral Officer, under the Minister, controls the Australian Electoral Office. In this he is assisted by the Deputy Chief Australian Electoral Officer. In addition to supervising and co-ordinating the performance of all the Office’s enrolment and election activities, the Chief Australian Electoral Officer advises the Minister for Administrative Services as required on matters relevant to electoral policy, legislation and procedure, supervises the nationwide dissemination of electoral informa­ tion, oversights electoral education programs, and controls the conduct of such

research as is necessary from time to time to support the Office’s other activities.

Australian Electoral Officers

The Australian Electoral Office has a Head Office in each State capital city. The Australian Electoral Officer for each State directs all of the Office's activities within the State, including the conduct of Senate and House of Representatives elections.

The Australian Electoral Officer in each of the four joint roll States (New South Wales, Victoria, South Australia and Tasmania) is responsible for the day to day operation of the Commonwealth-State arrangement for the joint preparation, alteration and revision of electoral rolls in force in that State.

Divisional Returning Officers

Each State is divided into a number of Electoral Divisions, corresponding to the number of Members of the House of Representatives, with a Divisional Returning Officer appointed for each Division. The Australian Capital Territory is divided into two Electoral Divisions; the Northern Territory is one Division. A Returning Officer is appointed for each of these Divisions.

In the Northern Territory an Assistant Returning Officer, located in Alice Springs, is appointed as well. Divisional Returning Officers and Returning Officers arrange for and conduct elections for the House of Representatives and the Senate.

Electoral Divisions in each State are divided into Subdivisions. Subdivisions in the Northern Territory are called 'Districts'. The two A.C.T. Divisions are not subdivided. Each Divisional Returning Officer is the Electoral Registrar for all of the Subdivisions within his Division. As Electoral Registrar he is the officer responsible for keeping the electoral roll constantly up to date. In the A.C.T. the Returning Officers are the Electoral Registrars for their Divisions, while in the Northern Territory the Returning Officer is the Electoral Registrar for fourteen Districts and the Assistant Returning Officer is appointed for the remaining five.

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The high level of enrolment activity reported in the Annual Report for 1979/80 continued through 1980/81. There were 9 100 031 electors enrolled in all Divisions as of 30 June 1981. During the preceding twelve months a total of 2 883 927 roll trans­ actions were required. This was an average of 23 071 roll transactions in each Division, or about 92 per working day. (For enrolment figures from 1977 to 1981 see Appendix C).

During 1980/81 computerised processing of the Commonwealth Electoral Roll for all States (except South Australia) was transferred to the Department of Administrative Services’ new computer installation at the Benjamin Offices. (Commonwealth electoral roll maintenance in South Australia is carried out through the use of that State’s

Electoral Office computer facilities). This transfer considerably improved processing efficiency and generally reduced the overall turnaround time required to implement roil transactions. Following up the ADR feasibility study first referred to in the Annual Report for

1978/79, a study team made up of officers of both the Australian Electoral Office and the Department of Administrative Services ADR Section commenced a formal inquiry late in 1980/81 into the information requirements of the Office. The results of this study should provide the foundation for the future development of computer systems to meet the entire range of Australian Electoral Office needs.

In addition to processing enrolment transactions, Divisional Returning Officers conduct annual 'Habitation Reviews'. The staff employed for this task, known as review officers, systematically visit households throughout all urban areas in order to check the enrolment details of electors living at those habitations, and institute appropriate follow up enrolment action in cases where electors are not correctly enrolled. These procedures are designed to ensure that all qualified persons are correctly enrolled.

In more remote areas, an Electoral Agency system is used to check enrolments in a similar fashion. Electoral Agents regularly review lists of the electors enrolled for a particular locality. These Agents, usually police or postal officials, are chosen because of their familiarity with the movement of electors within such localities.

As the most immediate contact points between electors and the Electoral Office, Divisional Offices are also concerned with the dissemination of electoral information and educational material designed to ensure, among other things, that electors are aware of their rights and responsibilities; and, at the time of an election, of procedures for recording a formal vote, ways to apply for postal votes and of the locations of

polling places.

Review of Commonwealth Functions

Following the Review of Commonwealth Functions, Cabinet decided that management support services of the Australian Electoral Office were to be centralised within the Management Services Division of the Department of Administrative Services. Preliminary discussions have been held with officers of the Public Service Board and the Department of Administrative Services on how to give effect to this decision in terms of practicability and cost effectiveness.

Office and management improvements

Typing and stenographic services Improvements were made in typing and stenographic services by creating a position of Typist Supervisor in Central Office, by the introduction of new word processing equipment in Central Office and the three major eastern States, and by pooling steno­ graphic services for senior officers in Central Office.

Automatic data processing An ADR development group continued to review the effectiveness of current ADR systems. This review is concentrated on the establishment of an on-line electoral roll maintenance network linking all Divisional Offices, Head Offices and Central Office.

The group is also working with officers of the Department of Administrative Services on

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a study of the needs and resources of the Office (discussed in the earlier section dealing with the functions of Divisional Returning Officers). The Office continues to use common service ADR arrangements (mainly for roll maintenance activities) in conjunction with the Department of Administrative Services.

There is a limited use of the ‘CSIRONET’ computer for research development and resource management, e.g. collation, tabulation and production of election statistics.

Management improvements

Sub-managerial assistance to Australian Electoral Officers in the States has resulted in greater devolution and delegation of responsibility, particularly in personnel and finance functions and maintenance of the Office’s electoral activities.

Simplification of financial and personnel services

Improved coding within the Department of Finance computer ledger system was introduced and will provide for better accounting controls and management reporting arrangements. A revised accounting procedure for payment of habitation review officers was finalised, This procedure will be introduced in 1981 /82.

4

LEGISLATION

A list of the Acts administered by the Australian Electoral Office is provided in Appendix B. On 2 December 1980 the Minister for Administrative Services, the Hon. Kevin Newman, M.P., announced in Parliament that he was examining the Common­ wealth Electoral Act and the conduct and administration of elections and that he would report to the Government on the completion of this examination.

In addition to the Minister’s general review, two particular matters were announced— (a) in the Prime Minister’s extended policy speech of 30 September 1980 it was stated that the Government would legislate to change voluntary electoral enrol­ ment for Aboriginals to compulsory enrolment; (b) in a Ministerial Statement to Parliament on 7 May 1981 the Minister for Immigra­

tion and Ethnic Affairs, the Hon. Ian Macphee, M.P., foreshadowed amendment of the Commonwealth Electoral Act to make Australian citizenship, rather than British subject status, the basis of eligibility for electoral enrolment. Mr Macphee told Parliament that Commonwealth and State Ministers responsible for immigration and ethnic affairs had reached agreement that:

(1) migrants, irrespective of their country of origin should be treated equally in relation to requirements to enrol, to vote at elections for parliament and to nominate as a candidate for election to parliament; (2) Australian citizenship is the appropriate basis for the franchise; (3) no person currently enrolled as an elector should be disenfranchised, and it

should be mandatory for all non-Australian citizen British subjects on the electoral rolls to remain on the rolls; (4) uniform legislation to give effect to the foregoing should be enacted by the Commonwealth and all States. In addition, Mr Macphee reported that all Ministers had agreed that it would be appropriate to introduce the new arrangements from 1 January 1982 but that this was still subject to confirmation by the respective Governments.

Regulations There have been a number of amendments to regulations administered by the Australian Electoral Office.

Northern Territory electoral district boundaries

The Northern Territory Electoral Regulations defined Northern Territory electoral Districts by reference to the Districts established by the Northern Territory Electoral Districts Regulations. Following the repeal of these Regulations by the Northern Territory (Self Government) Act 1978, Statutory Rule No. 240 of 1980 repealed the earlier

definition, inserted a new definition and conferred power on the Minister to divide the Northern Territory into Districts for Commonwealth electoral purposes.

Amendments flowing from Commonwealth Electoral Amendment Act 1980

As reported in the Annual Report for 1979/80, the Commonwealth Electoral Amendment Act 1980 repealed various provisions of the Commonwealth Electoral Act dealing with

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electoral expenditure and the reporting of that expenditure. Statutory Rules No. 240, 241, 242 and 243 of 1980, promulgated during 1980/81, made consequential and complementary amendments to all Commonwealth electoral regulations by deleting the procedures previously prescribed for the filing of returns of expenses by candidates,

political parties and other organisations as well as deleting the prescribed forms for such returns.

Extension of facilities for the transmission of absent, postal and section vote ballot papers

Statutory Rule No. 275 of 1980 and Statutory Rules Nos. 80, 82 and 111 of 1981 extended the facilities legally available to Assistant Returning Officers to transmit absent, postal and section ballot papers to Divisional Returning Officers at the time of an election by permitting the use of approved courier services. Approvals must be given by the Chief Australian Electoral Officer in respect of the Territories and the Australian Electoral Officers in respect of their States. Prior to the amendments these

ballot papers could only be transmitted by 'hand or registered post'.

Return of writs in the Northern Territory for House of Representatives Elections

Statutory Rule No. 91 of 1981 provided that Writs for House of Representatives elections in the Northern Territory must be returned within 90 days of their issue. This brings the Northern Territory into line with the States and the Australian Capital Territory. Previously, Writs were to be returned within 60 days of polling day.

Admission of absent votes to the scrutiny

Statutory Rules Nos. 80 and 82 of 1981 amended existing electoral regulations to streamline the admission of absent votes to the preliminary scrutiny. The Regulations now provide that Divisional Returning Officers may admit absent voters' ballot papers to the preliminary scrutiny, even if the absent voters' declarations have not been attested by the presiding officer who issued the ballot papers, so long as the electors' names are listed in the presiding officer’s record of absent votes issued.

Price of rolls

Statutory Rules Nos. 83, 84 and 85 of 1981 increased the prices of electoral rolls to:

Principal Roll for a Division $8.30

Principal Roll for a Subdivision .80 Supplemental Roll fora Division .80 Supplemental Roll for a Subdivision .30 The prices were last fixed in 1966.

Northern Territory— receipt of postal votes

Statutory Rules Nos. 141 and 142 of 1981 prescribed that postal votes cast for House of Representatives and Senate elections may be received up to 10 days following the close of the poll. This brings the Northern Territory into line with the position in the States and the Australian Capital Territory. Previously, the period for the return of postal votes was 28 days.

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18 OCTOBER 1980 — GENERAL ELECTION

The major activity of the Office in 1980-81 was, of course, the preparation for and conduct of the 18 October 1980 general election for the House of Representatives and half the Senate. The election, announced by the Prime Minister in Parliament on 11 September, was conducted on the following timetable: the issue of writs (and close of rolls) on 19 September 1980; the close of nominations on 27 September 1980; polling day on 18 October 1980; and the return of the writs on or before 17 December 1980.

Thirty-four Senators—five from each State and two each from the Australian Capital Territory and the Northern Territory—and 125 Members of the House of Representa­ tives were elected. The Senators for the States were elected for six-year terms commencing on 1 July 1981. Senators for the Territories are elected for terms corres­

ponding to those of Members of the House of Representatives. The results of the election have been published and are available in four publications: General Election for the House of Representatives 1980—Result of Count of First Preference Votes and Distribution of Preferences, The Senate Election 18 October 1980 — Result of Count of First Preference Votes and Distribution of Surplus Votes and Preferences, General Election for the House of Representatives 1980— Analysis of Result of Count of First Preference Votes and The Senate Election 18 October 1980— Analysis of Result of Count of First Preference Votes. All may be purchased at Australian Government Bookshops for $4.40, $7.40, $6.20 and $6.20 respectively.

Polling staff and polling places

The organisation of any Federal election is a major exercise. All the necessary equip­ ment— ballot boxes, voting screens and the like— must be delivered on time. The responsibility for this rests with the 125 Divisional Returning Officers. The efficiency of the election depends upon their thoroughness. In 1980, 62 111 polling officials were

recruited and provided with at least some form of basic instruction. Only about two- thirds of these officials had previous polling experience. Eight thousand two hundred and eighty-one polling places had to be arranged and staffed.

Nominations

Five hundred and two candidates nominated for the 125 House of Representatives Divisions and 182 candidates for the thirty-four Senate vacancies. Over twenty million ballot papers were printed and distributed.

Overseas postal voting

The Australian Electoral Office, on the advice of the Department of Foreign Affairs, appointed Assistant Returning Officers to issue and receive postal voting papers at fifty-four overseas posts where such appointments were considered necessary to meet the needs of potential voters. Appointments also were made at Cocos (Keeling),

Christmas and Norfolk Islands and the R.A.A.F. Base Butterworth. A total of 28,506 postal votes were cast at these fifty-eight overseas locations, of which 13 021 were cast at Australia House, London.

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Polling day

8 513 996 electors voted— over 94.4% of the enrolled electorate of 9 014 920. 7 504 646 voted on polling day at polling places as ordinary voters (88.1 % of those voting); 364,642 voted as postal voters (4.3% of those voting); 628 052 voted as absent voters elsewhere in their State (7.4%); and 16 656 voted as section voters (0.2%).

208 438 votes were rejected from the House of Representatives scrutiny and 821 632 from the Senate scrutiny as being informal. This represented 2.45% and 9.65% of the total vote for the House of Representatives and Senate respectively.

National tally room

As with previous elections, the major proportion of the votes cast were counted on election night. 6 689 282 House of Representatives votes (about three-quarters of all those recorded) had been counted by 12 midnight E.S.T. (compared with about two- thirds at recent previous elections). A total of 7 375 529 (about four-fifths) had been

counted when counting ceased and the National Tally Room closed down at 3.05 a.m. E.S.T. 19 October. Virtually all the ordinary votes, except those cast in remote areas, notably in Divisions such as the Northern Territory and Kalgoorlie, were included in this count. (Most absent votes were counted in the following two days. Postal votes were counted progressively over the period allowed for the receipt of postal votes cast before the close of the poll.)

Most polling places in each Division were established as counting centres. To ensure that the results were brought together and made available as quickly as possible for public information, arrangements were made for progressive results to be phoned through from counting centres to Divisional Offices. The results were then checked and progressively entered in each capital city into the Department of Business and

The national tally room at the Canberra showgrounds multi-purpose pavilion on election night, 18 October 1980

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Consumer Affairs' computer network. Immediately thereafter, the results were available at the Tally Room in Canberra where the information was displayed, on the tally board and on visual display terminals, for use by the public, journalists and commentators. The move of the National Tally Room to the multi-purpose pavilion of the Canberra

Showground, forecast in the Annual Report for 1979/80 was a great success. Because of the greater space and additional facilities available, the venue was a vast improve­ ment on the previous location, Belconnen High School.

Declarations of the poll

In eighty-five Divisions candidates were elected without a distribution of preferences, although in some of these Divisions the declaration of the poll had to await the counting of all postal votes. In forty Divisions preferences had to be distributed before a candidate achieved an absolute majority and could be declared elected. This meant that in many Divisions the results were not known and preferences could not be

distributed until the statutory period allowed for the receipt of postal votes (ten days in all Divisions except the Northern Territory where twenty-eight days were allowed— now see Statutory Rule No. 141 1981) had elapsed. The counting of the votes for the House of Representatives preceded counting of

votes for the Senate. As always, this, together with the complexity of the Senate scrutiny, with its large numbers of candidates and the need to await receipt of postal votes before the establishment of quotas, and distribution of surpluses and allocation of preferences, prolonged the Senate count and the polls could not be declared until

some time after polling day.

Visit by overseas electoral officials— Malaysia and Sri Lanka Three officers each from the Malaysian Electoral Commission (Mr Rashid bin Haji Abdul Rahman, Secretary to the Electoral Commission, Mr C. S. Singhe and Mr Zainuddin bin Sidek) and from the Sri Lankan Electoral Commission (Mr L. A. G. Jayasekera, Senior

Deputy Commissioner of Elections, Mr K. N. W. Abeysekera and Mr A. D. De Silva) were in Australia to observe preparations for and the conduct of the General Election.

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BY-ELECTIONS

Subsequent to the General elections of 1980 it was necessary to conduct four by- elections— in McPherson (Old) following the death on 7 January 1981 of the Hon. Eric Robinson; in Boothby (S.A.) following the resignation on 27 January 1981 of the Hon. John McLeay; in Curtin (W.A.) following the resignation on 22 January 1981 of the Hon. Victor Garland and in Wentworth (N.S.W.) following the resignation on 17 February 1981 of the Hon. R. J. Ellicott, Q.C.

Preferences had to be counted in three by-elections, McPherson, Curtin and Went­ worth. All four Divisions were retained by the Liberal Party, leaving the numbers of the parties in the thirty-second Parliament unchanged. Some details of the four by-elections are shown below:

Division

Issue of writ and close of rolls Close of

nominations Polling day Declaration of the poll Enrol­

ment

Total vote

% turn­ out

Boothby (S.A.) 27 January 13 February 21 February 23 February 80404 65679 81.69

Curtin (W.A.) 27 January 11 February 21 February 27 February 64512 50458 78.21

McPherson (Old) 27 January 11 February 21 February 2 March 86139 72626 84.31

Wentworth (N.S.W.) 3 March 19 March 11 April 22 April 69972 48633 69.50

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OTHER ELECTORAL ACTIVITIES

Proclamation of new subdivisional boundaries in New South Wales

The Commonwealth and New South Wales maintain electoral rolls jointly, under an arrangement entered into pursuant to section 32 of the Commonwealth Electoral Act 1918 and section 21B of the New South Wales Parliamentary Electorates and Elections Act 1912. Central to this arrangement is the agreement that so far as practicable Sub­ divisions of Commonwealth Divisions and Subdivisions of State Electoral Districts shall

be coterminous. The redistribution of New South Wales State Electoral Districts was proclaimed on 28 March 1980. Many State Subdivisional boundaries were altered by this redistribution.

Following this alteration in State Subdivisional boundaries, the Commonwealth and the State jointly reviewed all their Subdivisional boundaries. The review took account of Subdivisions split by the State redistribution and at the same time examined rationalisation (on grounds of administrative convenience) of other Subdivisional

boundaries, including the amalgamation of certain Subdivisions. New Commonwealth Subdivisional boundaries for New South Wales were proclaimed on 6 May 1981. Subdivisional boundary changes did not, of course, affect the boundaries of Commonwealth electoral Divisions.

Industrial elections

The Industrial Registrar referred 375 industrial elections to the Australian Electoral Office under the provisions of the Conciliation and Arbitration Act 1904 during the year 1980/81 (see Appendix D).

Miscellaneous elections

The Australian Electoral Office also conducted a number of elections for other govern­ mental organisations through the year: • Australian Wheat Board— grower representatives • Australian Honey Board— producer representatives

• Capital Territory Health Commission— part-time Commissioner and Deputy to represent nurses • A.C.T. Dental Board— practitioner representatives • A.C.T. Pharmacy Board— pharmacist representatives • A.C.T. Medical Board— practitioner representatives • Public Service Board— divisional representatives for appeal boards • Australian Broadcasting Commission— officers' representatives and deputy on

Disciplinary Appeal Board • Commonwealth Teaching Service— officers' representatives on Promotions Appeal Boards The cost of all these elections was borne by the Australian Electoral Office.

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Island territory elections

Christmas Island Advisory Council elections Mr H. Harmer, Assistant Australian Electoral Officer for South Australia, visited Christ­ mas Island from 16 June to 16 July 1980, at the request of the Department of Home Affairs, to assist in the conduct of the first election of eight members to the new fourteen-member Christmas Island Advisory Council. At the election, held on Saturday

12 July, 92.5% of the enrolled electorate of 1659 recorded votes. Only eighty-six informal votes were recorded, although there were forty-nine candidates for the eight vacancies.

Norfolk Island Legislative Assembly by-election Mr L. A. G. Heaton, Executive Officer, visited Norfolk Island from 20 June to 26 June 1981, at the request of the Department of Home Affairs, to assist the Returning Officer with the conduct of the election of two members of the Legislative Assembly.

Overseas elections— Uganda

Mr R. J. C. Whalen, Senior Assistant Secretary, was a member of the Observer Group sent by the Commonwealth Secretariat at the invitation of the Ugandan Government to observe the preparations for and conduct of the Ugandan elections held on 10-11 December 1980. Mr R. Montano, Divisional Returning Officer for Kingsford-Smith, was a member of the Observer Group support staff.

Ballot boxes and screens

As noted in the Annual Report for 1979/80, contracts were let during 1979/80 for the production of new ballot boxes and voting screens, to be acquired as needed to replace damaged existing stock. Difficulties emerged during the testing and proving of their design. Testing is continuing.

The Australian Electoral Office mobile display at Markettown, Leichhardt

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ELECTORAL INFORMATION, EDUCATION AND RESEARCH

Aboriginal education

The Australian Electoral Office operates three mobile Aboriginal electoral education teams to assist Aboriginals. The aim of the teams is to provide Aboriginals with information concerning their electoral rights and responsibilities and the operation of

the Australian electoral system. Teams in Western Australia and South Australia began work in June 1979. The Northern Territory team commenced work in the field in January 1981. Arrangements for the operation of these teams were made in full consultation with the Governments of Western Australia, South Australia and the Northern Territory.

Schools kit

As foreshadowed in the Annual Report for 1979/80, in conjunction with the Curriculum Development Centre, development of a ‘Schools Kit’ was completed. The Kit consists of three student booklets and a teachers' guide, which includes a set of slides and material for the conduct of a mock election. The Curriculum Development Centre has distributed one copy of the kit to every secondary school in Australia. (Copies of the

Kit may be purchased from the Curriculum Development Centre for $12.50 each.)

Mobile display

As also foreshadowed in the Annual Report for 1979/80, development during 1980/81 of a mobile display of electoral enrolment information was completed. This display, which includes posters, photographs, multi-lingual material and an audio-visual presentation, was used during 1980/81 at the Perth Royal Agricultural Show and at Australian Capital Territory secondary schools. It is being used currently in Sydney at shopping malls, particularly those in areas with large ethnic communities.

Ethnic electoral information

In addition to use of the mobile display, extensive efforts were made by the Australian Electoral Office at the time of the October General Election, and for the four by-elections, to serve the needs of ethnic voters. Advertisements explaining procedures for enrolment, absent voting and describing how to cast a formal vote were placed in

ethnic newspapers and broadcast over ethnic radio. Multi-lingual pamphlets entitled Voting Information and Marking Your Ballot Papers were distributed to ethnic organisa­ tions. Multi-lingual posters and advertisements were displayed in polling places on polling day. Multi-lingual polling officials were employed in areas with large ethnic

communities. The multi-lingual pamphlet Your Electoral Rights and Responsibilities was reprinted in 1980/81 in English and nine other languages and continues to be widely distributed. A copy of this pamphlet together with an electoral claim card is sent to every

unenrolled person over 18 years of age shortly after the acquisition of Australian citizenship.

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Map catalogue

The acquisition of information for a catalogue containing details of Commonwealth electoral maps prepared since 1902 and which are available in major Australian libraries was completed during 1980/81. The catalogue is in draft form and should be published during 1981/82.

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STAFFING AND FINANCE

Staffing

The active establishment of the Australian Electoral Office as at 30 June 1980 was 771 positions. Staff ceilings were approved against these positions of 725 full-time and twenty-five part-time staff. The average employment levels for the year were 723 full-time operative staff, twenty-two part-time staff and twenty-four inoperative staff.

Finance

Expenditure for the 1980/81 financial year was as follows:

Item Description

Expenditure 1980/81 $'000

161-1-01 Salaries and allowances 11 375

161-1-02 Overtime 61

161-2-01 Travelling and subsistence 219

161-2-02 Office requisites and equipment, stationery and printing 335

161-2-03 Postage, telegrams and telephone services 379

161-2-04 Office services 145

161-2-05 Administration of the Commonwealth Electoral Act 4 583

161-2-06 Commonwealth elections and referendums 12 206

161-2-07 Freight and cartage 88

161-2-08 Computer services 849

161-2-09 Incidental and other expenditure 62

Total 30 302

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Appendix A

Statutory office holders under the AUSTRALIAN ELECTORAL OFFICE ACT 1973

Position Name

Appoint­ ment Date Expiry

Date

Chief Australian Electoral Officer PEARSON, Keith William 1.10.76 30. 9.83

Deputy Chief Australian Electoral Officer CIRULIS, Andrejs 1. 8.78 31. 7.85

Australian Electoral Officer for New South Wales WHITE, Charles Ivor 31. 1.77 30. 1.84

Australian Electoral Officer for Victoria ABBOTT, Laurence John 1. 7.80* 30. 6.87

Australian Electoral Officer for Queensland COLEMAN, Francis Joseph 1. 1.77 31.12.83

Australian Electoral Officer for South Australia WALSH, Albert Jack 1. 7.80* 30. 6.87

Australian Electoral Officer for Western Australia Australian Electoral Officer for Tasmania

YOUNG, Barry George (Acting):):

LENNARD, John Richard 23. 3.81 f 22. 3.88

* Initially appointed 1.7.1973 t Initially appointed 23.3.1974 φ Appointed 1.7.81

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Appendix B

Acts administered by the Australian Electoral Office under the direction of the Minister for Administrative Services

Representation Act 1905 Referendum (Constitution Alteration) Act 1906 Commonwealth Electoral Act 1918 Northern Territory Representation Act 1922

Representation Act 1948 Australian Electoral Office Act 1973 Senate (Representation of Territories) Act 1973 Australian Capital Territory Representation (House of Representatives) Act 1973 Australian Capital Territory Representation (House of Representatives) Act 1974

Commonwealth Electoral (Redistribution) Act 1977

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Appendix C

Number of electors enrolled— States and Territories as at 30 June 1977-81

1977 1978 1979 1980 1981

New South Wales 3 059 402 3 099 259 3 095 268 3153 981 3 211 224

Victoria 2 301 695 2 307 786 2 371 637 2 372 063 2 425 900

Queensland 1 251 659 1 261 006 1 284 844 1 335 895 1 379 989

South Australia 814 570 821 116 828 344 842 707 855 674

Western Australia 694 432 694 373 708 629 739 525 754 387

Tasmania 262 009 263 275 264 305 273 083 277 490

Australian Capital Territory 121 411 126 934 132 724 133 510 139 745

Northern Territory 39 186 46 386 44 872 54 198 55 622

Australia 8 544 364 8 620 135 8 730 623 8 904 962 9 100 031

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Appendix D

Section 170 of the CONCILIATION AND ARBITRATION ACT 1904— Industrial Elections: Number referred by Industrial Registrar for conduct by Australian Electoral Office during years ended 30 June 1977-81

1977 1978 1979 1980 1981

New South Wales 41 79 81 89 85

Victoria 68 71 85 88 87

Queensland 29 36 37 49 39

South Australia 24 34 51 46 53

Western Australia 28 38 32 34 33

Tasmania Australian Capital

27 46 34 44 38

Territory 18 24 29 21 29

Northern Territory 10 10 7 8 11

Australia 245 338 356 379 375

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Appendix E

Publications

Books General Election for The House of Representatives 1980— Result of Count of First Preference Votes and Distribution of Preferences, Australian Government Publishing Service, Canberra 1981.

The Senate Election 18 October 1980— Result of Count of First Preference Votes and Distribution of Surplus Votes and Preferences, Australian Government Publishing Service, Canberra 1981. General Election for The House of Representatives 1980—Analysis of Result of Count of First Preference Votes, Australian Government Publishing Service, Canberra 1981.

The Senate Election 18 October 1980— Analysis of Result of Count of First Preference Votes, Australian Government Publishing Service, Canberra 1981. Election Statistics: Senate Election and General Election of Members of the House of Representatives, 10 December 1977, Australian Government Publishing Service, Canberra 1978. A Summary of Commonwealth Election and Referendum Statistics 1901-1975, Australian Government Publishing Service, Canberra 1976.

Commonwealth Electoral Procedures and other Information relating to Electoral and Election Matters, Australian Government Publishing Service, Canberra 1976. Referendum Statistics, 21 May 1977, Australian Government Publishing Service, Canberra 1980. You Can Have Your Say (three editions— Western Australia, South Australia and Northern Territory), Australian Electoral Office and Education Department of Western Australia, 1980. An explanation of enrolment and voting procedures for use in the Aboriginal Electoral Education Program. Instructor’s Guide to ‘You Can Have Your Say’ (three editions— Western Australia, South Australia and Northern Territory), Australian Electoral Office and Education

Department of Western Australia, 1980. An instructor’s handbook to assist in the explanation of enrolment and voting procedures for use in the Aboriginal Electoral Education Program.

Pamphlets Your Electoral Rights and Responsibilities (multi-lingual pamphlet in English, Italian, Greek, Serbo-Croatian, Spanish, Portuguese, Turkish, Arabic, French and German), Australian Electoral Office, Canberra, 1979.

Parliament, Elections and You, Australian Electoral Office, Canberra, 1979. Voting Information (multi-lingual pamphlet in English, Italian, Greek, Serbo-Croatian, Spanish, Portuguese, Turkish, Arabic, French, German and Vietnamese), Australian Electoral Office, Canberra, 1980. Marking Your Ballot-papers (multi-lingual pamphlet in English, Italian, Greek, Serbo-Croatian, Spanish, Portuguese, Turkish, Arabic, French, German and Vietnamese) Australian Electoral Office, Canberra 1980.

Film You Can Have Your Say, Film Australia, 1979. (1 film reel (15 min.), sound, colour, 16 mm, 160 m). A film on enrolment and voting procedures for use in the Aboriginal Electoral Education Program.

Forthcoming publications Election Statistics: Senate Election and General Election of Members of the House of Representatives, 18 October 1980, to be published by the Australian Government Publishing Service. Commonwealth Electoral Maps since Federation: A Catalogue of holdings in major Australian Libraries.

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