Note: Where available, the PDF/Word icon below is provided to view the complete and fully formatted document
Public Works Committee Act - Parliamentary Standing Committee on Public Works - Reports - Adelaide Airport: Upgrading for international services (5th Report of 1982)


Download PDF Download PDF

The Parliament of the Commonwealth of Australia

A D ELA ID E AIRPORT: U PG R A D IN G FOR INTERNATIONAL SERVICES

Parliamentary Standing Committee on Public Works

(Fifth Report o f 1982)

Presented and ordered to be printed 5 May 1982

Parliamentary Paper No. 98/1982

Parliamentary Standing Committee on Public Works

REPORT

relating to

ADELAIDE AIRPORT: UPGRADING FOR INTERNATIONAL SERVICES

(Fifth Report of 1982)

THE PARLIAMENT OF THE COMMONWEALTH OF AUSTRALIA 1982

1 9 8 2

THE PARLIAMENT OF THE COMMONWEALTH OF AUSTRALIA

PARLIAMENTARY STANDING COMMITTEE ON PUBLIC WORKS

R E P O R T

relating to

ADELAIDE AIRPORT :

UPGRADING FOR

INTERNATIONAL SERVICES

(Fifth Report of 1982)

Australian Government Publishing Canberra 1982 Service

© Commonwealth of Australia 1982

Printed by C.J. THOMPSON, Commonwealth Government Printer, Canberra

MEMBERS OF THE PARLIAMENTARY STANDING COMMITTEE ON PUBLIC WORKS

(Twenty-sixth Committee)

Melville Harold Bungey, Esq., M.P. (Chairman)

James Leslie McMahon, Esq., M.P. (Vice-Chairman) 5

Senate House of Representatives

Senator Dominic John Foreman

Senator Bernard Francis Kilgariff

Senator John Raymond Martyr ‘

Senator Jean Isabel Melzer 1

Senator Harold William Young

David Bruce Cowan, Esq., M.P.

Benjamin Charles Humphreys, Esq., M

Urquhart Edward Innes, Esq., M.P.

Murray Evan Sainsbury, Esq., M.P.

1 R e t i r e d 30 June 1981

2 C e a s e d to b e m e m b e r o n e l e c t i o n as P r e s i d e n t

of the Senate on 18 A u g u s t 1981

3 A p p o i n t e d 25 A u g u s t 1981

4 A p p o i n t e d 25 A u g u s t 1981

5 A p p o i n t e d V i c e - C h a i r m a n 27 A u g u s t 1981

E X T R A C T F R O M

THE VOTES AND PROCEEDINGS OF THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, NO. 70 DATED 17 FEBRUARY 1982

8 PUBLIC WORKS COMMITTEE - REFERENCE OF WORK - ADELAIDE AIRPORT - UPGRADING FOR INTERNATIONAL SERVICES: Mr. Hunt (Minister for Transport), for Mr. McVeigh (Minister for Housing and Construction), pursuant to notice, moved - That, in accordance with the provisions of the Public Works Committee Act 1969,

the following proposed work be referred to the Parliamentary Standing Committee on Public Works for consideration and report: Adelaide Airport: Upgrading for international services.

Mr. Hunt presented plans in connection with the proposed work.

Debate ensued.

The debate having been closed by the reply of Mr. Hunt -Mr. Wallis, by leave, addressed the House.

Question - put and passed.

WITNESSES

Andrews, J.S., Esq., Project Manager, Department of Housing and Construction, City Mutual Centre, 10-20 Pulteney Street, Adelaide, South Australia

Becker, H.T., Esq., M.P., Member for Hanson, P.O. Box 186, Brooklyn Park, South Australia

Blight, S.M., Esq., 22 Iluka Street, Glenelg North, South Australia

Boyce, H.W., Esq., Town Clerk, City of West Torrens, Municipal Offices, 165 Burbridge Road, Adelaide, South Australia Brown, E.C., Esq., Acting Chief Aerodrome and Road

Engineer, Department of Housing and Construction, DHC House, 470 Northbourne Avenue, Dickson, Australian Capital Territory

Burrowes, N.E., Esq., Secretary, Anti Airport Noise Association Incorporated, 6 Derrick Avenue, North Glenelg, South Australia

Calvert, J.S., Esq., Projects Officer, Ansett Handling Services, 13-17 Cope Street, Redfern, New South Wales

Cook, L.I., Esq., Chief Aircraft Evaluation Engineer, Qantas Airways Limited, 70 Hunter Street, Sydney, New South Wales

Cox, M.J., Esq., Property Development Manager, Qantas Airways Limited, 70 Hunter Street, Sydney, New South Wales

Deare, M.J., Esq., Manager, Trade Development Division, Chamber of Commerce and Industry, South Australia Inc., 12 Pirie Street, Adelaide, South Australia

Fairbairn, W.A., Esq., Airways Surveyor, Regular Public Transport Branch, Flying Operations and Airworthiness Division, Department of Transport, P.O. Box 367, Canberra City, Australian Capital Territory

Flaherty, Dr. J.A., Spokesman, Metropolitan Regional Organisation Western, P.O. Box 144, Glenelg, South Australia

Golding, P ., Esq., Chairperson, Thebarton Residents Association, 21 Bennett Avenue, Thebarton, South Australia

Gosbell, K.B., Esq., Acting Associate Director, Projects, Department of Housing and Construction, City Mutual Centre, 10-20 Pulteney Street, Adelaide, South Australia

Hans, J.R., Esq., International Relations Projects Officer, Qantas Airways Limited, 70 Hunter Street, Sydney, New South Wales

Hardie, R.L., Esq., Manager, Victoria, Qantas Airways Limited, C.B.A. House, 114 William Street, Melbourne, Victoria

Harris, B.G., Esq., Principal Engineer, Environment and Security Branch, Airways Operations Division, Department of Transport, P.O. Box 367, Canberra City, Australian Capital Territory

Hayward, Captain L.L., Superintendent Line Operations, Qantas Airways Limited, 70 Hunter Street, Sydney, New South Wales

Howard, R.A., Esq., Assistant Secretary, Australian International Pilots Association, 68 Moncur Street, Woollahra, New South Wales

Huggett, J.W.E., Esq., Senior Assistant Secretary, Airport Planning and Development, Department of Transport, P.O. Box 367, Canberra City, Australian Capital Territory

Hutchinson, J.W., Esq., Assistant Director, Policy Research, S.A. Department of Transport, P.O. Box 1599, GPO, Adelaide, South Australia

Inns, G.J., Esq., Director of Tourism, S.A. Department of Tourism, 18 King William Street, Adelaide, South Australia

Kocher, Mrs. H.I., Vice President, Anti Airport Noise Association Incorporated and Co-ordinator Help for Airport Victims, 23 Wilson Street, Cowandilla, South Australia

Lakeland, E.H., Esq., Controller of Buildings, Department of Transport, P.O. Box 367 , Canberra City, Australian Capital Territory

McLagan, D.S., Esq., Principal Architect (Aviation), Department of Housing and Construction, DHC House, 470 Northbourne Avenue, Dickson, Australian Capital Territory

Murray, Ms., N. Member of Committee, Thebarton Residents Association, 21 Bennett Avenue, Thebarton, South Australia

Murray, N.S., Esq., Airport Handling Controller, Trans Australia Airlines, 50 Franklin Street, Melbourne, Victoria

Nettle, R.A., Esq., Economist, Chamber of Commerce and Industry, South Australia Inc., 12 Pirie Street, Adelaide, South Australia

Oswald, J.K., Esq., M.P., Member for Morphett, 6866 Anzac Highway, Glenelg, South Australia

Palmer, G.R., Esq., Councillor, City of West Torrens, Municipal Offices, 165 Burbridge Road, Adelaide, South Australia

Piening, R.H., Esq., Principal Airports Engineer, Airport Planning and Development Branch, Department of Transport, P.O. Box 367, Canberra City, Australian Capital Territory

Rein, Ms. Α.Ξ., Chief Planning and Research Officer, S.A. Department of Tourism, 18 King William Street, Adelaide, South Australia

Roberts, D. St.I., Esq., Director, National Board, South Australian Chapter, Australian Federation of Travel Agents Ltd., P.O. Box 1972, Adelaide, South Australia

Rowe, L.G., Esq., Director-General, S.A. Department of Trade and Industry, G.P.O. Box 1264, Adelaide, South Australia

Scott, J.L., Esq., M.P., Federal Member for Hindmarsh, Shop 5 , Findon Village, 127 Findon Road, Findon, South Australia

Smith, C.G., Esq., Member and Past President, The Motor Inn and Motel Association of Australia (S.A. Branch), 8 Angas Street, Kent Town, South Australia

Spurr, W.T., Esq., Chief Executive Officer, Australian Hotels Association (S.A. Branch), 45 Grenfell Street, Adelaide, South Australia

Truskin, G., Esq., Property Development Manager, Trans Australia Airlines, 50 Franklin Street, Melbourne, Victoria

Unsworth, I.H. Esq., Director, Forecasting and Statistics, Air Transport Policy Division, Department of Transport, P.O. Box 367, Canberra City, Australian Capital Territory

Westmore, C.L., Esq., Supervisor, Air Traffic Control Operations Search and Rescue, SA/NT Region, Department of Transport, P.O. Box 367, Canberra City, Australian Capital Territory

Williams, D.J., Esq., Deputy Town Clerk, City of Adelaide, Town Hall, Adelaide, South Australia

Wright, J.D., Esq., M.P., Deputy Leader of the Opposition and Member for Adelaide, Shop 9, Richmond Village, 200 West Beach Road, Richmond, South Australia

C O N T E N T S

Paragraph

THE REFERENCE 1

THE COMMITTEE'S INVESTIGATION 3

BACKGROUND 10

THE NEED 11

Committee's Conclusions 20

THE PROPOSAL 22

Terminal Building 27

Aprons and Taxiways 34

The Runway 36

Road Access and Car Parking 37

Services 38

Security 40

Utilisation 41

Alternatives to the Proposal 45

REACTIONS TO THE PROPOSAL 47

Aircraft Noise 49

Pollution 54

Safety 56

Wake Turbulence 58

Airport Relocation 61

Master Plan and Environmental Impact Statement 62

Economic Benefits 65

Committee's Conclusions 67

THE SITE 70

Committee's Conclusion 81

OTHER OBSERVATIONS

Curfew and Noise Abatement 83

Radio Aids 84

Staffing of ITB 85

Committee's Conclusion 89

Disposal of Aircraft Garbage 90

Committee's Conclusion 91

92 LIMIT OF COST

Paragraph

PROGRAM 93

Committee 1s Conclusion 95

RECOMMENDATIONS AND CONCLUSIONS 96

APPENDIX A - CONSTRUCTION

A. TERMINAL BUILDING Building Structure 97

Building Form 98

External Cladding and Finishes 99

Internal Cladding and Finishes 100

Mechanical Services 101

Electrical Services 102

Fire Protection 108

B. ENGINEERING WORKS AND SERVICES Aircraft Pavements 111

Other Pavements 116

Car Parking 118

External Electrical Services 119

Domestic Water 122

Fire Services 123

Sewerage 124

Stormwater Drainage 125

Landscaping 126

ILLUSTRATIONS

Site Layout Plan A.

Site Plan B.

ITB - Floor Plan C.

ITB - Elevations D.

ITB - Sections E .

PARLIAMENTARY STANDING COMMITTEE ON PUBLIC WORKS

ADELAIDE AIRPORT: UPGRADING FOR INTERNATIONAL SERVICES

R E P O R T

By resolution on 17 February 1982 the House of

Representatives referred the proposal to upgrade Adelaide Airport for International Services to the Parliamentary

Standing Committee on Public Works for investigation and report to Parliament.

The Committee has the honour to report as follows:

THE REFERENCE

1. The proposal referred to the Committee consists of the following elements:

- a single storey terminal building including

facilities for arriving and departing passengers;

- an apron to accommodate two Boeing 747 (B747)

aircraft adjacent to the new terminal; - a taxiway to connect the new apron to the

existing taxiway system;

- widening of some taxiway fillets to allow

regular use by B747 or other wide-body international jet aircraft;

- engineering services, access roads, car parking areas; and - improvements to the airport electrical

reticulation system.

2· The estimated cost of the proposed work is $10.9 million at January 1982 prices.

THE COMMITTEE'S INVESTIGATION

3. The Committee received written submissions from

the Department of Transport (DOT) and the Department of Housing and Construction and took evidence from their

representatives at a public hearing in Adelaide on 31 March and 1 and 2 April 1982.

1 .

4. The Committee also received written submissions

and took evidence from Mr John Scott, M.P., Federal Member

for Hindmarsh; Mr Jack Wright, M.P., Deputy Leader of the

Opposition and Member for Adelaide, South Australian

Parliament; Mr Heini Becker, M.P., Member for Hanson, South Australian Parliament; Mr John Oswald, M.P., Member

for Morphett, South Australian Parliament.

5. Mr Ralph Jacobi, M.P., Federal Member for Hawker,

presented a written submission.

6. The following organisations and individuals

presented written submissions and their representatives also

gave evidence; The South Australian Government, the Corporation of the City of Adelaide, the Council of the

City of West Torrens, the Thebarton Residents Association,

the Anti Airport Noise Association and Help for Airport

Victims Committee, the Australian International Pilots

Association, the Metropolitan Regional Organisation Western,

Trans Australia Airlines, Qantas Airways Limited, Ansett

Handling Services, the Chamber of Commerce and Industry,

S .A. Inc, the South Australian Chapter of the Australian Federation of Travel Agents Ltd, the Motor Inn and Motel

Association of Australia (S.A. Branch), the Australian

Hotels Association (S.A. Branch) and Mr Stephen Blight.

7. The Committee also received a number of letters

and written submissions from private individuals and

organisations concerning the proposal.

8. Prior to the public hearing the Committee

inspected the proposed site for the International Terminal

Building (ITB) and apron.

9. The Committee's proceedings will be printed as

Minutes of Evidence.

BACKGROUND

10. This is the second reference relating to works proposed at Adelaide on which the Committee has reported in 1982 . In

March 1982 the Committee's final report relating to the Upgrading of Airport Facilities for the Introduction of Domestic Wide- Body Aircraft was tabled (Second Report of 1982). That report related to works proposed at Hobart and Adelaide Airports for

2,

the introduction of domestic wide-bdoy aircraft and the consequer redeployment of the existing domestic fleet. In recommending

that the Adelaide component of the proposal should proceed, the

Committee recommended that the House of Representatives refer

to the House of Representatives Standing Committee on Environment and Conservation the matter of aircraft noise. The Committee

understands that the Minister for Transport and the Minister for

Home Affairs and Environment have the recommendation under active

consideration. The Committee also understands that the Ministei will also be responding to other conclusions and recommendations

relating to the more vigorous application of noise abatement

procedures and the operation of light executive jet aircraft and

the ground running of turbo-propeller aircraft within curfew houi

THE NEED

11- At present Adelaide does not have direct access to

scheduled regular international flights and is the only capital

city without this facility. Use of Adelaide Airport by inter­ national flights has been confined to infrequent charter flights

by B707 and DCS aircraft and by aircraft using Adelaide as a weather alternate.

12. Adelaide has the second highest percentage of European

born population of all capital cities and in 1979/80 received

13.2 per cent of all international air travellers to Australia.

In the year ended March 1981 an average of 2000 international

passengers per week travelled in each direction to and from Soutl· Australia. This number comprised 1500 South Australian resident,

travellers and 700 overseas visitors who indicated South Australj as their State of main destination on their Immigration Arrival Card.

13. South Australians wishing to travel overseas in these circumstances are required to make their way to existing gateway

ports at Sydney, Melbourne or Perth. This arrangement imposes add-on costs to the price of overseas travel. These costs consis of the cost of domestic airfares or land transport costs to and

from the gateway port and because many domestic flights to gate­

way ports do not readily link up with international flights, it

necessitates additional time waiting for connections which may require overnight accommodation at the gateway port. In evidenc

3 .

it was stated that 80 per cent of South Australian travellers

leave the country through Tullamarine, travel on 15 different

international carriers and on 80 flights per week.

14. In 1979 the Joint Government Advisory Committee on Adelaide's Airport requirements found that regular international

services would not become viable until the 1990s. The Committee's report did recommend, however, that planning options

for both the existing and future major airport sites incorporate

international airline facilities.

15. The report of the House of Representatives Select

Committee on Tourism of 1978 (Parliamentary Paper 281/1978),

although recommending international services for Townsville made

no recommendations for similar facilities to be provided at

Adelaide Airport.

16. The Department of Transport, in evidence, indicated

that the provision of international facilities at Adelaide

Airport, was not high on the departmental list of airport priorities. The decision by the Government to provide inter­

national facilities at Adelaide Airport reinforces the views

taken by this Committee in earlier reports (Redevelopment of Brisbane International Airport - Further Dredging and Reclamation

Ninth Report of 1981; and Upgrading of Airport Facilities for the

Introduction of Domestic Wide-Body Aircraft - Second Report of 1982) that a set of national priorities for airport development

should be determined in place of the current ad hoc approach to

airport development.

17. A recent reassessment of the economic viability

of the Adelaide population base to support sustained regular

international flights has been carried out. The reassessment,

carried out by the Department of Transport (DOT), is based on an analysis of Bureau of Statistics data for 1979 and estimates

the additional demand that would be generated as a result of the provision of direct access to international flights. The international carriers provided evidence supporting this assess­

ment. The DOT study indicates that for 1979 the estimated traffic generation was 133 470 passengers whose origins and

destinations are set out in Table 1 below;

4.

TABLE 1 - Potential International

Passengers Available for Carriage

on International Services, Adelaide, 1979

Origin destination

Passenger movements per annum Per

Asia 44 680 33

United Kingdom 39 740 30

New Zealand 49 050 37

TOTAL 133 470 100

1°· Some submissions to the Committee stressed the

benefits to be gained from direct international airline

freight services. The Committee does not accept this view

as being a substantial factor in support of the proposal to

provide international facilities at Adelaide.

19. Evidence indicated that attempts to encourage

arrangements between international carriers and domestic

airlines to overcome the penalties now being experienced by

international travellers to and from South Australia had

been unsuccessful, and no meaningful developments could be anticipated in this area.

20. Committee's Conclusions International air

travellers, to and from Adelaide, are penalised by the

existing airline arrangements, particularly the lack of an international gateway at Adelaide.

21. The Committee accepts that there is marginal justification for providing international airline terminal

facilities in Adelaide, provided the Government is convinced that the penalties now being experienced cannot be removed in any other way.

THE PROPOSAL

22. The proposal is to construct a separate international

terminal building at Adelaide airport capable of handling a

full load of passengers from one B747 aircraft and to construct an apron capable of accommodating two B747 aircraft.

5.

23. This will necessitate the construction of a new

building, an aircraft apron, extending an existing taxiway

and providing some fillet widening.

24. To enable these facilities to be provided at the site proposed it would also be necessary to realign the access

road leading to the domestic terminal, to provide a carpark

for 250 vehicles and to provide electrical power, water and

sewerage services.

25. The breakup of the estimated cost of the proposal,

at January 1982 prices, is $10.9 million made up as follows:

$m

Terminal building 4.1

Apron and other aircraft pavements 3.0

Access roads, carpark, engineering services 3.8

TOTAL 10.9

26. Construction details are at Appendix A of this

report.

27. Terminal Building The extent of the proposed

terminal building is based on the ITB recently constructed at Townsville which was designed to cater for one fully loaded

B747 aircraft to normal levels of service.

28. Facilities to be provided in the terminal will

include health, immigration and customs, public areas and

space for a concessionaire.

29. Departing passengers and members of the public will

enter the terminal through the main entrance in the north­

west corner. The entrance leads to the public concourse area which will have passenger check-in areas adjacent to which

will be the baggage make up areas where items of non-cabin

baggage are placed in baggage containers before loading on

aircraft.

30. After checking in passengers will proceed through

immigration to the departure lounge before boarding their

aircraft.

31. Members of the public should be able to view departing and arriving aircraft and await the arrival of

6.

passengers from the public viewing area, which is an

extension of the public concourse, in the southern corner of the building.

32. Arriving passengers will enter the terminal and

proceed through health and immigration checks and after

claiming their baggage from a conveyor belt will proceed

through customs and enter the public concourse.

33. It is proposed that arriving and departing

passengers would leave or board their aircraft via an

elevated aerobridge. The inclusion of this feature will

necessitate the construction of a stair tower and lift at

the southern end to provide access to the static link

aerobridge. The additional cost of this feature is

$500,000. The Committee notes that aerobridges are not provided at Brisbane, Perth, Hobart or Darwin International Airport

Terminals, and is not aware of significant disabilities

resulting from this lack. Furthermore, it is understood

that the aerobridge at Townsville was provided to meet

quarantine requirements, not relevant to Adelaide. The

Committee believes there to be insufficient justification

for the inclusion of the aerobridge and associated tower.

The area of the terminal involved will therefore need to be redesigned.

34. Aprons and Taxiways The proposed apron is sited

to accommodate one B747 in an aerobridge nose-in position

and one B747 free-standing. Without an aerobridge the two aircraft would be nose-in free-standing. The size of the

apron and the number of parking positions has been determined

by considering the potential of the Adelaide air traffic

market and likely airline scheduling. Two positions will

enable one aircraft to stay overnight whilst permitting one early morning arrival.

35. The apron will be connected to the main runway

and existing taxiway system by extending taxiway B by 100 metres.

36. The Runway The existing main (05/23) runway is

2582 metres long, 45 metres wide, with 7.5 metre wide

7.

runway shoulders. The Department of Housing and Construction

advised that the runway is of sufficient strength to handle

the introduction of international services. There are no

proposals to extend the main runway beyond the length now

available. The length of the main runway may, however,

result in restrictions to the operating weights of large international aircraft. The Australian International Pilots

Association and Qantas both stated in evidence that the

runway is of sufficient length to enable aircraft to operate on stated routes, i.e. Adelaide-Singapore direct, Adelaide-

Perth direct and Adelaide-New Zealand direct.

37. Road Access and Car Parking Construction of the

terminal at the proposed site will necessitate some road

realignment. This realignment will result in the existing access road to the domestic terminal being moved further

east, the addition of a one way road loop servicing the

entrance to the terminal building and a carpark constructed

between the terminal and the realigned road servicing the domestic terminal. This arrangement facilitates access to

the ITB and avoids the need for traffic from the ITB having

to proceed past the domestic terminal when leaving the

airport.

38. Services The capacity of the existing electrical

reticulation system is now fully utilised and will need to

be upgraded to provide the additional requirements of an

ITB complex. It is therefore proposed to provide a new high voltage feeder cable for incoming power from the

airport boundary to serve both the ITB complex and the

domestic terminal area. This rationalisation will result in savings in overall cost and further savings can be made

by the provision of a combined standby power generation facility for, again, the ITB and the domestic terminal. Accordingly, it is proposed to provide a new high voltage

feeder cable and a powerhouse to provide standby power to

both terminals.

8.

39. In addition, the ITB will be provided with water for

domestic and fire fighting purposes, a sewerage system, apron

lighting and carpark lighting.

40. Security Provision has been made in the design

of the gate lounge to permit outward bound passengers and their baggage to be screened and for the subsequent segregation

of screened passengers. The boundary between the public

(landside) and the secure (airside) areas will consist of a

combination of wire mesh security fencing, lockable doors and gates.

41. Utilisation DOT stated that indications from the

airline industry are that a service level of six flights,

most of which would transit through Adelaide, is currently

planned. It was anticipated that at least one of these flights

would be a terminating flight.

42. Qantas stated in evidence that their anticipated

movements would range from between 12 to 20 per week. On the

assumption that the facilities will become available towards

the end of 1982, Qantas intends to provide for the operation

of services to the United Kingdom/Europe, Asia and

New Zealand from the date the facilities become available.

43. British Airways (BA) plan to commence operations

with one arrival and one departure per week probably en route

to Sydney. Depending on the volume of competition and

capacity,this frequency will increase to twice a week within about one year of the commencement of services. BA will

commence operations as soon as the terminal is ready, but these plans are contingent on BA obtaining Commonwealth

Government approval.

44. Singapore Airlines advised the Committee that

subject to Commonwealth Government approval its operation of

one flight per week from Adelaide would commence in

April 1983.

9.

45. Alternatives to the Proposal DOT advised the

Committee that two other alternatives were considered during

the initial investigations into the provision of facilities

for international services. These alternatives were:

a. Upgrading of the domestic terminal and apron

area to accommodate the required international

aircraft and passenger processing facilities as

well as domestic airline facilities. Studies carried out by DOT and the Department of Housing

and Construction indicated that given space

constraints imposed by the proximity of the 12/20

runway strip and a possible parallel taxiway, and

the existing building area, and given the structure

and extent of the present domestic terminal and

associated aprons, this option would result in an

insufficient number of parking positions and

associated ground manoeuvring area.

b . Provide limited international aircraft and passenger

processing facilities with health, immigration and

customs clearance activities being carried out

at an existing gateway port. This would preclude the operation of direct outward bound and inward

flights, pose security problems and is inconsistent

with present practice.

46. The possibility of using RAAF Base Edinburgh

for international flights was also pursued by the Committee. The Department of Housing and Construction advised that the

strength of pavements at Edinburgh is not adequate for B747 aircraft loadings and traffic proposed and the taxiways are

two narrow. The Department estimated that the cost to provide the international services proposed for Adelaide Airport at RAAF Edinburgh would not be less than $20 million.

10.

REACTIONS TO THE PROPOSAL

47. Those opposed to the proposal reiterated many of

the points made at the previous enquiry into the proposed

upgrading of airport facilities for the introduction of

domestic wide-body aircraft. These concerned aircraft noise,

safety, air pollution and the effects of vibration and

wake turbulence on houses near the airport boundary in the flight path of the main runway.

48. The majority of those opposing the proposal were

not against international services to Adelaide. Their

opposition was directed to further development of Adelaide Airport which they believed would further delay decisions

concerning the construction of a new Adelaide Airport.

The lack of decision, and the continued development of the

airport at its present site, they believe, would worsen the

level of aircraft noise, add to air pollution and increase the possibility of an aircraft crashing into the houses under

the flight path.

49. Aircraft Noise As mentioned above, the Committee

recommended in its final report relating to the upgrading

of airport facilities for the introduction of domestic

wide-body aircraft that the Minister for Transport should refer

the matter of aircraft noise to the House of Representatives

Standing Committee on Environment and Conservation. The Committee understands this is now being considered by relevant Ministers. Draft terms of reference for the enquiry are at

paragraph 59 of the Committee's report.

50. The Committee's report also drew attention to the

number of properties, estimated in 1980 by DOT to be within

the 25 Noise Exposure Index, and of the reduction in this number by 1990.

51. Evidence provided by DOT for this reference

indicates that takeoff noise levels of B747 aircraft will

be lower than those currently being produced by B727 aircraft and noise levels on approach to landing will be slightly higher

than DC9 aircraft.

11.

52. in overall terms, DOT stated in evidence that B747

aircraft will be about as noisy as a DC9 on both takeoff and

landing.

53. On balance the Committee believes that the operation

of B747 aircraft at the level proposed will not worsen the

noise problem.

54. Pollution A number of witnesses asserted that

particulates and fuel components from aircraft operating

from the airport have formed soot-like film on exposed

surfaces of houses. The Committee believes there to be many

potential sources of this material other than aircraft, such

as internal combustion engines. At the Committee's request DOT is carrying out tests on water tanks of some houses

under the flight path of the main runway near the airport

boundary in order to establish the level of pollution and the source of the alleged water contamination.

55. The tests will initially involve gas chromatography

analysis of domestic kerosene and aviation fuel to use as

bench marks for the subsequent analysis of water samples.

For hydrocarbons the tests will involve gas chromatographic

analysis of samples taken from the water tanks and a control

sample taken from a site away from the airport. For particulate

analysis the samples will be passed through filter paper which can trap particles down to .45 microns in size. The results

of the tests will be made available to the Committee.

56. Safety A number of witnesses stated their opposition

to the proposed introduction of international flights was based

on safety. They believed the main runway to be of insufficient length to handle large international aircraft and the location

of houses under the flight path would expose them to greater safety risk than exists already. As mentioned previously, Qantas, the Australian International Pilots Association and DOT all stated

in evidence that the existing 05/23 runway is adequate for the international operations currently envisaged. The main runway

is 2528 metres in length. DOT stated in evidence that international operations from Australia are currently being carried

out from runways of lesser lengths as shown in Table 2 below:

12.

------- ---------- — — —

TABLE 2 - Runway Lengths -Brisbane and Townsville

Aircraft Type Runway Length Destination

Brisbane B747 Combi 04/22 2366 Tokyo

Brisbane B747-238B(RR) 04/22 2366 Hong Kong

Townsville B747SP 01/19 2438 Honolulu

Townsville B747-238B 01/19 2438 Auckland

57. Impartial evidence by leading overseas aviation

writers, tabled by DOT, tended to suggest that safety criteria

established and administered by DOT are conservative and that

this has resulted in a comparatively good safety record.

Provided safety measures and standards continue to be rigidly

enforced and provided Adelaide Airport has the requisite air

traffic control and navigation facilities available, the

Committee sees no reason why, on the grounds of safety alone,

international flights should not be able to operate from

Adelaide.

58. Wake Turbulence Some residents and their

representatives asserted that significantly larger aircraft

would subject houses near the airport boundary under the

flight path of the main runway to increased levels of wake

turbulence. These houses, they asserted, are already subjected to this phenomenon which causes short-lived but

strong wind gusts, roof tiles to be lifted and windows broken.

59. DOT advised the Committee that it is not possible to directly compare wake turbulence produced by B747 and

B727 aircraft because of the many variables which have to

be considered. The intensity of the downwash of air is a

function of the speed of the aircraft, the wing loading and

the shape of the wing. DOT stated that experience at airports around Australia has shown that the recorded damaging effect

of wake turbulence has been minimal, being confined to a small number of tiles being dislodged as a result of

inadequate fixing.

13.

60. The Committee believes nevertheless that the magnitude

of wake turbulence under the flight path will not decrease with

the operation of B747 type aircraft. In the short term the effects

of wake turbulence on the houses in question should be monitored

and action taken to minimise any property damage. In the longer term, and in concert with the development of a provisional

master plan for the present airport, and in concert with the

South Australian Airfields Committee examination of alternative

sites, some rezoning and redevelopment of areas adjacent to the current Adelaide Airport significantly affected may be necessary.

61. Airport Relocation As mentioned in the Committee's

previous report, the South Australian Airfields Committee is

currently endeavouring to identify possible sites for a new

airport for Adelaide as a matter of priority. The Committee

urges both the South Australian and Commonwealth Governments

to react quickly to the State Airfield Committee's

recommendations.

62. Master Plan and Environmental Impact Statement The

Minister for Transport and the Minister for Home Affairs and

Environment recently announced that a draft Environmental Impact Statement and provisional master plan would be released for public comment in July 1982. The Committee understands the

environmental and social consequences likely to be associated

with the continued development and use of Adelaide Airport, and any increase in international air traffic over the anticipated

4 to 6 flights per week, will be addressed in the provisional master plan and draft Environmental Impact Statement.

63. The Committee notes that no Envionmental Impact Statement was required for the proposed ITB works although a

public information program was conducted by DOT to enable

Adelaide residents to familiarise themselves with it and to

comment on it.

64. The Committee is critical of the fact that a full

Environmental Impact Statement was not prepared before the

decision to provide international facilities at Adelaide Airport was made.

65. Economic Benefits A number of organisations,

in supporting the proposal, stated direct access to

international flights would benefit the South Australian

economy. The South Australian Government stated the tourist

industry, worth nearly $300 million to the State, has had

its growth retarded in recent years and access to international

flights would provide opportunities for full utilisation

of the tourist industry infrastructure. Facilities for

international conventions, already available or under

construction, would also benefit from international traffic.

66. Other organisations pointed out access to

international flights would improve the scope for air freight

and the lack of this facility would no longer be a disincentive

to overseas and Australian companies establishing or expanding

their operations in South Australia.

67. Committee's Conclusions The construction of a

separate international terminal building and associated

apron and upgraded electrical services is supported.

68. The Committee is critical of the fact that a full

Environmental Impact Statement was not prepared before the

decision to provide international facilities at Adelaide

Airport was made.

69. The design of the proposed terminal building is satisfactory with the exception of the stair tower and

elevated aerobridge which should not be included.

15.

THE SITE

70· The proposed site for the ITS complex is adjacent to

the main airport entrance road, about 500 metres north-east of the domestic terminal.

71. It is understood that the final master plan for

Adelaide Airport (not yet available) will provide for the

eventual shift of the current domestic terminal to an area

immediately adjacent to the proposed site for the ITB. When

giving evidence at the public hearing DOT admitted that the

current siting for the ITB was determined to permit the domestic

terminal to be located further from adjacent houses because

the volume of domestic traffic was expected to impose a greater

noise nuisance to nearby residences.

72. Houses about 350 metres from the ITB site would be

exposed to noise from aircraft engines and auxiliary power

units (APUs). The level of noise from these sources has not

been assessed but it can reasonably be expected to be above that

generated by general aviation aircraft which use the area

now, and to persist for longer periods than noise made by

departing and arriving aircraft using the main runway.

The proposed works include the provision of a bund close to

this housing to alleviate the noise nuisance caused by aircraft using the ITB. A blast deflection barrier is also proposed in

conjunction with the ITB at this site at a cost of $40,000.

73. The Committee sought further advice from DOT and

the Department of Housing and Construction on the practicalities

and comparative cost of locating the ITB complex on a site opposite the present domestic terminal (the "alternative

site").

74. DOT advised the Committee that the alternative site

is inconsistant with the provisional master plan for Adelaide Airport which provides for the location of a future domestic

terminal complex alongside the proposed site. Further

disadvantages of the alternative site include increased taxiing distances for aircraft, the elimination of the possibility of constructing a parallel 05L/23R runway in the

future, the relocation of some general aviation, and difficulties

of access between the domestic terminal and the ITB.

16 .

75 . However it must be made clear that the capacities of

the current runways at Adelaide Airport are sufficient to meet

forecast aircraft movements until 2010 so that the provision of

an additional runway is not accepted as being critical.

76. The Department of Housing and Construction advised the Committee that the increased cost of constructing the ITB at the

alternative site is assessed at between $0.5 and 0.75 million. Additional costs would arise from site preparation, 200 metres

of full strength taxiway, electrical reticulation, water supply

and sewerage. DOT advised the Committee that no time penalty

attaches to the use of the alternative site although similar

assurances have not been received from the Department of Housing and Construction in this respect.

77. The Committee believes the increased taxiing distances

resulting from locating the ITB at the alternative site are not

a significant factor mitigating against the site in the light of taxiing distances operating at other Australian airports.

78. The Committee realises that the separate location of the

ITB and domestic terminal will create problems for passengers on

domestic flights connecting with international flights but the

Committee believes the number of travellers at Adelaide Airport so affected will be significantly less than the number of travellers

at other airports where a similar separation of domestic and

international terminals exists.

79. The alternative site has the advantage of being about 650 metres from residential areas and is contiguous to aprons serving the present domestic terminal.

80. It could also be argued that locating the ITB at the proposed site would add weight to locating the new domestic terminal

next to it. The future development of Adelaide Airport will be the

subject of a provisional master plan and draft Environmental Impact

Statement, which will be made available for public comment.

The siting of any future domestic terminal complex will be an important aspect of future development about which public comment

must first be sought.

81. Committee's Conclusion The proposed site for the

International Terminal Building at Adelaide Airport is not suitable. The International Terminal Building should be

constructed opposite the present domestic terminal.

82. At the Committee's meeting on 29 April 1982 it

was moved by Senator Foreman, seconded Senator Martyr, that

the following paragraph be inserted in the draft report and

the Committee agreed:

"SENATOR FOREMAN'S VIEWS

My views on the further development of Adelaide Airport are in the Committee's Second Report of

1982 (Final Report relating to the Upgrading of

Facilities for the Introduction of Domestic Wide-

Body Aircraft). I wish to reiterate that before any further development of Adelaide Airport is

undertaken,tangible and positive steps must be

taken now by the Commonwealth and State Governments

for the construction of a new airport for Adelaide.

The construction of an international terminal should be deferred at least pending the issue of the provisional master plan and draft Environmental

Impact Statement for public comment, an assessment

of public reaction, the completion of a final Environmental Impact Statement and master plan,

and preferably until after the South Australian

and Commonwealth Governments have taken the positive steps, mentioned above, for the construction

of a new airport for Adelaide."

OTHER OBSERVATIONS

83. Curfew and Noise Abatement International flights

will arrive and depart Adelaide outside curfew hours. The Committee believes aircraft movements should be restricted

as far as possible to daylight hours. The Committee also reiterates recommendations, made in its previous report for

domestic wide-body aircraft, concerning the scope for more rigorous application of noise abatement procedures. The

Minister for Transport so far has not responded to this recommendation. All international flights wherever possible,

and without pre judicing safety, should land from the direction of the sea and take off over the sea.

18.

84. Radio Aids The Australian International Pilots

Association pointed out to the Committee that the DOT

submission made no mention of radio aids. Adelaide Airport

would therefore be the only international airport in Australia serving international routes that would be without International

Distance Measuring Equipment (DMEI). DOT advised the Committee that the provision of DMEI is planned for Adelaide and the

installation of a Category 1 Instrument Landing System on

Runway 05 is under consideration. The Committee believes both

systems should be operational when regular international

flights commence and planning and funding should proceed on that basis.

85. Staffing of ITB The Committee sought information

on the staffing of the ITB by relevant Commonwealth departments.

The ITB complex will require to be manned by officers from DOT,

the Department of Business and Consumer Affairs (Bureau of

Customs), the Department of Immigration and Ethnic Affairs, the Department of Health and the Australian Federal Police.

86. Information provided by these departments indicates that the terminal will be manned by staff assigned to positions

which have yet to be created, by staff re-deployed from other

areas and by staff on overtime.

87. Advice from departments indicates that additional

capital costs of at least $0.42 million are required and are above the estimated construction costs considered in this

report. The major requirements are from the Department of

Business and Consumer Affairs with capital costs of some

$257,000 representing required expenditure in visual display

units, printer, closed circuit television cameras and monitors and the Department of Health of $150,000 for the provision of a macerator.

88. Advice indicated that additional annual operating

costs for the Department of Business and Consumer Affairs,

the Department of Health, the Department of Immigration and

Ethnic Affairs and the Australian Federal Police total no less

than $250,000 per annum, although it is clear that approaches to the Public Service Board for staffing changes in most cases have yet to be made.

19 .

The Public Service Board 89. Committee's Conclusion

should conduct a co-ordinated review of the staffing by

Commonwealth departments of the International Terminal

Complex. This review should include the requirements of

all departments, and especially encompass the need for new positions to be created, the need for and the level of

overtime, the practicalities of using part-time staff and

the consequences of using,either on a full-time or part-time

basis, redeployed staff.

90. Disposal of Aircraft Garbage The Committee is

concerned that satisfactory facilities for the disposal

of garbage from aircraft will not be available at the airport

when international flights commence. It is understood that

a macerator/steriliser unit will be provided, however, as it will not be available by October 1982, interim arrangements

for garbage disposal will be required.

91. Committee's Conclusion As a matter of urgency, relevant

departments should ensure that facilities at Adelaide Airport for the disposal of garbage from international aircraft are

operational when international flights commence.

LIMIT OF COST

92. The limit of cost estimate for the works at January 1982

prices is $10.9 million made up as follows:

Terminal building (including furniture and fittings) Apron and other aircraft pavements

$

4 100 000

3 000 000

Access road, car park and engineering services 3 800 000

10 900 000

PROGRAM

93. The works are planned to commence during May 1982.

The following elements of the proposal are to be completed to a stage which will allow for the commencement of international

flights in October 1982:

20.

- sufficient of the taxiway and apron area

to accommodate a single B747 aircraft;

- tug and ground service equipment pavement

areas to service a single aircraft;

- the building structure, roofing, cladding and glazing;

- adequate partitioning to provide the required

level of security;

- sufficient lighting and power;

- water supply and sewer drainge; - public toilets;

- roadworks and car parking; - fire protection works.

94. The whole of the works are planned to be completed by March 1983.

95. Committee's Conclusion With the exception of the

stair tower, lift and elevated aerobridge, estimated to cost

$500 000, the Committee recommends the construction of work to a maximum of $11,150 million at the alternative site.

RECOMMENDATIONS AND CONCLUSIONS

96. The summary of recommendations and conclusions of

the Committee and the paragraph in the report to which each refers is set out below.

Paragraph

1. INTERNATIONAL AIR TRAVELLERS, TO AND FROM

ADELAIDE, ARE PENALISED BY THE EXISTING

AIRLINE ARRANGEMENTS, PARTICULARLY THE LACK OF AN INTERNATIONAL GATEWAY AT ADELAIDE. 20

2. THE COMMITTEE ACCEPTS THAT THERE IS MARGINAL

JUSTIFICATION FOR PROVIDING INTERNATIONAL

AIRLINE TERMINAL FACILITIES IN ADELAIDE, PROVIDED THE GOVERNMENT IS CONVINCED THAT

THE PENALTIES NOW BEING EXPERIENCED CANNOT BE REMOVED IN ANY OTHER WAY. 21

I

21.

3 .

4 .

5.

6 .

7.

THE CONSTRUCTION OF A SEPARATE

INTERNATIONAL TERMINAL BUILDING AND

ASSOCIATED APRON AND UPGRADED ELECTRICAL

SERVICES IS SUPPORTED. 67

THE COMMITTEE IS CRITICAL OF THE FACT

THAT A FULL ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT WAS NOT PREPARED BEFORE THE

DECISION TO PROVIDE INTERNATIONAL FACILITIES AT ADELAIDE AIRPORT WAS

MADE. 6 8

THE DESIGN OF THE PROPOSED TERMINAL

BUILDING IS SATISFACTORY WITH THE

EXCEPTION OF THE STAIR TOWER AND

ELEVATED AEROBRIDGE WHICH SHOULD NOT

BE INCLUDED. 69

THE PROPOSED SITE FOR THE INTERNATIONAL

TERMINAL BUILDING AT ADELAIDE AIRPORT

IS NOT SUITABLE. THE INTERNATIONAL TERMINAL BUILDING SHOULD BE CONSTRUCTED OPPOSITE THE PRESENT DOMESTIC TERMINAL. 81

THE PUBLIC SERVICE BOARD SHOULD CONDUCT

A CO-ORDINATED REVIEW OF THE STAFFING BY COMMONWEALTH DEPARTMENTS OF THE INTER­

NATIONAL TERMINAL COMPLEX. THIS REVIEW SHOULD INCLUDE THE REQUIREMENTS

OF ALL DEPARTMENTS, AND ESPECIALLY ENCOMPASS THE NEED FOR NEW POSITIONS TO

BE CREATED, THE NEED FOR AND THE LEVEL

OF OVERTIME, THE PRACTICALITIES OF USING PART-TIME STAFF AND THE CONSEQUENCES OF

USING, EITHER ON A FULL-TIME OR PART­ TIME BASIS, REDEPLOYED STAFF. 89

AS A MATTER OF URGENCY, RELEVANT DEPARTMENTS SHOULD ENSURE THAT FACILITIES

AT ADELAIDE AIRPORT FOR THE DISPOSAL OF GARBAGE FROM INTERNTIONAL AIRCRAFT ARE

OPERATIONAL WHEN INTERNATIONAL FLIGHTS

COMMENCE. 91

22.

Paragraph

9. THE LIMIT OF COST ESTIMATE FOR THE

WORKS AT JANUARY 1982 PRICES IS

$10.9 MILLION. 92

10. WITH THE EXCEPTION OF THE STAIR TOWER,

LIFT AND ELEVATED AEROBRIDGE, ESTIMATED

TO COST $500 000, THE COMMITTEE

RECOMMENDS THE CONSTRUCTION OF WORK

TO A MAXIMUM OF $11,150 MILLION AT THE ALTERNATIVE SITE. 95

Paragraph

(M.H. BUNGEY) Chairman

Parliamentary Standing Committee on Public Works, Parliament House, CANBERRA, ACT

29 April 1982.

APPENDIX A.

CONSTRUCTION

A. TERMINAL BUILDING

97. Building Structure The building structure will

consist of steel portal frames on concrete pad footings with a reinforced concrete slab floor. The building will

be of single storey construction.

98. Building Form Glazing will be restricted to

public areas and lounges. The false ceiling throughout

the building will conceal engineering services and assist

in noise suppression.

99. External Cladding and Finishes Prefinished

lightweight cladding will be used for external walls.

Window frames will be coloured anodised aluminium with fixed glazing.

100. Internal Cladding and Finishes Walls will be

plaster board with protective rails and finishes as

appropriate to achieve the planned decor. Ceilings to

public spaces will be acoustic board. Floors will be

carpeted throughout with ceramic tiles in toilets and other wet areas. Plant rooms will have bare concrete floors

treated for dust control.

101. Mechanical Services Occupied areas of the building will be air conditioned with mechanical ventilation

to toilets, plant rooms and service areas. Refrigerated drinking fountains, set at a level to allow for use by

people in wheel chairs, will be provided. A baggage conveyor, incorporating a "racetrack" collection system

will be provided to the baggage collection area of the

arrivals hall.

102. Electrical Services The terminal complex will be

connected to the State Power Supply Authority grid.

24.

103. Lighting in the larger open spaces and public

areas will be mercury vapour with fluorescent lighting

in offices, toilets and plant areas. Incandescent down

lighting will be used to highlight areas of special function or interest.

104. Emergency, battery powered, lighting will be provided.

105. A public address system will be provided.

106. Provision will be made for a flight information

system which will be installed by user airlines at their expense.

107 . Cable ducting will be provided throughout the

building for the installation of telephone services.

108. Fire Protection A sprinkler system will be

provided throughout the building. The system will be

connected to a warning alarm and the central alarm, panel

for the airport which is located at the airport fire station.

109. Fire hose reels and hand extinguishers will be

placed in suitable locations throughout the complex.

110. Fire partitioning and exits will be constructed

throughout the building in accordance with the relevant building code.

B. ENGINEERING WORKS AND SERVICES

111. Aircraft Pavements The aircraft pavement works

consist of an apron, a connecting taxiway and the widening

of some fillets.

112. The apron area will be constructed to accommodate

two B747-type aircraft, each of maximum all up mass of

350 tonnes.

113. The aircraft parking positions, covering 6,660

square metres of the apron area adjacent to the terminal building will be rigid concrete pavement which will comprise

■ .····

25.

400mm cement concrete on 150mm crushed rock on not less

than 1000mm of sand.

114. The remainder of the apron, which will be

14,000 square metres in area, will be flexible pavement

comprising 50mm bituminous/tar concrete on 300mm fine

crushed rock on 150mm sub-base on not less than 1500mm

sand.

115. The existing pavements which will be used by

international aircraft are of sufficient strength to

handle international aircraft movements. The need for

future resurfacing of aircraft pavements, which would

eventually be required under use by domestic aircraft,

may have to be brought forward. Resurfacing of existing

pavements cannot be justified at present.

116. Other Pavements A 15 metre wide road directly

adjacent to the apron and the terminal building will be

constructed for the movement of aircraft tugs. The road

will be a flexible pavement comprising 25mm bituminous

concrete on 175mm of fine crushed rock on not less than

600mm sand.

117 . Pavements for the movement and parking of ground

service equipment will consist of a parking area adjacent

to the north-east of the terminal building and a link

road between the international and domestic aprons.

118. Car Parking Sealed car parking will be provided

for 250 vehicles between the terminal building and the

main access road. An adjacent unsealed area will be

available for overflow parking.

119. External Electrical Services A new high voltage

feeder main will be provided. It will extend from the

State Power Supply Authority grid at Burbridge Road to the

international and domestic terminals.

120. a central services building will be constructed

adjacent to the ITB carpark to accommodate new emergency

power generating equipment.

26.

121. The aircraft apron will be floodlit and the

lighting of roadways and car parking areas will be of

similar standard to that existing already.

122. Domestic Water The airport domestic water

supply system has sufficient capacity to supply the ITB.

123. Fire Services A separate water supply for fire

protection, required under State building codes, will be

provided. The main supply will be run from the existing

fire service supply in the domestic terminal area.

124. Sewerage The ITB will be connected to the

existing airport sewerage system. The increased load due

to this development is within the capacity of the existing system.

125. Stormwater Drainage Roof areas from the ITB

will be connected by underground pipework to the airport

stormwater drainage system. All pavements will be designed for surface drainage.

126. Landscaping Trees and shrubs will be planted in

the area of the ITB to match the landscaping development already undertaken along and adjacent to the main access

road to the airport.

27.

(angar domestic

-mon.

control to w e r

taxiway'A'

ta x iw a y 'B '

runw ay 0 5 /2 3

A D E L A I D E A IR P O R T :

U P G R AD IN G FO R

IN T E R N A T IO N A L S E R V IC E S

ne w aircraft pavements

SITE LAYOUT P L A N

stairs

AEROBRIDGE

TO APRON

-1 . — I

- Π

□ □ π π

□ □ □ □ □ □ □ □

□ C33 □ □

press

TO CA RPARK

A D E L A I D E A IR P O R T INTERNATIONAL

TERMINAL BUILDING w

arriving

W passengers -> < departing ^ passengers

L E G E N D

1 d e p artu re lounge

2 public viewing

3 airlin e s handling

4 public concourse 5 baggage handling

6 to ilets / baby care

6a staff toilets

7 concessionaires

8 health

9 im m igration

10 customs

11 plant room

12 baggage breakdown

13 covered w a lkw ay

14 1st class passenger lounge

FLOOR P L A N

internationaT

NO RTH W E S T

N O R TH E A S T

ADELAIDE

S O U T H E A S T

SO U TH W E S T

ft EB

Ah»

A D E L A D E A R PO R T E L E V A T IO N S INTERNATIONAL _ ,____ , ,_____ ,

TERMINAL BUILDING f U I___ ___ I I