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Australian Apple and Pear Corporation Act - Australian Apple and Pear Corporation - Report and financial statements, together with Auditor-General's Report - Period - 1 July 1976 to 31 December 1977 (3rd)


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The Parliament of the Commonwealth of Australia

A U STR A LIA N APPLE A N D PEAR CORPORATION

Third Annual Report

1976-77

Presented pursuant to Statute 29 May 1978 Ordered to be printed 9 June 1978

Parliamentary Paper N o. 156/1978

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AUSTRALIAN APPLE AND PEAR CORPORATION ACT 1973-76

Statement by the Minister regarding the operation of the Act.

In persuance of Section 37 of the Australian Apple and Pear Corporation Act 1973-76, I present the Third Report of the Corporation covering the period 1st July 1976 to 31st December 1977.

IAN McCAHON SINCLAIR Minister of State for Primary Industry

March, 1978 CANBERRA, A.C.T.

By authority:

Capitol Press

Melbourne

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THIRD REPORT OF THE AUSTRALIAN APPLE AND PEAR CORPORATION FOR THE PERIOD 1st JULY, 1976 TO 31st DECEMBER, 1977

Australian Apple and Pear Corporation Act 1973-1976

44 Market Street, Melbourne, 3000, March, 1978

The Rt. Hon. the Minister for Primary Industry, Parliament House, Canberra, A.C.T.

PRELIMINARY In accordance with the provisions of the Australian Apple and Pear Corporation Act 1973-76, the Corporation submits to the Rt. Hon. the Minister its report for the period 1st July, 1976 to 31st December, 1977.

COMPOSITION OF THE CORPORATION Chairman: Mr. R.W. Bain (to 4/11/76) Mr. L.G. Leckie, O.B.E. (from 5/11/76)

Members representing Australian Apple and Pear Growers: Mr. R.J. Morey (Deputy Chairman) Mr. R.B. Walker Mr. H.C. Gubler (to 31/8/77) Mr. G.S. Abbotts (from 1/9/77) Mr. B.R. Williams

Members representing the Australian Government: Mr. R.B. Coombs (to 31/8/77) Mr. E.L. Jenkins (from 1/9/77)

Other Members: Mr. R.W. Bain (from 5/11/76 to 31/8/77) Mr. G.R. Muir (to 31/8/77) Mr. P.C. Chandler (to 4/11/76; from 1/9/77) Mr. ,A.G. English, O.B.E. Mr. H. Morgan (from 1/9/77)

General Manager: Mr. W.J. Oldman

Secretary: Mr. R.W. Elms

Overseas Representative: Mr. R.H. Brown (London) 2

The Corporation wishes to record its appreciation of the contributions made by those previous members of the Corporation who served during part of the period covered by the Report - Messrs. R.W. Bain, H.C. Gubler, and G.R. Muir. In particular, the Corporation notes the contribution made by its first Chairman, Mr. R.W. Bain, who subsequently rendered valuable service as a specialist member.

STANDING COMMITTEES Domestic Marketing Committee (Convenor - Mr. P.C. Chandler) Overseas Marketing Committee (Convenor - Mr. L.G. Leckie, O.B.E.)

Shipping Committee (Convenor - Mr. L.G. Leckie, O.B.E.) Processing Committee (Convenor - Mr. P.C. Chandler) Industry Assistance Advisory Committee - (Convenor Mr. L.G. Leckie, O.B.E.)

Quality Control Committee (Convenor - Mr. R.J. Morey)

OVERVIEW

Production The total apple crop in 1977 is estimated at around 17m boxes, somewhat larger than the 1976 “ off” year, although the biennial crop pattern was not as pronounced in some States as in other “ on” years (e.g. Victoria). The Western Australian harvest was severely affected by extensive hail damage which drastically reduced export availability by over 50%.

Pear production was somewhat less than normal, particularly in New South Wales. Details of the estimated production by States are set out below, together with comparisons for 1976.

Apples (Boxes) Pears (Boxes)

1976 1977 1976 1977

TAS 3,989,095 3,638,980 156,915 72,450

NSW 3,069,550 4,764,541 840,125 339,600

WA 2,792,350 1,600,017 287,100 220,000

VIC 2,862,850 3,629,387 5,702,125 5,375,000

QLD 1,348,270 2,299,988 213,675 152,000

WA 1,061,610 1,192,500 507,925 289,000

Total 15,113,725 17,125,413 7,707,865 6,448,050

Apple production in 1978 is expected to be substantially below that of 1977 due mainly to severe frost damage in Tasmania and generally adverse conditions in Eastern Mainland States. The pear crop is likely to be average.

Disposal The pattern of disposal of the apple crop appears to have shown little change from the previous year. After suffering a substantial reduction, exports have now reached a level which it is important to maintain not only for the purpose of providing an

outlet for existing production in the exporting States but also to provide a buffer against seasonal short supply on the domestic market, which remains by far the most remunerative outlet. The Stabilization Scheme can be seen in this context as having a

more far reaching effect than simply assisting the'export sector. It is also helping to ensure price stability in the domestic market which in the long term should advantage both grower and consumer. Whilst the processing outlet is essentially a salvage operation, its development is important as part of the whole orchard operation. Accumulated stocks of processed

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products were reduced during the year, and with the exception of Western Australia, most fruit available has been taken up by processors, particularly for juicing. In general, production and disposal of apples now appear to be more in balance than has been the experience in recent years.

The following table provides an estimate of the disposal pattern:

Apples

Export Market (fresh) 2,398

Domestic Markets (fresh) 10,084

Interstate Markets (fresh) 837

Canning 1,502

Juicing 1,706

Surplus 597

Total 17,124

(‘000 boxes)

The Corporation recognises the essential inter-relationship between all disposal avenues for apples and pears and product research, market research, product de­ velopment and promotion are being actively persued by a number of working committees of the Corporation covering export, domestic marketing, processing and

quality control.

DOMESTIC MARKET

Prices for fresh apples in the main domestic markets were not as high as 1976, due to the increased supplies available, particularly in New South Wales, Western Australia and Victoria. However, despite fears of an over-supply situation, overall market results were reasonable with a steady demand being encouraged by a national promotional campaign. Shipments from Tasmania to Melbourne, Sydney and Brisbane, assisted by the Tasmanian Freight Equalisation Scheme, were moderate (estimated at 373,000 boxes) and did not have any marked effect on general price levels.

The question of quality was again the focus of attention by the Corporation and industry organisations. An intensified public relations campaign was conducted in the industry’s magazine, “ Apple and Pear World” in an endeavour to bring home to growers the fundamental importance of supplying only quality fruit for the market. In general there appears to have been an improvement in the quality and condition of most fruit reaching the consumer which of course involves everybody along the distribution chain. The supervision of quality control standards at State Government level is a difficult matter, but there is recognition of the need for effective control at all points right through to the retailer.

Given a reliable product at retail level, the Corporation believes that consump­ tion of both apples and pears can be increased by effective promotion. In 1977, the Corporation ran a national campaign in conjunction with industry bodies in the States involving television, point of sale merchandising, and a number of specific projects. One of these was a pilot “ Apples for Schools” campaign aiming to provide

school tuck shops with good fruit at reasonable prices. It is proposed to develop the project on a national basis. Whilst the Corporation has no regulatory powers as far as the domestic market is concerned, it sees itself as having a prime responsibility to explore all possible

avenues for maximising local consumption. Quite apart from a major role already being played in promotional campaigns, the Corporation intends to develop a closer association with actual market operations so that growers generally can have access to accurate and up to date market advice.

The Corporation has been active in communicating its views and objectives to the industry in general and a number of visits have been made by the Chairman and

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other members to growing areas in each State for meetings with growers and other industry representatives. Liaison has also been established with State Government Departments concerned with industry matters.

EXPORT MARKETS

(a) UK/EUROPE Apples The 1977 southern hemisphere apple season in UK/Europe was probably the most extraordinary one on record. Poor European crops were followed by drastically reduced shipments from most southern hemisphere suppliers resulting in a situation of acute under-supply. As a result record prices were achieved, in many instances more than double those of 1976.

Prior to the commencement of the season expectations amongst most export apple growers were not high. The 1976 season had brought disastrous returns and many importers, particularly in the UK had suffered severe losses. There were also wide­ spread corrfplaints about the quality and condition of Tasmanian fruit. Against this background there were considerable doubts as to whether importers would be either willing or able to provide the necessary finance for the export operation. Initial approaches by exporters to the market seeking the required level of guaranteed

advances met with complete failure (except in Sweden). A delegation from Australia, consisting of the Chairman and Mr. R.B. Walker had long and exhaustive discussions with importers in all major markets. Importers were advised of a number of measures taken to improve the quality and condition of Tasmanian apples so as to ensure a more reliable product. The delegation succeeded in inducing a number of major importers in the UK to take fruit on a guaranteed advance plus accommodation advance providing any repayment of the latter was guaranteed by a Government. There were also some importers who indicated their interest in straight

guaranteed advance business. With time running out and the first vessels due to arrive, the Tasmanian Govern­ ment took urgent action to establish a temporary marketing authority with the necessary financial backing to enable it to negotiate an arrangement with selected UK importers for the placement of some 500,000 boxes. This underpinned the whole European operation and enabled fruit to be called up to fill the ships. Subsequently, arrangements were made by Tasfruit Pty. Ltd., acting as agents for the Authority, to conclude arrangements in Germany and other Continental outlets.

Significantly, Tasmanian fruit, for the first time, was controlled under a system whereby importer panel members in the UK agreed to accept directions regarding the placing of fruit in cool store and its release according to overall market assess­ ments. The fact that importers received substantial remuneration under a profit

sharing arrangement designed to provide an incentive to maximise their returns has been the subject of criticism. It is clear that the retention by importers of a share of the proceeds of sales does have an effect on the Government’s commitment under the Stabilization Scheme and any future arrangement of sudh a nature would need to

be taken into account for Stabilization purposes. In any case the Corporation, through its regulatory powers, will seek to ensure that any future arrangement is in the best interest of all concerned. The improvement of Tasmanian fruit quality and condition over 1976 was noted and appreciated by the trade. The measures introduced in Tasmania (including the

limitation on time between picking and pre-cooling), have undoubtedly restored the reputation for quality so nearly lost in the previous season. Apple shipments from other States consisted largely of Grannys Smiths. Unfort­ unately, Western Australia’s quantities reached only 288,000 boxes (less than half of

normal) due to severe hail damage. The overall quality of the Western Australian fruit was not up to the usual high standard. In general it was a difficult year for Western Australian growers and exporters, although sales results on ah under-5

supplied market were exceptional. Quantities of Granny Smiths were also shipped from Victoria and N.S.W./Queensland. Full details of shipments by States according to destination are set out in Table 4. It will be noted that the total quanity of 1,820,000 boxes represents a further decline from the level of 2,398,000 boxes in 1976 and 3,391,000 in 1975. The full extent of the decline in the export trade to UK/Europe can be gauged from the fact that over 6,000,000 boxes were exported as recently as 1971.

The main reason for the extraordinary buoyant market conditions was the overall reduction in supplies from the southern hemisphere. The following figures giving details of quantities from South Africa, Australia and New Zealand tell their own story:

Apples (Boxes) 1977 1976

South A frica........................................................... 5,358,652 9,200,000

Australia................................................................. 1,820,082 2,398,129

New Zealand........................................................... 2,309,000 3,151,000

Because of the record price levels there were not heavy demands on stabilization funds. However, because of the effects of freight rates and domestic cost inflation, returns to growers will represent only a partial return to profitability. An indication of the comparative position for major varieties in terms of price ranges in 1977 and 1976 is provided below:

UK Price Range (per box)

„ . 1977 (£stg.) 1976 (£stg.)

Tasmania Granny Sm ith................................................... 8.00— 12.50 0.75 — 5.40

Jonathan........................................................... 7.70— 10.50 2.00 — 4.60

Sturmer ............ 8.00— 13.00 2.00 — 5.50

Democrat........................................................... 9.00— 11.50 2.00 — 6.20

West Australia Granny Sm ith................................................... 8.30— 13.00 3.50 — 6.00

Looking towards 1978, it is already clear that crops in the northern hemisphere will be again below average and the existing short supply situation is likely to extend into the next southern hemisphere season. Again the decisive factor will be the balance between demand and supply. Overall it would appear that, whilst prices as high as 1977 are unlikely, the market should be more favourable than in 1976 and

1975.

Pears Australia’s pear shipments to UK/Europe (483,000 boxes), also showed a sub­ stantial reduction on previous years, although there were increases from other southern hemisphere countries. Prices remained at satisfactory levels for most of the season and once again the market leader was the Victorian Packham’s Triumph. One disappointing feature was the decline in the French market. Official French statistics show that only 177,000 boxes of Australian pears were imported compared with 340,000 in 1976 and 305,000 in 1975. (These figures include quantities discharged at other European ports). On the other hand, an estimated 225,000 boxes were shipped by the Argentine, more than double the 1975 figure.

The overall quality and condition of Victorian pears was reported as excellent and well up to the high standards normally expected from this section of the industry.

(b) OTHER MARKETS Apples Sales of Tasmanian apples to markets outside UK/Europe showed a disappointing decline. A number of competitive factors, including a large speculative shipment

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from Chile inhibited buyers in Hong Kong and only 36,000 boxes of Tasmanian Delicious were imported compared with 164,000 in 1976. On the other hand, shipments to Singapore showed some improvement on the previous year. This is also an important market for Western Australian apples and despite supply problems, shipments were maintained at satisfactory levels. Ship­ ments to the potentially important Indonesian market were also disappointing due largely to a reduction in the availability of the required sizes and varieties from Tasmania.

As Table 4 shows, the total export to other destinations amounted to approx 674.000 boxes compared with 828,000 in 1976. The Corporation is hopeful that, with a return to more normal competitive conditions in 1978 and reasonable availa­ bility of specific varieties (e.g. Delicious) and sizes, the ground lost in 1977 can be

regained.

Pears Shipments of Victorian pears fell from 635,000 boxes in 1976 to just over 618,519. The important trade to Hong Kong was maintained reasonably well and there was an encouraging increase in shipments to Singapore. However, the overall disappoint­ ment was the North American market where quantities fell from 265,000 to only

144.000 due to a heavy carry over of local pears and availability problems.

(c) OVERSEAS PROMOTION Promotional campaigns were conducted in all important markets through the Overseas Trade Publicity Committee. Total expenditure was $130,590 of which the Commonwealth Government contributed $51,439. The net cost was further reduced by an 85% grant from the Export Market Development Grants Scheme. This Scheme

has been the subject of a recent Inquiry by the Industries Assistance Commission. The Corporation gave evidence at the Inquiry strongly supporting the continuance of the Scheme.

PROCESSING

The apple and pear processing industry provides an outlet for fruit which is below the necessary standard of quality for fresh disposal. In this context it is important in the overall economics of orcharding. In 1977, as estimated 1,706,000 boxes of apples were utilised in the processing of apple juice and cider and some 1,502,000 boxes for

“ solid pack” products. Overall, the processing industry is a fragmented one. The Corporation is building up its basic statistical data on production and trends and is establishing avenues for a reliable flow of source material. In so doing an assessment is being made of the particular areas which offer the best scope for development. In this regard it is

already clear that juice and cider have the greatest potential, although the markets in which they operate are extremely competitive. Following research done by C.S.I.R.O., the Corporation has introduced an apple drink formula to processors under the label of “ Country Orchard” . It remains to

be seen whether the product can be developed on a successful commercial basis having regard to cost competitive factors. The services of C.S.I.R.O. are to be utilised for further research in the development of juices, juice blends and other processed forms.

The Corporation has also had discussions with leading producers of cider with a view to developing plans for increased promotion and distribution (both alcoholic and non alcoholic). Product research in the development of perry from pear juice concentrate has

been carried out in conjunction with the Victorian Department of Agriculture. Unlike cider, this product is currently subject to Commonwealth Sales Tax which provides a serious competitive barrier. Representations have been made by the Corporation for removal of the tax burden.

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. OVERSEAS SHIPPING AND FREIGHT RATES Increasing freight costs, particularly over recent years, have severely weakened the industry’s ability to compete in major export markets. This problem was highlighted in the findings of the Industries Assistance Commission following its 1975 Inquiry

into the Apple and Pear Industry. The Commission commented as follows: “ Exporting fresh apples and pears is costly because of their bulk and perishable nature. Freight costs have increased substantially in recent years and Australian exporters have been disadvantaged vis a vis other southern hemisphere competitors. . . ” Consistent with its responsibilities under the Act, the Corporation has gone to considerable lengths in its endeavours to obtain the most favourable freight rates and shipping services for the export industry. It is a difficult assignment involving exhaustive negotiations with various shipping Conferences and with individual ship­ owners. Broadly the Australian mainland requirements are covered by Conference tonnage now virtually all in containers which have proved a most satisfactory method of fruit transport. Regretfully Tasmania still has to rely largely on convent­ ional tonnage with slow loading rates and the inevitable multiple handling of individual boxes of fruit.

Containers rates for UK/Europe in 1977 were negotiated with the Australia to Europe Shipping Conference and resulted in an increase of 10% on 1976 rates. Whilst the Corporation still maintains membership of the Australian Shippers Council, it believes the industry’s own special difficulties can best be solved by negotiating separately with shipowners.

Arrangements for the 1978 season for containers to UK/Europe have recently been concluded. The result is an increase of 9% on 1977 rates which is a difficult burden for the industry to carry. Convential tonnage for Tasmania’s requirements for UK/Europe was mainly covered by an arrangement with Refrigerated Express Lines (A’Asia) Ltd. A similar arrangement has been negotiated for 1978 at no increase in rates. It is pleasing to report that the Tasmanian Apple and Pear Marketing Authority in its first year of operation was able to achieve substantially improved loading productivity at Port Huon.

Tasmania’s shipments to S.E. Asia were again carried by Reefer Lines of Singapore under a special arrangement which has now existed for a number of years. This is a costly operation with ships being provided on a shuttle service to Hong Kong, Singapore and Jakarta. Unfortunately because of market resistance and availability problems the quantities shipped fell well below expectations resulting in vacant space.

INDUSTRY ASSISTANCE

The Government decided to continue the Stabilization Scheme in 1977 on the same basis as in 1976 — i.e. Apples 2 m boxes covering shipments “ at risk” to UK/Europe only, at a maximum of

$2 per box.

Pears 1.4 m boxes covering shipments “ at risk” to UK/Europe and North America at a maximum of 80 cents per box. In addition an arrangement for supplementary assistance on a Commonwealth/ State basis was to be provided up to a maximum of $1 m.

In view of the extraordinary prices enjoyed in Europe during the season, there was not a large call on the Government’s commitment under stabilization for 1977. The Corporation has been concerned that uncertainty as to the future was having a deleterious effect on the industry in general and made submissions to the Government in August for the continuation of stabilization over a five year period.

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The parameters proposed for apples were $3 per box (plus indexation) on a quantity °f 2 m boxes in 1978 with the quantity to be reviewed annually. For pears the proposal covered a quantity of 900,000 boxes with maximum support of $1.20 per box. In the Corporation’s view, continuance of export stabilization is essential not

only to prevent hardship to growers with no other outlet but to maintain export markets as a buffer against “ on” and “ off” year variations in production and their consequential effect on domestic supplies and prices. After consideration of the industry’s submissions, the Government decided to continue Stabilization in 1978 on the same basis as in 1977, together with supplement­ ary assistance under Commonwealth/State agreements up to a maximum of $1 m to be applied to apple shipments “ at risk” to UK/Europe. The Government also agreed that stabilization would be available in 1979 at levels to be determined at the

appropriate time.

STABILIZATION SCHEME - 1976 and 1977 Included in the Report are Statements setting out details of the operation of the Apple andTear Stabilization Act during the 1976 and 1977 seasons. In 1976, 20 varieties required a stabilization “ pay out” and the total amount paid to owners of the fruit was $4,168,364.76.

In 1977, 17 varieties required a stabilization “ pay out” and the total amount paid to owners of the fruit was $596,610.50. Varietal Support Prices were reviewed prior to the commencement of the 1977 season in accordance with Section 7 of the Act and the Bureau of Agricultural

Economics carried out a survey of movements in cash costs, covering growing, packing and presentation. The result was an increase of 46.7 cents in Support Prices for 1977. FINANCE

The attached statement covers the period from 1st July, 1976 to 31st December, 1977. This is due to an amendment to the Act which provides for a change from a financial year basis to a calendar year. During the period expenditure exceeded revenue by $191,286.00 necessitating a call on reserves.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

The Corporation wishes to acknowledge your helpful co-operation and advice as Minister for Primary Industry and expresses its appreciation of the assistance rendered by officers of the Department of Primary Industry and the Department of Trade and Resources. The Corporation also expresses its thanks for the co-operation

of various industry organisations including the Australian Apple and Pear Growers Association and the Australian Apple and Pear Shippers Association. STATISTICAL The Statistical Section of the Report provides reference details relating to

production and export: Table 1. Australian Production of Apples and Pears. Table 2. Number of Trees and Yields. Table 3. Export of Australian Apples and Pears by Destination.

Table 4. Comparative Export Figures for Apples and Pears by States and Des­ tination. Table 5. Southern Hemisphere Production. Table 6. Southern Hemisphere Exports to Britain/Europe. Table 7. Exports of Australian Apples by Main Varieties to Britain, Sweden and

Germany.

GORDON LECKIE Chairman

W. J. OLDMAN General Manager

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Australian Apple and Pear Corporation

Statem ent of Income and Expenditure for the Period

1 July 1976 to 31 December, 1977

INCOME

$ $

Proceeds from Apple and Pear L ev y .......................................................... 608,921

Interest .......................................................................................................... 19,880

Other Income: Commonwealth Government Export Market Development Grant (1976) .................. 110,255

739,056

EXPENDITURE

Members of Corporation: Fees, Allowance and Expenses.............................. 113,592

Administration: Salaries........................................................................................ 177,156

O th e r .......................................................................................... 147,834

Publicity and Promotion:

Australia .................................................................................... 240,853

O verseas....................................................................................... 75,983

Research and Development:

Fresh Fruit Research................................................................... 17,329

Processed Products Research ................................................... 21,841

Market Development and R esearch......................................... 48,377

Grants to Australian Apple and Pear Growers A ssociation............................... 78,190

D epreciation.............................................................................................................. 3,695

Provision for Furlough .......................................................................................... 5,492

, 930,342

Excess of Expenditure over Incom e............................................................ 191,286

L. G. F. LECKIE, Chairman W. J. OLDMAN, General Manager

COMPARATIVE FIGURES FOR 1976 Comparative figures for the year ended 30 June 1976 are not included due to the above statement covering a period of eighteen months.

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Australian Apple and Pear Corporation

Balance Sheet as at 31 December, 1977

1976 $ CURRENT ASSETS $ $

55,380 Cash and Bank B alance.................................................... 53,103

266,000 Short Term Investments (at co st).................................... 150,000

70,429 D eb to rs............................................................................... 3,217

6,807 Income Accrued and Prepaym ents.................................. 21,619

227,939

OTHER ASSETS

9,548 Furniture, Fittings, Plant and Equipment (at cost) . . . 8,829 (note 1)

1,890 Less Accumulated D epreciation..................................... 2,923 (note 1)

406.274 —

---- :------ 233,845

CURRENT LIABILITIES ------------

9,294 Creditors and Accrued Liabilities.................................... 22,659

PROVISIONS AND RESERVES

34,508 Provision for Furlough ................................................ 40,000

ACCUMULATED FUNDS

253,796 Balance as at 30 June 1976 .............................................. 362,472

108,676* * Less Deficit for period ended 31 December 1977 ......... 191,286

171,186

406.274 233,845

Notes to and forming part of the accounts:

NOTE 1: Due to a change in the accounting policy to write off assets having a cost of less than $150 fixed assets totalling $3,256 have been fully depreciated and removed from the books of account. This has resulted in a net increase for the current period’s depreciation of $1,997.

L. G. F. LECKIE, Chairman W. J. OLDMAN, General Manager

* Surplus

CONTINGENT ASSETS Under the Export Market Developmental Grants Act 1974, the Corporation has lodged a claim for a Grant of $95,414 for eligible expenditure incurred during the year ended 30 June 1977.

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Australian Apple and Pear Corporation APPLE AND PEAR STABILIZATION TRUST ACCOUNT Australian Apple and Pear Corporation as agents for the Commonwealth of Australia

Statement of Receipts and Payments for Period 11 July 1976 to 30 June 1977

Apples Pears

Apples Pears

Apples Pears

Apples Pears

1975 SEASON RECEIPTS

$ $

Stabilization payments by the Australian Government — Section 14 of the Apple and Pear Stablization Act 1971-1976.

2,705,199.49 NIL 2,705,199.49 Export Duty collected on behalf of the

Australian Government — Section 10 (1) of the Apple and Pear Stabilization Export Duty Collection Act 1971-1976.

1,034.69 9,277,90

10,262.59

1976 SEASON $ $

3,888,322.37 280,042.39 4,168,364,76

NIL NIL

NIL

2,715,462.08 4,168,364.76

PAYMENTS

2,705,199.49 NIL 2,705,199.49

1,034.69 9,227.90

10,262.59

Stabilization Payments — Section 15 of the Apple and Pear Stabilization Act 1971-1976. 3,888,322.37 - 280,042.39

4,168,364.76

Export Duty remitted to the Australian Government — Section 10 (2) of the Apple and Pear Stabilization Export Duty Collection Act 1971-1976.

NIL NIL

NIL

2,715,462.08 4,168,364.76

NIL BALANCE AS AT 30th JUNE 1977. NIL

L. G. LECKIE, Chairman. W. J. OLDMAN, General Manager

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Australian Apple and Pear Corporation APPLE AND PEAR STABILIZATION TRUST ACCOUNT Australian Apple and Pear Corporation as agents for the Commonwealth of Australia

Statement of Receipts and Payments for Period 1 July 1977 to 31 December 1977

Apples Pears

Apples Pears

1976 SEASON $ $

3,888,322.37 280,042.39 4,168,364.76

NIL NIL

NIL

RECEIPTS

Stablization payments by the Australian Government — Section 14 of the Apple and Pear Stablization Act 1971-1977.

Export Duty Collected on behalf of the

Australian Government — Section 10 (1) of the Apple and Pear Stablization Export Duty Collection Act 1971-1977.

1977 SEASON $ $

554.091.03 42,519.47 596,610.50

43,659.43 45,758.32

89,417.75

4,168,364.76 686,028.25

PAYMENTS

Apples Pears

Apples Pears

Stablization Payments — Section 15 of the Apple and Pear Stablization Act 1971-1977.

3,888,322.37 280,042.39 4,168,364.76 Export Duty remitted to the Australian

Government — Section 10 (2) of the Apple and Pear Stablization Export Duty Collection Act 1971-1977.

NIL NIL

NIL

554,091.03 42,519.47 596,610.50

NIL NIL

NIL

4,168,364.76 596,610.50

NIL BALANCE AS AT 31st DECEMBER, 1977 89,417,75

NOTE: Credit balance of $89,417.75 represents part collections of export duty to 31.12.1977 — balance of duty payable in January 1978 totals $10,520.85. Total duty payable in respect of the 1977 season amounting to $99,938.60 is to be remitted to the Department of Primary Industry — Canberra in February, 1978.

L. G. LECKIE, Chairman W. J. OLDMAN, General Manager

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21 April 1978

The Right Honourable the Minister for Primary Industry, )

Parliament House, CANBERRA A .C.T. 2600

Dear Sir,

Australian Apple and Pear Corporation

In compliance with section 37 (3) of the Australian Apple and Pear Corporation Act 1973, the Corporation has submitted to r my report financial statements comprising a Statement of Income and Expenditure for the period 1 July 1976 to 31 December 1977 and a Balance Sheet as at 31 December 1977.

Copies of the statements in the form approved in pursuance of section 37 (1) of the Act are attached for your information. I now report that in my opinion — (a) the statements are based on proper accounts and records; (b) the statements are in agreement with the accounts and records and show fairly the financial transactions for the

period 1 July 1976 to 31 December 1977 and the state o f the affairs of the Corporation as at that date; and (c) the receipt, expenditure and investment of moneys and the acquisition and disposal of assets by the Corporation during the period have been in accordance with the Act. In addition, in respect of the transactions arising from the performance of functions under section 14 of the Apple and Pear Stabilization Act 1971 and section 10 of the Apple and Pear Stabilization Export Duty Collection Act 1971, the Corporation has submitted Statements of Receipts and Payments, Apple and Pear Stabilization Trust Account, for the periods

1 July 1976 to 30 June 1977 and 1 July 1977 to 31 December 1977. I now report that these statements, copies of which are attached, are in accordance with the audited accounts and records.

Yours faithfully,

(Sgd)D .R. STEELE CRAIK <

Auditor-General :

TABLE 1

Production of Australian Apples and Pears (Boxes) APPLES:

New South Western Aust. Capital

South Wales V ictoria Queensland A ustralia A ustralia Tasm ania T erritory Total

1968 ................ 3,287,000 3,875,000 1,071,000 1,378,000 2,060,000 7,943,000 1,000 19,615,000

1969 ................ 3,701,000 4,858,000 2,043,000 1,561,000 2.870,000 7,138,000 3,000 22,174,000

1970 ................ 4,100,000 5,331,000 1,250,000 1,561,000 2,610,000 7,400,000 7,000 22,259,000

1971 ................ 4,016,000 5,079,000 2,025,000 1,583,000 3,156,000 7,373,000 6,000 23,238,000

1972 ................ 3,640,000 3,629,000 1,839,000 1,177,000 2,750,000 5,873,000 5,000 18,913,000

1973 ................ 5,733,000 4,770,000 1,976,000 1,466,000 2,960,000 7,024,000 6,000 23,935,000

1974 ................ 3,028,000 2,982,433 1,635,882 973,760 2,764,963 5,948,017 1,732 17,335,520

1975 ................ 3,647,962 3,914,528 1,825,174 1,103,415 2,476,294 4.545,942 2.290 17.515.605

1976 ............. 3,069,550 2,852,850 1,348,270 1,061,610 2,792,350 3,989,095 1,980 15,115,705

1977 (est.) .. . . 4,764,541 3,629,387 2,299,988 1,192,500 1,600,017 3,638,985 (A) 17,125,413

1978 (est.) . . . , 3,686,650 3,195,500 1,582,000 928,500 2,600,000 3,255,000 (A) 15,248,650

(A) Included in total.

PEARS:

1968 ............ .. 582,000 5,342,000 125,000 610,000 182,000 511,000 — 7,351,000

1969 ..... 649,000 3,420,000 128,000 405,000 191,000 451,000 — 5,244,000

1970 ...... 816,000 7,044,000 119,000 644,000 212,000 496,000 — 9,331,000

1971 ...... 736,000 7,061,000 172,000 649,000 177,000 397,000 — 9,132,000

1972 ................ 687,000 7,144,000 192,000 486,000 222,000 296,000 -v 9,027,000

1973 ...... 740,000 6,013,000 197,000 513,000 227,000 302,000 (A) 7,992,000

1974 ................ 568,000 5,800,017 165,003 433,869 201,306 309,137 — 7,477,490

1975 ...... 425,639 5,575.876 149,506 505.614 219,040 143.065 fA) 7.018.740

1976 ................ 840,125 5,702,125 213,675 507,925 287,100 156,915 — 7,707,865

1977 (est.) . . . . 339,600 5,375,000 152,000 289,000 220,000 72,450 (A) 6,448,050

1978 (est.) . . . . 1,171,820 5,654,000 191,500 517,000 240,000 69,000 (A> 7,844.320

(A) Included in total.

NOTE: The source of information for the figures for 1968-1976 inclusive is the Australian Bureau of Statistics. The figures for 1977 & 1978 are estimates submitted by the several States Departments of Agriculture.

14

Numbers of Trees and Yields per Tree t a b l e 2

AUSTRALIAN APPLES AND PEARS APPLES

1971-72 1972-73 1973-74 1974-75 1975-76

N um ber of Trees— Bearing ( 0 0 0 ) .....................................

N um ber o f Trees— Bearing and N on-bearing (000) .. Yield per B earing Tree (B u s h e ls ) ....................................

7,337 9,111 2.58

7,125 8,737 2.94

5,380 7,701 2.72

5,897 7,004 3.3

5,551 6,520 2.78

PEA R S

N um ber of Trees— Bearing ( 0 0 0 ) .....................................

N um ber of Trees—Bearing and N on-bearing (000) .. Yield per Bearing Tree ( B u s h e ls ) ....................................

2,145 2,494 4.21

2,168 2,447 3.67

1,960 2,248 3.76

2,005 2,246 3.42

1,663 1,853 4.66

Source: A ustralian B ureau of Statistics.

15

Exports from Australia for the years 1968-1977

Destinations 1968 1969 1970 197Γ

B ritain............................................... 3.184,456 3,886,892 3,699,782 3,73®

Ir e la n d ............................................. 109,399 187,052 176,269 143ΛΪ

Germany.......................................... 1,689,936 1,438,801 1,003,421 1,169,081

Sw eden............................................. 494,779 471,482 563,901 533,31!

N orw ay............................................ 34,546 1,350 10,235 -i

B elg iu m ........................................... 5,397 — 2,608 62,611 f

Holland ........................................... 45,093 123,289 102,095 369,27!

Finland............................................. 50,386 86,761 71,347 67,53!'

Denmark ......................................... 172,630 158,510 146,903 180,98!

France............................................... — — — -

Total E u ro p e .................................. 2,602,166 2,467,245 2,076,779 2,526,28)

Total B ritain /E u ro p e.................... 5,786,622 6,354,137 5,776,561 6,257,1)1

U.S.A................................................ 25,402 58,397 104,889 298,61'

Canada ............................................. — 71,647 69,350 91,64!*

Panam a/Venezuela........................ — — — 15,60!

E gypt/A den.................................... 3,891 2,010 3,250

Arabian G u lf.................................. 29,735 29,154 70,868 73,438

India/Pakistan .............................. — — — i

T hailand........................................... 8,082 9,994 3,834 lit

Philippines...................................... 151,395 108,866 16,606 -

Singapore........................................ 497,432 560,498 591,243 696,711

M alaysia.......................................... 65,774 60,510 58,986 63,048 ^

Hong Kong...................................... 204,021 177,472 167,180 224,974

M auritius........................................ 16,514 6,303 21,297 16,528

East A frica...................................... 47,538 39,185 53,268 27,52

West A fric a .................................... 2,490 — — -

Indonesia........................................ 2,051 3,219 8,869 48,41

Pacific Islands (inch New Guinea) 50,456 60,128 47,584 66,46'

Miscellaneous (inch Christmas Isles and Saigon and Burma) 1,292 10,937 1,838 1,M

Total Other D estinations.............. 1,106,073 1,198,320 1,219,062 1,624,2»

GRAND T O T A L .......................... 6,892,695 7,552,457 6,995,623 7,881,468 r

P E A R S (B o x e s )

)

Destinations 1968 1969 1970 1971

Britain.............................................. 757,679 410,489 714,512 462,12!

Ireland ............................................ 9,750 3,219 10,421

Germany.......................................... 70,449 49,536 82,061 67,20!

Sw eden............................................ 131,615 29,955 102,357 151,47!

Norway............................................ 74,112 50,427 49,037 42,851'

Belgium .......................................... 40,042 6,300 45,648 125,34!

Holland ........................................... 86,065 75,306 165,820 67,14!

F inland............................................ 27,374 — — -

France.............................................. 272,906 6,558 253,563 138,138

Denmark ........................................ 1,900 1,575 2,000 3,50

Total E u ro p e .................................. 714.213 222,876 710,907 595,643"

Total B ritain/E urope.................... 1,471,892 633,365 1,425,419 1,057,772

U.S.A............................................... 19,521 225,529 256,865 473,57!

Canada ............................................ 20,640 28,738 43,827

Panama/Venezuela........................ — — 5,565

Egypt/Aden/Arabian G u lf .......... 200 — 1

Singapore ........................................ 92,171 119,911 167,165 209,462

M alaysia.......................................... 4,577 4,327 6,656 8,781.

Hong Kong...................................... 90,852 98,767 107,929 114,788*

Mauritius/East A fric a .................. 370 _ — 2,808

Pacific Islands (inch New Guinea) 8,453 8,777 8,165 13,528

Miscellaneous (inch Christmas Isles and In donesia.................... 217 733 725 862

Total Other D estinations.............. 216,161 478,884 576,243 873,19)

GRAND T O T A L .......................... 1,688,053 1,112,249 2,001,662 1,930,978

16

TABLE 3

1972 1973 1974 1975 1976 1977 2,968,443 2,614,088 1 ;791,803 1,807,121 1,384,836 750,321 110,307 53,804 ___ 278,759 1,359,850 492,226, 604,603 377,347 306,992 443,091 677,358 428,046 342,439 288,487 390,439 86,950 — 16,985 9,389 8,003 5,511 88,062 27,532 50,901 35,820 115,674 25,724 604,168 132,580 259,256 143,637 97,006 58,089 91,287 50,497 68,705 74,680 70,925 145,499 171,159 230,826 231,038 79,789 64,293 — 21,847 — 10,343 4,144 16,429 J,0 6 6 ,9 8 0 3,154,485 1,361,707 1,584,270 1,013,293 1,069,761 4,035,423 5,768,573 3,153,510 3,391,391 2,398,129 1,820,082 197,001 82,950 88,313 95,892 10,178 4,657 — 469 — 4,051 — 2,590 — 94,572 — _— 7,473 3,000 __ 34,747 11,343 89,862 156,865 126,956 88,715— 461 — 3,634 z — — 9,914 — 557,385 602,405 461,900 587,826 300,684 347,674 52,885 54,275 43,860 41,904 52,721 55,447 242,054 249,788 157,928 179,882 188,908 58,937 11,326 10,463 1,886 2,519 4,226 630 34,796 6,818 150 13,631 — 1,95077,354 85,602 107,618 95,451 79,774 49,839 86,955 76,652 33,012 64,553 63,458 60,8231,323 1,510 987 1,522 1,643 3,081 1,295,826 1,284,781 998,430 1,247,730 828,548 674,343 5,331,249 7,053,354 4,151,940 4,639,121 3,226,677 2,494,4251972 1973 1974 1975 1976 1977519,078 303,528 336,407 163,327 198,241 47,66652,430 182,136 50,696 83,084 29,242 76,874157,486 155,916 136,380 102,836 92,493 53,47639,110 53,148 28,838 36,789 25,895 23,805189,094 83,301 180,424 259,323 256,669 143,610156,095 250,842 153,330 168,361 171,236 82,3623,750 — 3,045 3,652 1,848 3,04089,959 119,337 59,677 33,535 58,605 51,068— 3,000 _ — — 1,232687,924 847,680 612,390 687,580 635,988 435,4671,207,002 1,151,208 948,797 850,907 834,229 483,133274,876 571,604 417,050 234,597 258,127 134,465— — 2,285 7,491 6,510 9,602100 1,052 9,300 17,008 5,421 5,684233,619 262,722 238,781 322,206 259,609 275,2008,333 6,568 7,400 4,671 9,763 2,316176,916 255,141 178,487 256,774 279,895 259,3091,160 891 30 — — —17,200 18,422 6,295 15,662 16,455 19,4711,264 5,295 10,566 20,403 17,950 23,058“ 713,468 1,121,695 870,194 878,812 853,730 729,1051,920,470 2,272,903 1,818,991 1,729,719 1,687,959 1,212,23817

Comparative Export Figures by States and Destinations for Years 1976 and 1977 APPLES (B oxes) V ictoria N.S.W. Queensland

1976 1977 1976 1977 1976 1977

B ritain .............................. 35,152 29,526 — 6,734 — 7,246

H o llan d ............................ 5,698 43,244 — 1,036 — 10,720

G erm any.......................... — 33,152 — 1,554 — 2,069

Sweden ............................ 54 926 — — —

Belgium............................ 12,950 79,240 — 3,405 — 6,752

F in la n d ............................ — — — — —

D enm ark.......................... — — — — —

France .............................. 4,144 13,839 — — — 1,036

N orw ay............................ — 96 — — —

Total Europe.................... 22,846 170,497 — 5,995 — 20,577

Total B ritain/E urope.. . . 57,998 200,023 — 12,729 — 27,823

U.S.A................................ 2,072 518 —

Canada ............................ _ _

Arabian Gulf .................. — _

S ingapore........................ — 2,151 — 20,391 598

M alaysia.......................... — — _ _

Indonesia.......................... — —

Hong K o n g ...................... — — — _ 1,450 10,720

M auritius.......................... — _ _

East A fric a ...................... — _

Xmas Islands .................. 160 484

Pacific Islands ................ 10,578 6,979 28,394 35,849 24,486 17,995

B u rm a .............................. — — — — — —

Total Other Destinations 12,810 10,132 28,394 56,240 25,936 29,313

GRAND TO T A L............ 70,808 210,155 28,394 68,969 25,936 57,136

P E A R S ( B 'oxes) 1

B ritain .............................. 163,288 44,352 — — — —

H olland............................ 171,236 82,362 — — — —

G erm any.......................... 15,729 76,267 — — — — >

Sweden ............................ 101,424 53,476 — — — —

Belgium............................ 251,963 143,610 4,704 — — —

Finland ............................ 1,848 3,040 — — — —

D enm ark.......................... — 1,232 ' -- — — —

France .............................. 58,605 51,068 — — — —

N orw ay........................... 16,964 23,805 — — — —

Total Europe.................... 617,769 434,860 4,704 — —

Total Britain/Europe. . . . 781,057 479,212 4,704 — —

U.S.A................................ 216,173 120,114 — — ' — -

Canada ............................ 6,510 8,272 — — — —

Arabian G u l f .................. — — — — — —

S ingapore........................ 129,663 204,612 17,489 4,602 — —

M alaysia.......................... 1,815 — 399 — — —

Indonesia.......................... 13,196 22,368 — — — —

Hong K ong...................... 264,657 259,309 15,271 — — — *

M auritius.......................... — — — — — —

Xmas Is la n d .................... — 160 — — — —

Pacific Islands (incl. New Guinea) . . . . 3,167 3,684 7,244 14,087 1,822 1,700

Total Other Destinations 635,181 618,519 40,403 18,689 1,822 1,700

GRAND TOTA L............ 1,416,238 1,097,731 45,107 18 ,6 8 9 1,822 1,700

» ; - i

18

TABLE 4

W estern A ustralia Tasm ania South A ustralia Total

1976 1977 1976 1977 1976 1977 1976 1977

591.208 178,625 758,476 528,190 ___ _ 1,384,836 750,321

31,780 26,984 106,159 15,022 143,637 97,006

55,498 38,108 321,849 232,109 ___ ___ 377,347 306,992

14,002 10,467 274,431 379,046 — — 288,487 390,439

22,870 26,277 — — — — 35,820 115,674

— — 74,680 70,925 — — 74,680 70,925

— — 79,789 64,293 — — 79,789 64,293

— — — 1,554 — — 4,144 16,429

9,389 7,431 — 476 — — 9,389 8,003

133,539 109,267 856,908 763,425 — — 1,013,293 1,069,761

724,747 287,892 1,615,384 1,291,615 — — 2,398,129 1,820,082

— — 8,106 4,139 — — 10,178 4,657

— — — 2,590 — — — 2,590

126,956 87,211 — — — 1,504 126,956 88,715

216,812 197,469 83,872 127,065 — — 300,684 347,674

52,721 55,447 ___ 52,721 55,447

11,000 9,779 68,774 40,060 — — 79,774 49,839

23,750 11,875 163,708 36,342 ___ ___ 188,908 58,937

4,226 630 — — — — 4,226 630

— 1,950 — — — — — 1,950

1,483 1,174 255 1,643 1,913

— — 63,458 60Λ23

L

1,168 — — — — — 1,168

436,948 366,703 324,460 210,196 — 1,759 828,548 674,343

1,161,695 654,595 1,939,844 1,501,811 — 1,759 3,226,677 2,494,425

___ — 34,953 3,314 — — 198,241 47,666

l l l l l l l l

13,513 607

-

l l l l l l l l

!

171,236 29,242 101,424 256,667

1,848

58,605 16,964

82,362 76,874 53,476 143,610

3,040 1,232 51,068 23,805

— — 13,513 607 — — 635,986 435,467

— — 48,466 3,921 — — 834,227 483,133

42,021 14,351 605 — 258,799 134,465

1,330 — — 6,510 9,602

4,421 5,684 — 1,000 — 5,421 5,684

78,264 65,634 10,662 352 — — 236,078 275,200

7,550 2,316 — — — — 9, /64 2,316

3,004 ___ — — — 16,200 22,368

— — — —

— 279,928 259,309

400 410 — — — 120 400 690

— — — 12,233 19,471

93,639 74,044 52,683 16,033 1,605 120 825,333 729,105

- 93,639 74,044" 101,149 19,954 1,605 120 1,659,560 1,212,238

19

Southern Hemisphere Production t a b l e 5

in Ό00 M etric Tonnes 1977

APPLES:_____________________ 1972_________ 1973__________1974_________ 1975_________ 1976 (Preliminary)

Australia.............................. 360 431 535 365 275 277

New Z e a la n d .......... 129 139 150 125 139 139

South Africa ...................... 286 298 137 263 305 270

A rgentina............................. 450 233___________786__________ 605__________ 576 820

PEARS:_____________________________________________________________________________________________

Australia.................. 184 190 162 158 140 142

New Z e alan d .......... 19 19 16 15 17 7

South Africa .......... 100 80 21 41 51 80

A rgentina................ 97 43 110 97 122 160

TABLE 6

Southern Hemisphere Apple and Pear Exports to Britain/Europe (Pre. 000’s Boxes liminary)

A PPLES: 1968 1 969 1 970 1 971 1972 1 973 1 974 1 975 1 976 1977

A ustralia.............. 5,786 6,354 5/774 6 J5 7 4/135 5/769 3,154 3/39Ϊ 2/598 1,810

South A frica........ 6,559 6,060 6,178 6,592 8,720 7,323 7,174 7,385 9,200 5,35?

New Zealand........ 1,859 1,750 2,458 2,531 2,994 2,792 2,832 2,707 3,151 2,309

A rg en tin a............ 6,675 5,683 3,847 4,594 5,098 955 4,170 4,547 4,113 5,411

Chile .................... — — — — — — — — 2,500 1,821

Total ......................... 20,879 19,847 18,257 19/774 20/547 16/539 17,330 18,030 21,362 16,710

PEARS:

A ustralia.............. 1,472 633 1,425 1,057 1,207 1/51 949 851 834 483

South A frica........ 1,420 1,400 1,246 1,438 1,795 1,788 1,026 1,231 2,325 2,516

New Zealand........ 143 80 135 149 78 113 31 9 10 21

A rg en tin a............ 1,012 562 464 372 609 22 579 463 571 331

Chile .................... ~~ — — — — — — — — — 141

T o ta l.................... ~ 4,047 2,675 3,270 3/1Ϊ6 3Ϊ689 3/174 2,585 2,554 3/740 3,492

20

Exports of Australian Apples by Main Varieties t a b l e 7

Boxes

V ariety 1972 1973 1974 1975 1976 1977 B RITA IN :G ranny Sm ith .. .S t u r m e r ...............Jonathan . . ..D em ocrat . . ..G olden D e lic io u s .............C rofton .. ..Cox’s O range . . . . G eeveston Fanny .. .. Red Jon ath an . . ..C le o p a t r a ..............Rome B e a u t y .............Y a t e s .....................O t h e r s ...................... . 1,109,668

. 542,160

. 491,207

. 234,667

. 208,834

. 159,111

. 61,863

. 41,129

. 40,862

. 20,193

. 14,017

. 12,999

. 31,733

945,796 364,242 345,282 198,269 230,712 208.569

62,240 22,346 31,245 39,741

65,097 24,568 75,981

827,174 179,299 148,313 289,856

195,282 82,330 39,070 7,595

19,588

3,296

1,001,712 191,295 159,312 87,299 136,557 141,836

32,775 38

24,266

1,878 2,263 27,890

819,791 173,421 88,865 72,123

91,987 73,416 21,978 611

24,863

1,093 16,688

272,473 115,182 77,986 92,967

42,137 50,651 3,185

1,275

94,465

TO T A L .............................. . 2,968,443 2,614,088 1,791,803 1,807,121 1,384,836 750,321

SW EDEN: C l e o p a t r a ....................... . 150,536 185.421 133,838 102,869 81,572 98,628 G ranny S m i t h ................... . 113,003 170,787 93,239 97,794 73,210 103,921 D e m o c r a t........................... . 89,448 158,372 112,192 93,136 76,724 137,654 G eeveston F a n n y ............. . 30,369 40,674 44,093 17,162 25,343 27,343 J o n a t h a n ............................. . 21,898 69,278 26,565 18,508 10,779 10,599 T asm an’s P r i d e ............... . 14,965 21,469 6,873 4,205 5,665 6,271 Red Jonathan . . . . . . . . 3,218 7,734 4,324 4,767 5,079 1,718 O t h e r s .................................. . 19,654 23,623 6,922 3,998 10,115 4,305TO T A L .............................. . 443,091 677,358 428,046 342,439 288,487 390,439G ER M A N Y :G ranny S m i t h ................... . 115,305 558,546 236,993 273,512 179,149 195,459D e m o c r a t............................ . 91,341 224,254 144,053 154,163 94,122 95,902S tu r m e r ................................ . 28,455 158,425 51,492 -- - 686 —J o n a t h a n ............................. . 24,561 213,656 31,531 90,864 65,777 4,491C le o p a t r a ............................ . 8,031 64,694 12,498 5,978 — —T asm an’s P r i d e ............... . 5,797 5,762 1,395 — 1,431 1,009G olden D e lic io u s ............. . 2,390 52,319 7,046 42,220 8,596 —G eeveston F a n n y ............. . 1,231 15,360 3,093 13,850 6,538 26S c a r l e t .................................. . 358 5,930 1,971 — 1,970 203O t h e r s .................................. . 1,290 60,904 2,154 24,016 19,078 9,902T O T A L .............................. . 278,759 1,359,850 492,226 604,603 377,347 306,992Source: D epartm ent of Prim ary Industry. 21

Australian Apple and Pear Corporation Australian Apple and Pear Corporation Act 1973

LIST OF LICENSED PERSONS Period commencing 20th January, 1978, and ending 19th January, 1981.

DEVELOPMENTAL LICENCES

For shipment to Iran, Arabian Gulf and other Middle East Markets, Japan, Soviet Block Countries and Taiwan and any other areas so declared by the Australian Apple and Pear Corporation.

NUMBER STATE NAME AND ADDRESS PORTS OF SHIPMENT

T/78/20 Tas. The Tasmanian Apple and Hobart

Pear Marketing Authority, Burnie

1 Castray Esplanade, Launceston

HOBART. Tas. 7000 Devonport

W /78/1 (D) W.A. Western Grannysmith Pty. Ltd. Fremantle

C /— Arthur Young & Co., Albany

20-22 Mount Street, PERTH. W.A. 6000

Bunbury

V /78/2 (D) Vic. Vicappear Pty. Ltd. Melbourne

C /— Parkhill, Lithgow & Gibson, 500 Collins Street, MELBOURNE. Vic. 3000

Geelong

N /78/3 (D) N .S.W ./Q ld.N .S.W ./Q Id. Apple and Pear Shipper’s Sydney Association, C /— F. Chilton, 316 Pitt Street, SYDNEY. N.S.W. 2000

Brisbane

S/78/4 (D) S.A. South Australian Apple and

Pear Shipper’s Association, Ebenezer Place, ADELAIDE. S.A. 5000

Port Adelaide

ORDINARY LICENCES WESTERN AUSTRALIA

For shipment to all areas except Developmental areas listed above and where otherwise indicated. From the Ports of Fremantle, Albany and Bunbury.

NUMBER NAME AND ADDRESS

W/78/1 Blue Moon (W.A.) Pty. Ltd.

Cnr. Henderson St. & South Terrace, FREMANTLE. W.A. 6160

W /78/2 Craig Mostyn & Growers Packing Co. Pty. Ltd.,

1 Essex Street, FREMANTLE. W.A. 6160

W /78/3 Etherington Exports Pty. Ltd.

Metropolitan Markets, PERTH. W.A. 6005

W /78/4 C. M. Paul Pty. Ltd.

17 High Street, FREMANTLE. W.A. 6160

W /78/5 Burridge & Warren (W.A.) Pty. Ltd.

C /— Commonwealth Bank Building, 88 High Street, FREMANTLE. W.A. 6160

W /78/6 R. N. Mooney Pty. Ltd.

Market House, 849-851 Wellington Street, PERTH. W.A. 6000

W /78/7 Westralian Fruit Exports Pty. Ltd.

21 Cliff Street, FREMANTLE. W.A. 6160 22

LIST OF LICENSED PERSONS Period commencing 20th January, 1978, and ending 19th January, 1981.

N U M B E R N A M E A N D A D D RESS

W /78/8 M.A.E.S.

South West Highway, MANJIMUP. W.A. 6258

W /78/9 R. Walker & Co. Pty. Ltd.

11 Market Street, FREMANTLE. W.A. 6160

W /78/10 Mercer Traders Pty. Ltd.

Metropolitan Markets, PERTH. W.A. 6000

VICTORIA

For shipment to all areas except Developmental areas as listed. From the Ports of Melbourne and Geelong.

(Restricted to Singapore, Malaysia, Hong Kong, Indonesia & Christmas Isles) (Restricted to

Singapore, Malaysia Hong Kong, Indonesia & Christmas Isles)

V/78/11 B. & P. Sunshots Pty. Ltd.

118 Queen Street, MELBOURNE. Vic. 3000

V/78/12 Craig Mostyn & Growers Packing Co.

Pty. Ltd. 144 Jolimont Road, JOLIMONT. Vic. 3002

V/78/13 Les McKeand & Son Pty. Ltd.

457-467 Malvern Road, SOUTH YARRA. Vic. 3141

V/78/14 Geoffrey Thompson & Growers Co-operative Ltd.

20 Queen Street, MELBOURNE. Vic. 3000

V/78/15 F. W. Year (O’Shea) Pty. Ltd.

27 Peel Street, WEST MELBOURNE. Vic. 3003

V/78/16 Blue Moon Exports Pty. Ltd.

Toolamba Road, MOOROOPNA. Vic. 3629

SOUTH AUSTRALIA

For shipment to all areas except Developmental areas listed above. From the Port of Adelaide.

S/78/17 Craig Mostyn & Growers Packing Co. Ltd.

65 St. Vincent Street, PORT ADELAIDE. S.A. 5015

S/78/18 Chilton Thompson & Co. Pty. Ltd.

C /— Geoffrey Thompson & Growers Co-operative Pty. Ltd., 20 Queen Street, MELBOURNE. Vic. 3000

S/78/19 Murray River Wholesale Co-operative Ltd.

77-79 Grenfell Street, ADELAIDE. S.A. 5000

S/78/34 MacKenzie & Co. (S.A.) Pty. Ltd.

Unit 9, 6 Collyer Court, LINDEN PARK. S.A. 5065

TASMANIA

For shipment to all areas (including Developmental areas) From the Port of Hobart, Burnie, Launceston and Devonport.

T /78/20 The Tasmanian Apple and Pear Marketing

Authority, 1 Castray Esplanade, HOBART. Tas. 7000

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N U M B E R ____________ N A M E A N D A D D RESS_______________________

NEW SOUTH WALES

For shipment to all areas except Developmental areas listed above and where otherwise indicated. From the Ports of Sydney, Newcastle, Woolongong and Brisbane.

LIST OF LICENSED PERSONS Period commencing 20th January, 1978, and ending 19th January, 1981.

N/78/21 Committee of Direction of Fruit Marketing,

C. Block, Sydney Markets, FLEMINGTON. N.S.W. 2129

N/78/22 C. Geo. Kellaway & Sons (Eastern) Pty. Ltd.

108 Burke Road, ALEXANDRIA. N.S.W. 2015

N/78/23 P.D.S. Co-operative Ltd.

Cnr. Quay & Valentine Streets, SYDNEY. N.S.W. 2000

N /78/24 F. Chilton Pty. Ltd.

316 Pitt Street, SYDNEY. N.S.W. 2000

N/78/25 Craig Mostyn & Growers Packing Co. Ltd.

127 Kent Street, SYDNEY. N.S.W. 2000

N /78/26 E. Pardy & Sons (O’Seas),

Store 15, Building J, FLEMINGTON MARKETS. N.S.W. 2129

N/78/28 Antico’s, (Restricted to

Store 16, Warehouse H, Flemington Markets, FLEMINGTON. N.S.W. 2129

Pacific Islands only)

N /78/29 All States Providores Pty. Ltd. (Restricted to

Warehouse M, Singapore, Indonesia,

Flemington Markets, Malaysia, Hong Kong

FLEMINGTON. N.S.W. 2129

QUEENSLAND

and Pacific Islands)

For shipment to all areas except Developmental areas as listed and where otherwise indicated. From the Ports of Brisbane, Cairns, Townsville and Sydney.

Q/78/27 Alf Chave (Exports) Pty. Ltd. (Restricted to

Brisbane Markets, Sherwood Road, ROCKLEA. Old. 4106

Pacific Islands only)

Q /78/30 The Committee of Direction of Fruit Marketing,

Sherwood Road, ROCKLEA. Qld. 4106

Q/78/31 P.D.S. Co-operative Ltd.

Cnr. Cribb & McDougall Streets, MILTON. Qld. 4064

Q/78/32 Hawker & Shadforth (Exports) Pty. Ltd.

23 Rossiter Parade, HAMILTON CENTRAL. Qld. 4007

Q/78/33 Bright Bros. Pty. Ltd. (Restricted to

Brisbane Markets, Sherwood Road, ROCKLEA. Qld. 4106

Pacific Islands only)

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