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Tiwi Land Council—Report for 2014-15


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Pursuant to Section 46 of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013, the

accountable authority of the entity must prepare and give an annual report to the responsible

Minister, for presentation to the Parliament, on the Land Council’s activities during the period.

ENABLING LEGISLATION

The Aboriginal Land Rights (Northern Territory) Act 1976 provides a grant

to the Tiwi Land Trust, and is the enabling legislation of the Tiwi Land

Council established by Special Gazette No.S162 of 18 August 1978.

RESPONSIBLE MINISTER

Senator the Honourable Nigel Scullion, Minister for Indigenous Affairs, has been our responsible Minister for the whole of the reporting period.

ANNUAL REPORT

2014-15

Senator the Honourable Nigel Scullion

Minister for Indigenous Affairs

P.O. Box 6100.

Senate

Parliament House

CANBERRA ACT 2600

Dear Minister,

THIRTY-SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT

In accordance the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013, I am pleased to present to you

the thirty-sixth annual report of the Tiwi Land Council for the period 1 July 2014 to 30 June 2015. The report

includes a copy of our audited financial statements forwarded to you by the Australian National Audit Office.

Yours sincerely,

Gibson Farmer Illortaminni Chairman Tiwi Land Council

9th September 2015

The Tiwi Land Council is the Statutory Authority of Owners of the Tiwi Islands

Management Offices Wurrumiyanga: 0408 304 934 Pirlangimpi: 0407 947 866 Milikapiti: 0418 136 331

Land Council Operational Headquarters Pickatamoor Phone: (08) 8970 9373 Fax:(08) 8978 3698 www.tiwilandcouncil.com

Secretariat

Phone: (08) 8997 0797 Fax:(08) 8947 2552

All correspondence The Chairman, PO Box 38545 Winnellie NT 0821

ENABLING LEGISLATION 1

RESPONSIBLE MINISTER 1

A STATEMENT OF OUR PAST 6

A STATEMENT OF PRESENT PURPOSE 6

OUR VISION FOR THE FUTURE 6

CONTACT 6

CHAIRMAN`S REPORT 7

ANNUAL REPORTING REQUIRMENTS 9

OUTLINE OF ORGANISATIONAL STRUCTURE 9

Location of Activities and Facilities 10

Staff Retained and Employed 10

REVIEW OF OPERATIONS AND FUTURE PROSPECTS 11

1.0 PERFORMANCE 12

1.1 FINANCIAL RESOURCES AND APPLICATION 13

1.1.1 Analysis of Performance 13

2 PRINCIPAL OUTPUTS 14

2.1 LAND SEA AND NATURAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT SUPPORT SERVICES 14

2.1.1 Details of consultants engaged 15

2.1.2 Grants received 15

2.1.3 Fee for service received section 37(2) 15

2.1.4 Permit Administration 2014/15 15

2.2 ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT AND COMMERCIAL SERVICES 16

2.2.1 Tiwi Enterprises 17

2.2.2 Tiwi Plantation Corporation and Port Melville 18

2.2.3 Process and assist Land Use Agreements 19

2.2.4 Outcomes and Benefits 20

2.2.5 Assist economic advancement through employment education and training 21

2.2.5.1 Tiwi Islands Training and Employment Board 21

2.2.5.2 Tiwi Education Board 22

2.2.6 Process Mining and Exploration applications 24

2.2.7 Provide research and assistance for Infrastructure needs 25

2.2.7 Details of consultants engaged 25

Senator the Honourable Nigel Scullion

Minister for Indigenous Affairs

P.O. Box 6100.

Senate

Parliament House

CANBERRA ACT 2600

Dear Minister,

THIRTY-SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT

In accordance the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013, I am pleased to present to you

the thirty-sixth annual report of the Tiwi Land Council for the period 1 July 2014 to 30 June 2015. The report

includes a copy of our audited financial statements forwarded to you by the Australian National Audit Office.

Yours sincerely,

Gibson Farmer Illortaminni Chairman Tiwi Land Council

9th September 2015

ENABLING LEGISLATION 1

RESPONSIBLE MINISTER

1

A ST

ATEMENT OF OUR PAST

6

A ST

ATEMENT OF PRESENT PURPOSE

6

OUR

VISION FOR THE FUTURE

6

C

ONTACT

6

CHAIRM

AN`S REPORT

7

ANNU

AL REPORTING REQUIRMENTS

9

OUTLINE OF OR

GANISATIONAL STRUCTURE

9

L

ocation of Activities and Facilities

10

S

taff Retained and Employed

10

RE

VIEW OF OPERATIONS AND FUTURE PROSPECTS

11

1.0 PERFORM

ANCE

12

1.1 FINANCIAL RESOUR

CES AND APPLICATION

13

1.1.1 A

nalysis of Performance

13

2 PRINCIP

AL OUTPUTS

14

2.1 L

AND SEA AND NATURAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT SUPPORT SERVICES

14

2.1.1 D

etails of consultants engaged

15

2.1.2 Gr

ants received

15

2.1.3 F

ee for service received section 37(2)

15

2.1.4 P

ermit Administration 2014/15

15

2.2 EC

ONOMIC DEVELOPMENT AND COMMERCIAL SERVICES

16

2.2.1 T

iwi Enterprises

17

2.2.2

Tiwi Plantation Corporation and Port Melville

18

2.2.3 P

rocess and assist Land Use Agreements

19

2.2.4 O

utcomes and Benefits

20

2.2.5 A

ssist economic advancement through employment education and training

21

2.2.5.1

Tiwi Islands Training and Employment Board

21

2.2.5.2

Tiwi Education Board

22

2.2.6 P

rocess Mining and Exploration applications

24

2.2.7 P

rovide research and assistance for Infrastructure needs

25

2.2.7 D

etails of consultants engaged

25

CONTENTS

2.3 ADVOCACY SERVICES 25

2.3.1 P

romote Public Awareness

25

2.3.2 P

rovide Advocacy and representation

26

2.3.3 C

ultural and Heritage Support

26

2.3.4 F

acilitate Community Development Initiatives

27

2.3.5 D

etails of consultants engaged

27

2.4 ADMINISTR

ATION AND SUPPORT SERVICES

27

2.4.1 A

dminister and Distribute Payments

27

2.4.2 A

dminister the Land Trust

28

2.4.3 A

ssist in resolution of land disputes

28

2.4.4 D

etails of consultants engaged

28

2.5 JUDICIAL DECISIONS, MINISTERIAL DIREC

TIONS AND LEGISLATIVE IMPACT

28

3.0 C

ORPORATE GOVERNANCE

29

3.1 A

CCOUNTABLE AUTHORITY PROFILES

29

3.1.1 Chair

man

29

3.1.2 Chief Ex

ecutive Officer

30

3.1.3 Ex

ecutive Management Committee

30

3.2 MEE

TINGS OF LAND COUNCIL

31

3.2.1 F

ull Land Council Meetings

31

3.2.2 Ex

ecutive Management Committee Meetings

32

3.3 G

overnance Practices

40

3.4 MEE

TINGS OF COMMITEES

42

3.5 RISK M

ANAGEMENT REGISTER

44

3.6 O

THER STATUTORY REQUIREMENTS

49

3.6.1 I

ndemnities and insurance premiums for officers

45

3.6.2

Asset Value

45

3.6.3 A

pproved ABA Budget

45

3.6.4 C

orporate Governance and Planning

45

3.6.5 S

ection 35 Payments

45

3.6.6 S

ection 37(4) Payments

46

3.6.7 F

raud Control

46

CONTENTS

3.6.8 Pecuniary Interests Registers 46

3.6.9 R

elated Parties Registers

46

3.6.10 C

ompliance Report - Finance

46

3.6.11 P

rotective Security Policy Framework

47

3.6.12 C

ompliance with Commonwealth Authorities

(Annual Reporting) Orders 2011

47

3.6.13 C

ompliance Report - Legal

47

3.6.14 L

egal Service Multi Use List

47

3.6.15 A

ustralian National Archives

47

3.6.16 E

cologically sustainable development

47

3.6.17 ENVIR

ONMENTAL PERFORMANCE

48

3.6.17.1 Ener

gy efficiency

48

3.6.17.2 W

aste

48

3.6.17.3 W

ater

48

3.6.18 O

ccupational Health and Safety

48

3.6.19 A

udit Committee Required Assessments

50

3.6.20 A

dvertising and Market Research section

311 Commonwealth Electoral Act 1918

50

3.6.21 En

tity Resource Statement

50

3.7 M

ANAGEMENT OF HUMAN RESOURCES

52

3.7.1 D

eveloping Human Resources

52

3.7.2 S

tatistics on Staffing

52

3.7.3 S

tatistics on Employees who identify as Indigenous

53

3.7.4 Emplo

yment Benefits and Categorisation

54

LIST OF REQUIREMENT

S

54

C

ompliance Index of Commonwealth Authorities

(Annual Reporting) Orders 2011

59

C

ompliance Index Aboriginal Land Rights

(Northern Territory) Act 1976 (ALRA)

61

GL

OSSARY

62

INDEX

63

CONTENTS

6 TIWI LAND COUNCIL ANNUAL REPORT 2014/2015

A STATEMENT OF OUR PAST

“The aboriginals of Bathurst and Melville islands remained a unified entity repelling any unwanted effects of alien contact, embracing others, and generally enjoying authority over their own lives and customs for a period of two centuries.”

(Krastins, V. “The Tiwi: A Culture Contact History of the Australian Aborigines on Bathurst and Melville Islands 1705-1942.” BA Hons Thesis, ANU: 1972).

A STATEMENT OF PRESENT PURPOSE

“We believe the Tiwi Land Council provides a continuation of those processes now affirmed in legislation; recognising our one language and common and distinct customs; our constant contact with each other and shared hunting grounds and ceremonies; our established practice of calling meetings and seeking the advice of our elders that have served our people for thousands of years, and is a recognised and respected authority for the management, protection and development of our interests.”

(Matthew Wonaeamirri, Eric Brooks, Hyacinth Tungutalum, Raphael Apuatumi, Cyril Rioli - A Special Meeting of Clan Leaders at Pularumpi, 1st June 1977).

OUR VISION FOR THE FUTURE “Our vision is of an independent and resilient Tiwi society built on the orderly and well managed utilization of our natural and human resources through reliance upon our own management, maintenance and protection of unique cultural and natural resource values for the enjoyment and benefit of future generations of Tiwi.”

(Tiwi Land Council Meetings and Workshops developing the strategies and responsibilities leading to publication and ratification of the Tiwi Islands Regional Natural Resource Management Strategy, 29th September 2003).

CONTACT

Mr. Gibson Farmer Illortaminni

Chair of Tiwi Land Council

Email:

inf

o@tiwilandcouncil.com

Phone:

(08) 8997 0797

M

ail:

PO B

ox 38545, Winnellie NT 0821

Internet address: http://www.tiwilandcouncil.com

CHAIRMAN’S REPORT

The Time is Now.

Welcome to the 36th Edition of our Annual Report, including our 36th unqualified audit.

2014/15 has brought with it a time to remember those great leaders past and present who had the vision, foresight and determination to get us to where we are today. As you read this, our Tiwi men and women are working in our own Forestry Plantations, harvesting the trees to be exported from our own Port Melville, where even more of our Tiwi men and women are working.

Our kids in all our schools on the Tiwi Islands are seeing a future; a future not clouded by the depression of welfare, grog and drugs, but a future of real job satisfaction right here on our ancestral land; a future where a real job gives us the satisfaction of knowing that our fridges are always full, our kids are never hungry; a future where a real job means we can afford to buy a car and a boat to take our kids to their country and a future where we can feel good about ourselves because we know we are providing for our kids and our families and all the good that comes from knowing that we are participating in building a great Tiwi Nation.

We keep getting hounded and trashed in the media by people who just don’t get it, people who would rather see us trying to exist on handouts, unable to read and write and in a spiral of welfare dependency, generation after generation. They say we don’t care about our environment.

Well, we’re not playing their game.

7 TIWI LAND COUNCIL ANNUAL REPORT 2014/2015

CHAIRMAN’S REPORT

The Time is Now.

Welcome to the 36th Edition of our Annual Report, including our 36th unqualified audit.

2014/15 has brought with it a time to remember those great leaders past and present who had the vision, foresight and determination to get us to where we are today. As you read this, our Tiwi men and women are working in our own Forestry Plantations, harvesting the trees to be exported from our own Port Melville, where even more of our Tiwi men and women are working.

Our kids in all our schools on the Tiwi Islands are seeing a future; a future not clouded by the depression of welfare, grog and drugs, but a future of real job satisfaction right here on our ancestral land; a future where a real job gives us the satisfaction of knowing that our fridges are always full, our kids are never hungry; a future where a real job means we can afford to buy a car and a boat to take our kids to their country and a future where we can feel good about ourselves because we know we are providing for our kids and our families and all the good that comes from knowing that we are participating in building a great Tiwi Nation.

We keep getting hounded and trashed in the media by people who just don’t get it, people who would rather see us trying to exist on handouts, unable to read and write and in a spiral of welfare dependency, generation after generation. They say we don’t care about our environment.

Well, we’re not playing their game.

Chairman: Gibson Farmer Illortaminni

8 TIWI LAND COUNCIL ANNUAL REPORT 2014/2015

We are Tiwi. We are a proud people. We are the ‘can do’ people. We get knocked down, but we get up again! We’ll make mistakes and will continue to make mistakes, but it won’t stop us from trying. We’ll learn from those mistakes and become better and stronger for the effort. Our great leaders had the foresight to allocate up to 10% of our land for development to create real jobs and a real life for our people - and that’s the vision that our new wave of young leaders on our TLC Executive are committed to seeing through, while at the same time ensuring that we look after our land and our sea like we have for thousands of years.

Our environment, our land and our sea is who we are, it’s what keeps us strong, it provides tucker for us, it’s our identity, it’s our life, it’s everything to us. We will welcome successful development to get a life for our people while at the same time ensuring we look after our country. We make no apologies for this. We have a future to build for our kids and grandkids and build it we will.

2014/15, also saw the end of an era. Two of our great leaders and past Chairmen in Cyril Kalippa and Robert Tipungwuti retired after decades of tireless work for our people, along with our longest serving CEO in John Hicks. Through their time with the TLC they saw the development of our forestry industry and Port Melville, the establishment of Ranku community, Township Leasing at Wurrumiyanga, Milikapiti and Ranku as well as the Tiwi College, just to name a few outstanding achievements.

We wish them well in their well-earned retirement years where they can justifiably reflect on a job well done!

Muna,

Gibson Farmer Illortaminni Chairman

9th September 2015

9 TIWI LAND COUNCIL ANNUAL REPORT 2014/2015

ANNUAL REPORTING REQUIREMENTS

BASIS Section 46 of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 requires preparation of an Annual Report.

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS This report contains our prepared financial statements, including the Auditor-General`s report on those financial statements.

REPORT OF OPERATIONS Commonwealth Authorities (Annual Reporting) Orders 2011, as amended, provides detailed requirements for information about operations and activities. This report contains that detail required.

OUTLINE OF ORGANISATIONAL STRUCTURE

Shading represents external positions

TIWI LAND COUNCIL

AUDITOR

LEGAL ADVISER

EXECUTIVE MANAGEMENT COMMITTEE

CHAIR & CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER

INDEPENDENT AUDIT COMMITTEE

Chief Financial Officer

Executive Officers Administration, Governance and Compliance

Secretary Land Use & Resources

Principal Legal Officer

Registrar Traditional Owners

10 TIWI LAND COUNCIL ANNUAL REPORT 2014/2015

LOCATION OF ACTIVITIES AND FACILITIES

The map provided below locates facilities developed by the Land Council for the conduct of required major activities. These include:-•

Headquar

ters office, meeting hall and ceremonial grounds at Pickataramoor adjacent to the Tiwi College. This facility is the centre for most meetings of the Land Council and the Management Committee and is so situated to draw upon students from the College, including members of the Junior Land Council, to participate at meetings and develop an understanding of the leadership challenges facing Tiwi society.

•

O

ffices at all three Townships where Managers and members of the Management Committee also reside.

•

S

ecretariat/CEO (leased) office in Darwin that monitors legal, natural resource management, environmental audit and financial compliance and provides support to our staff on the Islands.

STAFF RETAINED AND EMPLOYED Limited and best use of funds has required the Land Council retain external professional staff to provide key services:

•

L

egal - Piper Alderman, Melbourne and Adelaide.

•

E

conomic and Corporate - KPMG, Darwin; Department of Business NTG.

•

T

iwi Corporate being 10 corporations all with skilled managers meeting every second month with economists, financiers and skilled successful independent businessmen.

11 TIWI LAND COUNCIL ANNUAL REPORT 2014/2015

LOCATION OF ACTIVITIES AND FACILITIES

The map provided below locates facilities developed by the Land Council for the conduct of required major activities. These include:-• Headquarters office, meeting hall and ceremonial grounds at Pickataramoor adjacent to the Tiwi College. This facility is the centre for most meetings of the Land Council and

the Management Committee and is so situated to draw upon students from the College, including members of the Junior Land Council, to participate at meetings and develop an understanding of the leadership challenges facing Tiwi society.

• Offices at all three Townships where Managers and members of the Management Committee also reside.

• Secretariat/CEO (leased) office in Darwin that monitors legal, natural resource management, environmental audit and financial compliance and provides support to our staff on the Islands.

STAFF RETAINED AND EMPLOYED Limited and best use of funds has required the Land Council retain external professional staff to provide key services:

• Legal - Piper Alderman, Melbourne and Adelaide.

• Economic and Corporate - KPMG, Darwin; Department of Business NTG.

• Tiwi Corporate being 10 corporations all with skilled managers meeting every second month with economists, financiers and skilled successful independent businessmen.

The Land Council is required to employ permanent staff. During the 2014/15 Financial Year it directly employed seven persons:

•

Chief Ex

ecutive Officer, John Hicks LLB. Was retained by the Land Council in April 1986 and was provided with, and retained on, a ten year contract from 2005. In 1995 Mr. Hicks also became Secretary to the newly established Management Committee of the Land Council. Mr Hicks commenced annual leave and long service leave at the beginning of 3rd October 2014, leading into the retirement as at the 30 June 2015.

•

S

ecretary, Land and Resource Management, Kate Hadden BSc (Hons); McKell Medallist, Accredited Environmental Auditor, was seconded from the NT Government in 2000 and remains a Land Council employee subject to tri-annual reviews of her secondment.

•

D

evelopment and Risk Management Advisor and Acting CEO Brian Clancy DipEd, is employed on a ten year contract from 2008. Mr Clancy full time roll as Acting CEO commenced on 3rd October 2014.

•

P

rincipal Legal Officer, Derek Mayger LLB. MBA FCPA, is employed on a three year contract from 2014.

•

R

egistrar of Traditional Owners - Mrs Jennifer Clancy Ullungurra, Cert Teacher, is employed on a ten year contract from 2008.

•

Ex

ecutive Officer, Terry Larkin - based at the Pickataramoor HQ Office; assisting the Land Council with ICT support across its various locations, office administration and implementation of digital records management.

•

Oper

ations and Cultural Liaison Officer - Rachel Burke, also based at the Pickataramoor HQ; fully trained representative for Work Health and Safety, office administration, operation of Pickataramoor HQ hospitality duties (guest accommodation and meetings), cultural liaison with wider Tiwi community.

REVIEW OF OPERATIONS AND FUTURE PROSPECTS

The functions of the Land Council are described at Section 23 of the enabling legislation and refer to the good management, protection and development of land pursuant to the express wishes of those who own the land, having regard to the opinions of others who also live on that land. Timeliness, resource allocation and priority protection mandates are also provided at Section 23AA.

In order to implement the functions of the Land Council with increased efficient and efficacy training has been identified as a strategic development, focus on corporate governance, financial management and statutory legislation and regulations interpretation.

There will be attention to the finalisation of the Vernon Islands land claim during the coming year. Land Council will in addition to continuing the well-respected natural resource management of the Tiwi Islands, devote much of its time to the negotiating. Negotiation pertain to exploration licence applications and petroleum exploration permit application, section 19 leases with traditional owners and interested businesses, and potentially a township lease.

In 2015-2016 it is anticipated that the Tiwi private economy will commence employing Tiwi’s in real job and creating an income stream from investments. The Land Council looks forward in assisting these enterprises when their assistance is sort.

We are entering a new phase, with the ten strong men of the Executive Management Committee setting a strong foundation for the future direction of the Tiwi Land Council.

12 TIWI LAND COUNCIL ANNUAL REPORT 2014/2015

1.0 PERFORMANCE Through the past decade the Land Council has adopted key performance indicators integrated within the outcome budgeting and financial management process.

Note - Where appropriate a reference to Land also refers to Sea or other Waterways secured as a result of High Court determinations 2007/08.

Performance is measured and monitored within these output groups.

OUTPUT GROUP

Land, Sea and Natural Resource Management Support Services

Administer and issue permits for access/closures to or through Aboriginal land and sea.

Provide research and assistance as required to Aboriginal landowners and other Aboriginal people to manage land and sea and to undertake activities consistent with their ambitions and the sustainability of their resources.

The Tiwi Land Council has secure title to those areas of land traditionality owned by the Tiwi people. Fur ther claims have the suppor t and resources of the Nor thern Land Council to assist them.

Land Claims and Acquisitions Support Services

Assist as appropriate in the economic advancement of Aboriginal people through employment, education and training, par ticularly in relation to land use proposals within Land Council Region.

Provide research and assistance and identify infrastructure requirements as appropriate to enable Aboriginal landowners and other Aboriginal people to under take commercial activities.

Process applications and assist in making land use agreements on Aboriginal land.

Process applications for consent to explore and mine on Aboriginal land.

Economic Development and Commercial Services

Promote public awareness on issues affecting Aboriginal people, their land and other rights.

Provide advocacy and representation as appropriate to the Traditional Owners and other clients of the Land Council.

Provide cultural and heritage suppor t as appropriate to the Traditional Owners and other clients of the Land Council.

Facilitate targeted Aboriginal community development initatives as appropriate with the Traditional onwers and other clients of the Land Council.

Advocacy Services

Administer and distribute statutory, negotiated and other payments as appropriate to the Traditional Owners and other clients of the Land Council.

Administer Land Trust in accordance with the provisions of the ALRA.

Assist in the resolution of disputes with respect to land as appropriate.

Administration Services

The Tiwi Land Council is unlikely to process or entertain Native Title Claims. Native Title

13 TIWI LAND COUNCIL ANNUAL REPORT 2014/2015

1.0 PERFORMANCE Through the past decade the Land Council has adopted key performance indicators integrated within the outcome budgeting and financial management process.

Note - Where appropriate a reference to Land also refers to Sea or other Waterways secured as a result of High Court determinations 2007/08.

Performance is measured and monitored within these output groups.

1.1 F inancial Resources and Application Detailed audited financial statements are attached. In summary the Land Council received approximately $2.179m from the Commonwealth in section 64(1) funding. It was allocated during the financial year against the four output groups as illustrated in the charts below:

Dollar expenditure for the year can be summarized in this accompanying graphic:

1.1.1 A nalysis of Performance Tiwi Land Council expended funds in accordance with approved estimates, sections 34 and 35 of the Aboriginal Land Rights (Northern Territory) Act 1976, with total expenditure of $27,875 below budget. Commitment to purchase at the end of June 2015 of printing and publications was $14,688 at the end of the year, publications were not received and had not been recorded in the accounts.

Comprehensive income for the year ending 30 June 2015 of ($56,745) included $177,662 of depreciation non-cash expense, with cash increase of $58,328 to $528,234 representing 32.8% of equity.

The Tiwi Land Council holds on trust for the Office of Township Leasing an insurance settlement for the Wurrumiyanga pontoon destroyed by fire. These funds will be used towards the construction phase of the new ferry pontoon terminal. A Liability is recorded in the statement of financial position for this amount with an equivalent amount of funds held at cash at bank of $122,551.

In addition to these funds, the Land Council also applies for and is in receipt of grants, significantly applied for management and environmental compliance in the use of land. Grant totals are reflected in our financial statements and noted in the Principal Output Group.

14 TIWI LAND COUNCIL ANNUAL REPORT 2014/2015

2.0 PRINCIP AL OUTPUTS

2.1 Land S ea and Natural Resource Management Support Services

Our vision is of an independent and resilient Tiwi society built on the orderly and well managed utilisation of our natural resources. Inherent in this is the maintenance and protection of our unique cultural and natural resource values for the enjoyment and benefit of future generations of Tiwi.

A key achievement for 2014/15 was winning the United Nations Association of Australia 2015 World Environment Day Biodiversity Award. The Award recognised a joint CSIRO/Tiwi Land Ranger project controlling fire ants on Melville Island in one of the world’s largest eradications to date.

The year produced other solid results for land, sea and natural resource management on the Tiwi Islands, despite funding uncertainty in some areas. Wages funding was sourced for one year for Tiwi Land Rangers, so the remaining staff were reinstated to full time positions in September. Vacancies from previous funding shortfalls were not filled due to lack of ongoing funding past September 2015.

Despite the reduced staff, focus remained on fire management for emissions abatement, and managing key threats such as mimosa pigra and lantana. Rangers were also able to provide support to visiting researchers and continue with contract quarantine services and support. Land Rangers also hosted work experience students from Tiwi College.

Analysis of the 2014 controlled burning showed that there was potential for burning to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, however with changed government policy and introduction of the Emissions Reduction Fund, it is now questionable whether the sale of credits would cover costs. Annual fire plan development and implementation continued with support through ABA grant funding, and collaborative work is currently underway to identify optimal burning regimes for biodiversity outcomes.

Marine Ranger staffing remained constant with wages support for four positions from Working on Country, and operational funding support from NT Fisheries. Activities included regular coastal and land based patrols monitoring marine debris and/or unusual events, and ongoing marine biodiversity monitoring. No significant threats were observed, and marine species sightings, turtle nesting events and shorebird nesting were all observed to be normal.

In December an agreement was signed with the NT Government to remove permit restrictions for fishing in creeks and rivers in the southern part of the Tiwi Islands. This led to an increased focus from Tiwi Marine Rangers on community consultations and monitoring fishing effort. One Marine Ranger was selected to undertake Certificate III in Fisheries Compliance to support the agreement, and all Marine Rangers will be heavily involved during the review processes built into the agreement.

Another agreement was reached with the NT Government to identify areas of land potentially suitable for economic development. The Tiwi Land Council and Tiwi Rangers assisted with extensive biodiversity, land and water capability assessments in northeast Bathurst Island, the first area to be assessed. A working group was formed to provide guidance and facilitate ongoing consultations with Landowners for exploring and managing development options. Work also continued with the University of Melbourne to develop decision support systems for the preservation of natural and cultural values in areas where development may be considered.

The Tiwi Land Council’s Land Use Request process was maintained, ensuring that environmental matters are considered prior to any natural resource use or modification, and that landowners are adequately consulted. 41 requests were processed for minor projects that involved natural resource use.

Fee for service based activities continued to be sought to provide a local revenue stream, and in 2014/15 the amount received was $4,272.73, and reflects activities under the Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry dealings.

15 TIWI LAND COUNCIL ANNUAL REPORT 2014/2015

2.1.1 D etails of consultants engaged:

Total Land and Resource Management Consultancies 2014-2015: $20,000

TLC Research Access Agreements are in place for all consultants identified below.

• CSIRO - Assist the Tiwi Land Council to develop a CFI (Carbon Farming Initiative) project applica tion using the savanna burning methodology. 20,000

2.1.2 Gr ants received

Funding stream & project Project/purpose Amount received 2014/15

NT Fisheries Indigenous Marine Ranger support $165,000

Commonwealth Government Working on Country

Marine Ranger wages support $178,040

Commonwealth Government Indigenous Capability and Development Sustainable Ranger Wages and Changed Fire Regimes

$274,400

ABA beneficial payments under section 64(4)

Replacement Marine Ranger Vessel - Milikapiti

$30,369

Commonwealth Government Indigenous Capability and Development Tiwi Cultural, Language and leadership support (funeral & ceremonies)

$317,000

Commonwealth Indigenous Carbon Farming Fund

Fire Management for GHG abatement on the Tiwi Islands

$42,100

2.1.3 F ee for service received section 37(2)

ECoz Environmental Services $436.36

Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry $4,272.73

Tiwi land and sea rangers provided services generating $4,709.09 in fees.

2.1.4 P ermit Administration 2014/15:

Authority to issue permits is provided under the Aboriginal Land Act 2010 (NT) amended. Tiwi require that there be an on island resident person or organization willing to undertake responsibility for the visitor and the visit. We also attach some quarantine restrictions to permits in regard to feral animals, invasive weeds and other documented and advised environmental risks.

Trends over the last 35 years illustrate changing patterns and influences upon owners and residents of the Tiwi Islands. Total numbers of known annual visitor’s barely exceeded 1000 people in the period from 1978 to 1993. Numbers reached a peak of over 7000 by 2008 and have collapsed again to pre-2000 levels with only 1985 last year. In the current 2013-2014 period a total of 2,183 permits were issued - an increase of 10%.

Of interest are the changing purposes and interests of visitors. Fishing tourists now outnumber all others. Government officials and service contractors have maintained numbers that escalated from 2010. Fishing tourists managed by our Tiwi owned Tiwi Islands Adventures from their three fishing lodges are a significant reason for visitor numbers. There is also some evidence

16 TIWI LAND COUNCIL ANNUAL REPORT 2014/2015

of Authority to issue permits is provided under the Aboriginal Land Act 2010 (NT) amended. Tiwi require that there be an on island resident person or organization willing to undertake responsibility for the visitor and the visit. We also attach some quarantine restrictions to permits in regard to feral animals, invasive weeds and other documented and advised environmental risks.

Trends over the last 36 years illustrate changing patterns and influences upon owners and residents of the Tiwi Islands. Total numbers of known annual visitor’s barely exceeded 1000 people in the period from 1978 to 1993. Numbers reached a peak of over 7000 by 2008 and have collapsed again to pre-2000 levels with only 1985 last year. In the current 2014-2015 period a total of 1,573 permits were issued - an increase of 14%.

Permits issued in 2014-2015 Fishing tourists 235 (220, 2013-14), visitors general 313 (347, 2013-14) and visitors work 1025 (712, 2013-14). Government officials and service contractors have maintained numbers that escalated from 2010. Fishing tourists managed by our Tiwi owned Tiwi Islands Adventures from their three fishing lodges are a significant reason for visitor numbers. There is also some evidence of increasing tourist numbers to the Islands as a result of affordable ($40) one way sea Ferry fares introduced on a professionally operated service commenced last year. The operators Sealink have recently joined with our landowners and Tiwi Islands Adventures to expand the tourism experience and attractions.

Permits are the process of the Permission Principle that underwrites Tiwi traditional governance now being more strongly asserted by the current generation of leaders and landowners. The online Permit application process has dramatically reduced the workload in administering the system and has allowed more accurate, accessible data to be compiled and retrieved.

Income received as a benefit to landowners was $8,709, less $1,818 in a website upgrade.

2.2 E conomic Development And Commercial Services

The Land Council strategy over many decades has sought to found and facilitate a Tiwi private economy. 26% of expenditure targets those industries and activities capable of providing jobs and a viable Tiwi economic future. The land, and assets upon the land (other than land under lease), is owned and held by the Tiwi Aboriginal Land Trust. The only organisation able to direct and operate that Trust is the Tiwi Land Council. Since the 1980`s Land Owners, in development of their private economy, have been required to take commercial risks - something the Land Council is prevented from entertaining by law. Landowners have developed their own private trustee corporations to manage and develop their assets, including plantations, commercial sub-divisions, ports and multiplier industry and activity linked to these core industries. All corporations have a beneficial purpose.

17 TIWI LAND COUNCIL ANNUAL REPORT 2014/2015

of Authority to issue permits is provided under the Aboriginal Land Act 2010 (NT) amended. Tiwi require that there be an on island resident person or organization willing to undertake responsibility for the visitor and the visit. We also attach some quarantine restrictions to permits in regard to feral animals, invasive weeds and other documented and advised environmental risks.

Trends over the last 36 years illustrate changing patterns and influences upon owners and residents of the Tiwi Islands. Total numbers of known annual visitor’s barely exceeded 1000 people in the period from 1978 to 1993. Numbers reached a peak of over 7000 by 2008 and have collapsed again to pre-2000 levels with only 1985 last year. In the current 2014-2015 period a total of 1,573 permits were issued - an increase of 14%.

Permits issued in 2014-2015 Fishing tourists 235 (220, 2013-14), visitors general 313 (347, 2013-14) and visitors work 1025 (712, 2013-14). Government officials and service contractors have maintained numbers that escalated from 2010. Fishing tourists managed by our Tiwi owned Tiwi Islands Adventures from their three fishing lodges are a significant reason for visitor numbers. There is also some evidence of increasing tourist numbers to the Islands as a result of affordable ($40) one way sea Ferry fares introduced on a professionally operated service commenced last year. The operators Sealink have recently joined with our landowners and Tiwi Islands Adventures to expand the tourism experience and attractions.

Permits are the process of the Permission Principle that underwrites Tiwi traditional governance now being more strongly asserted by the current generation of leaders and landowners. The online Permit application process has dramatically reduced the workload in administering the system and has allowed more accurate, accessible data to be compiled and retrieved.

Income received as a benefit to landowners was $8,709, less $1,818 in a website upgrade.

2.2 Economic Development And Commercial Services

The Land Council strategy over many decades has sought to found and facilitate a Tiwi private economy. 26% of expenditure targets those industries and activities capable of providing jobs and a viable Tiwi economic future. The land, and assets upon the land (other than land under lease), is owned and held by the Tiwi Aboriginal Land Trust. The only organisation able to direct and operate that Trust is the Tiwi Land Council. Since the 1980`s Land Owners, in development of their private economy, have been required to take commercial risks - something the Land Council is prevented from entertaining by law. Landowners have developed their own private trustee corporations to manage and develop their assets, including plantations, commercial sub-divisions, ports and multiplier industry and activity linked to these core industries. All corporations have a beneficial purpose.

2.2.1 T iwi Enterprises:

Tiwi Enterprises Pty Ltd was established in 2008 by the 8 Tiwi Land Groups to provide expertise, develop, facilitate and manage economic development opportunities, many of these as a result of Township Leasing at Wurrumiyanga and with their the Mantiyupwi owners. At 30 June 2015 Tiwi Enterprises had 43 employees, 35 of these are Tiwi

Activities of Tiwi Enterprises in 2014-15 are summarized below:

• Ma nagement of Mantiyupwi projects, including:

• M

antiyupwi Motel - now has 16 self-contained single units available for visitors, as well as the 8 person complex. The 6 room complex has been converted to office space and is rented Territory Housing. The motel also has a conference room, an outdoor meeting area, and the office space is utilised by TITEB for their RJCP program.

•

Shopping C

entre, Wurrumiyanga - has now been open for business for 2 years. It is a busy complex and Tiwi Enterprises provides the cleaning service. Landscaping of the grounds is an ongoing project.

•

W

orking in partnership with Tiwi Islands Training and Employment Board (TITEB):

•

T

iwi Enterprises continues to work with TITEB to deliver the RJCP project, working towards increasing job opportunities for Tiwi.. Tiwi Enterprises provides payroll and administration services to the project, as well as working with local employers to ensure that where possible, jobs and training opportunities within local businesses go to Tiwi workers.

•

P

rovision of payroll services:

•

F

or TITEB employees based on Tiwi Islands.

18 TIWI LAND COUNCIL ANNUAL REPORT 2014/2015

• Small Business initiativ es:

•

H

ire car service - now have a fleet of 15 cars, all based in Wurrumiyanga. Five of the vehicles are owned by Tiwi Landowner organisations, and managed by Tiwi Enterprises.

•

G

arden and maintenance service established in early 2012.

•

T

iwi Bus Service - funding has been received from the NT Government to establish this service in the 2015-16 year.

•

Ma

nagement and administration of grants for the operations of:

•

T

iwi Land Ranger Program - a 12 month program funded by ABA through Tiwi Resources and employs 15 Tiwi staff. This concludes in September 2015.

•

IL

C Milikapiti Nursery/Farm - employs 10 Tiwi staff.

•

DE

WHA Marine Rangers Program - employs 4 staff.

•

NT

G grant for the design of pontoons at Wurrumiyanga and Paru.

•

O

ngoing sponsorship of the Tiwi Bombers Football Club.

•

Nguiu G

arage

•

T

he Nguiu Garge has the dual purpose of keeping the hire fleet in good repair as well as providing mechanical workshop services to the community. Currently employs 8 people, 5 of whom are Tiwi

2.2.2 T iwi Plantation Corporation and Port Melville:

In 1999/2000 a total of 31,200 ha of hardwood plantations was approved for establishment and operation on the Tiwi Islands, including clearing of native tropical savanna woodland. 28,326 ha has been cleared and planted to Acacia mangium, leaving 2,874 ha currently uncleared and not planted. In addition, there are 767 ha of commercially harvestable Caribbean pine planted over the period 1975 to 1985.

The Tiwi forestry and port businesses are managed by the independent ASIC registered companies, Tiwi Plantations Corporation Pty Ltd and Port Melville Pty Ltd respectively. Shareholders of the two companies are Tiwi representatives of the eight Tiwi landowning groups. Directors and Board Members of both companies are Tiwi.

Regular briefings are provided to Tiwi Land Council Executive Managers on progress and status of both businesses by the General Manager of both companies. The Tiwi Land Council is not involved and has no role in the businesses of either company.

Harvesting, ship loading and woodchip storage depot equipment costing $4.845 million (excluding GST) has been purchased through an Aboriginal Benefits Account grant provided by the Australian Government. With the approval of the Australian Government, this equipment was used as security for a commercial loan of $6.1 million (including GST) from a major commercial financial institution for the purchase of the remaining equipment.

Harvesting of Acacia mangium plantations on land traditionally owned by Munupi landowning group commenced on 23rd June with a Tiwi Harvest Field Day which was well attended by Tiwi from all communities on the Islands. Woodchip is currently being stockpiled at Port Melville.

Installation of equipment at the woodchip storage depot at Port Melville is currently underway and expected to be completed in August. The first export shipment of woodchip is expected mid-September.

The Conditions of Approval under the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act for the hardwood plantations on Melville Island were reviewed by the Australian Government Department of Environment and transferred to Tiwi Plantations Corporation Pty Ltd. Tiwi Plantations Corporation Pty Ltd is now the sole approval holder of these conditions. Tiwi Plantations Corporation has submitted and received approval for an Environmental Management Plan which will direct the management, harvesting and replanting of the hardwood plantations into the future.

19 TIWI LAND COUNCIL ANNUAL REPORT 2014/2015

• Small Business initiatives:

• Hire car service - now have a fleet of 15 cars, all based in Wurrumiyanga. Five of the vehicles are owned by Tiwi Landowner organisations, and managed by Tiwi Enterprises.

• Garden and maintenance service established in early 2012.

• Tiwi Bus Service - funding has been received from the NT Government to establish this service in the 2015-16 year.

• Management and administration of grants for the operations of:

• Tiwi Land Ranger Program - a 12 month program funded by ABA through Tiwi Resources and employs 15 Tiwi staff. This concludes in September 2015.

• ILC Milikapiti Nursery/Farm - employs 10 Tiwi staff.

• DEWHA Marine Rangers Program - employs 4 staff.

• NTG grant for the design of pontoons at Wurrumiyanga and Paru.

• Ongoing sponsorship of the Tiwi Bombers Football Club.

• Nguiu Garage • The Nguiu Garge has the dual purpose of keeping the hire fleet in good repair as well as providing mechanical workshop services to the community. Currently employs 8 people, 5 of whom are Tiwi

2.2.2 Tiwi Plantation Corporation and Port Melville:

In 1999/2000 a total of 31,200 ha of hardwood plantations was approved for establishment and operation on the Tiwi Islands, including clearing of native tropical savanna woodland. 28,326 ha has been cleared and planted to Acacia mangium, leaving 2,874 ha currently uncleared and not planted. In addition, there are 767 ha of commercially harvestable Caribbean pine planted over the period 1975 to 1985.

The Tiwi forestry and port businesses are managed by the independent ASIC registered companies, Tiwi Plantations Corporation Pty Ltd and Port Melville Pty Ltd respectively. Shareholders of the two companies are Tiwi representatives of the eight Tiwi landowning groups. Directors and Board Members of both companies are Tiwi.

Regular briefings are provided to Tiwi Land Council Executive Managers on progress and status of both businesses by the General Manager of both companies. The Tiwi Land Council is not involved and has no role in the businesses of either company.

Harvesting, ship loading and woodchip storage depot equipment costing $4.845 million (excluding GST) has been purchased through an Aboriginal Benefits Account grant provided by the Australian Government. With the approval of the Australian Government, this equipment was used as security for a commercial loan of $6.1 million (including GST) from a major commercial financial institution for the purchase of the remaining equipment.

Harvesting of Acacia mangium plantations on land traditionally owned by Munupi landowning group commenced on 23rd June with a Tiwi Harvest Field Day which was well attended by Tiwi from all communities on the Islands. Woodchip is currently being stockpiled at Port Melville.

Installation of equipment at the woodchip storage depot at Port Melville is currently underway and expected to be completed in August. The first export shipment of woodchip is expected mid-September.

The Conditions of Approval under the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act for the hardwood plantations on Melville Island were reviewed by the Australian Government Department of Environment and transferred to Tiwi Plantations Corporation Pty Ltd. Tiwi Plantations Corporation Pty Ltd is now the sole approval holder of these conditions. Tiwi Plantations Corporation has submitted and received approval for an Environmental Management Plan which will direct the management, harvesting and replanting of the hardwood plantations into the future.

The Hon. Greg Hunt, Minister for the Environment, has advised that the Tiwi export operations for woodchip do not require consideration under the EPBC Act and the Department of Environment has advised that the construction and operation of the Tiwi woodchip storage depot at Port Melville does not require assessment under the Act.

Further operations of the port, including shipping movements, fuel storage activities and fueling activities associated with future operations of the Port as a Marine Supply Base, have been formally referred to the Department of Environment by the port operator Ezion Offshore Logistics Hub (Tiwi) Pty Ltd for a binding decision to be made as to whether or not approval is needed under the EPBC Act.

Roger Smith General Manager Tiwi Plantations Corporation

2.2.3 P rocess and assist Land Use Agreements

The following major activities summarize the significant focus of landowners, staff and consultations at meetings through the year. These are the links between Land owner strategies to achieve employment and private industry participation, tied to the authority`s principal outputs.

•

Discussions with O

TL continuing over possible township lease at Pirlangimpi. •

F

urther development of Ranger and Land Management programs. •

Ongoing dev

elopment of Marine Ranger powers and training. •

Ongoing c

oordination with medical researchers studying Tiwi susceptibility to kidney disease and other afflictions. •

M

anagement of Exploration Licence Applications from a range of mining companies. •

M

anagement of Exploration Permits Application from MBS Oil and Gas Pty Ltd. •

F

ishing and hunting permits managed through Land Council on island staff, improved efficiency and reduced costs have been achieved by again undertaking this function in house. •

C

onstruction projects and consultations in reference to landowner revenue from gravel, soil and sand extraction. •

C

ontinuing harvest and collection of Crocodile Eggs on Bathurst and Melville Islands and payments related thereto. •

Buffalo hun

ting and utilization on Melville Island. •

C

ontinuation of Olive Ridley Turtle research, tagging and protection planning on various beach locations, together with more detailed genetic and sustainable population analysis. •

C

ontinuing assessment of various incidents of beach erosion and coastal threats. •

C

ontinuing feral animal and weed discovery and eradication programs. •

C

ontinuing support and discussion with the Land Ranger program targeting endangered species, soils, water, weeds, fire management, buffer zone compliance and fortnightly community consultations especially in the schools. •

C

ommencement of intensive appraisal and land capability assessments for agri-business opportunities initiated in agreement with Northern Territory Government. •

V

ernon Islands Land Claim - finalising of key aspects of Tiwi ownership over Vernon Islands through continuing discussions with Federal Government and NLC. •

D

edicated Fire Management Committee resourced - formal meeting processes undertaken at four comprehensive meetings throughout the reporting period. •

I

ntegration of Fire Management for Greenhouse Abatement with general Land Council strategies and landowner participation, assisted through CSIRO research. •

R

ehabilitation nursery contracts with Matilda Zircon continuing. •

Suppor

t and planning with Marine Rangers in Border Security; insect monitoring; disposal of foreign vessels and pilot services at Port Melville. •

F

isheries Agreement and Settlement Deed negotiated with Northern Territory Government providing commercial support for Tiwi corporations involved in Tourist

20 TIWI LAND COUNCIL ANNUAL REPORT 2014/2015

Fishing whilst encouraging permit free access for recreational and commercial fishermen across large coastline areas of both islands. •

A

pproval given for the construction of an additional Pirlangimpi Progress Association (PPA) staff dwelling on Lot Number currently/already utilised by PPA for staff housing. •

F

eral cat trial on Bathurst Island continuing in partnership with Tiwi Rangers.

2.2.4 O utcomes and Benefits

Outcomes from land use agreements are the strength and self-reliance being generated by Tiwi society in returning again to their own use of land and participating in its management to secure the economic use required by 21st century Tiwi living and working on their land. The tensions of “cultural economic land use” and “sustainable economic land use” once indivisible, continue to be promoted by sections of the media. Tiwi landowners have settled upon the use of up to 10% of their land for the purposes of engaging with, and participating in, the Australian economy.

Benefits include:

•

R

oads constructed. •

E

ducational infrastructure. •

Housing

.

•

W

ater conservation and planning. •

Spor

ting infrastructure. •

Land secur

ity (weeds, endangered species management) and protection. •

Land

management expertise and land owner identification with improving use and required skills. •

T

ownship Planning and professional appraisal of living spaces. •

Elec

tricity Planning and assessments of central power generation and distribution networks. •

Elev

ated governance and compliance regimes driven by economic purposes now exposed to validation and transparency demands of all landowners. •

G

eneral health improvements. A dramatic decline in Tiwi death rates since the late 1990`s, now in published data, suggests a twenty year improvement in the Tiwi lifespan from 47 years twenty years ago to in excess of 65 years today. •

Business appr

aisals and planning linked to professional advisers across a range of industries - agri-business; tourism and small business. •

M

eetings initiated with the ten major Tiwi Corporate enterprises every second month for Tiwi business leaders to share information, experience and needs. •

T

iwi Business Guide published with core information of Tiwi private economy leaders. •

A

ttracting required Tiwi good science through the Scientific Reference Committee. •

I

ncreasing identification of jobs with behaviour purposes and the skills required to attain them and participate in the Tiwi beneficial purpose. •

I

ncome accruing to landowners from their use of land regularly exceeds $1m every year. This year comprising permit fees ($200,000); rents and levies ($420,000); revenues under mining agreements ($394,000) and sales of sand gravel and other resources ($15,000). None of this income benefits the Land Council. It is directly paid to landowner corporations who are audited and monitored for “group benefit” compliance outcomes. •

I

ncreasing landowner investments from their use of land income are also beginning to return revenues to their trust accounts. Profits from Hire Cars; Rents from investment houses and buildings; Contracts secured; Interest on funds deposited - are all over six figure amounts.

21 TIWI LAND COUNCIL ANNUAL REPORT 2014/2015

2.2.5 A ssist economic advancement through employment education and training

The Tiwi Land Council’s focus on training and education is manifest in its ongoing support for the Tiwi Islands Training and Employment Board and Tiwi Education Board. Reports on the operations of these bodies are provided below.

2.2.5.1 T iwi Islands Training and Employment Board

The Tiwi Islands Training and Employment Board, TITEB, delivers and coordinates all training on the Tiwi Islands. TITEB is a Registered Training Organisation, RTO, and a Group Training Organisation, GTO, and is owned and managed by a Tiwi Board of Directors. The CEO reports to the Board. As of the 1st of July 2013 TITEB became the provider of the Remote Jobs and Communities Program, (RJCP), on the Tiwi Islands. RJCP rolled up the CDEP, IEP and the JSA function on the Islands. Instead of job seekers having to deal with three and sometimes four agencies, one which operated from Cairns, they can now deal directly with TITEB which they know and trust as it is owned by the Tiwi. As a result TITEB now has 53 staff, 39 Tiwi, looking after approximately 650 jobseekers. We now also have a deputy CEO, who manages the RJCP program and several senior managers who together with the CEO make up the Senior Managers Team, SMT.

Under the RJCP contract we are required to place job seekers in activities which lead to employment. This has been difficult due to the lack of infrastructure but the RJCP team has come up with some innovative projects which have led to the creation of activities and real jobs.

In 2014 the Board delivered 34,200 Actual Hours Contact (AHC), which was an increase of 15,538 AHC or 83%. Table1 below outlines training activity for the past seven years.

Year Training Activity (AHC)

2014 34,200

2013 18,662

2012 14,425

2011 32,010

2010 15,324

2009 17,995

2008 17,180

2007 31,076

Table 1: AHC delivery 2007 to 2014

The increase in activity was directly related to the awarding of the RJCP contract to TITEB. When TITEB took over CDEP, the training for this cohort was again delivered through the TITEB, RTO instead of being imported from Tasmania and Cairns which had been the previous practice. The increase in hours was also helped with the Commonwealth’s breaching of people who had agreed to attend Language Literacy and Numeracy Programs, LLNP, as part of their agreement to receive welfare payments, but did not attend. This is the highest AHC ever reached by TITEB.

22 TIWI LAND COUNCIL ANNUAL REPORT 2014/2015

The Board is currently conducting a SEE Program in Nguiu for unemployed people receiving income support. The aim of the program is to provide participants with foundation skills to go onto further study and employment. This program has guaranteed notional funding for 3 years. The contract expires on the 30th June 2015.

The TITEB Group Training Organisation (GTO) has been established for almost 14 years now. The GTO was established to house our group Apprenticeship Scheme. To date 298 Tiwi have completed their apprenticeships. There were 35 apprentices in training in 2014. The Tiwi Islands Shire Council withdrew all their apprentices from the TITEB in 2012.

Our Apprenticeship programs were under threat with the Commonwealth changes. The Workplace English Language and Literacy program has been axed as has the mentor support program. The joint funding agreement between the Commonwealth and Territories and States is also under scrutiny. Funding of $800,000 over two years from IAS has been approved to bolster to activities of the GTO.

Capital Infrastructure funding from the Vocational Indigenous Industry Program has been axed as has the Indigenous Industry Skill Centre funding. We were lucky to fund 3 of our projects from these funding pools before they were wound up. We managed to purchase farm equipment to put the farm back together at Wurrumiyanga with a $150,000 grant from the Community Development Fund, CDF. 5 submissions with CDF for various infrastructure projects mostly to do with building accommodation and offices have been rejected. We currently have infrastructure assets to the value of $3.6.

TITEB continues to go from strength to strength despite recent drawbacks! We are fortunate to have staff that are passionate about their roles in TITEB and persevere with some hardships which we consider as short term. And we are optimistic that we can make things work for the Islands. We still consider that, in TITEB, we have a model worthy of consideration by other communities! It is a model with a proven track record and a “can do” attitude.

Our new Community Action Plan, “Tiwi together” points a clear, cohesive picture forward and has the full backing of the Tiwi. Together we will achieve our Vision for “A prosperous future for all Tiwi through lifelong learning and skills development.

Norm W Buchan CEO Tiwi Islands Training and Employment Board.

The Land Council remains encouraged at the impact of meaningful wage earning employment on training completion rates. Our Training Board is attempting to manage and train a largely illiterate and purposeless workforce. These are risks that have been visited upon many aboriginal populations. Land owners and their leaders have created the opportunities for full employment of the Tiwi workforce. These opportunities exist. The risks must be managed.

The established Tiwi Education Board is a significant strategy supported and encouraged by the Land Council to deliver apprentices for training who understand the purposes of industries upon their land and seek participation within that workforce.

2.2.5.2 T iwi Education Board

The Tiwi College, under the Leadership of the Tiwi Education Board, has gone from strength to strength this year. We were fortunate to be successful in our IAS funding application through the Federal Government with work already begun on building another two Family Group Homes to take our student cohort to 100 over the next couple of years.

As you can see in the graph below, we are beginning to consistently achieve 80% plus attendance and are now setting our sights on 90%. We have a growing waiting list of students and families wanting to enrol their kids at the College and into the culture of ‘Peaceful Pika’.

23 TIWI LAND COUNCIL ANNUAL REPORT 2014/2015

Our amazing Growing Young Women are completing Years 10, 11 and 12 through the NT Open Education College and our Senior Young Men are completing certificates in Sport and Recreation through our SEDA program which includes paid work one day a week as well as certificates in Construction.

We have developed an incredible and stable staff and are celebrating a number of staff having earned long service leave, which means they are staying for the long haul and our family group home parents are achieving amazing outcomes with our kids.

The vision of the Tiwi Education Board is clear, we are preparing our future leaders of tomorrow for our Tiwi workforce of today, so that as they develop, they will reap all the benefits of employment for themselves, their families and the wider Tiwi community.

We hear of the continued success of our Tiwi primary schools at Milikapiti and Pirlangimpi and the great inroads being made in our schools at Wurrumiyanga with attendance, literacy and numeracy outcomes.

So, to the future.....the Tiwi Education Board is committed to having an increased governance role in all schools on the Tiwi Islands and is currently working with the NT Education Department and Milikapiti and Pirlangimpi schools and is also committed to re-opening Ranku Primary school.

On behalf of the Tiwi Education Board, I would like to thank our committed Tiwi and non Tiwi principals and staff in all of our schools on the Islands for your amazing work, often far and beyond the call of duty.

We are lucky that throughout our Island schools we also have A Graders wanting to help us maximise achievements; Matthew Hayden, Guy Reynolds, Macquarie Bank, KPMG at the Tiwi College, the Cathy Freeman Foundation at our Wurrumiyanga schools are just some of the people that share our Tiwi vision for our future.

Thanks must also go to our TITEB/RJCP Tiwi School Attendance Officers who daily assist our schools and families, including our Tiwi College students to see the value of going to school every day.

Nimpangi

Jennifer Ullungura Clancy Chairwoman

Tiwi Education Board Tiwi Future in Tiwi Hands

24 TIWI LAND COUNCIL ANNUAL REPORT 2014/2015

2.2.6 P rocess Mining and Exploration applications:

TABLE OF RECEIVED MINING APPLICATIONS AND PROCESSES.

ELA

NUMBER

APPLICANT

APPLIED & CONSENTED

DATE BY WHICH PROPOSAL MUST BE LODGED

CONSULTATION PERIOD ENDS Discussions with Landowners must occur prior to this date

27664 Rio-Tinto 30.4.2010 30.7.2010

31.10.2015 Initial exploration discussions completed. Agreements in draft.

28617 Tennant Creek Gold 14.2.2011 7.12.2011

This now a Rio-Tinto interest which the Land Council has agreed to consider in 2014-15

29035 29036 29222

Kalbar Resources

4.9.2012 4.9.2012 12.6.2012

30.11.2012 30.11.2012 1.12.2012

31.10.2016 Substantive detail presented under consideration

29243 Rio-Tinto 17.7.2012

27.6.2012 Received 10.7.2012

31.10.2016 Substantive detail presented under consideration

29244 Rio-Tinto 17.4.2012

27.6.2012 Received 10.7.2012

31.10.2016 Substantive detail presented under consideration

EP(A)216 MBS Oil 15.2.2011 5.7.2012 31.10.2016 Under review by the Land Council.

Substantive detail presentation on 29 August 2015 were made by Kalbar Resources Pty Ltd and Rio Tinto Exploration. MBS Oils and Gas Pty Ltd made their substantive details presentation on 25 February 2015. Draft terms and conditions are under construction, with a view of communicating these in the 2015-2016 year.

2.2.7 P rovide research and assistance for Infrastructure needs:

Several studies by the Northern Territory Government in recent years have substantiated and engineered roading infrastructure costs for the Tiwi Islands at over $35m required to be spent over five years. Local Government lacks both revenue and capacity for road works beyond small and minor maintenance tasks. Road closures remain a certainty every wet season on every road.

The Northern Territory Government also funded and has responded to a study of inter and intra island sea transport needs. A Darwin to Tiwi passenger ferry service commenced in September 2013, providing subsidized fares of $40 each way. Fares at this level have not been known since single engine aircraft and a DC3 were operating in the 1970`s.

The Land Council Science Reference Committee (SRC) with Melbourne University re-established after changed University staff positions and met once during the year. Work, however, has continued with University support and includes:

Effects of different fire regimes on small mammal populations Effects of different fire regimes on native seedling recruitment Development of dynamic models of economic development, biodiversity and ecosystem services, to understand and predict the benefits and impacts of development options.

25 TIWI LAND COUNCIL ANNUAL REPORT 2014/2015

2.2.6 Process Mining and Exploration applications:

TABLE OF RECEIVED MINING APPLICATIONS AND PROCESSES.

ELA

NUMBER

APPLICANT

APPLIED & CONSENTED

DATE BY WHICH PROPOSAL MUST BE LODGED

CONSULTATION PERIOD ENDS Discussions with Landowners must occur prior to this date

27664 Rio-Tinto 30.4.2010 30.7.2010

31.10.2015 Initial exploration discussions completed. Agreements in draft.

28617 Tennant Creek Gold 14.2.2011 7.12.2011

This now a Rio-Tinto interest which the Land Council has agreed to consider in 2014-15

29035 29036 29222

Kalbar Resources

4.9.2012 4.9.2012 12.6.2012

30.11.2012 30.11.2012 1.12.2012

31.10.2016 Substantive detail presented under consideration

29243 Rio-Tinto 17.7.2012

27.6.2012 Received 10.7.2012

31.10.2016 Substantive detail presented under consideration

29244 Rio-Tinto 17.4.2012

27.6.2012 Received 10.7.2012

31.10.2016 Substantive detail presented under consideration

EP(A)216 MBS Oil 15.2.2011 5.7.2012 31.10.2016 Under review by the Land Council.

Substantive detail presentation on 29 August 2015 were made by Kalbar Resources Pty Ltd and Rio Tinto Exploration. MBS Oils and Gas Pty Ltd made their substantive details presentation on 25 February 2015. Draft terms and conditions are under construction, with a view of communicating these in the 2015-2016 year.

2.2.7 Provide research and assistance for Infrastructure needs:

Several studies by the Northern Territory Government in recent years have substantiated and engineered roading infrastructure costs for the Tiwi Islands at over $35m required to be spent over five years. Local Government lacks both revenue and capacity for road works beyond small and minor maintenance tasks. Road closures remain a certainty every wet season on every road.

The Northern Territory Government also funded and has responded to a study of inter and intra island sea transport needs. A Darwin to Tiwi passenger ferry service commenced in September 2013, providing subsidized fares of $40 each way. Fares at this level have not been known since single engine aircraft and a DC3 were operating in the 1970`s.

The Land Council Science Reference Committee (SRC) with Melbourne University re-established after changed University staff positions and met once during the year. Work, however, has continued with University support and includes:

Effects of different fire regimes on small mammal populations Effects of different fire regimes on native seedling recruitment Development of dynamic models of economic development, biodiversity and ecosystem services, to understand and predict the benefits and impacts of development options.

Research ethics and further genetic investigation particularly related to kidney disease and impacts.

New research needs were identified in the areas of:

Recreational fishing impact in response to the Fisheries Settlement Deed under Blue Mud Bay Feral buffalo herd management for environment protection and food Managing biosecurity threats from the mainland

CSIRO partnerships have been enhanced through the continuation of Carbon-fire studies with Land Rangers and our students at Tiwi College. Scientists were engaged to produce a seasonal calendar showing native plants and animals, their uses and seasonality.

2.2.7 D etails of consultants engaged:

Economic and Commercial Services Consultancies 2014/15: $273,107

•

K

. Stewart Contracting - Asset assessment repair and maintenance

62,580

•

P

iper Alderman - Legal; Land management and Township Leases

140,224

•

M

idena Lawyers; Contractual obligations

37,813

•

L

ex Silvester; Barrister

32,490

2.3 ADVOC AC Y SERVICES 2.3.1 P romote Public Awareness:

The outcomes of public awareness enhance the general outcomes sought by the Land Council of enhancing social, political and economic participation and equity for Tiwi people.

The output tools to achieve these outcomes are:

• T he publication of “The Tiwi”, a newsletter published every second month by the Tiwi Land Council to advise our landowners of the key activities undertaken by the Land Council throughout the year. “The Tiwi” contains a range of historically and environmentally relevant articles designed to ensure that our people receive accurate information about the history and traditions of Tiwi people and are able to make those connections of land use and beneficial purpose in the modern era. It is posted online to our web site as well as 1000 copies distributed among our people, along with a presence on social media.

•

Land

Council quarantine and environmental policy brochures distributed at all airline, shipping and all tourism and private organizations and business dealing with and on the Tiwi Islands. 1,000 copies distributed each year.

•

P

ublications and booklets of our people, our land and of the Land Council on sale and through distribution retail outlets. •

B

ooklets and flyers detailing Forestry work opportunities and the new Tiwi College were also produced and distributed to Tiwi constituents.

•

P

ress and media releases and commentaries on general Land Council activity during the year in television; print media and various web pages.

•

A

nnual Report itself. 600 copies.

•

T

iwi Land Council web site - with links to other partners and organizations. Web management and additional segments were added during the year following redesign and continued utilising more cost effective website hosts. The website averaged over 350 visits per month over the course of the year.

26 TIWI LAND COUNCIL ANNUAL REPORT 2014/2015

• A n online version of ‘The Tiwi’ (our bi-monthly newspaper for landowners) has been active since January 2014. This online version is a dedicated Facebook page, closely monitored by staff at our Pickataramoor Headquarters. It provides us with the ability to keep the Tiwi community up to date more regularly via ‘posts’ such as meeting notices and text/photos relating to current events/items of interest across the islands. This came in response to landowners clearly using social media more and more to communicate in this digital age.

2.3.2 P rovide Advocacy and representation:

Promoting, protecting and advancing the rights and interests of Tiwi people through advocacy and representation continues to enhance the outcomes sought by the Land Council.

Direct and minuted consultations of the Management Committee and the Land Council number between 30 and 40 a year. Meeting every 10 days is required to manage business. This is far less than the 80-100 or so meetings that have been recorded annually in past years. This decline is attributable to the increasing number of Tiwi-owned and operated businesses that now lay claim to the attentions of Traditional Owners and are unrelated to Land Council functions. The Office of Township Leasing and Township Landowners engage in their own meetings. In addition, the Land Council Management Committee is required to operate a small budget and must balance the frequency of meetings with available funds. It does this on the basis that such a reduction does not result in a reduction of the Land Council’s ability to represent Tiwi people.

Consultations provide the foundation of Land Council decision-making across all output groups. The execution of Township Leases over Milikapiti and Ranku was the culmination of a lengthy consultation process with all affected Traditional Owners.

Exhaustive Advocacy and representation is increasingly provided through various strategic committees and workshops initiated by the Land Council covering particular issues including coastal and fisheries management, weed management, threatened species management and natural resource management, monitoring and evaluation. Additionally education, health, governance and other forums extend the range of representation and the interests of members determined to secure their future on their land.

2.3.3 C ultural and Heritage Support:

Support was provided during the year for:

•

F

ilm and audio recording of interviews with elders recording their experiences including ceremonial and dance preparation and routines.

•

K

alama and Pukamani Ceremony funding and support; as well as the recording of important meetings and decisions.

•

F

unding of funeral and final ceremony related to death and group respect.

•

F

unding to Art Centres for interaction with primary school children and teaching by artists.

•

F

unding of Art Centre planning of exhibitions, travel and attendance.

•

Land R

anger survey of Sites of Significance in areas that may be affected by various land use proposals and developments. •

Hosting detailed meetings of lando

wners to discuss genealogies, inheritance patterns

and considerations by landowners for their management of risks related to land ownership and use of land.

•

P

reliminary discussions with Glen Wightman for editing and expansion work on the second edition of the Tiwi Plant and Animal Book.

27 TIWI LAND COUNCIL ANNUAL REPORT 2014/2015

• An online version of ‘The Tiwi’ (our bi-monthly newspaper for landowners) has been active since January 2014. This online version is a dedicated Facebook page, closely monitored by staff at our Pickataramoor Headquarters. It provides us with the ability to keep the Tiwi community up to date more regularly via ‘posts’ such as meeting notices and text/photos relating to current events/items of interest across the islands. This came in response to landowners clearly using social media more and more to communicate in this digital age.

2.3.2 Provide Advocacy and representation:

Promoting, protecting and advancing the rights and interests of Tiwi people through advocacy and representation continues to enhance the outcomes sought by the Land Council.

Direct and minuted consultations of the Management Committee and the Land Council number between 30 and 40 a year. Meeting every 10 days is required to manage business. This is far less than the 80-100 or so meetings that have been recorded annually in past years. This decline is attributable to the increasing number of Tiwi-owned and operated businesses that now lay claim to the attentions of Traditional Owners and are unrelated to Land Council functions. The Office of Township Leasing and Township Landowners engage in their own meetings. In addition, the Land Council Management Committee is required to operate a small budget and must balance the frequency of meetings with available funds. It does this on the basis that such a reduction does not result in a reduction of the Land Council’s ability to represent Tiwi people.

Consultations provide the foundation of Land Council decision-making across all output groups. The execution of Township Leases over Milikapiti and Ranku was the culmination of a lengthy consultation process with all affected Traditional Owners.

Exhaustive Advocacy and representation is increasingly provided through various strategic committees and workshops initiated by the Land Council covering particular issues including coastal and fisheries management, weed management, threatened species management and natural resource management, monitoring and evaluation. Additionally education, health, governance and other forums extend the range of representation and the interests of members determined to secure their future on their land.

2.3.3 Cultural and Heritage Support:

Support was provided during the year for:

• Film and audio recording of interviews with elders recording their experiences including ceremonial and dance preparation and routines.

• Kalama and Pukamani Ceremony funding and support; as well as the recording of important meetings and decisions.

• Funding of funeral and final ceremony related to death and group respect.

• Funding to Art Centres for interaction with primary school children and teaching by artists.

• Funding of Art Centre planning of exhibitions, travel and attendance.

• Land Ranger survey of Sites of Significance in areas that may be affected by various land use proposals and developments. • Hosting detailed meetings of landowners to discuss genealogies, inheritance patterns and considerations by landowners for their management of risks related to land

ownership and use of land.

• Preliminary discussions with Glen Wightman for editing and expansion work on the second edition of the Tiwi Plant and Animal Book.

2.3.4 F acilitate Community Development Initiatives:

Promotion and advancement of rights and interests continues to achieve the outcomes of social, political and economic participation and equity for Tiwi landowners.

The Land Council continued to respond to community requests for landscaping and regular monitoring of sea erosion; weed infestation and training and awareness workshops. Land Management Officers` attended upon all schools in awareness discussions of environmental risks and constraints and the requirements of good land management practices. The enthusiasm of school children is evident and the integration of the cadet ranger program at Tiwi College, along with the CSIRO, is particularly necessary to further these interests into adulthood.

The Land Council increased its extended support to landowners at Wurrumiyanga in economic development within their community including motel, Government Business Centre, Shopping Complex, take away restaurant, vehicle hire and other accommodation projects. This also includes support for their Consultative Forum, now a key plank in Lease arrangements and development of the Wurrumiyanga Township.

Township Leases in Milikapiti, Ranku and Wurrumiyanga are currently in place between the respective Traditional Owners and the Federal Government. Government discussions with relevant Traditional Owners are continuing in regard to a possible township lease at a fourth community, Pirlangimpi.

The Land Council assisted the Commonwealth and Landowners in their five year review of the Wurrumiyanga Township Lease during the year. The review addressed, among routine procedural matters, unpaid rates from Government authorities and made adjustments to the satisfaction of landowners.

2.3.5 D etails of consultants engaged:

Advocacy Services Consultancies 2014/15:

$ 11,509

• La titude Travel $11,184

• P

iper Alderman Lawyers - Land Trust advice and consultations $11,184

2.4 ADMINISTRATION AND SUPPORT SERVICES

2.4.1 A dminister and Distribute Payments:

Outcomes remain consistent with our endorsed framework. Outputs include the administration of payments to landowners and to Land Council clients.

Grants for Funeral and Ceremonial purposes require detailed applications and approval processes in both the access and distribution of these payments. Funds from the ABA have been applied for these purposes.

Land use payments that include lease payments, payments under Mining agreements, payments under permit and fishing agreements accrue to specific landowner accounts now exceeding 70 family groups. These accounts are managed and audited through private accountants retained by the landowners for this purpose. Fund Managers are able to certify expenditure through these accounts following group policies detailed at Group Meetings. Monthly income and expenditure statements are tabled at group meetings and also through the Audit Committee. These accounts are also available through security codes on-line.

28 TIWI LAND COUNCIL ANNUAL REPORT 2014/2015

2.4.2 A dminister the Land Trust

The legal structure of the Land Council within which it can achieve the outcomes sought by members is primarily the establishment of a Land Trust to hold title to land. The Tiwi Aboriginal Land Trust is established under the Aboriginal Land Rights (Northern Territory) Act 1976. The only body with authority and capacity to direct and administer this Trust is the Tiwi Land Council.

Administration of the Trust also includes work to maintain traditional owner registers and respond to queries and certification of aboriginality and/or Tiwi recognition. The Land Council traditional registers are assisted by data now sourced from the Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies.

2.4.3 A ssist in resolution of land disputes

Tiwi land ownership is a dynamic entitlement with various alliances and structures changing boundaries over time. The advantage of there being only one title to Tiwi land requires continuing Tiwi consensus over various internal clan or “country” issues. Traditional processes continue to demand consensus over these issues and effectively prevent these matters becoming disputes.

The Northern Territory Government and the Tiwi Land Council are in the process of finalizing the agreement for the Tiwi people to assume ownership and control over the Vernon Islands.

2.4.4 A ssist in resolution of land disputes

Administration and Support Service Consultancies 2014/15:

$ 21,441

• T iwi Islands Adventures Pty Limited - Record Management $ 15,320

• S

ol Media - web site management $ 6,121

2.5 JUDICIAL DECISIONS, MINISTERIAL DIRECTIONS AND LEGISLATIVE IMPACT

The Aboriginal Land Commissioner continued to seek completion of matters associated with our land claim number 9 related to the Vernon Islands. Matters in progress at the end of the year were, final consultations pertaining to a settlement deed given the decision in Northern Territory of Australia v Arnhem Land Aboriginal Land Trust (2008) 236 CLR 24 by the Land Council and, the Northern Land Council’s consultation with Traditional Owners and affected Aboriginal people of the area. Call-overs in September 2014, December 2014, March 2015 and May 2015 assisted the parties. The Tiwi claim to ownership of the Vernon Islands has been accepted by all relevant parties and final details of the transfer of ownership.

The High Court decisions in `Blue Mud Bay` (2007/8) continues to provide significant strength to our Landowners who are refining their management and authority over these resources of the streams, creeks and estuaries consistent with Permission and Resource Management Principles developed through generations of tradition. The Northern Territory Government has been constructively working on these matters since August 2012 with a settlement deed signed in December 2014.

The Minister made no directions to us during the year. Consultations with the Minister and his office are regular and provide thoughtful advice and comment to the Land Council across a range of portfolio issues - Township Leasing; Trust and Land Management; Rights and Entitlements; Health and Disability; Education; Economic and Social issues and Income Management.

Senior officials of the Department of the Prime Minister & Cabinet and Department of Finance visited in April 2015 to assist our accountability and responsibility obligations under the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act.

The Land Council has reviewed and discussed Bills, Amendments and Draft Legislation notified at various meetings. New (Commonwealth and Territory) legislation introduced, enacted or amended during the year

29 TIWI LAND COUNCIL ANNUAL REPORT 2014/2015

that directly affected Tiwi people and the Land Council includes:

•

P

ublic Governance, Performance and Accountability 2013 amendment No 36 2015 •

P

ersonal Property Security Act 2009 amendment No 5 2015

Certification

This report of operations and related activity is made in accordance with a resolution of the Management Committee of the Tiwi Land Council at meeting 405 held at Milikapiti on 9th September 2015, acknowledging the responsibility of the Management Committee of the Land Council under section 19 of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013, for the preparation and content of this Report of Operations in accordance with Finance Minister`s Orders.

Gibson Farmer Illortaminni Chairman/Director.

9th September 2015

3.0 C ORPORATE GOVERNANCE

The Land Council discarded a line-management structure 18 years ago in favour of more traditional responsibility and decision making processes through a Management Committee. The Management Committee was approved by the Minister pursuant to section 29A of the Land Rights Act on 21 March 1995.

3.1 ACCOUNTABLE AUTHORITY PROFILES

3.1.1 Chairman

Gibson Farmer Illortaminni was born on 23 June, 1958 at Milikapiti on Melville Island and educated at schools in Darwin and McKay. He returned to the Tiwi Islands to take up apprentice forester employment in the plantations being developed on Melville Island during the 1970s.

Mr Illortaminni is a senior elder of the Mantiyupwi people and was an early supporter of the formation of the Tiwi Land Council in 1978, He has represented their interests on the Land Council for the past decade. During that time Mr Illortaminni has been a strong advocate for education and training and the creation and security of Tiwi jobs.

Since being elected to the Chairmanship in February 2012, Mr Illortaminni has been tireless in promoting Tiwi interests on the Tiwi Islands, on the mainland and overseas. He recently embarked on a trip to Singapore and secured a crucial commitment from listed Singaporean company Ezion to assist in the construction of Port Melville.

Mr Illortaminni leads by example in all facets of his life and has recently celebrated his 29th wedding anniversary with his wife Linda, with whom he lives in Milikapiti. They have two children and eleven grandchildren.

Mr Illortaminni was elected in 11 February 2015 an appointed Chair for a further 3 years.

30 TIWI LAND COUNCIL ANNUAL REPORT 2014/2015

3.1.2 Chief Executive Officer

Brian Clancy was born in Melbourne in 1965 and moved to Bathurst Island as a teacher in 1987 until 1993 where he moved into Darwin to teach at St Johns College for six years before returning to Bathurst Island in 1999 as a teacher and principal of Xavier Community Educational Centre. In 2004 Brian was employed as the Training Manager with the Tiwi Islands Training and Employment Board and moved to the Tiwi Land Council in 2007 as Development and Risk Manager Advisor, Deputy CEO, including the role of Tiwi College principal for a short time and currently as Acting TLC CEO.

Married to Jennifer Ullungura Clancy for 21 years, Brian’s passion is turning around the disastrous educational outcomes over the past two decades and providing quality Education for our Tiwi youth so that they can access the many employment opportunities right here on their own Islands, in industries that our Tiwi Leaders, past and present, have developed over many years in Forestry, Port Melville, through Township Leasing and Tourism as well as Local Government, Health, Education, Tiwi Enterprises and our many Traditional Owner owned companies.

Brian considers his role is more of a secretariat role rather than a traditional CEO role, in that he understands that the Tiwi people make the decisions on what direction and vision they set for their future and it is not the role of a non Tiwi person to be setting the platform, with his role to use his skills to help put the Tiwi vision for their people into reality.

Tiwi know what they need for their people to thrive, to be successful and the pathway to get there. Brian does not see his current role as a long term position and is committed to developing our young leaders to take on the TLC CEO and other Leadership positions that have traditionally been taken by non Tiwi people.

3.1.2 Executive Management Committee

Members of the Executive Management Committee are drawn from members of the full land council members. At the conclusion of the year the Executive Management Committee existed of 10 members.

Name of Executive Management Committee Full Year or Commencement Date

Farmer, Gibson - Chair Full Year

Guy Jnr., David Commenced February 2015

Kalippa, Cyril - Retired July to September 2014

Kerinaiua, Wesley Commenced September 2014

Munkara, Danny - Chair of Trustees Full Year

Puruntatameri, Richard Commenced December 2014

Tipiloura, Stanley - Deputy Chair Commenced December 2014

Tipungwuti, Andrew Full Year

Tipungwuti, Brian - Trustee Full Year

Tipungwuti, Robert - Retired July 2014 to February 2015

Tungutulum, Leslie Full Year

Wilson, John - Trustee Commenced February 2015

31 TIWI LAND COUNCIL ANNUAL REPORT 2014/2015

3.2 MEETINGS OF LAND COUNCIL

The Full Land Council met on 6 occasions during the year. Correspondence is tabled at meetings of the Management Committee who also co-opt other members to attend upon their meetings as required. 35 were required during the year to manage the business of the Land Council.

3.2.1 F ull Land Council Meetings

Six full land council meetings were held in 2014-2015;

Meeting Number Date

283 29 August 2014

284 8 September 2014

285 28 October 2014

286 10 December 2014

287 11 February 2015

288 25 February 2015

The names of each person who held the role of member of the Land Council during the financial year are;

Name of Trustee / Delegate Name of Trustee / Delegate

Bush, Andrew Puruntatameri, Patrick

Farmer, Gibson - Chair Puruntatameri, Richard

Fernando, Ivan - Trustee Timaepatua, Bonaventure

Guy Jnr., David Tipakalippa, Dennis

Kalippa, Cyril - Retired Tipiloura, Bernard

Kanitilla, Stephen Tipiloura, Conell

Kantilla, Dominic Tipiloura, Eric - Trustee

Kerinaiua, Cyril J. Tipiloura, Stanley - Deputy Chair

Kerinaiua, Wesley Tipungwuti, Andrew

Kerinauia, Wally - Trustee Tipungwuti, Baylon

Molaminni, Damian Tipungwuti, Brian - Trustee

Mungatopi, Fredrick Tipungwuti, Emmanuel

Mungatopi, Vincent Tipungwuti, Robert

Munkara, Danny - Chair of Trustees Tungutulum, Leslie

Munkara, Jonathon Ullungura, Barry

Pautjimi, Andre Wilson, John - Trustee

Pautjimi, Valentine Wilson, Trevor

Pilakui, Vernard Wommatakimmi, Gabriel - Trustee

Puantulura, Joseph Wommatakimmi, Kim Brooks

Puruntatameri, Barry Wommatakimmi, Neville

Puruntatameri, Kim - Trustee Wonaeamirri, Pedro

32 TIWI LAND COUNCIL ANNUAL REPORT 2014/2015

3.2.2 Ex ecutive Management Committee Meetings

DATE

EXECUTIVE MEETING NUMBER

EXECUTIVE MANAGERS ATTENDING

OTHER MEMBERS ATTENDING

ABSENT

1/7/14 366

Gibson Farmer, Andrew Tipungwuti, Wesley Kerinauia, John Wilson

9/7/14 367

Gibson Farmer Illortaminni (Chair), Danny Munkara, John Wilson, Wesley Kerinaiua, Stanley (John Boy) Tipiloura, Richard Puruntatameri, Cyril Kalippa, Brian Tipungwuti, Leslie Tungatulum

Andrew Tipungwuti

30/7/14 368

Gibson Farmer Illortaminni (Chair), Danny Munkara, John Wilson, Brian Tipungwuti, Leslie Tungatulum, Andrew Tipungwuti, David Junior Guy, Wesley Kerinauia

Emmanuel Tipungwuti, Bonaventure Timaepatua, Trevor Wilson, Robert Tipungwuti

Richard Puruntatameri, Stanley Tipiloura

13/8/14 369

Gibson Farmer Illortaminni (Chair), John Wilson, Wesley Kerinaiua, Stanley (John Boy) Tipiloura, Richard Puruntatameri, Brian Tipungwuti, Leslie Tungatulum, Andrew Tipungwuti, David Junior Guy

B.J. Timaepatua Cyril Kalippa

20/8/14 370

Gibson Farmer Illortaminni (Chair), John Wilson, Wesley Kerinaiua, Stanley (John Boy) Tipiloura, Richard Puruntatameri, Brian Tipungwuti, Leslie Tungatulum, Andrew Tipungwuti, David Junior Guy

Wally Kerinauia Jnr, Eric Tipiloura, Robert Tipungwuti, B.J. Timaepatua

Danny Munkara

33 TIWI LAND COUNCIL ANNUAL REPORT 2014/2015

DATE

EXECUTIVE MEETING NUMBER

EXECUTIVE MANAGERS ATTENDING

OTHER MEMBERS ATTENDING

ABSENT

27/8/14 371

Gibson Farmer Illortaminni (Chair), John Wilson, Wesley Kerinaiua, Stanley (John Boy) Tipiloura, Richard Puruntatameri, Brian Tipungwuti, Leslie Tungatulum, Andrew Tipungwuti, David Junior Guy

Cyril Kalippa, Danny Munkara

3/9/14 372

Gibson Farmer Illortaminni (Chair), John Wilson, Wesley Kerinaiua, Stanley (John Boy) Tipiloura, Richard Puruntatameri, Brian Tipungwuti, Leslie Tungatulum, Andrew Tipungwuti, David Junior Guy, Danny Munkara

Emmanuel Tipungwuti, Pedro Wonaeamirri

Cyril Kalippa

10/9/14 373

Gibson Farmer Illortaminni (Chair); John Wilson; Wesley Kerinaiua; Stanley (John Boy) Tipiloura; Richard Puruntatameri; Brian Tipungwuti; Andrew Tipungwuti; David Junior Guy; Danny Munkara;

Robert Tipungwuti, B.J. Timaepatua

Leslie Tungatulum,

17/9/14 374

Gibson Farmer Illortaminni (Chair), John Wilson, Wesley Kerinaiua, Stanley (John Boy) Tipiloura, Richard Puruntatameri, Brian Tipungwuti, Leslie Tungatulum, Andrew Tipungwuti, David Junior Guy

34 TIWI LAND COUNCIL ANNUAL REPORT 2014/2015

DATE

EXECUTIVE MEETING NUMBER

EXECUTIVE MANAGERS ATTENDING

OTHER MEMBERS ATTENDING

ABSENT

24/9/14 375

Gibson Farmer Illortaminni, John Wilson, Danny Munkara, David Guy, Stanley Tipiloura, Andrew Tipungwuti, Leslie Tungatulum, Wesley Kerinauia, Richard Puruntatameri, Brian Tipungwuti

Robert Tipungwuti

1/10/14 376

Gibson Farmer Illortaminni, John Wilson, Danny Munkara, Junior Guy, Andrew Tipungwuti, Leslie Tungatulum, Wesley Kerinauia, Richard Puruntatameri, Brian Tipungwuti

Ivan Fernando Stanley Tipiloura

8/10/14 377

Gibson Farmer Illortaminni, John Wilson, Danny Munkara, David Junior Guy, Andrew Tipungwuti, Leslie Tungatulum, Wesley Kerinauia, Richard Puruntatameri, Brian Tipungwuti, Stanley Tipiloura

Robert Tipungwuti, Dennis Tipakalippa

15/10/14 378

Gibson Farmer Illortaminni, John Wilson, Danny Munkara, David Junior Guy, Andrew Tipungwuti, Leslie Tungatulum, Wesley Kerinauia, Richard Puruntatameri, Brian Tipungwuti, Stanley Tipiloura

Robert Tipungwuti

35 TIWI LAND COUNCIL ANNUAL REPORT 2014/2015

DATE

EXECUTIVE MEETING NUMBER

EXECUTIVE MANAGERS ATTENDING

OTHER MEMBERS ATTENDING

ABSENT

22/10/14 379

Gibson Farmer Illortaminni, John Wilson, David Junior Guy, Andrew Tipungwuti, Leslie Tungatulum, Wesley Kerinauia, Richard Puruntatameri, Brian Tipungwuti, Stanley Tipiloura

Bonaventure Timaepatua Danny Munkara

5/11/14 380

Gibson Farmer Illortaminni, John Wilson, David Junior Guy, Andrew Tipungwuti, Leslie Tungatulum, Wesley Kerinauia, Richard Puruntatameri, Brian Tipungwuti, Stanley Tipiloura

Danny Munkara

12/11/14 381

Gibson Farmer Illortaminni, John Wilson, David Junior Guy, Andrew Tipungwuti, Leslie Tungatulum, Wesley Kerinauia, Richard Puruntatameri, Brian Tipungwuti, Stanley Tipiloura

Ivan Fernando, Kim Puruntatameri, Robert Tipungwuti

Danny Munkara

19/11/14 382

John Wilson, David Junior Guy, Andrew Tipungwuti, Leslie Tungatulum, Wesley Kerinauia, Brian Tipungwuti, Danny Munkara

Robert Tipungwuti

Gibson Farmer Illortaminni, Richard Puruntatameri, Stanley Tipiloura

25/11/14 383

John Wilson, David Junior Guy, Leslie Tungatalum, Wesley Kerinauia, Brian Tipungwuti, Danny Munkara, Gibson Farmer Illortaminni, Stanley Tipiloura

Richard Puruntatameri, Andrew Tipungwuti

36 TIWI LAND COUNCIL ANNUAL REPORT 2014/2015

DATE

EXECUTIVE MEETING NUMBER

EXECUTIVE MANAGERS ATTENDING

OTHER MEMBERS ATTENDING

ABSENT

3/12/14 384

John Wilson, David Junior Guy, Leslie Tungatulum, Wesley Kerinauia, Brian Tipungwuti, Gibson Farmer Illortaminni, Stanley Tipiloura, Richard Puruntatameri, Andrew Tipungwuti

Danny Munkara

17/12/14 385

John Wilson, David Junior Guy, Leslie Tungatulum, Wesley Kerinaiua, Gibson Farmer Illortaminni, Stanley Tipiloura, Richard Puruntatameri, Danny Munkara

Robert Tipungwuti

19/1/15 386

Gibson Farmer, Danny Munkara, Andrew Tipungwuti, Leslie Tungatulum, Brian Tipungwuti, Stanley Tipiloura, Richard Puruntatameri

John Wilson, Wesley Kerinaiua

21/1/15 387

David Junior Guy, Leslie Tungatulum, Wesley Kerinaiua, Gibson Farmer Illortaminni, Stanley Tipiloura, Richard Puruntatameri, Danny Munkara, Brian Tipungwuti, Richard Puruntatameri, Andrew Tipungwuti

Kim Puruntatameri

37 TIWI LAND COUNCIL ANNUAL REPORT 2014/2015

DATE

EXECUTIVE MEETING NUMBER

EXECUTIVE MANAGERS ATTENDING

OTHER MEMBERS ATTENDING

ABSENT

3/12/14 384

John Wilson, David Junior Guy, Leslie Tungatulum, Wesley Kerinauia, Brian Tipungwuti, Gibson Farmer Illortaminni, Stanley Tipiloura, Richard Puruntatameri, Andrew Tipungwuti

Danny Munkara

17/12/14 385

John Wilson, David Junior Guy, Leslie Tungatulum, Wesley Kerinaiua, Gibson Farmer Illortaminni, Stanley Tipiloura, Richard Puruntatameri, Danny Munkara

Robert Tipungwuti

19/1/15 386

Gibson Farmer, Danny Munkara, Andrew Tipungwuti, Leslie Tungatulum, Brian Tipungwuti, Stanley Tipiloura, Richard Puruntatameri

John Wilson, Wesley Kerinaiua

21/1/15 387

David Junior Guy, Leslie Tungatulum, Wesley Kerinaiua, Gibson Farmer Illortaminni, Stanley Tipiloura, Richard Puruntatameri, Danny Munkara, Brian Tipungwuti, Richard Puruntatameri, Andrew Tipungwuti

Kim Puruntatameri

DATE

EXECUTIVE MEETING NUMBER

EXECUTIVE MANAGERS ATTENDING

OTHER MEMBERS ATTENDING

ABSENT

4/2/15 388

David Junior Guy, Leslie Tungatulum, Wesley Kerinaiua, Gibson Farmer Illortaminni, Stanley Tipiloura, Richard Puruntatameri, Danny Munkara, Brian Tipungwuti, Andrew Tipungwuti, John Wilson

18/2/15 389

David Junior Guy, Leslie Tungatulum, Wesley Kerinaiua, Gibson Farmer Illortaminni, Richard Puruntatameri, Danny Munkara, Brian Tipungwuti

Kim Puruntatameri, Dennis Tipakalippa

Andrew Tipungwuti, Stanley Tipiloura

5/3/15 390

David Junior Guy, Leslie Tungatulum, Wesley Kerinaiua, Gibson Farmer Illortaminni, Richard Puruntatameri, Brian Tipungwuti, Andrew Tipungwuti, Stanley Tipiloura, John Wilson

Kim Puruntatameri, Dennis Tipakalippa,

Danny Munkara

18/3/15 391

David Junior Guy, Leslie Tungatulum, Wesley Kerinaiua, Gibson Farmer Illortaminni, Danny Munkara, Richard Puruntatameri, Brian Tipungwuti, Andrew Tipungwuti

Eric Tipiloura, Ivan Fernando, Walter Kerinaiua Jnr, Bonaventure Timaepatua

John Wilson, Stanley Tipiloura, Kim Puruntatameri, Gabriel Wommatakimmi

1/4/15 392

David Junior Guy, Leslie Tungatulum, Wesley Kerinaiua, Gibson Farmer Illortaminni, Richard Puruntatameri, Brian Tipungwuti, Andrew Tipungwuti, Stanley Tipiloura, John Wilson, Danny Munkara

38 TIWI LAND COUNCIL ANNUAL REPORT 2014/2015

DATE

EXECUTIVE MEETING NUMBER

EXECUTIVE MANAGERS ATTENDING

OTHER MEMBERS ATTENDING

ABSENT

15/4/15 393

David Junior Guy, Wesley Kerinaiua, Gibson Farmer Illortaminni, Richard Puruntatameri, Brian Tipungwuti, John Wilson, Danny Munkara

Andrew Tipungwuti, Leslie Tungatulum, Stanley Tipiloura

29/4/15 394

Gibson Farmer Illortaminni, Andrew Tipungwuti, David Junior Guy, Wesley Kerinaiua, Richard Puruntatameri, Brian Tipungwuti, John Wilson, Danny Munkara, Stanley Tipiloura,

Dennis Tipakalippa, Kim Puruntatameri

6/5/15 395

David Junior Guy, Wesley Kerinaiua, Gibson Farmer Illortaminni, Richard Puruntatameri, John Wilson, Leslie Tungatulum, Stanley Tipiloura, Danny Munkara

Andrew Tipungwuti, Brian Tipungwuti

20/5/15 396

David Junior Guy, Wesley Kerinaiua, Gibson Farmer Illortaminni, Richard Puruntatameri, John Wilson, Leslie Tungatulum, Stanley Tipiloura, Danny Munkara, Brian Tipungwuti, Andrew Tipungwuti

Kim Puruntatameri, Bonaventure Timaepatua, Wally Kerinauia, Ivan Fernando, Bernard Tipiloura, Eric Tipiloura

39 TIWI LAND COUNCIL ANNUAL REPORT 2014/2015

DATE

EXECUTIVE MEETING NUMBER

EXECUTIVE MANAGERS ATTENDING

OTHER MEMBERS ATTENDING

ABSENT

15/4/15 393

David Junior Guy, Wesley Kerinaiua, Gibson Farmer Illortaminni, Richard Puruntatameri, Brian Tipungwuti, John Wilson, Danny Munkara

Andrew Tipungwuti, Leslie Tungatulum, Stanley Tipiloura

29/4/15 394

Gibson Farmer Illortaminni, Andrew Tipungwuti, David Junior Guy, Wesley Kerinaiua, Richard Puruntatameri, Brian Tipungwuti, John Wilson, Danny Munkara, Stanley Tipiloura,

Dennis Tipakalippa, Kim Puruntatameri

6/5/15 395

David Junior Guy, Wesley Kerinaiua, Gibson Farmer Illortaminni, Richard Puruntatameri, John Wilson, Leslie Tungatulum, Stanley Tipiloura, Danny Munkara

Andrew Tipungwuti, Brian Tipungwuti

20/5/15 396

David Junior Guy, Wesley Kerinaiua, Gibson Farmer Illortaminni, Richard Puruntatameri, John Wilson, Leslie Tungatulum, Stanley Tipiloura, Danny Munkara, Brian Tipungwuti, Andrew Tipungwuti

Kim Puruntatameri, Bonaventure Timaepatua, Wally Kerinauia, Ivan Fernando, Bernard Tipiloura, Eric Tipiloura

DATE

EXECUTIVE MEETING NUMBER

EXECUTIVE MANAGERS ATTENDING

OTHER MEMBERS ATTENDING

ABSENT

27/5/15 397

David Junior Guy, Wesley Kerinaiua, Gibson Farmer Illortaminni, Richard Puruntatameri, John Wilson, Leslie Tungatulum, Stanley Tipiloura, Danny Munkara, Brian Tipungwuti, Andrew Tipungwuti

3/6/15 398

David Junior Guy, Wesley Kerinaiua, Gibson Farmer Illortaminni, Richard Puruntatameri, John Wilson, Leslie Tungatulum, Stanley Tipiloura, Andrew Tipungwuti, Brian Tipungwuti, Danny Munkara

Bonaventure Timaepatua

5/6/15 399

Gibson Farmer Illortaminni, Leslie Tungatulum, Wesley Kerinaiua, Stanley Tipiloura, John Wilson, David Junior Guy, Brian Tipungwuti, Andrew Tipungwuti, Richard Puruntatameri

Kim Puruntatameri, Bonaventure Timaepatua

23/6/15 400

David Junior Guy, Wesley Kerinaiua, Gibson Farmer Illortaminni, Richard Puruntatameri, John Wilson, Leslie Tungatulum, Stanley Tipiloura, Brian Tipungwuti, Danny Munkara

Bonaventure Timaepatua Andrew Tipungwuti

40 TIWI LAND COUNCIL ANNUAL REPORT 2014/2015

The Management Committee is required to meet regularly to:

•

M

onitor the Budget and control the expenditure of the Land Council, as an internal Finance Committee, reporting to the Land Council and seeking advice from the Independent Audit Committee.

•

A

ssess and advise upon various development and land use proposals, and referring matters requiring decisions to the Land Council.

•

M

onitor environmental and other development impact upon land and land use.

•

M

onitor the Budget and control the expenditure of the Land Council, as a Finance Committee.

•

D

evelop those strategies to ensure financial controls are adequate and consistent with Government regulations, and provide advice and respond to the independent Audit Committee.

•

A

ttend upon the Natural Resource Management Committee of the Land Council and monitor environmental impact upon land and land use and develop strategies for effective land management for the consideration of the Land Council.

•

A

ssess and monitor community responses to the impact of development and to develop strategies to further the harmonious development of Tiwi society.

•

A

ssess the impact and make such recommendations to the Land Council in regard to Commonwealth and State legislation and policy affecting the Tiwi people.

•

C

oordinate and monitor the opinions and policies of various Boards, Corporations and Committees established by the Tiwi people for assessment by the Land Council in undertaking its functions.

•

A

ssess and respond to those requirements of visitors seeking discussions with the Land Council and owners of Tiwi land.

3.3 Go vernance Practices:

Tiwi traditional governance and risk management sustained their people through 6,000 -8,000 years upon the Tiwi Islands. Processes and decisions were developed containing strict codes to manage resources, relationships and uncertainty. Governance itself required the presentation of arguments, debate and verdicts that validated claims and enforced compliance. This experience continues to influence Land Council governance for 21st century Tiwi, now seeking the sustainable purpose of modern governance requirements.

The Land Council must not only demonstrate its own compliance, but provide convincing participatory opportunities to its members and landowners of the purpose now required to demonstrate their own. This work has been the focus of leadership through the life of the Land Council - a Tiwi purpose and convictions to sustainably manage them. Participation in a private economy is now illustrating a purpose. It requires gathering accurate information and testing that information for sustainable decision making. This work is assisted and informed by Committee structures developed by the Land Council.

As a Statutory Authority, the Land Council aims to promote and manage the efficient and effective use of the financial and human resources of the Land Council in undertaking the directions and policy of the Land Council and to monitor that use consistent with the commitment of the Land Council to responsible development and the ambitions of the Tiwi people. Committees assist to achieve these aspirations:

41 TIWI LAND COUNCIL ANNUAL REPORT 2014/2015

The Management Committee is required to meet regularly to:

• Monitor the Budget and control the expenditure of the Land Council, as an internal Finance Committee, reporting to the Land Council and seeking advice from the Independent Audit Committee.

• Assess and advise upon various development and land use proposals, and referring matters requiring decisions to the Land Council.

• Monitor environmental and other development impact upon land and land use.

• Monitor the Budget and control the expenditure of the Land Council, as a Finance Committee.

• Develop those strategies to ensure financial controls are adequate and consistent with Government regulations, and provide advice and respond to the independent Audit Committee.

• Attend upon the Natural Resource Management Committee of the Land Council and monitor environmental impact upon land and land use and develop strategies for effective land management for the consideration of the Land Council.

• Assess and monitor community responses to the impact of development and to develop strategies to further the harmonious development of Tiwi society.

• Assess the impact and make such recommendations to the Land Council in regard to Commonwealth and State legislation and policy affecting the Tiwi people.

• Coordinate and monitor the opinions and policies of various Boards, Corporations and Committees established by the Tiwi people for assessment by the Land Council in undertaking its functions.

• Assess and respond to those requirements of visitors seeking discussions with the Land Council and owners of Tiwi land.

3.3 Governance Practices:

Tiwi traditional governance and risk management sustained their people through 6,000 -8,000 years upon the Tiwi Islands. Processes and decisions were developed containing strict codes to manage resources, relationships and uncertainty. Governance itself required the presentation of arguments, debate and verdicts that validated claims and enforced compliance. This experience continues to influence Land Council governance for 21st century Tiwi, now seeking the sustainable purpose of modern governance requirements.

The Land Council must not only demonstrate its own compliance, but provide convincing participatory opportunities to its members and landowners of the purpose now required to demonstrate their own. This work has been the focus of leadership through the life of the Land Council - a Tiwi purpose and convictions to sustainably manage them. Participation in a private economy is now illustrating a purpose. It requires gathering accurate information and testing that information for sustainable decision making. This work is assisted and informed by Committee structures developed by the Land Council.

As a Statutory Authority, the Land Council aims to promote and manage the efficient and effective use of the financial and human resources of the Land Council in undertaking the directions and policy of the Land Council and to monitor that use consistent with the commitment of the Land Council to responsible development and the ambitions of the Tiwi people. Committees assist to achieve these aspirations:

• T he Executive Management Committee sits also as an Internal Finance Committee which operates in conjunction with the Independent Audit Committee to control the expenditure of the Land Council, reporting to the Land Council. Its members are the Land Council Management Committee and also include the CEO; Land Council Accounts Manager and external Auditors. The Finance Committee monitors progress against the budget at regular meetings and makes recommendations to the Independent Audit Committee.

•

I

ndependent Audit Committee (IAC) completed the required four meetings for the year. The IAC, now in its eighth year, is obliged to review its charter each year and has done so during 2014/15. The Committee comprises Mr. Hugh Bradley (Chief Magistrate retired), Mr. Deven Patel (Auditor and Accountant) and Mr. Ross Connolly (Architect and Businessman) attended all meetings of the IAC during the year. The Land Council CEO, Accounts Manager/External Accountant and Executive Officer are ex-officio members and attend meetings as required. The committee`s responsibilities and rights are outlined in its charter that has been adopted and is contained on the Land Council website www.tiwilandcouncil.com. The IAC monitors financial progress and systems of the Land Council but has a much broader role in identifying risk and advising on management and processes to better manage those risks. Members are required to assess their own performance each year and to also review the Audit Committee Charter annually. Members complied with these requirements held in the 2014-15 period. The Committee is also required to meet with our Auditors during the process of our audit from May through September 2013. These meetings and exchanges have taken place. The Committee has also invited two Tiwi members of the Land Council Management Committee to attend IAC meetings on a regular basis.

•

Na

tural Resource Management related Committees and Rangers. These committees met 7 times during the year and include Land and Marine Rangers employed together with co-opted members in areas of relevant science and task requirements.

•

S

cience Reference Committee was re-established after University of Melbourne staff changes, and met once during this reporting period, with a renewed commitment to meet twice/year funds permitting. The committee was established at the direction of the Land Council for better and more scientific detail and information to assist Tiwi decisions. Current work of this committee continues and new research areas have been identified, including land use planning, recreational fishing impacts, feral animal management, treatment and storage of research data and intellectual property.

42 TIWI LAND COUNCIL ANNUAL REPORT 2014/2015

3.4 MEETINGS OF COMMITEES

ORGANISATION DATE MEETING NO. MEMBERS ATTENDING

EX OFFICIO ATTENDANCE

ABSENT

Land Rangers Committee Meeting 18/9/14 13

Willie Rioli, Colin Kerinaiua, Jose Puruntatameri, Willie Roberts, Kim Wommatakimmi

Kate Hadden, Bruce Holland

Land Rangers Committee Meeting 27/11/14 14

Willie Rioli, Colin Kerinaiua, Willie Roberts, Kim Wommatakimmi

Gibson F Illortaminni, Brian Tipungwuti, Kate Hadden, Bruce Holland

Jose Puruntatameri, Vivian Kerinaiua

Land Rangers Committee Meeting 10/2/15 15

Willie Rioli, Vivian Kerinaiua, Jose Puruntatameri, Willie Roberts, Kim Wommatakimmi

Kate Hadden, Bruce Holland

Colin Kerinaiua

Fire and Weed Management 27/11/14 18

Willie Rioli, Gibson F Illortaminni, John Wilson, Brian Tipungwuti, Connell Tipiloura, Pedro Wonaeamirri, Vincent Mungatopi, Colin Kerinaiua, Kim Wommatakimmi, Willie Roberts,

Kate Hadden, Bruce Holland, Quinten Pope, Craig Phillips, Alistair Emslie, Guy McSkimming, Karl Sibley, Adam Liedloff, Maryclaire Milikins, Mavis Kerinaiua

Christopher Burack, Jose Puruntatameri, Vivian Kerinaiua

Fire and Weed Management 19/3/14 19

Willie Rioli, Gibson Illortaminni, Pedro Wonaeamirri, Wesley Kerinaiua, Brian Tipungwuti, David Guy, Kim Wommatakimmi, Frederick Mungatopi, Baylon Tipungwuti, Guiseppe Mungatopi, Barry Puruntatameri, Connell Tipiloura, Vivian Kerinuaia, Willie Roberts, Jose Puruntatameri

Kate Hadden, Bruce Holland, Jodie Millsom, Brian Clancy, Karl Sibley, Mark Desailly, Alistair Emslie, Guy McSkimming, Alan Andersen, Adam Liedloff, Barbara McKaige, Anna Richards, Jon Schatz, Maryclaire Milikins, Mavis Kerinaiua, Peter Penley

John Wilson, Colin Kerinaiua

Fire and Weed Management 30/4/15 20

Willie Rioli, John Wilson, Connell Tipiloura, Dennis Tippakalippa, Willy Roberts, Jose Puruntatameri, Vincent Mungatopi, Danny Munkara, David Guy, Pedro Wonaeamirri, Kim Wommatakimmi, Vivian Kerinaiua, Jeffrey Mungatopi, Guiseppe Mungatopi, Des Bruppacher

Kate Hadden, Bruce Holland, Alistair Emslie, Anna Richards, Mark Desailly

Gibson F Illortaminni, Colin Kerinaiua

Land

Development Working Group

25/6/15 1

Gibson F Illortaminni, Brian Tipungwuti, Leslie Tungatulum, Stanley Tipiloura, Richard Puruntatameri, David Guy

Kate Hadden, Geoff McKenzie, John Berto

Science Reference Committee 26/2/15 5

Janet Hergt, Gerd Bossinger, Kate Hadden, John Hicks, Carla Hicks, Gibson F Illortaminni, Leslie Tungatulum, Peter Vesk, Jose Puruntatameri, Willie Roberts

Hugh Davies, Michelle Freeman, Emily Nicholson

Peter Ades, Glen Samsa

Independent Audit Committee 21/08/14 26

Hugh Bradley; Deven Patel; Ross Connolly.

John Wilson, Wesley Kerinaiua, Brian Clancy, Kate Hadden, Derek Mayger, John Hicks, Terry Larkin

Independent Audit Committee 11/11/14 27

Hugh Bradley; Deven Patel; Ross Connolly.

John Wilson, Wesley Kerinaiua, Brian Clancy, Kate Hadden, Derek Mayger

Independent Audit Committee 27/02/15 28

Hugh Bradley; Deven Patel; Ross Connolly.

John Wilson, Brian Clancy, Derek Mayger

Wesley Kerinaiua

Independent Audit Committee 19/06/15 29

Hugh Bradley; Deven Patel; Ross Connolly

John Wilson, Wesley Kerinaiua, Brian Clancy, Kate Hadden, Derek Mayger

43 TIWI LAND COUNCIL ANNUAL REPORT 2014/2015

Fire and Weed Management 30/4/15 20

Willie Rioli, John Wilson, Connell Tipiloura, Dennis Tippakalippa, Willy Roberts, Jose Puruntatameri, Vincent Mungatopi, Danny Munkara, David Guy, Pedro Wonaeamirri, Kim Wommatakimmi, Vivian Kerinaiua, Jeffrey Mungatopi, Guiseppe Mungatopi, Des Bruppacher

Kate Hadden, Bruce Holland, Alistair Emslie, Anna Richards, Mark Desailly

Gibson F Illortaminni, Colin Kerinaiua

Land

Development Working Group

25/6/15 1

Gibson F Illortaminni, Brian Tipungwuti, Leslie Tungatulum, Stanley Tipiloura, Richard Puruntatameri, David Guy

Kate Hadden, Geoff McKenzie, John Berto

Science Reference Committee 26/2/15 5

Janet Hergt, Gerd Bossinger, Kate Hadden, John Hicks, Carla Hicks, Gibson F Illortaminni, Leslie Tungatulum, Peter Vesk, Jose Puruntatameri, Willie Roberts

Hugh Davies, Michelle Freeman, Emily Nicholson

Peter Ades, Glen Samsa

Independent Audit Committee 21/08/14 26

Hugh Bradley; Deven Patel; Ross Connolly.

John Wilson, Wesley Kerinaiua, Brian Clancy, Kate Hadden, Derek Mayger, John Hicks, Terry Larkin

Independent Audit Committee 11/11/14 27

Hugh Bradley; Deven Patel; Ross Connolly.

John Wilson, Wesley Kerinaiua, Brian Clancy, Kate Hadden, Derek Mayger

Independent Audit Committee 27/02/15 28

Hugh Bradley; Deven Patel; Ross Connolly.

John Wilson, Brian Clancy, Derek Mayger

Wesley Kerinaiua

Independent Audit Committee 19/06/15 29

Hugh Bradley; Deven Patel; Ross Connolly

John Wilson, Wesley Kerinaiua, Brian Clancy, Kate Hadden, Derek Mayger

44 TIWI LAND COUNCIL ANNUAL REPORT 2014/2015

3.5 RISK MANAGEMENT REGISTER The Land Council retained the services of the Australian Federal Police during the year to further develop our Risk Management protocols, Registers and Manuals. Work was completed in 2014/15 and align systems, codes and responses to the Security Frameworks of Government and the particular interests and difficulties of managing Tiwi risk in particular. The Land Council maintains a comprehensive Risk Management Register. Compliance is a continuing focus discussed during the year.

Our Code of Conduct policy applies to all representatives and Directors providing the framework of principles for conducting business, dealing with other representatives, members and suppliers. The Code of Conduct does not replace legislation and if any part of it is in conflict, then legislation takes precedence. This policy is based on the following principles:

•

A

ct and maintain a high standard of integrity and professionalism.

•

B

e culturally aware and sensitive.

•

R

espect Tiwi Culture at all times.

•

B

e responsible and scrupulous in the proper use of Company information, funds, equipment and facilities.

•

B

e considerate and respectful of the environment and others.

•

Ex

ercise fairness, equality, courtesy, consideration and sensitivity in dealing with other representatives, directors, members and suppliers.

•

A

void apparent conflict of interests, promptly disclosing to a TLC senior manager any interest which may constitute a conflict of interest.

•

P

romote the interests of TLC.

•

P

erform duties with skill, honesty, care and diligence.

•

A

bide by policies, procedures and lawful directions that relate to your employment with the TLC and/or our members.

•

A

void the perception that any business transaction may be influenced by offering or accepting gifts.

•

Under no cir

cumstances may representatives offer or accept money.

•

A

ny representative, who in good faith, raises a complaint or discloses an alleged breach of the Code, whilst following correct reporting procedures, will not be disadvantaged or prejudiced. All reports will be dealt with in a timely and confidential manner.

TLC expects co-operation from all representatives in conducting themselves in a professional, ethical and socially acceptable manner of the highest standards.

45 TIWI LAND COUNCIL ANNUAL REPORT 2014/2015

3.5 RISK MANAGEMENT REGISTER The Land Council retained the services of the Australian Federal Police during the year to further develop our Risk Management protocols, Registers and Manuals. Work was completed in 2014/15 and align systems, codes and responses to the Security Frameworks of Government and the particular interests and difficulties of managing Tiwi risk in particular. The Land Council maintains a comprehensive Risk Management Register. Compliance is a continuing focus discussed during the year.

Our Code of Conduct policy applies to all representatives and Directors providing the framework of principles for conducting business, dealing with other representatives, members and suppliers. The Code of Conduct does not replace legislation and if any part of it is in conflict, then legislation takes precedence. This policy is based on the following principles:

• Act and maintain a high standard of integrity and professionalism.

• Be culturally aware and sensitive.

• Respect Tiwi Culture at all times.

• Be responsible and scrupulous in the proper use of Company information, funds, equipment and facilities.

• Be considerate and respectful of the environment and others.

• Exercise fairness, equality, courtesy, consideration and sensitivity in dealing with other representatives, directors, members and suppliers.

• Avoid apparent conflict of interests, promptly disclosing to a TLC senior manager any interest which may constitute a conflict of interest.

• Promote the interests of TLC.

• Perform duties with skill, honesty, care and diligence.

• Abide by policies, procedures and lawful directions that relate to your employment with the TLC and/or our members.

• Avoid the perception that any business transaction may be influenced by offering or accepting gifts.

• Under no circumstances may representatives offer or accept money.

• Any representative, who in good faith, raises a complaint or discloses an alleged breach of the Code, whilst following correct reporting procedures, will not be disadvantaged or prejudiced. All reports will be dealt with in a timely and confidential manner.

TLC expects co-operation from all representatives in conducting themselves in a professional, ethical and socially acceptable manner of the highest standards.

3.6 O THER STATUTORY REQUIREMENTS

3.6.1 Indemnities and insurance premiums for officers

In 2004 the Land Council was obliged to adopt Comcover as insurer. Policy Terms and Conditions do include Management Committee Members’ and Officers` Liability. The limit of liability is $100m. A premium of $2,462 was paid for this cover for the 2014-15 year and a certificate of currency has been issued.

3.6.2 Asset Value

A revaluation of our assets is undertaken three years. This required valuation at 30 June 2013 and was completed by the Australian Valuation Office (AVO), with the next valuation due for the year ending 30 June 2016.

3.6.3 Approved ABA Budget

Our approved budget at 1st July 2013 remained unvaried throughout the year. Our attached financial statements record our performance against this income.

3.6.4 Corporate Governance and Planning

Basic Corporate Governance training for Tiwi members began last year, with some members undertaking courses provided by the Tiwi Training and Employment Board. Our Land Council specific corporate governance training program has been formulated with Manuals and course structures designed by KPMG. These include a board evaluation and performance review protocols of our Members and Management Committee. Our first intake is now scheduled for training over six months commencing in October 2014.

The Land Council is committed to ensuring that the Land Council has an effective corporate governance system which adds value and assists the Land Council in achieving its functions. The Land Council ensures that an effective and efficient approach to corporate governance is developed and implemented and to ensure that the Accountable Authority is comprised of individuals with skill and expertise that are necessary for, and of assistance to, the Land Council.

The Tiwi Land Council has established an independent external Audit Committee of distinguished and reputable members and value their assessment and opinion on the systems, operations and risks of the Tiwi Land Council.

3.6.5 Section 35 Payments

Following recent amendments to the Aboriginal Land Rights (NT) Act 1976, section 37 of the amending Act 93 of 2006 requires a statement and certification in regard to any payments made by the Tiwi Land Council under Section 35 of the Act. Tiwi Land Council made a determination under Section 35(2) for the distribution of $394,218.75 to Yimpinari Aboriginal Corporation.

Funds were received under section 64(3) of the aforementioned act on the 23rd January 2015, with payment of these funds been made in accordance with the determination made under section 35(2) on the 23rd April 2015. The determination was made at the full land council meeting held on the 25th February 2015 that upon establishment of the Yimpinari Aboriginal Corporation, mining royalty equivalents were to be transferred.

46 TIWI LAND COUNCIL ANNUAL REPORT 2014/2015

3.6.6 Section 37(4) Payments

Yimpinari Aboriginal Corporation was paid $61,469.57 and Tiwi Resources was paid $31,718.00 from fund received from the Department of Mines and Energy under section 16 of the Aboriginal Land Rights Act.

3.6.7 Fraud Control

The Land Council is satisfied that it has in place appropriate fraud control mechanisms to meet the needs and integrity of the Land Council. There were no detected or reported incidents during the year. The Land Council has adopted a Code of Conduct and Terms and Conditions that are supported by the Members. Introduction of a Pecuniary Interests Register during 2010 continues to be formally confirmed each year and members obliged to formally declare interest at every meeting.

3.6.8 Pecuniary Interests Registers

The Land Council has adopted the advice of the Minister and maintains Pecuniary Interest Registers for all members from January 2010. All Land Council members annually update their details in the Pecuniary Interests Register. This has been complied with for the 2014-15 year. Of our 109 suppliers, there are twelve in which one or more of our members are directors.

3.6.9 Related Parties Registers

All members have signed a Related Parties register to enable the Land Council to guard against potential conflicts of interest beyond conflicts of pecuniary interest. All members declare any relevant pecuniary interests before each meeting. Some Land Council Members are Directors of 10 suppliers. During the year the Land Council conducted business of varying amounts with these suppliers. They are:

NAME

TOTAL $AUD

Jilamara Arts & Crafts Munupi Arts & Crafts Nguiu Ullintjinni Assoc. Pirlangimpi Progress Assoc. Tiwi Education Board Tiwi Enterprises Pty Ltd Tiwi Islands Adventures Pty Limited Tiwi Island Regional Council Tiwi Plantations Corporation Tiwi Resources

30,000.00 30,000.00 27,081.49 22,038.27 38,130.91 632,585.25

45,543.41 82,422.00 79,975.45 591,188.45

3.6.10 Compliance Report - Finance

In addition to both Management and Solicitor representation letters required by the Australian National Audit Office as part of audit procedures, the Finance Minister requires a report of compliance with the provisions and requirements of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 (PGPA Act); and the PGPA Rules as amended from time to time, by the Tiwi Land Council. The compliance report for the financial year 2014/2015 has been completed.

3.6.11 Protective Security Policy Framework

Transition to the new Protective Security Policy Framework (PSPF) required our auditors enquire of security clearances applicable to contract personnel retained for the audit of the Tiwi Land Council. Access arrangements under Sub-Section 56(2) of the Archives Act 1983 were supported by the Land Council Audit Committee for the purposes of field work and testing required by our external auditors. Further detail and the compliance regimes required have recently been discussed by the Land Council in August 2013. An exemption has been sought as permitted by the legislation.

3.6.12 Compliance with Commonwealth Authorities (Annual Reporting) Orders 2011

A compliance Index is provided at page 49 to 51 of this report. It refers to matters required to be contained and reported herein. Those matters relevant to our Authority are listed. Those outside the authority or legislative powers and functions of the Tiwi Land Council are not included and are expressly noted.

3.6.13 Compliance Report - Legal

The Attorney General requires a statement each year of legal expenses incurred by the authority including in-house legal costs and fees. This report has been completed for the 2014/15 financial year.

Compliance with Legal Service Directions 2005 require Legal Service Expenditure Reports to the Office of Legal Services Coordination by 9 July 2015. The Tiwi Land Council has completed and forwarded this Report.

3.6.14 Legal Service Multi Use List

The Legal Services Amendment Direction 2012 (No.1) was made 31st May 2012 and commenced at 1 June 2012, effectively requiring the Land Council utilize only approved providers of legal services endorsed by the Commonwealth. The Tiwi Land Council has endorsed the listing of our major law firm Piper Alderman for continuing legal services. Piper Alderman comply with the listing requirements

3.6.15 Australian National Archives

Transition to digital record keeping is well underway with plans to implement and operate our own secure on-site server during the 2015-16 financial year. The server will be installed to our Pickataramoor office space and will meet all the necessary Australian National Archives standards/ requirements. It will be accessible to select Land Council staff in various locations in both Darwin and at the various Tiwi Islands operational offices outlined earlier in this report (Location of Activities and Facilities).

Our consultative obligations and meeting processes require manual paper trails rather than electronic and digital references. For these reasons it is likely both paper and digital records will be required for many years ahead.

3.6.16 Ecologically sustainable development

Discussions continued with the University of Melbourne through the Scientific Reference Committee to work up a project that develops optimal management strategies for biodiversity, ecosystem services and economic development.

The Land Use Request process was maintained throughout the year, with an increasing acceptance by external organisations of their obligations to assess the impact of their operations on the natural resources of the islands.

47 TIWI LAND COUNCIL ANNUAL REPORT 2014/2015

3.6.11 Protective Security Policy Framework

Transition to the new Protective Security Policy Framework (PSPF) required our auditors enquire of security clearances applicable to contract personnel retained for the audit of the Tiwi Land Council. Access arrangements under Sub-Section 56(2) of the Archives Act 1983 were supported by the Land Council Audit Committee for the purposes of field work and testing required by our external auditors. Further detail and the compliance regimes required have recently been discussed by the Land Council in August 2013. An exemption has been sought as permitted by the legislation.

3.6.12 Compliance with Commonwealth Authorities (Annual Reporting) Orders 2011

A compliance Index is provided at page 49 to 51 of this report. It refers to matters required to be contained and reported herein. Those matters relevant to our Authority are listed. Those outside the authority or legislative powers and functions of the Tiwi Land Council are not included and are expressly noted.

3.6.13 Compliance Report - Legal

The Attorney General requires a statement each year of legal expenses incurred by the authority including in-house legal costs and fees. This report has been completed for the 2014/15 financial year.

Compliance with Legal Service Directions 2005 require Legal Service Expenditure Reports to the Office of Legal Services Coordination by 9 July 2015. The Tiwi Land Council has completed and forwarded this Report.

3.6.14 Legal Service Multi Use List

The Legal Services Amendment Direction 2012 (No.1) was made 31st May 2012 and commenced at 1 June 2012, effectively requiring the Land Council utilize only approved providers of legal services endorsed by the Commonwealth. The Tiwi Land Council has endorsed the listing of our major law firm Piper Alderman for continuing legal services. Piper Alderman comply with the listing requirements

3.6.15 Australian National Archives

Transition to digital record keeping is well underway with plans to implement and operate our own secure on-site server during the 2015-16 financial year. The server will be installed to our Pickataramoor office space and will meet all the necessary Australian National Archives standards/ requirements. It will be accessible to select Land Council staff in various locations in both Darwin and at the various Tiwi Islands operational offices outlined earlier in this report (Location of Activities and Facilities).

Our consultative obligations and meeting processes require manual paper trails rather than electronic and digital references. For these reasons it is likely both paper and digital records will be required for many years ahead.

3.6.16 Ecologically sustainable development

Discussions continued with the University of Melbourne through the Scientific Reference Committee to work up a project that develops optimal management strategies for biodiversity, ecosystem services and economic development.

The Land Use Request process was maintained throughout the year, with an increasing acceptance by external organisations of their obligations to assess the impact of their operations on the natural resources of the islands.

48 TIWI LAND COUNCIL ANNUAL REPORT 2014/2015

The Tiwi Land Council has an accredited internal environmental auditor on staff who conducts annual internal environmental audits for Plantation Management Partners, the managers of the Tiwi plantation estate. The 2012/13 audit was carried out in September 2013, and led to a successful independent (external) audit for 2013, resulting in the Tiwi Forestry Project maintaining ISO14001 accreditation.

3.6.17 ENVIRONMENTAL PERFORMANCE

3.6.17.1 Energy efficiency

The Land Council Secretariat maintains small (190 sq meter) leased premises in Darwin. Operations and offices of the Land Council (5) are maintained on the Tiwi Islands reducing the need for air flights and charters. Members have investigated the use of tidal; wind and solar power, and undertaken detailed studies since 1999. The Land Council HQ Office at Pickataramoor is planning solar energy generation with current design work and costing under review.

3.6.17.2 Waste

Tiwi Land Council has required the Shire to progress licensing of Wurrumiyanga tip in accordance with environmental legislation, and supported their efforts to apply the same management standards to all tips across the Tiwi Islands (although this is currently not a legislative requirement).

3.6.17.3 Water

The Water Resource Strategy for the Tiwi Islands, developed by the Tiwi Islands Water Advisory Committee, made up of a NT Government Water Planner and three Tiwi Land Rangers, was signed off by the Minister and the full Tiwi Land Council in 2013. The Strategy identifies the freshwater resource on the Tiwi Islands, and sets out a framework for its sustainable management. Results to date clearly show that the freshwater resource is being used well within sustainable limits.

3.6.18 Occupational Health and Safety Information is required to be reported pursuant to Schedule 2 of the Work Health and Safety Act 2011. This report is required to comment upon:

•

T

he health and safety management arrangements of the Tiwi Land Council. •

T

he Land Council adopts audited standard for ISO 14001 complied with by our Forest Corporation in as much as they are relevant to employees of the Tiwi Land Council. Our Land and Marine Rangers are required to comply with Risk and Obligations Registers maintained by Tiwi Plantations Corporation. Detail that is relevant for other staff and Land Council facilities includes:

•

A

ustralian Workplace Safety Standards Act 2005 incident reporting procedures.

•

T

ransport Safety Investigations Act 2003 incident reporting procedures.

•

W

ork Health and Safety Act 2011 incident reporting procedures •

Danger

ous Goods and Transport Regulations Precautions and incident reporting procedures.

•

P

oisonous and Dangerous Drugs Act and Regulations. Storage and fumigation procedures.

•

C

oroners Act 1993 incident reporting procedures.

•

F

ire and Emergency Act and Regulations.

•

I

nitiatives taken during the year to ensure the health, safety and welfare at work of employees and contractors of the Entity or authority.

49 TIWI LAND COUNCIL ANNUAL REPORT 2014/2015

The Tiwi Land Council has an accredited internal environmental auditor on staff who conducts annual internal environmental audits for Plantation Management Partners, the managers of the Tiwi plantation estate. The 2012/13 audit was carried out in September 2013, and led to a successful independent (external) audit for 2013, resulting in the Tiwi Forestry Project maintaining ISO14001 accreditation.

3.6.17 ENVIRONMENTAL PERFORMANCE

3.6.17.1 Energy efficiency

The Land Council Secretariat maintains small (190 sq meter) leased premises in Darwin. Operations and offices of the Land Council (5) are maintained on the Tiwi Islands reducing the need for air flights and charters. Members have investigated the use of tidal; wind and solar power, and undertaken detailed studies since 1999. The Land Council HQ Office at Pickataramoor is planning solar energy generation with current design work and costing under review.

3.6.17.2 Waste

Tiwi Land Council has required the Shire to progress licensing of Wurrumiyanga tip in accordance with environmental legislation, and supported their efforts to apply the same management standards to all tips across the Tiwi Islands (although this is currently not a legislative requirement).

3.6.17.3 Water

The Water Resource Strategy for the Tiwi Islands, developed by the Tiwi Islands Water Advisory Committee, made up of a NT Government Water Planner and three Tiwi Land Rangers, was signed off by the Minister and the full Tiwi Land Council in 2013. The Strategy identifies the freshwater resource on the Tiwi Islands, and sets out a framework for its sustainable management. Results to date clearly show that the freshwater resource is being used well within sustainable limits.

3.6.18 Occupational Health and Safety Information is required to be reported pursuant to Schedule 2 of the Work Health and Safety Act 2011. This report is required to comment upon:

• The health and safety management arrangements of the Tiwi Land Council. • The Land Council adopts audited standard for ISO 14001 complied with by our Forest Corporation in as much as they are relevant to employees of the Tiwi Land Council. Our Land and Marine Rangers are required to comply with Risk and

Obligations Registers maintained by Tiwi Plantations Corporation. Detail that is relevant for other staff and Land Council facilities includes:

• Australian Workplace Safety Standards Act 2005 incident reporting procedures.

• Transport Safety Investigations Act 2003 incident reporting procedures.

• Work Health and Safety Act 2011 incident reporting procedures • Dangerous Goods and Transport Regulations Precautions and incident reporting procedures.

• Poisonous and Dangerous Drugs Act and Regulations. Storage and fumigation procedures.

• Coroners Act 1993 incident reporting procedures.

• Fire and Emergency Act and Regulations.

• Initiatives taken during the year to ensure the health, safety and welfare at work of employees and contractors of the Entity or authority.

The Tiwi Land Council has taken particular interest through initiatives of new staff since last year. These steps were taken to assure Land Council compliance with Australian Federal Legislation and to promote a risk averse approach to Work Health and Safety and the legislation promoting these requirements.

Rachel Burke has received extensive relevant training. All of the First Aid training was delivered by St John Ambulance NT Rachel received Certificates and training for/in:

•

M

anage First Aid in the Workplace •

A

pply Advanced First Aid •

A

pply First Aid •

I

ntramuscular Injections •

F

irst Aid Management of Anaphylaxis •

Emer

gency Medicines Kit Information Seminar, Royal Darwin Hospital •

Obtained A

uthorisation to Possess Poisons in a Medical Kit •

A

pproval to hold an Emergency Medical Kit which contains drugs (such as morphine) to be used in an Emergency •

Ha

ve installed CB Radio’s in Pickataramoor HQ vehicle and including a base station for radio communication here at the TLC Pickataramoor office •

P

rovided appropriate First Aid Kits in all TLC Vehicles and Accommodation.

•

P

urchased Emergency equipment. Spinal board, Neck braces, Trauma Bag, Inflatable splints, Equipment for taking patient ‘obs’, lockable cupboards to store restricted drugs •

Ha

ve advertised in ‘The Tiwi’, informing communities that if an emergency takes place near Pickataramoor, the TLC HQ can assist •

Displa

yed appropriate First Aid signs around the building •

I

mplemented an evacuation procedure - on display in prominent locations throughout the HQ •

Slipper

y when wet signs

•

Non Slip str

ips on steps

•

R

eporting procedures in place •

A

ny WH&S issues are now a permanent agenda item at all meetings.

•

T

wo Comcare inspectors performed site visit and issued a positive report regarding our adherence to all aspects of our WH&S requirements and responsibilities

•

Health and saf

ety outcomes (including the impact on injury rates of employees and contractors of the Entity or authority) achieved as a result of initiatives mentioned under paragraph (d) or previous initiatives. •

No r

eported injuries at any Land Council locations.

•

S

tatistics of any accidents or dangerous occurrences during the year that arose out of the conduct of undertakings by the Entity or authority and that required the giving of notice under section 68; •

No ac

cidents or dangerous occurrences.

•

A

ny investigations conducted during the year that relate to undertakings carried on by the employer, including details of all notices given to the employer under section 29, 46 or 47 during the year; •

No in

vestigations

•

Such

other matters as are required by guidelines approved on behalf of the Parliament by the Joint Committee of Public Accounts and Audit.

•

None

•

W

here an annual report of the activities of the Commonwealth authority is not required, under the Act or other law by or in accordance with which the authority is established or incorporated, to be prepared with a view to its being laid before each

50 TIWI LAND COUNCIL ANNUAL REPORT 2014/2015

House of the Parliament, a report concerning details, in relation to the authority in relation to a particular financial year, of the matters referred to in subsection (1), must be attached.

•

Not applic

able.

•

if a c

ontrolling interest in the Commonwealth authority is held, either directly or indirectly, by another Commonwealth authority in respect of the activities of which an annual report is so required to be prepared—to that annual report; •

Not applic

able

or •

if a c

ontrolling interest in the Commonwealth authority is not so held—to the annual report of the Entity or an Entity, administered by the responsible Minister for the first mentioned authority.

•

Not applic

able

3.6.19 Audit Committee Required Assessments

The Chair of the committee, in consultation with the Chair of the Land Council, will initiate a review of the performance of the committee at least once every two years. The review will be conducted on a self-assessment basis (unless otherwise determined by the Land Council) with appropriate input sought from the Land Council, the Chief Executive Officer, the internal and external auditors, management and any other relevant stakeholders, as determined by the Land Council.

The IAC performed the required self-assessment this year. Performance was agreed within acceptable performance benchmarks.

Review of Audit Committee Charter is also required annually. This review will include consultation with the Land Council. This has occurred for the 2014-2015 year and is contained with the minutes of the Committee. Substantive changes to the charter as are required to be recommended by the Committee are formally approved by the Land Council. No substantive changes advised during 2014-15.

The Audit Committee has noted requirements for Audit Charter changes in the 2014-2015 year as a consequence of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013. These have been reviewed at recent meetings and the Committee intends adoption of a new Charter consistent with new legislation.

3.6.20 Advertising and Market Research section 311 Commonwealth Electoral Act 1918

During 2014-15, the Tiwi Land Council did not conduct any advertising or market research within the meaning of section 311 of the Commonwealth Electoral Act 1918.

3.6.21 Entity Resource Statement

Source Grant Identity

Funds Carried forward from prior Years

Actual Income for 2014-2015 Expense for 2014-2015

Balance of funds 2014-2015

ABA beneficial payments under section 64(1) ABA s64(1) $ 0 $ 2,179,000 $ 2,164,312 $ 14,688

Other income

Combined with s 64(1) grant $ 0 $ 119,488 $ 106,301 $ 13,147

51 TIWI LAND COUNCIL ANNUAL REPORT 2014/2015

House of the Parliament, a report concerning details, in relation to the authority in relation to a particular financial year, of the matters referred to in subsection (1), must be attached.

• Not applicable.

• if a controlling interest in the Commonwealth authority is held, either directly or indirectly, by another Commonwealth authority in respect of the activities of which an annual report is so required to be prepared—to that annual report; • Not applicable

or • if a controlling interest in the Commonwealth authority is not so held—to the annual report of the Entity or an Entity, administered by the responsible Minister for the first mentioned authority.

• Not applicable

3.6.19 Audit Committee Required Assessments

The Chair of the committee, in consultation with the Chair of the Land Council, will initiate a review of the performance of the committee at least once every two years. The review will be conducted on a self-assessment basis (unless otherwise determined by the Land Council) with appropriate input sought from the Land Council, the Chief Executive Officer, the internal and external auditors, management and any other relevant stakeholders, as determined by the Land Council.

The IAC performed the required self-assessment this year. Performance was agreed within acceptable performance benchmarks.

Review of Audit Committee Charter is also required annually. This review will include consultation with the Land Council. This has occurred for the 2014-2015 year and is contained with the minutes of the Committee. Substantive changes to the charter as are required to be recommended by the Committee are formally approved by the Land Council. No substantive changes advised during 2014-15.

The Audit Committee has noted requirements for Audit Charter changes in the 2014-2015 year as a consequence of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013. These have been reviewed at recent meetings and the Committee intends adoption of a new Charter consistent with new legislation.

3.6.20 Advertising and Market Research section 311 Commonwealth Electoral Act 1918

During 2014-15, the Tiwi Land Council did not conduct any advertising or market research within the meaning of section 311 of the Commonwealth Electoral Act 1918.

3.6.21 Entity Resource Statement

Source Grant Identity

Funds Carried forward from prior Years

Actual Income for 2014-2015 Expense for 2014-2015

Balance of funds 2014-2015

ABA beneficial payments under section 64(1) ABA s64(1) $ 0 $ 2,179,000 $ 2,164,312 $ 14,688

Other income

Combined with s 64(1) grant $ 0 $ 119,488 $ 106,301 $ 13,147

Source Grant Identity

Funds Carried forward from prior Years

Actual Income for 2014-2015 Expense for 2014-2015

Balance of funds 2014-2015

ABA - Cultural Mentoring

$ 0 $ 117,000(1) $ 117,000(2) $ 0

ABA Tiwi Funeral Fund

$ 0 $ 200,000 $ 200,000 $ 0

NT Fisheries

Blue Mud Bay Settlement

$ 0 $ 165,000 $ 75,000 $ 90,000

Commonwealth Government Working on Country

Marine Ranger wages support $ 0 $ 178,040 $ 178,040 $ 0

Commonwealth Government Indigenous Capability and Development

Sustainable Ranger Wages and Changed Fire Regimes

$ 0 $ 274,400 $ 274,400 $ 0

ABA beneficial payments under section 64(4)

Replacement Marine Ranger Vessel - Milikapiti $ 0 $ 30,369 $ 30,369 $ 0

Commonwealth Indigenous Carbon Farming Fund

Fire Management for GHG abatement on the Tiwi Islands $ 83,195 $ 42,100 $ 47,737 $ 77,558

Self-Generated ECoz Environmental Services

$ 0 $ 436.36 $ 0 $ 436.36

Self-Generated

Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry

$ 0 $ 4,272.73 $ 727 $ 3,545.73

Gift

Chief Minister Awards

$ 0 $ 11,363.64 $ 0 $ 11,363.64

OTL Insurance $ 122,551 $ 0 $ 0 $ 122,551

$ 205,746.00 $ 3,321,469.73 $ 3,193,886.00 $ 333,289.73

Note (1): Represents total value invoiced under grant, the actual amount received was $104,265, with residue of $12,735 been received 10th July 2015.

Note (2): Represents total value invoiced by suppliers, the actual amount paid to suppliers was $104,265, with residue of $12,735 been paid on 15th July 2015.

52 TIWI LAND COUNCIL ANNUAL REPORT 2014/2015

3.7 MANAGEMENT OF HUMAN RESOURCES

3.7.1 Developing Human Resources

Human Resource Management is defined as the integrated use of procedures, policies, and practices to recruit, maintain, and develop employees in order for the organization to meet its desired goals. We have identified six broad areas: human resources capacity, human resources planning, personnel policy and practice, human resources data, performance management, and training.

Throughout the year we have seen the development personal policies and procedures, incorporating a focus on the digital technologies storage and retention of human resource details. Planning has been undertaken in developing framework a staff skills matrix, scheduled to be populated with pertinent data in 2015-2016. Performance management is assessed on both specific skills basis and the workflows within our integrated team. Continuing professional development has been undertaken in 2014-2015, and further training is scheduled for 2015-2016, the first of these will be human resources training at a certificate IV level for one of the staff members.

Executive management committee have been exposed to on the job training with regards to policies and procedures, applicability of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 and the Aboriginal Land Rights (Northern Territory) Act 1976, understanding is assessed on the basis of peer review.

3.7.2 Statistics on Staffing

Staff Gender

Years on Service at 30 June 2015

Expiry date of contract Employment status

Location

1 Female 15 30/06/2018 Full time Darwin

2 Female 8 30/06/2017 Full time Tiwi Islands

3 Female 2 30/06/2018 Full time Tiwi Islands

4 Male 8 30/06/2017 Full time Tiwi Islands

5 Male 2 30/06/2018 Full time Tiwi Islands

6 Male 1 30/06/2017 Full time Darwin

53 TIWI LAND COUNCIL ANNUAL REPORT 2014/2015

3.7 MANAGEMENT OF HUMAN RESOURCES

3.7.1 Developing Human Resources

Human Resource Management is defined as the integrated use of procedures, policies, and practices to recruit, maintain, and develop employees in order for the organization to meet its desired goals. We have identified six broad areas: human resources capacity, human resources planning, personnel policy and practice, human resources data, performance management, and training.

Throughout the year we have seen the development personal policies and procedures, incorporating a focus on the digital technologies storage and retention of human resource details. Planning has been undertaken in developing framework a staff skills matrix, scheduled to be populated with pertinent data in 2015-2016. Performance management is assessed on both specific skills basis and the workflows within our integrated team. Continuing professional development has been undertaken in 2014-2015, and further training is scheduled for 2015-2016, the first of these will be human resources training at a certificate IV level for one of the staff members.

Executive management committee have been exposed to on the job training with regards to policies and procedures, applicability of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 and the Aboriginal Land Rights (Northern Territory) Act 1976, understanding is assessed on the basis of peer review.

3.7.2 Statistics on Staffing

Staff Gender

Years on Service at 30 June 2015

Expiry date of contract Employment status

Location

1 Female 15 30/06/2018 Full time Darwin

2 Female 8 30/06/2017 Full time Tiwi Islands

3 Female 2 30/06/2018 Full time Tiwi Islands

4 Male 8 30/06/2017 Full time Tiwi Islands

5 Male 2 30/06/2018 Full time Tiwi Islands

6 Male 1 30/06/2017 Full time Darwin

3.7.3 Statistics on Employees who identify as Indigenous

Number

Indigenous Participation

% of Staff

Female 3 2 66%

Male 3 0 0%

Total 6 2 33%

54 TIWI LAND COUNCIL ANNUAL REPORT 2014/2015

3.7.4 Employment Benefits and Categorisation

Tiwi Land Council has engaged their staff under common law contracts. Contracts for are for a stated salary, with an expectation that staff apply themselves diligently, properly and with skill care and attention in the best interest of the Tiwi Land Council. The Land Council does not make performance payments or post-employment payments.

When employment contracts expire, employee agreements will be finalised on the bases outlined in the Australian Government Public Sector Workplace Bargaining Policy (Bargaining Policy), consistent with the Bargaining Policy, that all proposed remuneration increases are submitted to the Australian Public Service Commission (APSC) for assessment as affordable and offset by productivity gains.

LIST OF REQUIREMENTS

Ref Part of Report Description Page(s)

8(3) & A.4 Letter of transmittal 2

A.5 Table of contents 3

A.5 Index 63

A.5 Glossary 62

A.5 Contact officer(s) 6

A.5 Internet home page address and

Internet address for report

6

9 Review by Secretary

9(1) Review by departmental secretary

9(2) Summary of significant issues and developments

9(2) Overview of department’s performance

and financial results

9(2) Outlook for following year

9(3) Significant issues and developments - portfolio

10 Departmental Overview

10(1) Role and functions

10(1) Organisational structure 9

10(1) Outcome and programme structure

10(2) Where outcome and programme structures

differ from PB Statements/PAES or other portfolio statements accompanying any other additional appropriation bills (other portfolio statements), details of variation and reasons for change

NA

10(3) Portfolio structure NA

55 TIWI LAND COUNCIL ANNUAL REPORT 2014/2015

3.7.4 Employment Benefits and Categorisation

Tiwi Land Council has engaged their staff under common law contracts. Contracts for are for a stated salary, with an expectation that staff apply themselves diligently, properly and with skill care and attention in the best interest of the Tiwi Land Council. The Land Council does not make performance payments or post-employment payments.

When employment contracts expire, employee agreements will be finalised on the bases outlined in the Australian Government Public Sector Workplace Bargaining Policy (Bargaining Policy), consistent with the Bargaining Policy, that all proposed remuneration increases are submitted to the Australian Public Service Commission (APSC) for assessment as affordable and offset by productivity gains.

LIST OF REQUIREMENTS

Ref Part of Report Description Page(s)

8(3) & A.4 Letter of transmittal 2

A.5 Table of contents 3

A.5 Index 63

A.5 Glossary 62

A.5 Contact officer(s) 6

A.5 Internet home page address and

Internet address for report

6

9 Review by Secretary

9(1) Review by departmental secretary

9(2) Summary of significant issues and developments

9(2) Overview of department’s performance

and financial results

9(2) Outlook for following year

9(3) Significant issues and developments - portfolio

10 Departmental Overview

10(1) Role and functions

10(1) Organisational structure 9

10(1) Outcome and programme structure

10(2) Where outcome and programme structures

differ from PB Statements/PAES or other portfolio statements accompanying any other additional appropriation bills (other portfolio statements), details of variation and reasons for change

NA

10(3) Portfolio structure NA

11 Report on Performance

11(1) Review of performance during the year in relation

to programmes and contribution to outcomes 15, 16, 25, 27

11(2) Actual performance in relation to deliverables

and KPIs set out in PB Statements/ PAES or other portfolio statements

NA

11(2) Where performance targets

differ from the PBS/PAES,

NA

details of both former and new targets, and reasons for the change

11(2) Narrative discussion and analysis of performance 15, 16, 25, 27

11(2) Trend information NA

11(3) Significant changes in nature of

principal functions/services

NA

11(3) Performance of purchaser/provider arrangements NA

11(3) Factors, events or trends influencing

departmental performance

NA

11(3) Contribution of risk management

in achieving objectives

NA

11(4) Performance against service charter customer

service standards, complaints data, and the department’s response to complaints

NA

11(5) Discussion and analysis of the

department’s financial performance 13

11(6) Discussion of any significant changes

in financial results from the prior year, from budget or anticipated to have a significant impact on future operations.

13

11(7) Agency resource statement and summary

resource tables by outcomes

NA

56 TIWI LAND COUNCIL ANNUAL REPORT 2014/2015

12 Management and Accountability

Corporate Governance

12(1) Agency heads are required to certify their

agency’s actions in dealing with fraud. 46

12(2) Statement of the main corporate

governance practices in place

45

12(3) Names of the senior executive

and their responsibilities

NA

12(3) Senior management committees and their roles NA

12(3) Corporate and operational plans and associated

performance reporting and review

NA

12(3) Internal audit arrangements including

approach adopted to identifying areas of significant financial or operational risk and arrangements to manage those risks

NA

12(3) Policy and practices on the establishment and

maintenance of appropriate ethical standards NA

12(3) How nature and amount of remuneration

for SES officers is determined

NA

External Scrutiny

12(4) Significant developments in external scrutiny NA

12(4) Judicial decisions and decisions of

administrative tribunals and by the Australian Information Commissioner

NA

12(4) Reports by the Auditor-General, a Parliamentary

Committee, the Commonwealth Ombudsman or an agency capability review

NA

57 TIWI LAND COUNCIL ANNUAL REPORT 2014/2015

12 Management and Accountability

Corporate Governance

12(1) Agency heads are required to certify their

agency’s actions in dealing with fraud. 46

12(2) Statement of the main corporate

governance practices in place

45

12(3) Names of the senior executive

and their responsibilities

NA

12(3) Senior management committees and their roles NA

12(3) Corporate and operational plans and associated

performance reporting and review

NA

12(3) Internal audit arrangements including

approach adopted to identifying areas of significant financial or operational risk and arrangements to manage those risks

NA

12(3) Policy and practices on the establishment and

maintenance of appropriate ethical standards NA

12(3) How nature and amount of remuneration

for SES officers is determined

NA

External Scrutiny

12(4) Significant developments in external scrutiny NA

12(4) Judicial decisions and decisions of

administrative tribunals and by the Australian Information Commissioner

NA

12(4) Reports by the Auditor-General, a Parliamentary

Committee, the Commonwealth Ombudsman or an agency capability review

NA

Management of Human Resources

12(5) Assessment of effectiveness in managing

and developing human resources to achieve departmental objectives

52

12(6) Workforce planning, staff retention and turnover NA

12(6) Impact and features of enterprise or collective

agreements, individual flexibility arrangements (IFAs), determinations, common law contracts and Australian Workplace Agreements (AWAs)

NA

12(6) Training and development

undertaken and its impact

NA

12(6) Work health and safety performance NA

12(6) Productivity gains NA

12(7) Statistics on staffing 52

12(8) Statistics on employees who identify as Indigenous 53

12(9) Enterprise or collective agreements, IFAs,

determinations, common law contracts and AWAs 54

12(10) & B Performance pay 54

12(11)-(12) Assets

management Assessment of effectiveness of assets management NA

12(13) Purchasing Assessment of purchasing against

core policies and principles

NA

12(14)-(23) Consultants The annual report must include a summary statement detailing the number of new consultancy services contracts let during the year; the total actual expenditure on all new consultancy contracts let during the year (inclusive of GST); the number of ongoing consultancy contracts that were active in the reporting year; and the total actual expenditure in the reporting year on the ongoing consultancy contracts (inclusive of GST). The annual report must include a statement noting that information on contracts and consultancies is available through the AusTender website.

NA

12(24) Australian

National Audit Office Access Clauses

Absence of provisions in contracts allowing access by the Auditor-General NA

58 TIWI LAND COUNCIL ANNUAL REPORT 2014/2015

12(25) Exempt contracts Contracts exempted from publication in AusTender NA

12(26)-(28) Small business Procurement initiatives to support small business NA

13 Financial

Statements

Financial Statements Provided

21-Sep-15

Other Mandatory Information

14(1) & C.1 Work health and safety (Schedule 2, Part 4

of the Work Health and Safety Act 2011) 48

14(1) & C.2 Advertising and Market Research (Section 311A

of the Commonwealth Electoral Act 1918) and statement on advertising campaigns

50

14(1) & C.3 Ecologically sustainable development

and environmental performance (Section 516A of the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999)

48

14(1) Compliance with the agency’s obligations

under the Carer Recognition Act 2010 NA

14(2) & D.1 Grant programmes NA

14(3) & D.2 Disability reporting - explicit and transparent

reference to agency-level information available through other reporting mechanisms

NA

14(4) & D.3 Information Publication Scheme statement NA

14(5) Correction of material errors in

previous annual report

NA

E Agency Resource Statements and

Resources for Outcomes

50

F List of Requirements 54

59 TIWI LAND COUNCIL ANNUAL REPORT 2014/2015

12(25) Exempt contracts Contracts exempted from publication in AusTender NA

12(26)-(28) Small business Procurement initiatives to support small business NA

13 Financial

Statements

Financial Statements Provided

21-Sep-15

Other Mandatory Information

14(1) & C.1 Work health and safety (Schedule 2, Part 4

of the Work Health and Safety Act 2011) 48

14(1) & C.2 Advertising and Market Research (Section 311A

of the Commonwealth Electoral Act 1918) and statement on advertising campaigns

50

14(1) & C.3 Ecologically sustainable development

and environmental performance (Section 516A of the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999)

48

14(1) Compliance with the agency’s obligations

under the Carer Recognition Act 2010 NA

14(2) & D.1 Grant programmes NA

14(3) & D.2 Disability reporting - explicit and transparent

reference to agency-level information available through other reporting mechanisms

NA

14(4) & D.3 Information Publication Scheme statement NA

14(5) Correction of material errors in

previous annual report

NA

E Agency Resource Statements and

Resources for Outcomes

50

F List of Requirements 54

Compliance Index of Commonwealth Authorities (Annual Reporting Orders 2011 and Requirements for Commonwealth Authorities also covered by the Aboriginal Land Rights (Northern Territory) Act 1976

Requirement: Reference: Page(s)

Approval by Directors Commonwealth Authorities (Annual Reporting) Orders 2011, Clause 6

Page 2

Details of exemptions granted by Finance Minister in regard to reporting requirements

Commonwealth Authorities (Annual Reporting) Orders 2011, Clause 7

N/A

Enabling legislation

Commonwealth Authorities (Annual Reporting) Orders 2011, Clause 10

Pages 1

Responsible Minister Commonwealth Authorities (Annual Reporting) Orders 2011, Clause 11

Page 1

Ministerial Directions Commonwealth Authorities (Annual Reporting) Orders 2011, Clause 12

Certified none were advised. Page 29

General Policy Orders Commonwealth Authorities (Annual Reporting) Orders 2011, Clause 12

N/A

Work Health and Safety Commonwealth Authorities (Annual Reporting) Orders 2011, Clause 12

Pages 48 and 49

Advertising and Market Research

Commonwealth Authorities (Annual Reporting) Orders 2011, Clause 12

Web site monitoring and feedback protocols.

Disability Reporting Mechanisms

Commonwealth Authorities (Annual Reporting) Orders 2011, Clause 12

N/A

Ecologically sustainable development and environmental performance

Commonwealth Authorities (Annual Reporting) Orders 2011, Clause 12 Pages 14,15 and 48

Information about Directors Commonwealth Authorities (Annual Reporting) Orders 2011, Clause 13

Accountable Management Authority Pages 29 and 30

Organisational Structure Commonwealth Authorities (Annual Reporting) Orders 2011, Clause 14

Pages 9

Board Committees and their main responsibilities

Commonwealth Authorities (Annual Reporting) Orders 2011, Clause 14 Pages 29 and 30

Education and performance review processes; and ethics and risk management policies

Commonwealth Authorities (Annual Reporting) Orders 2011, Clause 14

Pages 44

Related Entity Transactions Commonwealth Authorities (Annual Reporting) Orders 2011, Clause 15

No Related Entities. At risk transactions informed by Register at page 44

60 TIWI LAND COUNCIL ANNUAL REPORT 2014/2015

Compliance Index of Commonwealth Authorities (Annual Reporting Orders 2011 and Requirements for Commonwealth Authorities also covered by the Aboriginal Land Rights (Northern Territory) Act 1976

Requirement: Reference: Page(s)

Significant events under section 15 of the CAC Act

Commonwealth Authorities (Annual Reporting) Orders 2011, Clause 16 (a)

There were no significant events in the period

Operational and financial results Commonwealth Authorities (Annual Reporting) Orders 2011, Clause (b)

Page 13

Attached audited financial statements

Key changes to the authority’s state of affairs or principal activities

Commonwealth Authorities (Annual Reporting) Orders 2011, Clause 16 (c)

No changes in the period Page 12 provides significant activities

Amendments to authority’s enabling legislation

Commonwealth Authorities (Annual Reporting) Orders 2011, Clause 16 (d)

None amending enabling legislation.

Significant judicial or administrative tribunal decisions

Commonwealth Authorities (Annual Reporting) Orders 2011, Clause 17 (a)

Page 28

Reports made about the authority

Commonwealth Authorities (Annual Reporting) Orders 2011, Clause 17 (b)

References to Government reports contained within this Report. No significant others.

Obtaining information from subsidiaries

Commonwealth Authorities (Annual Reporting) Orders 2011, Clause 18

The Tiwi Land Council has no subsidiaries

Indemnities and insurance premiums for officers

Commonwealth Authorities (Annual Reporting) Orders 2011, Clause 19

Premiums paid and noted page 45

Disclosure Requirements for Government Business Enterprise

Commonwealth Authorities (Annual Reporting) Orders 2011, Clause 20

The Tiwi Land Council is prevented by legislation from engaging itself in business enterprise and neither operates or benefits

from such business enterprise.

61 TIWI LAND COUNCIL ANNUAL REPORT 2014/2015

Compliance Index of Commonwealth Authorities (Annual Reporting Orders 2011 and Requirements for Commonwealth Authorities also covered by the Aboriginal Land Rights (Northern Territory) Act 1976

Requirement: Reference: Page(s)

Significant events under section 15 of the CAC Act

Commonwealth Authorities (Annual Reporting) Orders 2011, Clause 16 (a)

There were no significant events in the period

Operational and financial results Commonwealth Authorities (Annual Reporting) Orders 2011, Clause (b)

Page 13

Attached audited financial statements

Key changes to the authority’s state of affairs or principal activities

Commonwealth Authorities (Annual Reporting) Orders 2011, Clause 16 (c)

No changes in the period Page 12 provides significant activities

Amendments to authority’s enabling legislation

Commonwealth Authorities (Annual Reporting) Orders 2011, Clause 16 (d)

None amending enabling legislation.

Significant judicial or administrative tribunal decisions

Commonwealth Authorities (Annual Reporting) Orders 2011, Clause 17 (a)

Page 28

Reports made about the authority

Commonwealth Authorities (Annual Reporting) Orders 2011, Clause 17 (b)

References to Government reports contained within this Report. No significant others.

Obtaining information from subsidiaries

Commonwealth Authorities (Annual Reporting) Orders 2011, Clause 18

The Tiwi Land Council has no subsidiaries

Indemnities and insurance premiums for officers

Commonwealth Authorities (Annual Reporting) Orders 2011, Clause 19

Premiums paid and noted page 45

Disclosure Requirements for Government Business Enterprise

Commonwealth Authorities (Annual Reporting) Orders 2011, Clause 20

The Tiwi Land Council is prevented by legislation from engaging itself in business enterprise and neither operates or benefits

from such business enterprise.

COMPLIANCE INDEX Page(s)

Aboriginal Land Rights (Northern Territory) Act 1976 (ALRA)

Fees

Specify the total fees received for services provided by the land council:

a)

under P

art IV (Mining); and

b)

under 33A f

or services prescribed by the regulations that it provides in performing any of its functions, whether in the reporting year or the previous year.

Specify total fees received under s33B (other fees charged to the Commonwealth).

Provided specifically at pages 15

Section 35 Determinations

Include details of payments by the Council under Sec. 35 (2) or (3) and any determinations made by the Minister under Sec. 35 (6) made during the reporting year.

Details of payments made by determination or otherwise under 35(2), 35(6), 35(4), 35(4B), 35(11), and 67B (6) must be provided and include, the recipient of the amount; the subsection under which the amount was paid; and the total of the amount paid.

None are determined or made and are so certified at page 45

Details of amounts held in trust

In respect of amounts paid to the Council and held in trust at the end of the year; provide details of the amount paid to Council and the year it was paid, the amount held in trust, and the mining operation concerned.

Some Grant funds referred to in the attached financial reports and Notes.

Delegations

If there is a delegation under s28, particulars of activities during the year related to any delegated functions or activities must be provided

No delegations provided during the year

Committees

If a committee has been appointed under s29A to assist the Council in relation to the performance of any of its functions or the exercise of any of its powers, detailed information of its activities must be included.

The Tiwi Land Council has one Committee so appointed in 1995. This Management Committee is referred to

at pages 30 & 32 - 39

Consultants

Specify each consultant engaged by council during the year and the amount paid to each consultant. In order for comprehensive information to be reported details of the nature of work undertaken the total cost of the consultancy and the reasons why a consultant was required could be included in addition to the details required by this provision.

Consultants retained for each output activity are noted for that activity in the text from Page

12 - Principal Outputs.

62 TIWI LAND COUNCIL ANNUAL REPORT 2014/2015

GLOSSARY

ABA - Aboriginal Benefits Account

AHC - Actual Hours Contact

ANA - Australian National Archives

AQIS - Australian Quarantine and Inspection Service

CDEP - Community Development Employment Programme

CDF - Community Development Fund

CFI - Carbon Farming Initiative

CSIRO - Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation

EMC - Executive Management Committee

EOLHT - Ezion Offshore Logistics Hub (Tiwi) Pty Ltd

GHG - Green House Gas

GTO - Group Training Organisation

HQ - Headquarters

IAC - Independent Audit Committee

IEP - Indigenous Employment Programme

ILC - Indigenous Land Corporation

JSA - Job Services Australia

LLNP - Language, Literacy and Numeracy Programme

NLC - Northern Land Council

NT - Northern Territory

NTG - Northern Territory Government

OTL - Office of township Leasing

PPA - Pirlangimpi Progress Association

RJCP - Remote Jobs and Communities Program

RTO - Registered Training Organisation

TEB - Tiwi Education Board

TITEB - Tiwi Islands Training and Employment Board

TLC - Tiwi Land Council

63 TIWI LAND COUNCIL ANNUAL REPORT 2014/2015

INDEX A

Aboriginal Land Rights (Northern Territory) Act 1976 ............................................... 1, 13, 28, 52

A

udit Committee

....................................................................................................... 27, 40, 41, 45, 47, 50

A

udit Committee Charter

................................................................................................................... 41, 50

C

Consultancies ............................................................................................................................ 15, 25, 27, 28

E

Executive Management Committee ................................................................................ 11, 30, 41, 52

G Gibson Farmer Illortaminni .............................. 2, 6, 7, 8, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39

G

rants

........................................................................................................................................... 13, 15, 18, 27

M

Minister for Indigenous Affairs ............................................................................................................. 1, 2

N

NT Government ........................................................................................................................ 11, 14, 18, 48

P

Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 ............ 1, 2, 9, 29, 46, 50, 52

S

Senator the Honourable Nigel Scullion ............................................................................................ 1, 2

TIWI LAND COUNCIL GENERAL PURPOSE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED

30 JUNE 2015

TIWI LAND COUNCIL GENERAL PURPOSE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED

30 JUNE 2015

ABN 86 106 441 085

CONTENTS AUDIT REPORT 6 7

STATEMENT BY OFFICERS 6

9

STATEMENT OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME 7

0

STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL POSITION 7

1

STATEMENT OF CHANGES IN EQUITY 7

2

CASH FLOW STATEMENT 7

3

SCHEDULE OF COMMITMENTS 7

4

TABLE OF CONTENTS - NOTES 7

5

NOTE 1: SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES 7

6

NOTE 2: EVENTS AFTER THE REPORTING PERIOD 8

2

NOTE 3: EXPENSES 8

3

NOTE 4: INCOME 8

5

NOTE 5: FAIR VALUE MEASUREMENTS 8

6

NOTE 6: FINANCIAL ASSETS 8

7

NOTE 7: NON-FINANCIAL ASSETS 8

8

NOTE 8: PAYABLES 9

1

NOTE 9: PROVISIONS 9

2

NOTE 10: CASH FLOW RECONCILIATION 9

3

NOTE 11: CONTINGENT ASSETS AND LIABILITIES 9

4

NOTE 12: SENIOR MANAGEMENT PERSONNEL REMUNERATION 9

5

NOTE 13: REMUNERATION OF AUDITORS 9

6

NOTE 14: FINANCIAL INSTRUMENTS 9

7

NOTE 15: FINANCIAL ASSETS RECONCILIATION 9

9

NOTE 16: ASSETS HELD IN TRUST 1

00

NOTE 17: INCOME & EXPENDITURE AGAINST BUDGET S64(1) 1

01

67 TIWI LAND COUNCIL ANNUAL REPORT 2014/2015

AUDIT REPORT 67

STATEMENT BY OFFICERS 69

STATEMENT OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME 70

STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL POSITION 71

STATEMENT OF CHANGES IN EQUITY 72

CASH FLOW STATEMENT 73

SCHEDULE OF COMMITMENTS 74

TABLE OF CONTENTS - NOTES 75

NOTE 1: SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES 76

NOTE 2: EVENTS AFTER THE REPORTING PERIOD 82

NOTE 3: EXPENSES 83

NOTE 4: INCOME 85

NOTE 5: FAIR VALUE MEASUREMENTS 86

NOTE 6: FINANCIAL ASSETS 87

NOTE 7: NON-FINANCIAL ASSETS 88

NOTE 8: PAYABLES 91

NOTE 9: PROVISIONS 92

NOTE 10: CASH FLOW RECONCILIATION 93

NOTE 11: CONTINGENT ASSETS AND LIABILITIES 94

NOTE 12: SENIOR MANAGEMENT PERSONNEL REMUNERATION 95

NOTE 13: REMUNERATION OF AUDITORS 96

NOTE 14: FINANCIAL INSTRUMENTS 97

NOTE 15: FINANCIAL ASSETS RECONCILIATION 99

NOTE 16: ASSETS HELD IN TRUST 100

NOTE 17: INCOME & EXPENDITURE AGAINST BUDGET S64(1) 101

68 TIWI LAND COUNCIL ANNUAL REPORT 2014/2015

69 TIWI LAND COUNCIL ANNUAL REPORT 2014/2015

TIWI LAND COUNCIL FINANCIAL STATEMENTS for the year ended 30 June 2015

70 TIWI LAND COUNCIL ANNUAL REPORT 2014/2015

TIWI LAND COUNCIL STATEMENT OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME for the year ended 30 June 2015

TIWI LAND COUNCIL

for the year ended 30 June 2015

2015 2014

NET COSTS OF SERVICES Notes $ $

EXPENSES Employee benefits 3A 1,026,204 884,589

Supplier 3B 2,141,904 2,324,123

Depreciation and amortisation 3C 177,662 180,664

Losses from asset sales 3D 727 -

Other expenses 3E 31,718 529,218

Total expenses 3,378,215 3,918,594

OWN-SOURCE INCOME Own-source revenue Sale of goods and rendering of services 4A 14,351 16,725

Fees and fines 4B 92,152 -

Interest 4C 17,694 26,362

Other revenue 4D 11,364 -

Total own-source revenue 135,561 43,087

Gains Sale of assets 4E - 3,509

Total gains - 3,509

Total own-source income 135,561 46,597

Net cost of services (3,242,654) (3,871,998)

Revenue from Government 4F 3,185,909 3,778,297

Deficit before income tax on continuing operations (56,745) (93,701)

Deficit after income tax on continuing operations (56,745) (93,701)

Deficit attributable to the Australian Government (56,745) (93,701)

OTHER COMPREHENSIVE INCOME Changes in asset revaluation surplus - -

Total other comprehensive income - -

Total comprehensive income (loss) attributable to the Australian Government (56,745) (93,701)

Statement of Comprehensive Income

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

71 TIWI LAND COUNCIL ANNUAL REPORT 2014/2015

TIWI LAND COUNCIL STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL POSITION as at 30 June 2015 TIWI LAND COUNCIL

2015 2014

Notes $ $

ASSETS Financial Assets Cash and cash equivalents 6A 528,234 469,906

Trade and other receivables 6B 63,143 45,478

Total financial assets 591,377 515,384

Non-Financial Assets Land and buildings 7A 1,120,134 1,184,851

Property, plant and equipment 7B,C 249,075 335,879

Other non-financial assets 7D 10,328 13,046

Total non-financial assets 1,379,537 1,533,776

Total assets 1,970,914 2,049,160

LIABILITIES Payables Suppliers 8A 105,084 31,992

Other payables 8B 122,551 142,800

Total payables 227,635 174,793

Provisions Employee provisions 9A 130,460 204,803

Total provisions 130,460 204,803

Total liabilities 358,095 379,596

Net assets 1,612,819 1,669,564

EQUITY Parent Entity Interest Asset Revaluation Reserve 505,938 513,406

Retained surplus 1,106,881 1,156,158

Total parent entity interest 1,612,819 1,669,564

Total equity 1,612,819 1,669,564

Statement of Financial Position as at 30 June 2015

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

72 TIWI LAND COUNCIL ANNUAL REPORT 2014/2015

TIWI LAND COUNCIL STATEMENT OF CHANGES IN EQUITY for the year ended 30 June 2015 TIWI LAND COUNCIL Statement of Changes in Equity

2015 2014 2015 2014 2015 2014

$ $ $ $ $ $

Opening balance Balance carried forward from previous period

1,156,158 1,260,096 513,407 503,170 1,669,565 1,763,265

Adjusted opening balance

1,156,158 1,260,096 513,407 503,170 1,669,565 1,763,265

Comprehensive income Deficit for the period

(56,745) (93,701) - - (56,745) (93,701)

Other comprehensive income - Asset Revaluation

- - - - - -

Total comprehensive income

(56,745) (93,701) - - (56,745) (93,701)

of which: Attributable to the Australian Government

(56,745) (93,701) - - (56,745) (93,701)

Transfers between equity components

7,468 (10,237) (7,468) 10,237 - -

Closing balance as at 30 June

1,106,881 1,156,158 505,939 513,407 1,612,820 1,669,565

Closing balance attributable to the Australian Gove

rnment 1,106,881 1,156,158 505,939 513,407 1,612,820 1,669,565

The above statement should be read in conjunction w

ith the accompanying notes.

Retained earnings

Asset revaluation

surplus Total equity

for the year ended 30 June 2015

73 TIWI LAND COUNCIL ANNUAL REPORT 2014/2015

TIWI LAND COUNCIL CASH FLOW STATEMENT for the year ended 30 June 2015 TIWI LAND COUNCIL

2015 2014

Notes $ $

OPERATING ACTIVITIES Cash received Receipts from Government 3,442,086 4,286,746

Goods and services 134,181 90,231

Interest 17,694 26,362

Net GST received 88,651 129,659

Total cash received 3,682,612 4,532,998

Cash used Employees 1,112,599 857,354

Suppliers 1,914,085 2,135,984

Grants 570,731 1,562,433

Total cash used 3,597,415 4,555,771

Net cash used by operating activities 10 85,196 (22,774)

INVESTING ACTIVITIES Cash received Proceeds from sales of property, plant and equipment 3,500 12,000

Total cash received 3,500 12,000

Cash used Purchase of property, plant and equipment 30,368 453,262

Total cash used 30,368 453,262

Net cash used by investing activities (26,868) (441,262)

FINANCING ACTIVITIES Cash received Other 0.00 -

Total cash received 0.00 -

Cash used Other - -

Total cash used - -

Net cash from (used by) financing activities - -

Net Increase/(decrease) in cash held 58,328 (464,035)

Cash and cash equivalents at the beginning of the reporting period 469,906 933,941

Cash and cash equivalents at the end of the reporting period 6A 528,234 469,906

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

for the year ended 30 June 2015 Cash Flow Statement

74 TIWI LAND COUNCIL ANNUAL REPORT 2014/2015

TIWI LAND COUNCIL SCHEDULE OF COMMITMENTS as at 30 June 2015

TIWI LAND COUNCIL Schedule of Commitments

2015 2014

BY TYPE $ $

Commitments payable Other commitments Property Rental 67,600 67,600

Total other commitments 67,600 67,600

Net commitments by type 67,600 67,600

BY MATURITY Commitments payable Other Commitments One year or less 67,600 67,600

From one to five years - -

Over five years - -

Total other commitments 67,600 67,600

Net commitments by maturity 67,600 67,600

as at 30 June 2015

The nature of other commitments pertain to lease of property at Knuckey Lagoon.

The Land Council in its capacity as leasee of 5 Benson Court Knuckey Lagoon is committed to pay $1,300 per week.

This schedule should be read in conjuction with the accompanying notes.

75 TIWI LAND COUNCIL ANNUAL REPORT 2014/2015

TABLE OF CONTENTS - NOTES

NO

TE 1: SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES 7

6

NOTE 2: EVENTS AFTER THE REPORTING PERIOD 8

2

NOTE 3: EXPENSES 8

3

NOTE 4: INCOME 8

5

NOTE 5: FAIR VALUE MEASUREMENTS 8

6

NOTE 6: FINANCIAL ASSETS 8

7

NOTE 7: NON-FINANCIAL ASSETS 8

8

NOTE 8: PAYABLES 9

1

NOTE 9: PROVISIONS 9

2

NOTE 10: CASH FLOW RECONCILIATION 9

3

NOTE 11: CONTINGENT ASSETS AND LIABILITIES 9

4

NOTE 12: SENIOR MANAGEMENT PERSONNEL REMUNERATION 9

5

NOTE 13: REMUNERATION OF AUDITORS 9

6

NOTE 14: FINANCIAL INSTRUMENTS 9

7

NOTE 15: FINANCIAL ASSETS RECONCILIATION 9

9

NOTE 16: ASSETS HELD IN TRUST 1

00

NOTE 17: INCOME & EXPENDITURE AGAINST BUDGET S64(1) 1

01

76 TIWI LAND COUNCIL ANNUAL REPORT 2014/2015

Note 1: Summary of Significant Accounting Policies

TIWI LAND COUNCIL NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS for the year ended 30 June 2015

TIWI LAND COUNCIL NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS for the year ended 30 June 2015 Note 1: Summary of Significant Accounting Policies

1.1 Objectives of the Entity

The Tiwi Land Council is an Australian Government Controlled entity formed within the provisions of Section 21 of the Aboriginal Land Rights (NT) Act and is not-for profit entity. The Land Council receives appropriations from the Aboriginal Benefits Account pursuant to ministerially approved estimates prepared in accordance with Section 34 of the Act and made available under Section 64 of the Act.

The Land Council is structed to meet the following outcomes: Outcome 1: Our objective is to establish an independent and resilient Tiwi society built on the orderly and well managed utilisation of our natural and human resources through reliance upon our own management, maintenance and protection of unique cultural and natural resource values for the enjoyment and benefit of future generation of Tiwi. Outcome 2: Compliance with the statutory regulations through effective and structured corporate governance. Outcome 3: Establishment of communities to provide independent assurance and assistance to the Board on the Land Council's risk, control and compliance framework, and its external accountability responsibilities.

The continued existence of the Land Council in its present form and with its present programs is dependent on Government policy and on continuing appropriations by Parliament for the Land Council's administration and programs.

The funding conditions of the Land Council are laid down by the Aboriginal Land Rights (NT) Act, and any special purpose grant guidelines. Accounting for monies received from the Aboriginal Benefits Account is subject to conditions approved by the Minister for Indigenous Affairs.

1.2 Basis of Preparation of the Financial Statements

The financial statements are general purpose financial statements and are required by section 42 of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013.

The financial statements have been prepared on an accrual basis and in accordance with historical cost convention, except for certain assets and liabilities at fair value. Except where stated, no allowance is made for the effect of changing prices on the results or the financial position.

The financial statements are presented in Australian dollars and values are rounded to the nearest dollar unless otherwise specified.

Unless an alternative treatment is specifically required by an accounting standard or the FRR, assets and liabilities are recognised in the statement of financial position when and only when it is probable that future economic benefits will flow to the entity or a future sacrifice of economic benefits will be required and the amounts of the assets or liabilities can be reliably measured. However, assets and liabilities arising under executory contracts are not recognised unless required by an accounting standard. Liabilities and assets that are unrecognised are reported in the schedule of commitments or the contingencies note.

Unless alternative treatment is specifically required by an accounting standard, income and expenses are recognised in the statement of comprehensive income when, and only when, the flow, consumption or loss of economic benefits has occurred and can be reliably measured.

The financial statements have been prepared in accordance with:

a) Financial Reporting Rule (FRR) for reporting periods ending on or after 1 July 2014; and

b) Australian Accounting Standards and Interpretations issued by the Australian Accounting Standards Board (AASB) that apply for the reporting period.

77 TIWI LAND COUNCIL ANNUAL REPORT 2014/2015

1.3 Significant Accounting Judgements and Estimates

1.4 New Australian Accounting Standards Adoption of New Australian Accounting Standard Requirements

Future Australian Accounting Standard Requirements

1.5 Revenue

a) the risks and rewards of ownership have been transferred to the buyer;

b) the Land Council retains no managerial involvement or effective control over the goods;

c) the revenue and transaction costs incurred can be reliably measured; and

Revenue from Government

Revenues from the Aboriginals Benefit Account are recognised as revenue at the time they are received into the Land Council's bank account or are entitled to be received at year end.

Funding received or receivable from non-corporate Commonwealth entities (appropriated to the non-corporate Commonwealth entity as a corporate Commonwealth entity payment item for payment to this entity) is recognised as Revenue from Government unless they are in the nature of an equity injection or a loan.

a) the amount of revenue, stage of completion and transaction costs incurred can be reliably measured; and

b) the probable economic benefits associated with the transaction will flow to the Land Council.

The stage of completion of contracts at the reporting date is determined by reference to the proportion that costs incurred to date bear to the estimated total costs of the transaction.

Receivables for goods and services, which have 30 day terms, are recognised at the nominal amounts due less any impairment allowance account. Collectability of debts is reviewed as at end of reporting period. Allowances are made when collectability of the debt is no longer probable.

Interest revenue is recognised using the effective interest method as set out in AASB 139 Financial Instruments: Recognition and Measurement.

Revenue from the sale of goods is recognised when:

d) it is probable that the economic benefits associated with the transaction will flow to the Land Council.

Revenue from rendering of services is recognised by reference to the stage of completion of contracts at the reporting date. The revenue is recognised when:

In the process of applying the accounting policies listed in this note, the Land Council has made the following judgement that has the most significant impact on the amounts recorded in the financial statements: The fair value of land and buildings has been taken to be the depreciated replacement cost of similar buildings as determined by an independent valuer. In some instances, Land Council buildings are purpose built and may in fact realise more or less in the market.

No accounting assumptions or estimates have been identified that have a significant risk of causing a material adjustment to carrying amounts of assets and liabilities within the next accounting period.

No accounting standard has been adopted earlier than the application date as stated in the standard.

All standards that were issued prior to the sign-off date and are applicable to the current reporting period did not have a material effect, and are not expected to have a future material effect, on the entity’s financial statements.

All other standards that were issued prior to the sign-off date that are applicable to future reporting period(s) are not expected to have a future material impact on the entity’s financial statements

78 TIWI LAND COUNCIL ANNUAL REPORT 2014/2015

1.6 Gains

Resources Received Free of Charge

Sale of Assets

1.7 Employee Benefits

Leave

The liability for employee benefits includes provision for annual leave and long service leave. No provision has been made for sick leave as all sick leave is non-vesting and the average sick leave taken in future years by employees of the Land Council is estimated to be less than the annual entitlement for sick leave.

Separation and Redundancy

Superannuation

The Land Council makes employer contributions at the rate of 9.5% and 10%, in accordance with the employment contract.

1.8 Leases

A distinction is made between finance leases and operating leases. Finance leases effectively transfer from the lessor to the lessee substantially all the risks and rewards incidental to ownership of leased assets. An operating lease is a lease that is not a finance lease. In operating leases, the lessor effectively retains substantially all such risks and benefits.

Provision is made for separation and redundancy benefit payments. The Land Council recognises a provision for termination when it has developed a detailed formal plan for the terminations and has informed those employees affected that it will carry out the terminations.

Staff of the Land Council are members of the AMP TailoredSuper, Australian Super, Catholic Superannuation Fund, HostPlus Superannuation Fund, OnePath Integra Super, Rest Industry Super, Sunsuper Pty Ltd, The Trustee for Synergy Superannuation and NTGPASS.

The NTGPASS is a defined benefit scheme. The liability for the defined benefit scheme is recognised in the financial statements of the Northern Territory Government and is settled by the Northern Territory Government in due course. All the other superannuation funds are defined contribution schemes.

The liability for superannuation recognised as at 30 June represents outstanding contributions for the final fortnight of the year.

Liabilities for short-term employee benefits (as defined in AASB 119 Employee Benefits) and termination benefits due within twelve months of the end of reporting period are measured at their nominal amounts.

The nominal amount is calculated with regard to the rates expected to be paid on settlement of the liability.

The leave liabilities are calculated on the basis of employees’ remuneration at the estimated salary rates that will be applied at the time the leave is taken, including the Land Council’s employer superannuation contribution rates to the extent that the leave is likely to be taken during service rather than paid out on termination.

The liability for long service leave has been determined as the net present value of the liability. The estimate of the present value of the liability takes into account attrition rates and pay increases through promotion and inflation.

Resources received free of charge are recognised as revenue when, and only when, a fair value can be reliably determined and the services would have been purchased if they had not been donated. Use of those resources is recognised as an expense. Resources received free of charge are recorded as either revenue or gains depending on their nature.

Gains from disposal of assets are recognised when control of the asset has passed to the buyer.

79 TIWI LAND COUNCIL ANNUAL REPORT 2014/2015

1.9 Borrowing Costs

All borrowing costs are expensed as incurred.

1.10 Fair Value Measurement

1.11 Cash

a) cash on hand; and b) demand deposits in bank accounts with an original maturity of 3 months or less that are readily convertible to known amounts of cash and subject to insignificant risk of changes in value.

1.12 Financial Assets

Held-to-Maturity Investments

Loans and Receivables

Impairment of Financial Assets

Financial assets are assessed for impairment at end of each reporting periods.

Non-derivative financial assets with fixed or determinable payments and fixed maturity dates that the group has the positive intent and ability to hold to maturity are classified as held-to-maturity investments. Held-to-maturity investments are recorded at amortised cost using the effective interest method less impairment, with revenue recognised on an effective yield basis.

Trade receivables, loans and other receivables that have fixed or determinable payments that are not quoted in an active market are classified as ‘loans and receivables’. Loans and receivables are measured at amortised cost using the effective interest method less impairment. Interest is recognised by applying the effective interest rate.

Financial assets held at amortised cost - if there is objective evidence that an impairment loss has been incurred for loans and receivables or held to maturity investments held at amortised cost, the amount of the loss is measured as the difference between the asset’s carrying amount and the present value of estimated future cash flows discounted at the asset’s original effective interest rate. The carrying amount is reduced by way of an allowance account. The loss is recognised in the Statement of Comprehensive Income.

Tiwi Land Council classifies its financial assets in the following categories:

a) held-to-maturity investments; and

b) loans and receivables.

The classification depends on the nature and purpose of the financial assets and is determined at the time of initial recognition. Financial assets are recognised and derecognised upon trade date.

Where an asset is acquired by means of a finance lease, the asset is capitalised at either the fair value of the lease property or, if lower, the present value of minimum lease payments at the inception of the contract and a liability is recognised at the same time and for the same amount.

The discount rate used is the interest rate implicit in the lease. Leased assets are amortised over the period of the lease. Lease payments are allocated between the principal component and the interest expense.

Operating lease payments are expensed on a straight-line basis which is representative of the pattern of benefits derived from the leased assets.

Cash is recognised at its nominal amount. Cash and cash equivalents includes:

The entity deems transfers between levels of the fair value hierarchy to have occurred at the end of the reporting period.

80 TIWI LAND COUNCIL ANNUAL REPORT 2014/2015

1.13 Financial Liabilities

Financial Liabilities at Fair Value Through Profit or Loss

Other Financial Liabilities

1.14 Contingent Liabilities and Contingent Assets

1.15 Acquisition of Assets

1.16 Property, Plant and Equipment

Asset Recognition Threshold

The initial cost of an asset includes an estimate of the cost of dismantling and removing the item and restoring the site on which it is located. This is particularly relevant to ‘make good’ provisions in property leases taken up by the Land Council where there exists an obligation to restore the property to its original condition. These costs are included in the value of the Land Council's leasehold improvements with a corresponding provision for the ‘make good’ recognised.

Revaluations

Fair values for each class of asset are determined as shown below:

Asset Class: Fair value measured at:

Buildings Depreciated replacement cost

Infrastructure, Plant and Equipment Depreciated replacement cost Motor vehicles Depreciated replacement cost

Marine ranger boats Depreciated replacement cost

Assets are recorded at cost on acquisition except as stated below. The cost of acquisition includes the fair value of assets transferred in exchange and liabilities undertaken. Financial assets are initially measured at their fair value plus transaction costs where appropriate.

Assets acquired at no cost, or for nominal consideration, are initially recognised as assets and income at their fair value at the date of acquisition, unless acquired as a consequence of restructuring of administrative arrangements. In the latter case, assets are initially recognised as contributions by owners at the amounts at which they were recognised in the transferor's accounts immediately prior to the restructuring.

Purchases of property, plant and equipment are recognised initially at cost in the balance sheet, except for purchases costing less than $2,000, which are expensed in the year of acquisition (other than where they form part of a group of similar items which are significant in total).

Financial liabilities at fair value through profit or loss are initially measured at fair value. Subsequent fair value adjustments are recognised in profit or loss. The net gain or loss recognised in profit or loss incorporates any interest paid on the financial liability.

Other financial liabilities, including borrowings, are initially measured at fair value, net of transaction costs. These liabilities are subsequently measured at amortised cost using the effective interest method, with interest expense recognised on an effective yield basis.

The effective interest method is a method of calculating the amortised cost of a financial liability and of allocating interest expense over the relevant period. The effective interest rate is the rate that exactly discounts estimated future cash payments through the expected life of the financial liability, or, where appropriate, a shorter period.

Supplier and other payables are recognised at amortised cost. Liabilities are recognised to the extent that the goods or services have been received (and irrespective of having been invoiced).

Contingent liabilities and contingent assets are not recognised in the balance sheet but are reported in the relevant schedules and notes. They may arise from uncertainty as to the existence of a liability or asset or represent an asset or liability in respect of which the amount cannot be reliably measured. Contingent assets are disclosed when settlement is probable but not virtually certain and contingent liabilities are disclosed when settlement is greater than remote.

Financial liabilities are classified as either financial liabilities ‘at fair value through profit or loss’ or other financial liabilities. Financial liabilities are recognised and derecognised upon ‘trade date’.

81 TIWI LAND COUNCIL ANNUAL REPORT 2014/2015

Depreciation

2015 2014

Buildings 20 to 25 years 20 to 25 years

Motor Vehicles 5 to 8 years 5 to 8 years

Marine Ranger Boats 15 years 15 years

Impairment

Derecognition

1.17 Taxation / Competitive Neutrality

Revenues, expenses and assets are recognised net of GST except:

b) for receivables and payables.

The Tiwi Land Council is exempt from all forms of taxation except Fringe Benefits Tax (FBT) and the Goods and Services Tax (GST).

a) where the amount of GST incurred is not recoverable from the Australian Taxation Office; and

Depreciation rates applying to each class of depreciable asset are based on the following useful lives:

Plant and Equipment 2 to 20 years 2 to 20 years

All assets were assessed for impairment at 30 June 2015. Where indications of impairment exist, the asset’s recoverable amount is estimated and an impairment adjustment made if the asset’s recoverable amount is less than its carrying amount.

The recoverable amount of an asset is the higher of its fair value less costs to sell and its value in use. Value in use is the present value of the future cash flows expected to be derived from the asset. Where the future economic benefit of an asset is not primarily dependent on the asset's ability to generate future cash flows, and the asset would be replaced if the Land Council were deprived of the asset, its value in use is taken to be its depreciated replacement cost.

An item of property, plant and equipment is derecognised upon disposal or when no further future economic benefits are expected from its use or disposal.

Following initial recognition at cost, property, plant and equipment were carried at fair value less subsequent accumulated depreciation and accumulated impairment losses. Valuations were conducted with sufficient frequency to ensure that the carrying amounts of assets did not differ materially from the assets’ fair values as at the reporting date. The regularity of independent valuations depended upon the volatility of movements in market values for the relevant assets.

Revaluation adjustments were made on a class basis. Any revaluation increment was credited to equity under the heading of asset revaluation reserve except to the extent that it reversed a previous revaluation decrement of the same asset class that was previously recognised in the surplus/deficit. Revaluation decrements for a class of assets were recognised directly in the surplus/deficit except to the extent that they reversed a previous revaluation increment for that class.

Any accumulated depreciation as at the revaluation date is eliminated against the gross carrying amount of the asset and the asset restated to the revalued amount.

Depreciable property, plant and equipment assets are written-off to their estimated residual values over their estimated useful lives to Tiwi Land Council using, in all cases, the straight-line method or diminishing method of depreciation.

Depreciation rates (useful lives), residual values and methods are reviewed at each reporting date and necessary adjustments are recognised in the current, or current and future reporting periods, as appropriate.

82 TIWI LAND COUNCIL ANNUAL REPORT 2014/2015

TIWI LAND COUNCIL NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS for the year ended 30 June 2015

Note 2: Events After the Reporting Period

There was no subsequent events that have the potential to significantly affect the ongoing structure and financial activities of the Land Council.

Note 2: Events After the Reporting Period

TIWI LAND COUNCIL NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS for the year ended 30 June 2015

83 TIWI LAND COUNCIL ANNUAL REPORT 2014/2015

TIWI LAND COUNCIL NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS for the year ended 30 June 2015

Note 3: Expenses

2015 2014

$ $

Note 3A: Employee Benefits Wages and salaries 899,005 778,687

Superannuation:

Defined contribution plans 74,822 63,337

Defined benefit plans 14,757 15,113

Leave and other entitlements 37,620 27,452

Total employee benefits 1,026,204 884,589

Note 3B: Supplier Goods and services Airfares and charters 84,333 142,583

Business Development 46,427 33,545

Compliance 124,217 103,815

Culture, ceremony and land use distributions 317,000 317,780

Information Communications Technology 69,496 59,237

Land Group Township Leasing 800 5,328

Land and resource management 47,737 636,259

Legal and risk management 199,540 95,315

Roads and Survey 121,149 4,160

Special projects 532,763 569,410

Vehicle operations 197,827 143,736

Other 361,896 175,922

Total goods and services 2,103,186 2,287,090

Goods and services are made up of: Rendering of services - related entities 32,518 29,517

Rendering of services - external parties 2,070,668 2,257,573

Total goods and services 2,103,186 2,287,090

Other supplier expenses Operating lease rentals - external parties:

Minimum lease payments 33,800 33,800

Workers compensation expenses 4,918 3,233

Total other supplier expenses 38,718 37,033

Total supplier expenses 2,141,904 2,324,123

Note 3C: Depreciation and Amortisation Depreciation: Infrastructure, plant and equipment 19,299 25,285

Marine ranger boats 15,570 15,570

Buildings 64,717 46,719

Motor Vehicles 78,076 93,090

Total depreciation 177,662 180,664

Note 3: Expenses

TIWI LAND COUNCIL NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS for the year ended 30 June 2015

84 TIWI LAND COUNCIL ANNUAL REPORT 2014/2015

Note 3D: Losses from Asset Sales Property, plant and equipment:

Proceeds from sale 3,500 -

Carrying value of assets sold 4,227 -

Total losses from asset sales 727 -

Note 3E: Other Expenses Special Projects - 529,218

Land Owner distribution 31,718 -

Total other expenses 31,718 529,218

85 TIWI LAND COUNCIL ANNUAL REPORT 2014/2015

Note 4: Income

TIWI LAND COUNCIL NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS for the year ended 30 June 2015 TIWI LAND COUNCIL

NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS for the year ended 30 June 2015

Note 4: Income

2015 2014

OWN-SOURCE REVENUE $ $

Note 4A: Sale of Goods and Rendering of Services Rendering of services - external parties 14,351 16,725

Total sale of goods and rendering of services 14,351 16,725

Note 4B: Fees and Fines Fees 92,152 -

Total fees and fines 92,152 -

Note 4C: Interest Deposits 17,694 26,362

Total interest 17,694 26,362

Note 4D: Other Revenue Resources received free of charge - Tiwi Training 11,364 -

Total other revenue 11,364 -

Note 4E: Sale of Assets Motor vehicle Proceeds from sale - 12,000

Carrying value of assets sold - (8,491)

Net gain from sale of assets - 3,509

Note 4F: Revenue from Government Receipts from ABA: S64(1) 2,179,000 1,526,000

ABA - Ceremony/Kelama Funeral Fund 317,000 317,000

ABA- Land Ranger Safe Storage - 360,000

ABA - The Keeping House - 396,912

ABA - Marine Ranger Vessel 30,369 -

Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet TLC Sustainable Rangers Wages and Changed Fire Regimes 274,400 603,000 WOC- Tiwi Islands Land and Sea Management - Marine Ranger 178,040 326,410

Department of Primary Industry & Fisheries - Marine Ranger 165,000 60,000

Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet Indigenous Carbon Farming Fund 42,100 147,350

Australian Taxation Office - Fuel Tax Credit - 41,625

Total revenue from Government 3,185,909 3,778,297

86 TIWI LAND COUNCIL ANNUAL REPORT 2014/2015

Note 5: Fair Value Measurements

TIWI LAND COUNCIL NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS for the year ended 30 June 2015 TIWI LAND COUNCIL

NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS for the year ended 30 June 2015

Note 5: Fair Value Measurements

The different levels of the fair value hierarchy are defined below.

Level 1: Quoted prices (unadjusted) in active markets for identical assets or liabilities that the entity can access at measurement date. Level 2: Inputs other than quoted prices included within Level 1 that are observable for the asset or liability, either directly or indirectly.

Fair Value Measurements, Valuation Techniques and Inputs Used

2015 2014

$ $

Non-financial assets Marine Ranger Boats 100,438 85,640 2 market based valuation

on direct comparison basis

Buildings 1,120,134 1,184,851 3 Depreciated

replacement cost

Infrastructure, plant & equipment 48,335 67,634 2 market based valuation

on direct comparison basis

Motor Vehicles 100,302 182,606 2 market based valuation

on direct comparison basis

1,369,209 1,520,731

Level 3: Unobservable inputs for the asset or liability.

The Council determines fair value for its non-financial assets using the level 2 and 3 inputs in the fair value hierarchy. The following table discloses the fair value at 30 June 2015 and the valuation techniques used to derive its fair value.

Replacement cost based on comparable price of modern equivalent Remaining useful life of the building

Fair value measurements Category (Level 1, 2 or 34)*

For Levels 2 and 3 fair value measurements Valuation technique(s)2 Inputs used

The reconciliation for the recurring level 2 and 3 fair market value measurements of Buildings, Marine Ranger Boats, Motor Vehicles, Infrastructure, plant & equipment are detailed in note 7.

There was no change in valuation technique used by Council during the year.

The fair value of the Council's buildings as at 30 June 2015 have been determined and approved by the Council using the basis of the valuation carried out by the Australian Valuation Office as at 30 June 2013, who is a certified practising valuer and with relevant experience in the valuation of property. The fair value measurement for buildings has been categorised as Level 3 fair value based on the inputs of the valuation technique (see above).

The fair value of Marine Ranger Boats, Motor Vehicles and Infrastructure, plant & equipment as at 30 June 2015 has also been determined and approved by the Council using the basis of valuation carried out by the Australian Valuation Office as at 30 June 2013. The fair value measurement for these assets has been categorised as Level 2 fair value based on the inputs of the valuation techniques (see above).

For those Infrastructure, plant & equipment that are carried at cost, their cost approximates their market value.

The highest and best use of the infrastructure, plant and equipment approximates its current use.

87 TIWI LAND COUNCIL ANNUAL REPORT 2014/2015

Note 6: Financial Assets

TIWI LAND COUNCIL NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS for the year ended 30 June 2015

TIWI LAND COUNCIL NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS for the year ended 30 June 2015

Note 6: Financial Assets

2015 2014

$ $

Note 6A: Cash and Cash Equivalents Cash on hand or on deposit 528,234 469,906

Total cash and cash equivalents 528,234 469,906

Note 6B: Trade and Other Receivables

Other receivables:

GST receivable from the Australian Taxation Office 49,134 41,518

Other 14,009 3,960

Total other receivables 63,143 45,478

Total trade and other receivables (gross) 63,143 45,478

Total trade and other receivables (net) 63,143 45,478

Receivables are expected to be recovered in: No more than 12 months 63,143 45,478

Total trade and other receivables (net) 63,143 45,478

Receivables are aged as follows: Not overdue 63,143 45,478

Overdue by:

More than 90 days - -

Total receivables (gross) 63,143 45,478

88 TIWI LAND COUNCIL ANNUAL REPORT 2014/2015

Note 7: Non-Financial Assets

TIWI LAND COUNCIL NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS for the year ended 30 June 2015

TIWI LAND COUNCIL NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS for the year ended 30 June 2015

Note 7: Non-Financial Assets

2015 2014

$ $

Note 7A: Land and Buildings Buildings on Aboriginal land: Work in progress - 360,000

Fair value 1,231,570 871,570

Accumulated depreciation (111,436) (46,719)

Total buildings on Aboriginal land 1,120,134 1,184,851

Total land and buildings 1,120,134 1,184,851

No land or buildings were expected to be sold or disposed of within the next 12 months.

Note 7B: Property, Plant and Equipment Plant and equipment: Plant & Equipment at fair value 92,919 92,919

Accumulated depreciation (44,584) (25,285)

Total plant and equipment 48,335 67,634

Motor Vehicles: Fair value 256,997 272,999

Accumulated depreciation (156,695) (90,394)

Total Motor Vehicles 100,302 182,605

Marine Ranger Boats Work in progress 30,368 -

Marine Ranger Boats at fair value 101,210 101,210

Accumulated depreciation (31,140) (15,570)

Total Marine Ranger Boats 100,438 85,640

Total property, plant and equipment 249,075 335,879

Revaluations of non-financial assets

No indicators of impairment were found for property, plant and equipment.

No property, plant or equipment is expected to be sold or disposed of within the next 12 months.

All revaluations were conducted in accordance with the revaluation policy stated at Note 1. On 30 June 2013, an independent valuer, Australian Valuation Office, conducted the revaluations.

No indicators of impairment were found for land and buildings.

89 TIWI LAND COUNCIL ANNUAL REPORT 2014/2015

Note 7: Non-Financial Assets

TIWI LAND COUNCIL NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS for the year ended 30 June 2015

TIWI LAND COUNCIL NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS for the year ended 30 June 2015

Note 7: Non-Financial Assets

Marine Ranger Boats Buildings Motor Vehicles

Infrastructure, plant & equipment Total

$ $ $ $ $

As at 1 July 2014 Gross book value 101,210 1,231,570 272,999 92,919 1,698,698

Accumulated depreciation and impairment (15,570) (46,719) (90,393) (25,285) (177,967)

Net book value 1 July 2014 85,640 1,184,851 182,606 67,634 1,520,731

Additions:

By purchase 30,368 - - - 30,368

Revaluations recognised in other comprehensive income - - - - -

Depreciation expense (15,570) (64,717) (78,076) (19,299) (177,662)

Other movements reclassification - - - - -

Disposals: - (4,227) - (4,227)

Net book value 30 June 2015 100,439 1,120,134 100,304 48,335 1,369,211

Net book value as of 30 June 2015 represented by:

Gross book value 131,579 1,231,570 256,998 92,919 1,713,065

Accumulated depreciation and impairment (31,140) (111,436) (156,694) (44,584) (343,854)

Net book value 30 June 2015 100,439 1,120,134 100,304 48,335 1,369,211

Marine Ranger Boats Buildings Motor Vehicles

Infrastructure, plant & equipment Total

$ $ $ $ $

As at 1 July 2013 Gross book value 233,546 1,106,071 467,897 122,544 1,930,057

Accumulated depreciation and impairment (132,335) (234,501) (261,587) (45,010) (673,433)

Net book value 1 July 2013 101,210 871,570 206,310 77,534 1,256,624

Additions:

By purchase - 360,000 77,877 15,384 453,262

Revaluations recognised in other comprehensive income - - - - -

Depreciation expense (15,570) (46,719) (93,090) (25,285) (180,664)

Other movements reclassification - - - - -

Disposals: - - (8,491) - (8,491)

Net book value 30 June 2014 85,640 1,184,851 182,606 67,634 1,520,731

Net book value as of 30 June 2014 represented by:

Gross book value 101,210 1,231,570 272,999 92,919 1,698,698

Accumulated depreciation and impairment (15,570) (46,719) (90,393) (25,285) (177,967)

Net book value 30 June 2014 85,640 1,184,851 182,606 67,634 1,520,731

Note 7C: Reconciliation of the Opening and Closing Balances of Property, Plant and Equipment 2015

Note 7C (Cont'd): Reconciliation of the Opening and Closing Balances of Property, Plant and Equipment 2014

90 TIWI LAND COUNCIL ANNUAL REPORT 2014/2015

Note 7: Non-Financial Assets

TIWI LAND COUNCIL NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS for the year ended 30 June 2015

TIWI LAND COUNCIL NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS for the year ended 30 June 2015

Note 7: Non-Financial Assets

2015 2014

$ $

Note 7D: Other Non-Financial Assets Prepayments - 110

Salary and Wages paid in advance 10,328 12,936

Total other non-financial assets 10,328 13,046

Total other non-financial assets - are expected to be recovered in:

No more than 12 months 10,328 13,046

More than 12 months - -

Total other non-financial assets 10,328 13,046

No indicators of impairment were found for other non-financial assets.

91 TIWI LAND COUNCIL ANNUAL REPORT 2014/2015

Note 8: Payables

TIWI LAND COUNCIL NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS for the year ended 30 June 2015

TIWI LAND COUNCIL NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS for the year ended 30 June 2015

Note 8: Payables

2015 2014

$ $

Note 8A: Suppliers Trade creditors and accruals 105,084 31,992

Total suppliers payables 105,084 31,992

Suppliers payables expected to be settled within 12 months: External parties 105,084 31,992

Total 105,084 31,992

Total suppliers payables 105,084 31,992

Note 8B: Other Payables Salary and Wages PAYG - 20,249

Other 122,551 122,551

Total other payables 122,551 142,800

Total other payables are expected to be settled in:

No more than 12 months 122,551 142,800

More than 12 months - -

Total other payables 122,551 142,800

Settlement is usually made within 30 days.

92 TIWI LAND COUNCIL ANNUAL REPORT 2014/2015

Note 9: Provisions

TIWI LAND COUNCIL NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS for the year ended 30 June 2015

TIWI LAND COUNCIL NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS for the year ended 30 June 2015

Note 9: Provisions

2015 2014

$ $

Note 9A: Employee Provisions Leave 130,460 204,803

Total employee provisions 130,460 204,803

Employee provisions are expected to be settled in:

No more than 12 months 89,363 143,260

More than 12 months 41,097 61,543

Total employee provisions 130,460 204,803

93 TIWI LAND COUNCIL ANNUAL REPORT 2014/2015

Note 10: Cash Flow Reconciliation

TIWI LAND COUNCIL NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS for the year ended 30 June 2015

TIWI LAND COUNCIL NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS for the year ended 30 June 2015

Note 10: Cash Flow Reconciliation

2015 2014

$ $

Reconciliation of cash and cash equivalents as per Balance Sheet to Cash Flow Statement

Cash and cash equivalents as per: Cash flow statement 528,234 469,906

Statement of Financial Position 528,234 469,906

Discrepancy (0) (0)

Reconciliation of net cost of services to net cash from operating activities:

Net cost of services (3,242,654) (3,871,998)

Add revenue from Government 3,185,909 3,778,297

Adjustments for non-cash items Depreciation / amortisation 177,662 180,664

Loss / (Gain) on disposal of assets 727 (3,509)

Changes in assets / liabilities (Increase) / decrease in trade & other receivables (17,665) 2,618

(Increase) / decrease in inventories - -

(Increase) / decrease in non financial assets 2,718 (9,813)

Increase / (decrease) in prepayments received - -

Increase / (decrease) in employee provisions (74,343) 27,452

Increase / (decrease) in supplier payables 73,092 (71,484)

Increase / (decrease) in other payable (20,249) (55,000)

Increase / (decrease) in other provisions - -

Increase / (decrease) in tax liabilities - -

Increase / (decrease) in competitive neutrality payments payable - -

Net cash used by Operating activities 85,196 (22,774)

94 TIWI LAND COUNCIL ANNUAL REPORT 2014/2015

Note 11: Contingent Assets and Liabilities

TIWI LAND COUNCIL NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS for the year ended 30 June 2015 TIWI LAND COUNCIL

NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS for the year ended 30 June 2015

Note 11: Contingent Assets and Liabilities

2015 2014 2015 2014

$ $ $ $

Contingent assets Balance from previous period - - - -

New contingent assets recognised - - - -

Re-measurement - - - -

Assets recognised - - - -

Expired - - - -

Total contingent assets - - - -

Contingent liabilities Balance from previous period 35,000 - 35,000 -

New - 35,000 - 35,000

Re-measurement - - - -

Liabilities recognised - - - -

Obligations expired (35,000) - (35,000) -

Total contingent liabilities - 35,000 - 35,000

Net contingent assets (liabilities) - 35,000 - 35,000

Quantifiable Contingencies

Claims for damages or costs Total

The schedule of contingencies reports contingent liabilities in respect of 2015 of $0, (2014: $35,000).

95 TIWI LAND COUNCIL ANNUAL REPORT 2014/2015

Note 12: Senior Management Personnel Remuneration

TIWI LAND COUNCIL NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS for the year ended 30 June 2015

TIWI LAND COUNCIL NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS for the year ended 30 June 2015

2015 2014

$ $

Short-term employee benefits: Salary 211,322 225,420

Total short-term employee benefits 211,322 225,420

Post-employment benefits: Superannuation 34,314 23,149

Total post-employment benefits 34,314 23,149

Other long-term benefits: Annual leave accrued 22,291 13,676

Long-service leave 7,245 4,445

Total other long-term benefits 29,536 18,121

Termination benefits - -

Total employment benefits 275,171 266,690

Notes:

Note 12: Senior Management Personnel Remuneration

The total number of senior management personnel that are included in the above table are 3 of senior management personnel (2014: 2 of senior management personnel).

96 TIWI LAND COUNCIL ANNUAL REPORT 2014/2015

TIWI LAND COUNCIL NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS for the year ended 30 June 2015

Note 13: Remuneration of Auditors

2015 2014

$ $

Financial statement audit services are provided to the Land Council by the Australian National Audit Office (ANAO).

Fair value of the services provided Australian National Audit Office 22,525 18,000

Total 22,525 18,000

No other services were provided by the auditors of the financial statements.

Note 13: Remuneration of Auditors

TIWI LAND COUNCIL NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS for the year ended 30 June 2015

97 TIWI LAND COUNCIL ANNUAL REPORT 2014/2015

Note 14: Financial Instruments

TIWI LAND COUNCIL NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS for the year ended 30 June 2015 TIWI LAND COUNCIL

NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS for the year ended 30 June 2015

Note 14: Financial Instruments

2015 2014

$ $

Note 14A: Categories of Financial Instruments Financial Assets Loans & Receivables Cash at Bank 528,234 469,906

Receivables 14,009 3,960

Total 542,243 473,866

Carrying amount of financial assets 542,243 473,866

Financial Liabilities at amortised cost: Trade Creditors 105,084 31,992

Other payables 122,551 122,551

Total 227,635 154,543

Carrying amount of financial liabilities 227,635 154,543

2015 2014

$ $

Note 14B: Net Gains orLossess on Financial Assets Held-to-maturity: Interest revenue 17,694 26,362

Net gain/(loss) held-to-maturity 17,694 26,362

Net gain/(loss) from financial assets 17,694 26,362

The net income/expense from financial assets not at fair value from profit and loss is $17,694 [2014: $26,362].

98 TIWI LAND COUNCIL ANNUAL REPORT 2014/2015

Note 14C: Fair Value of Financial Instruments

Note 14D: Credit Risk

The Tiwi Land Council holds no collateral to mitigate against credit risk.

Note 14E: Liquidity Risk

Maturities for non-derivative financial liabilities 2015

On 1 to 2 2 to 5 > 5

demand years years years Total

$ $ $ $ $

Trade Creditors and accruals - 105,084 - - - 105,084

Other Payables - 122,551 - - - 122,551

Total - 227,635 - - - 227,635

Maturities for non-derivative financial liabilities 2014

On 1 to 2 2 to 5 > 5

demand years years years Total

$ $ $ $ $

Trade Creditors and accruals - 31,992 - - - 31,992

Other Payables - 122,551 122,551

Total - 154,543 - - - 154,543

The Land Council had no derivative financial liabilities in either 2015 or 2014

Note 14F: Market Risk

The Land Council held basic financial instruments that did not expose the Land Council to certain market risks such as currency risk and other price risk.

year $

within 1 year $

The Land Council's financial liabilities are trade creditors. The exposure to liquidity risk is based on the notion that the Land Council will encounter difficulty in meeting its obligations associated with financial liabilities. Thus was highly unlikely due to government funding and mechanisims available to the entity and internal policies and procedures put in place to ensure there were appropriate resources to meet its financial obligations.

within 1

The Land Council is exposed to minimal credit risk as the majority of financial assets is cash held with one of Australia's "Big 4", banks. The maximum exposure to credit risk the risk that arises from potential default of a debtor. This amount is equal to the total amount of receivables (2015: $14,009 and 2014: $3,960). The Tiwi Land Council has assessed the risk of default and decided that no impairment is required, (2015:$nil and 2014:$nil).

The carrying amount of all financial instruments is a reasonable approximation of fair value in both the current year and the prior year, due to their short term nature.

99 TIWI LAND COUNCIL ANNUAL REPORT 2014/2015

Note 15: Financial Assets Reconciliation

TIWI LAND COUNCIL NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS for the year ended 30 June 2014

TIWI LAND COUNCIL NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS for the year ended 30 June 2015

Note 15: Financial Assets Reconciliation

2015 2014

$ $

Financial assets Notes

Total financial assets as per balance sheet 591,377 515,384

Less: non-financial instrument components:

Trade and other receivables 6B 49,134 41,518

Total non-financial instrument components 49,134 41,518

Total financial assets as per financial instruments note 542,243 473,866

100 TIWI LAND COUNCIL ANNUAL REPORT 2014/2015

TIWI LAND COUNCIL NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS for the year ended 30 June 2015

Note 16: Assets held in Trust

Monetary assets

2015 2014

$ $

Land Use Funds Total amount held at the beginning of the reporting period (0) 577

Receipts 714,845 215,978

Payments (714,785) (216,555)

Total amount held at the end of the reporting period 60 (0)

Total 60 (0)

2015 2014

$ $

Cash Total amount held at the beginning of the reporting period 122,551 -

Receipts - 122,551

Payments - -

Total amount held at the end of the reporting period 122,551 122,551

Total 122,551 122,551

The Tiwi Land Council holds on trust for the Office of Township Leasing an insurance settlement for the Wurrumiyanga pontoon destroyed by fire. These funds will be used towards the construction phase of the new ferry pontoon terminal. A Liability is recorded in the statement of financial position for this amount.

The Tiwi Land Council acts as trustee for transactions undertaken on behalf of the Traditional Owners in relation to the use of land and other resources on the Tiwi Islands. These transactions are not recorded in the books of the Land Council. Movements in Land Use Funds during the year were:

101 TIWI LAND COUNCIL ANNUAL REPORT 2014/2015

Note 17: Income & Expenditure Against Budget S64(1)

TIWI LAND COUNCIL NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS for the year ended 30 June 2015

TIWI LAND COUNCIL NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS for the year ended 30 June 2015

Note 17: Income & Expenditure Against Budget S64(1)

ABA

Approved Estimates 2014/15

ABA Actuals 2014/15 Difference

$ $ $

Expenditure Administration and Support 724,341 695,756 28,585

Advocacy 346,494 358,601 (12,107)

Economic Development 542,333 589,333 (47,000)

Land & Resource Management 631,217 626,924 4,293

Capital Expenditure - - -

Total expenditure 2,244,385 2,270,614 (26,228)

Income ABA S64(1) 2,179,385 2,179,000 (385)

Total ABA

2,179,385 2,179,000 (385)

Other Other

65,000 119,488 54,488

Total Other

65,000 119,488 54,488

Total Income

2,244,385 2,298,488 54,103

Aboriginal Benefits Account Appropriations