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Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC)—Report for 2015-16


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Annual Report 2016

Storm Brewing by ABC Open contributor davetomo. Wedderburn, Victoria.

ii AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2016

New South Wales - Ultimo

ABC Ultimo Centre 700 Harris Street Ultimo NSW 2007

GPO Box 9994 Sydney NSW 2001

Tel. +61 2 8333 1500 abc.net.au

6 October 2016

Senator the Hon Mitch Fifield Minister for Communications Parliament House Canberra ACT 2600

Dear Minister

The Board of the Australian Broadcasting Corporation is pleased to present the Annual Report for the year ended 30 June 2016.

The Report is prepared in accordance with the requirements of Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 and the Australian Broadcasting Corporation Act 1983, and was approved by a resolution of the Board on 21 September 2016.

It provides a comprehensive review of the ABC’s performance in relation to its legislative mandate. The editorial theme of this year’s report—From the Everyday to the Extraordinary—highlights the ABC’s role in reflecting and reporting on matters that are important to the lives of Australians, bringing them the information they need every day, and the extraordinary stories that contribute to our national identity.

Yours sincerely

James Spigelman AC QC Chairman

Contents 1

Contents

SEVEN

THREE

EIGHT

FOUR

SIX

TWO

FIVE

ONE ABOUT THE ABC ABC services 4

ABC Board of Directors 9

Board Directors’ statement 14

Organisational structure 17

ABC Executive 18

The Year Ahead 23

Purpose, Vision and Values 24

AUDIENCE EXPERIENCES Audience trends 30

Online 32

Television 42

Radio 51

Regional 58

News and current affairs 61

International services 67

Consumer experiences 73

INSIDE THE ABC Editorial quality 80

Infrastructure and operations 84

People 88

Work health and safety 94

Corporate services 96

CORPORATE RESPONSIBILITY Corporate responsibility 102

Corporate responsibility in a broadcasting context 104

Environmental responsibility 108

Social responsibility 111

GOVERNANCE Corporate governance 120

Annual Performance Statements 126

Bonner Committee 134

ABC Advisory Council 136

CHARTS, GRAPHS AND TABLES Audience experiences 142

Inside the ABC 154

Corporate responsibility 160

Financial performance 164

FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE Financial summary 168

Independent auditor’s report 170

Financial statements 172

APPENDICES Appendices 217

Glossary 263

Index 264

2 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2016

In Hitting Home, award-winning journalist Sarah Ferguson examined how an abusive relationship escalates to violence.

The ABC’s vision is to be the independent home of Australian conversations, culture and stories.

Contents:

ABC services 4

ABC Board of Directors 9

Board Directors’ statement 14 Organisational structure 17 ABC Executive 18

The Year Ahead 23

Purpose, Vision and Values 24

Sarah Ferguson in Hitting Home

ABOUT THE ABC CHAPTER ONE

About the ABC 3

4 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2016

ABC Open a place where regional Australians tell their stories through written and visual

media, with ABC Open producers across the country

ABC services

abc.net.au

content to stream and download, and unique broadband content

Mobile

apps for smartphones and tablets

1 Also available in mainland capital cities as a digital radio service, and via digital satellite subscription services.

2 Also available in mainland capital cities as a digital radio service. Some Local Radio services are available via digital satellite subscription services.

3 Double J and ABC Jazz are also available on free-to-air digital and subscription television services.

4 Also streamed are Capital City Local Radio, National Radio Networks and half of all Regional Local Radio services.

National Radio Networks1 RN, Classic FM, triple j

Capital City Local Radio2 available

from all eight capital cities

Regional Local Radio has a presence in 48 regional locations around

Australia

Streaming4

all digital radio services are streamed online

Digital Radio3 Double J, ABC Jazz, ABC Country, ABC Grandstand, triple j Unearthed, and ABC Extra for special events

ABC iview the ABC’s online television service

ABC2

including ABC KIDS—content for preschoolers between 5am and 7pm—and ABC2 for a younger adult demographic between

7pm and 5am

ABC3 a dedicated children’s channel

ABC main channel the ABC’s primary television channel

Radio Australia a news and information radio service for the

Pacific region

1

2

3

About the ABC 5

ABC services

Images on this page 1 Dance on Landing by ABC Open contributor Greg Norman. Borroloola, Northern Territory.

2 Spraybow by ABC Open contributor Brett Delaney (surfwx). Newcastle, New South Wales.

3 100 Hundred Year Line by ABC Open contributor Andrew Gosling. Broken Hill, New South Wales.

4 Dining amongst the spiders by ABC Open contributor Lynda Snowden (CountryMum). Tocumwal, New South Wales.

5 Salmon Hole Fishing by ABC Open contributor Melanie Halton. Mount Gambier, South Australia.

ABC NewsRadio a national, 24-hour news network for radio

ABC News and Current Affairs online in-depth journalism content, analysis and opinion

ABC International Development partnering with media, civil society and government

organisations in the Asia-Pacific region, to assist in designing and delivering communication initiatives

ABC Retail ABC Shop Online and 224 ABC Centres throughout Australia

ABC Music and Events a variety of music products and live events

ABC Publishing and Licensing magazines, books and merchandise

Studio and Media Production provision of surplus production services

to the market

Sales and Business Development format, digital content, footage, audio and stills

Video Entertainment and Distribution DVD and digital distribution

Australia Plus television and online services for audiences across Asia and the Pacific

ABC News 24 a national, 24-hour news network for television

4

5

6 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2016

ABC services

Esperance

Karratha

Albany

Geraldton

Kalgoorlie

Bunbury

Perth

Broome

London

Jerusalem Beirut

Nairobi

Beijing

New Delhi Bangkok

Port Moresby

Tokyo Washington

Jakarta

Australian locations

International bureaux and news correspondents

Key

J

The ABC operates from 56 locations around Australia and 11 overseas bureaux For more information regarding the ABC’s domestic and international locations, see Appendix 17 on page 258.

Last mob for the day by ABC Open contributor Jessica Payton. Brewarrina, New South Wales.

About the ABC 7

ABC services

Longreach

Mount Isa

Alice Springs

Kununurra

Katherine

Mackay

Darwin

Townsville

Cairns

Brisbane

Melbourne

Sydney

Port Lincoln

Horsham

Renmark

Broken Hill

Adelaide

Port Pirie

Mount Gambier

Coffs Harbour

Lismore

Warrnambool

Dubbo

Wodonga

Tamworth

Orange

Mildura

Shepparton

Wagga Wagga

Port Macquarie

Newcastle

Muswellbrook

Bundaberg

Rockhampton

Launceston

Burnie

Bendigo

Ballarat

Toowoomba

Hobart

Wollongong

Gold Coast

Sale

Canberra

Bega

Sunshine Coast

Nowra

Port Augusta

8 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2016

Role and responsibilities of the Board The role and responsibilities of the ABC Board derive from the Australian Broadcasting Corporation Act 1983 (the ABC Act). Section 8 of the ABC Act requires the Board to ensure the functions of the Corporation are performed efficiently and with the maximum benefit to the people of Australia, while maintaining the ABC’s independence and integrity. It is required to ensure that the gathering and presentation of news and information is accurate and impartial according to the recognised standards of objective journalism; to develop codes of practice relating to programming matters; to ensure compliance with the ABC Act and other relevant legislation; and to consider matters of Government policy relevant to the functions of the Corporation when requested to do so by the Minister. The ABC Act also requires the Board to prepare corporate plans for the ABC and to notify the Minister of any matters likely to cause significant deviation from those plans.

The Board is the ‘accountable authority’ of the ABC under the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 (the PGPA Act) and is required to meet the duties specified in that Act.

In addition, individual Directors are required to meet objective standards of care and good faith, as set out in the PGPA Act.

Directors are required to observe the ABC Board Protocol, first adopted in September 2004, which sets out their responsibilities and rights. They are required to provide a declaration of interests upon their appointment, which is updated as necessary. At each meeting, Directors are asked if they wish to declare a material personal interest in any items on the agenda. Induction processes are in place for new Board members, and online training is available through provision of the Directors’ Manual and Public Sector Governance in Australia modules from Wolters Kluwer, CCH. Other professional development for Directors is provided as required.

The ABC Charter and Duties of the Board are set out in Appendix 1 (see page 218).

ABC services

About the ABC 9

ABC Board of Directors

Michelle Guthrie ABC Managing Director

BA, LLB

5 July 2016 - 4 July 20215

Michelle Guthrie joined the ABC as Managing Director in May 2016. Her appointment comes at a pivotal time for the national broadcaster as it seeks to maintain its relevance and deliver great Australian content in a fast-changing, fragmented and increasingly global media market.

Michelle brings to the task experience and expertise in media management, content development, and a detailed knowledge of both traditional broadcasting and the new digital media landscape. Over the last 25 years she has worked for a range of broadcasting and media organisations in Europe, Asia and North America, including BSkyB, Star TV and Google.

James Spigelman AC QC ABC Chairman

BA (Hons) LLB, Hon. LLD

1 April 2012 - 31 March 2017

James Spigelman was the Chief Justice and Lieutenant-Governor of New South Wales from 1998 to 2011. Between 1980 and 1998 he practised as a barrister in Sydney; he was appointed QC in 1986. Between 1972 and 1976 he served as Senior Adviser and Principal Private Secretary to the Prime Minister of Australia and as Permanent Secretary of the Commonwealth Government’s Department of the Media. From 1976 to 1979 he was a member of the Australian Law Reform Commission.

Mr Spigelman has served on the Boards and as Chair of a number of cultural and educational institutions including: Chair of the National Library of Australia between 2010 and 2012; Member of the Board of the Australian Film Finance Corporation between 1988 and 1992 (Chairman between 1990 and 1992); Member of the Board of the Art Gallery of New South Wales between 1980 and 1988 (Deputy Chairman between 1983 and 1988); and President of the Museum of Applied Arts and Sciences between 1995 and 1998. In November 2012 he was appointed a Director of the Board of the Lowy Institute for International Policy. In 2013 he was appointed a Non-Permanent Judge of the Court of Final Appeal of Hong Kong, and was reappointed in 2016 for a further term.

5 Michelle Guthrie was Acting Managing Director from 30 April to 4 July 2016.

10 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2016

ABC Board of Directors

Dr Kirstin Ferguson Company Director

PhD (QUT), LLB (Hons) (QUT), BA (Hons) (UNSW)

12 November 2015 - 11 November 2020

Dr Kirstin Ferguson is an experienced independent non-executive director on ASX100, ASX200, private company, and government Boards. Dr Ferguson’s current Board appointments include: CIMIC Ltd; SCA Property Group; and Hyne & Son Pty Ltd. Dr Ferguson was previously a non-executive director of Queensland Theatre Company, SunWater Ltd., the Queensland Rugby Union, and Dart Energy Ltd. Kirstin is a former CEO of a global organisation operating in the mining and resources services sector. She began her career as an Officer in the Royal Australian Air Force.

Dr Ferguson is an Adjunct Professor at the Queensland University of Technology (QUT) Business School, and holds a PhD in leadership and governance.

Peter Lewis 2 October 2014 - 1 October 2019

Peter Lewis is a member of the Advisory Board for Anacacia Capital. He has previously held board and advisory positions with the International Grammar School Sydney, TXA Australia Pty Ltd, Norwest Productions Pty Ltd, Propex Derivatives, Australian News Channel Pty Ltd, B Digital Limited, VividWireless Limited, Yahoo 7 Australia, Acquire Learning and Capitol Health Limited. He has extensive experience in financial management for media companies and has been the CFO of Seven Network Limited, Seven Group Holdings Limited, Seven Media Group, and Seven West Media Limited.

Mr Lewis is a Fellow of the Institute of Chartered Accountants in Australia, a member of the Australian Society of Certified Practising Accountants and a Fellow of the Governance Institute of Australia. He is Chair of the ABC Audit and Risk Committee.

Simon Mordant AM Investment Banker

FCA (UK), FCA (Australia)

8 November 2012 - 7 November 2017

Simon is Executive Co-Chairman of Luminis Partners. He is Chairman of the Board of the Museum of Contemporary Art Australia. Simon was Australian Commissioner for the 2015 Venice Biennale, and is a director of MoMA PS1 in New York; a Trustee of the American Academy in Rome; a member of the International Council of The Museum of Modern Art in New York; a member of the Executive Committee of the Tate International Council; a Director of the Garvan Research Foundation; a member of the Wharton Executive Board for Asia; and a member of the Italian Advisory Board for Venetian Heritage.

Mr Mordant is the Chair of the ABC Finance Committee.

About the ABC 11

ABC Board of Directors

Matt Peacock Journalist, ABC

Staff Elected Director

22 April 2013 - 21 April 2018

Matt is a senior journalist with the ABC’s 7.30 program, having formerly been ABC Radio’s chief political correspondent and reporter in New York, Washington and London. He is Adjunct Professor of Journalism with Sydney’s University of Technology (UTS), and authored the book Killer Company (HarperCollins, 2009), a history of Australia’s largest asbestos manufacturer, James Hardie. The book inspired the ABC Television miniseries, Devil’s Dust.

Donny Walford Company Director

24 November 2015 - 23 November 2020

Ms Donny Walford is the founder and Managing Director of DW Bottom Line Transition Strategists™ and DW Behind Closed Doors Pty Ltd®.

Ms Walford’s Board experience includes serving as Chairman for the Australian Dance Theatre, and as a Director for the Australian Women Chamber of Commerce and Industry (AWCCI) and the Defence Teaming Centre Inc. Her current Board memberships include Non-Executive Director at KeyInvest Ltd, Australian Associated Advisers Pty Ltd, the Heart Foundation (SA), SYC HYPA 100, and NDA Law.

Ms Walford holds an Associate Diploma in Accounting and a Diploma in Financial Planning. She is a Fellow of the AICD.

12 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2016

ABC Board of Directors

Retiring Director

Steven Skala AO Vice Chairman, Australia and New Zealand, of Deutsche Bank AG

BA LLB (Hons) (Qld) BCL (Oxon)

6 October 2005 - 5 October 2010; 24 November 2010 - 23 November 2015

Retiring Director

Jane Bennett Company Director

AdvCertAppSc (Dairy Tech), FAICD

30 June 2011 - 29 June 2016

Retiring Director

Professor Fiona Stanley AC FAA FASSA Patron and the founding Director of the Telethon Kids Institute (formerly Telethon Institute for Child Health Research)

MSc (Lon.), MD (WA), Hon. DSC (Murdoch), Hon DUniv (QUT), HonMD (Syd.), Hon. DUniv (Melb.), Hon. Dsc (ECU), Hon, FRACGP, Hon. FRCPCH (UK), FFPHM (UK), FAFPHM, FRAQNZCOG, FASSA, FAA, FRACP, FFCCH

30 June 2011 - 29 June 2016

About the ABC 13

ABC Board of Directors

Mark Scott led the Australian Broadcasting Corporation for 10 years as it navigated technological change and reimagined itself as a public broadcaster for the digital age. Under his leadership, the structure and operation of the Corporation was transformed and its services and reach expanded across traditional broadcasting platforms.

He was responsible for the ABC’s investment in digital content, and the provision of new services like ABC News 24, iview and the digital re-launch of Double J.

Mark positioned the organisation as a source for comprehensive digital media services delivering content to its audiences on a device, format and at a time of their choosing. Throughout Mark’s term, the ABC maintained its position as the most trusted source of news and information.

Mark ensured that the ABC continued its proud tradition of contributing to national culture and debate and adding to the rich storytelling heritage.

Before joining the ABC, Mark served 12 years in a variety of editorial and executive positions with Fairfax Media including Editorial Director of Fairfax’s newspaper and magazine division and Editor-in-Chief of Metropolitan, Regional and Community newspapers.

In his final speech as Managing Director, an address to the National Press Club on 24 February 2016, Mark concluded with the following observations about the ABC:

Mark Scott AO BA, DipEd, MA (Syd.), MPA (Harv), Hon. DLitt (Syd.)

ABC Managing Director

5 July 2006 - 4 July 2011 5 July 2011 - 4 July 2016 6

It’s the independent home of Australian conversations, culture and stories that are essential not just to our identity, but our way of life.

It’s still part of the lives of millions of Australians who use it each day and who want it well supported.

It is part of what makes Australia, Australia.

All of us, including Managing Directors of the ABC, come and go. I go with a belief in the ABC that is undiminished.

The public’s affection, trust, respect and support for the ABC remains strong. May it outlast us all—and may the ABC’s best days lie ahead.

6 Mark Scott was granted a leave of absence by the Board from 30 April to 4 July 2016.

14 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2016

Board Directors’ statement

Managing Director transition One of the most significant responsibilities of the ABC Board is the appointment of the Corporation’s Managing Director. In August 2014, the Board commenced a succession planning process in preparation for the possibility that Mark Scott, whose second term was due to end in July 2016, would not seek an extension. By January 2015 the Board had selected a search firm, and began the process of determining the role specification and conducting a global mapping exercise of potential candidates. The position was advertised in September 2015.

On 21 December 2015, the Chairman announced that the Board had appointed Michelle Guthrie to succeed Mr Scott as Managing Director from May 2016. Ms Guthrie was selected from a strong field of candidates on the basis of her content, operational and board experience within internationally-respected media companies, including a particular knowledge of digital media services.

In order to ensure an orderly transition, Ms Guthrie joined the ABC in April 2016 for a month-long handover with Mr Scott.

The Board thanks Mark Scott for his considerable contribution to the ABC, public broadcasting and the Australian media. For nearly 10 years, he led the Corporation through a period of technological change, cultivating its digital capabilities and introducing new services for the Australian public, including iview and ABC News 24.

The Board farewelled Mr Scott at a function in Ultimo that was attended by the Leader of the Opposition, past and present Ministers for Communications, and ABC staff. In recognition of Mr Scott’s contribution to public thought leadership around the role of the ABC, the Chairman announced the publication of a book of his major speeches as Managing Director and presented Mr Scott with a copy.

Efficiency initiatives In November 2014, the ABC commenced a program of support efficiency initiatives to respond to the funding reduction announced by the then Minister for Communications and given effect in the May 2015 Federal Budget. Implementation of these initiatives continued in 2015-16 and the Board received regular updates on their progress. At the end of the reporting period, the majority of these initiatives had been commenced or fully implemented.

The Board approved the signing of a new television transmission contract with Broadcast Australia that provided significant additional savings to the Corporation.

Taken together, the support efficiency initiatives and new transmission contract will deliver ongoing savings to the ABC of around $50 million per annum by 2018-19.

Consistent with its obligation to ensure that the functions of the Corporation are performed efficiently, the Board requested that Management develop a continuous improvement program in order to identify further efficiencies for reinvestment in ABC content and other strategic priorities. The Board set a savings target for the program of 2% per annum. The Board received regular updates on the continuous efficiency program, including the development of a training program for relevant ABC managers with the Business Excellence School at the University of Technology Sydney.

The Board has throughout the year maintained an active oversight role across ABC operations and accountabilities to ensure the Corporation performs efficiently and with maximum benefit to the people of Australia, as required under section 8 of the ABC Act.

About the ABC 15

Board Directors’ statement

Strategy and planning At the time that the support efficiency initiatives were approved, the Board also approved a range of additional cost-cutting initiatives to release funds for reinvestment in priority projects. Such projects had previously been funded from efficiency measures, but that source of funds was no longer available for such a purpose.

Throughout 2015-16, the Board received regular reports on the implementation of strategic long-term projects, including the Melbourne Accommodation Project (MAP), which consolidates the Corporation’s Melbourne presence at a single site, and the Web Content Management System (WCMS) project, which provides a platform for developing and publishing ABC content on digital platforms. In February 2016, the Board approved the commencement of the Integrated Media System (IMS) project, a major strategic project to replace disparate and aging radio and news production tools with a single, integrated system. The Board will continue to monitor the progress and efficiency of these projects as they are implemented.

The ABC Strategy 2020 was introduced in April 2015. One of the ‘pillars’ of the Strategy is enabling a creative and engaged workforce. To assess this, the Corporation conducted an inaugural Staff Engagement Survey in November 2015. In April 2016, the Board received the results of the survey, along with an outline of the steps that Management planned to take in response. The matter is of keen interest to the Board and it will continue to monitor the progress of the plan. An interim ‘pulse survey’ of staff engagement levels will be conducted in the second half of 2016.

In December 2015, the ABC announced the ABC Audience and Content Strategy towards 2020 to help guide content-making decisions and processes. That Strategy expands the central ‘pillar’ of the ABC Strategy 2020—audiences at the centre—and sets specific content-related targets for the Corporation.

In December 2015, the Board endorsed the ABC’s third Reconciliation Action Plan (RAP). The ABC Stretch Reconciliation Action Plan 2016-18, which was formally launched in February 2016, commits the Corporation to build upon the successes of its first two Plans, which, among other things, increased employment opportunities for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people within the ABC and delivered greater levels of programming by, for and about Australia’s first peoples.

Funding As 2015-16 was the final year of the ABC’s triennial funding period, the Board oversaw and endorsed the development of a new triennial funding proposal to Government for 2016-17 through 2018-19. The Board specifically sought the continuation of funding for the Enhanced Newsgathering Program, first provided in 2013-14.

The Federal Budget in May 2016 provided the Corporation with indexed base funding to maintain its core services and $41.4 million over three years to maintain some of the previously funded newsgathering initiatives. While the Board was disappointed that the funding represented a reduction in newsgathering funding, it was pleased that the funding allowed the continuation of the majority of Enhanced Newsgathering Program initiatives.

Structural change On 1 July 2015, the new Regional Division, announced in November 2014, came into existence. The Division brings together ABC services in, for and from regional Australia under a single umbrella. It was formed after extensive consultation and evaluation of the needs of regional audiences. During 2015-16, the Board received regular reports on the formation of the new division, including programming and structural changes.

In February 2016, the Board approved the creation of the position of Editorial Director and the formation of a new, centralised Editorial Policies Division under their direction. This change will ensure greater communication and coordination of editorial functions within the Corporation. To facilitate the change, the Board approved amendments to the ABC’s Editorial Policies so that all significant editorial issues are referred to the Editorial Policies Division for advice.

ABC Retail During 2014-15, the Board resolved that, in light of a decline in revenue from ABC Retail and the absence of assurance that the unit could return to profitability, it was necessary to close the ABC Shop network. The Board closely monitored the exit process as it was implemented in 2015-16. The majority of stores were closed by the end of March 2016, and all stores were closed by the end of April.

16 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2016

Board Directors’ statement

Editorial oversight The Board has a statutory obligation to ensure the accuracy and impartiality of ABC news and information and to ensure the Corporation maintains the highest editorial standards. Accordingly, the Board receives regular updates on the application of ABC Editorial Policies, including a review of complaints made about ABC programs.

During the year, the Board received specific reports in relation to the quality of the ABC’s news content and on-air diversity in news stories, and story selection on the ABC’s China Portal.

The ABC has, since December 2013, conducted a program of independent editorial reviews of specific aspects of ABC news and information programming. During 2015-16, three such reviews were completed.

The first examined coverage of the debate of the Higher Education Research and Reform Bill 2014 on ABC television, radio and online in March 2015. It found that the bulk of the interviews and reports complied with ABC policies and guidelines, but suggested that the ABC should acquire greater expertise in communicating important and complex policy areas like education to the Australian public. As a result of the review, the ABC acknowledged the need to better use its platforms and programs to provide more thoughtful and contextual coverage of such issues.

The second analysed Q&A and its performance in the first half of 2015. The review found no breaches of the Corporation’s impartiality standards. However, it made recommendations for enhancing the program.

The third examined ABC Radio current affairs coverage of the China-Australia Free Trade Agreement from June 2015, finding that the coverage was fair and impartial and adequately represented both sides of the public debate. It recommended that, in future coverage of similarly complex debates, the ABC take further steps to empower audiences to form their own opinions.

The Board considers the editorial review process to be one of the mechanisms that ensures the ABC meets the highest editorial standards. It will review the process in 2016-17 to identify opportunities for improving its effectiveness.

In June 2013, the Board formed a Science Reference Panel, chaired by Professor Fiona Stanley, to examine the ABC’s science content over a 12-month period and make recommendations for improving science coverage. In August 2015, the Board received the Science Reference Panel’s draft report, which recommended, among other things, the creation of an overarching ABC science strategy. Management responded to the report in December 2015. Implementation of the various recommendations continued throughout the first half of 2016.

In March 2016, the Board established an Arts Reference Panel, chaired by Simon Mordant, to assess and provide recommendations on the ABC’s arts coverage.

The work of these panels will help the Board in assessing how the Corporation is discharging its responsibilities in relation to specialist programming.

Board Directors Steven Skala AO was appointed a Director for a five-year term that expired on 23 November 2015. Jane Bennett and Professor Fiona Stanley AC FAA FASSA were appointed for five-year terms that expired on 29 June 2016. The Board records its thanks to Mr Skala, Ms Bennett and Professor Stanley for their contributions as Directors.

The Board welcomed Dr Kirstin Ferguson and Donny Walford, who were appointed in November 2015. At the end of the reporting period, the Board has two unfilled vacancies.

James Spigelman AC QC ABC Chairman on behalf of the ABC Board

About the ABC 17

Organisational structure

18 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2016

ABC Executive

Management of the ABC is the responsibility of a team of Executive Directors. Reporting to the Managing Director, this team convenes regularly and manages and coordinates its decision-making through a number of strategic leadership groups.

Leisa Bacon Director of Audience and Marketing

BBus (QUT) MBus (QUT) Exec Ed LCOR (Harvard)

Leisa Bacon was appointed as Director of Audience and Marketing in March 2014, centralising all the research, marketing, branding and creative/ promo teams across the ABC. That same year, Leisa won QUT’s Scholarship to Harvard, for Fostering Executive Women. Leisa commenced her marketing career in a graduate program for Procter & Gamble, and has worked in both local and global brand roles. She is a passionate brand advocate, and has over 20 years of marketing experience, working for the past decade in executive roles across arts, entertainment and consumer goods businesses, for several of Australia’s leading brands.

David Anderson Director of Corporate Strategy and Planning

David Anderson was appointed Director of Corporate Strategy and Planning in June 2014. In this role, he is responsible for leading the development and implementation of strategy, policy formulation and planning for the ABC. He has worked within the ABC for more than 25 years. His previous roles include Head of Television Business and Operations, and Acting Director of Television. In 2013, David was seconded to assist in the Government’s Efficiency Study of the National Broadcasters. During his career, David has overseen several major efficiency reviews that have facilitated the expansion of ABC services and investment in the Corporation’s strategic priorities.

David is the Deputy Chairman of Screenrights, the Australian audio-visual copyright body.

About the ABC 19

ABC Executive

Angela Clark Director of Digital Network

BA (Oxf.)

Angela Clark joined the ABC as Director of Digital Network (formerly the Innovation division) in March 2012. Angela started her career as an investment analyst before joining JCDecaux Australia as Managing Director and launching the company’s operations across four states. In 2003, Angela joined Macquarie Radio Network as CEO, leading the company for five years before leaving radio to pursue her passion for digital media, founding a number of start-ups in citizen-powered and local news. Angela currently sits on the Sydney Festival Board.

Richard Finlayson Director of Television

GradDipComms

Richard Finlayson joined the ABC as Director of Television in 2013. He has worked in media since 1985, beginning his career as a print journalist. He has built and sold his own successful media and TV production business, and worked for a number of years in subscription television, including in the role of Director of Programme Acquisitions for Foxtel Channel producer, XYZ. In 2009, he was appointed Chief Operating Officer at the SBS to lead organisational change with the goal of creating more Australian content and positioning SBS for a digital future.

Samantha Liston Director of ABC People

BEcon (UNSW)

Samantha Liston joined the ABC as Director of ABC People in March 2013. Sam has extensive experience in human resources and employee relations roles in the media sector. Prior to joining the ABC she was Group General Manager of Human Resources at Seven West Media and has also worked in human resources and employee relations roles at Fairfax and News Limited.

From April-June 2016, Sam worked with Michelle Guthrie, to manage her transition to the role of Managing Director. Rebekah Donaldson, Head of Employee Relations, acted as Director of ABC People during that time.

20 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2016

ABC Executive

Michael Millett Director of Corporate Affairs

Michael Millett was appointed Director of Communications in February 2009. Prior to joining the ABC, Michael has had a long career in print journalism. For the previous two years he was deputy editor of the Sydney Morning Herald. In a 20-year stint with the Herald, Michael served as a political correspondent, Canberra bureau chief, North Asia correspondent based in Tokyo, senior writer and news editor.

Lynley Marshall Chief Executive Officer of ABC International

MBA (Executive) (Auck.)

Lynley Marshall is responsible for the delivery of the ABC’s multiplatform international media service. Prior to this, Lynley held the role of Director of ABC Commercial. She also served as Director of New Media and Digital Services, responsible for the integrated delivery of the ABC’s digital content. Before joining the ABC, Lynley held a number of senior executive positions, including at Director level, in radio, television and new media in New Zealand.

Michael Mason Director of Radio

Michael Mason was appointed Director of Radio in November 2014. He has more than 25 years’ experience in commercial and public radio and television, including 13 years in senior management roles at the ABC.

Prior to his appointment as Director, Michael was the Group Program Director for ABC Radio, Manager of ABC RN and Head of Local Radio. Previously, he was the ABC’s State Director in South Australia, and Manager of 666 ABC Canberra. He has also worked as a program director and producer with 702 ABC Sydney, and with commercial radio in Sydney, Victoria and Queensland.

About the ABC 21

ABC Executive

David Pendleton Chief Operating Officer

B Bus(Acc) (UTS), SF Fin, FCPA

David Pendleton is the ABC’s Chief Operating Officer (COO). He is a Director and was the inaugural Chairman of MediaHub Australia. He joined the ABC as General Manager of Group Audit in 1996, becoming General Manager of Financial Operations and Accounting, and later Head of Finance. In 2002, he was appointed Director of Finance and Support Services, and became COO in 2004. Before joining the ABC, David held senior management positions in the New South Wales public sector.

Robert Patterson Director of ABC Commercial

BA (UNSW), GradDip(Mktg) (Macq.)

Robert Patterson was appointed Director of ABC Commercial in December 2012 and has subsequently led the Division through a period of dramatic transformation. He oversaw the revision of the Corporation’s retail model and has been focused on building the Division’s revenues by seeking new opportunities for video entertainment and music distribution. Robert has an extensive background in content creation, distribution and marketing. He joined the ABC as a Product Manager for ABC Classics. Following this he managed the ABC’s Music business before taking on the expanded role of General Manager ABC Events, Publishing and Music.

Gaven Morris Director of News

BA (Canb.)

Gaven Morris was appointed Director of News in October 2015, bringing to the role his extensive experience as a news executive, news editor, reporter and producer. Gaven’s previous roles at the ABC were as Head of News Content, in which he oversaw all of ABC News’s digital and broadcast news output, as National Editor for ABC News Online, and as Head of Continuous News.

Prior to his work at the ABC, Gaven reported and produced stories locally and internationally for CNN in London, and was appointed Head of Planning at Al Jazeera English after playing a senior role in the launch of the network. In 2015, Gaven completed an executive short course in Leading Change and Organisational Renewal at Stanford University. He was recently appointed an Adjunct Professor at Western Sydney University.

22 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2016

Fiona Reynolds Director of Regional

MA(IntRel) (Deakin)

Fiona was appointed Director of the ABC’s new Regional Division in December 2014, leading its creation and operations. She is based in Launceston, Tasmania. During a 28-year media career she has created and led teams to deliver high quality print, radio, television and digital content to audiences across Australia.

Fiona started as a cadet newspaper journalist in Launceston and went on to become an ABC News reporter, producer and manager based in Hobart, Parliament House Canberra, Melbourne and Brisbane. She was later appointed Tasmania’s first female daily newspaper Editor before returning to the ABC as State Director.

She is currently completing a PhD in Journalism, Media and Communications at the University of Tasmania.

ABC Executive

Alan Sunderland Editorial Director

BA

Alan Sunderland was appointed Editorial Director in February 2016. Prior to this appointment, Alan was Head of Editorial Policy and also Acting Director of People for a year.

Alan’s background is in journalism, having worked as a television and radio reporter and producer for both the ABC and SBS since 1979. From 1991 to 1996, Alan was the Political Editor for SBS TV in Canberra. He was the Head of News and Current Affairs programs for SBS TV for three years, and spent ten years in a variety of roles in news management at the ABC from 2005.

Rob Simpson Director of Legal and Business Affairs

BA, LLB (Hons) (Syd.)

Rob Simpson joined the ABC as Director of Legal in August 2007. Prior to that he was a partner at law firms Gilbert + Tobin and Baker & McKenzie. He has also had extensive experience as a corporate lawyer and member of management teams, including as the first General Counsel of Optus.

About the ABC 23

These are the opening lines of the ABC’s 2025 vision. They are designed to provide the national broadcaster with the clear guidance it needs in fulfilling its Charter and mapping a course through the very uncertain media landscape. They are designed to ensure that the ABC is as relevant when it celebrates its centenary in 2023 as it is now.

This section of last year’s Annual Report documented the challenges confronting the Corporation: the emergence of new platforms and aggressive new media players; the abrupt shift in power from the producers of content to the consumers; the instant availability of news and entertainment from anywhere in the world; the ever-increasing demand for seamless audience experiences.

If anything, the disruptive impact of convergence has increased. An influential survey published in the Harvard Business Review this year highlighted that 72% of global media executives expected moderate to massive digital disruption over the next 12 months. That means adaptation and an overriding concern for audience interests.

The ABC has a very proud tradition and is aware that change can be unsettling for some of its stakeholders, including staff and audiences. Inherent in the ABC mission is an understanding that the Corporation must carefully explain the rationale behind its decisions; articulate how they fit within the ABC Act and Charter; and take the community along with its journey.

It has always been thus. With innovation as a touchstone, the ABC has consistently embraced the opportunities presented by new technology to reward audiences. It quickly expanded to television in the 1950s to complement its radio services; it was the first to see the potential in online to complement its traditional broadcasting services; it pioneered the use of audience-friendly apps and created Australia’s first and still the most popular online catch-up television player.

Mobile platforms and social media are becoming increasingly popular ways of accessing ABC services. The focus over the next 12 months and beyond will be on ensuring adequate investment in these areas and the use of collaboration, creativity and digital dexterity across all Divisions to ensure that our programming is rich, multi-dimensional and fully accessible. And, as the BBC so colourfully put it, to maintain the dexterity required to ride two horses at once as we serve both traditional and new audiences.

The ABC does so with the comfortable knowledge that the community understands both the nature of the challenges confronting the Corporation and our response to it. This Annual Report contains details of the latest Audience Appreciation Survey.

In a fragmented media landscape, the community acknowledgement of the ABC’s performance against Charter objectives remains strong. The gap between the ABC and commercial media is widening—a public recognition that as convergence intensifies the stress on commercial business models, the value of the ABC becomes even more pronounced.

The triennial funding arrangement set down in the 2016-17 Budget provides the Corporation with the certainty it needs. The ABC must still deliver the program of cuts identified by the Federal Government, but there is indexed base funding over the triennium and a partial rollover of the Newsgathering initiative.

As always, the ABC must determine how best to shape its programming within the tight funding envelope. The emphasis will be on continuing efficiency and on innovation. Individual programs and services may change, but the core mission behind them will not.

Michelle Guthrie ABC Managing Director

The Year Ahead

The ABC will be the independent source of Australian conversations, culture and stories. We will reach 100% of Australians and be regarded as distinctive, relevant and indispensable in their lives.

24 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2016

Purpose, Vision and Values

Providing content and services of the highest quality lies at the heart of the ABC’s public purpose.

THE ABC’S PURPOSE is to fulfil its functions as set out in the ABC Act, particularly the ABC Charter.

THE ABC’S VISION is to be the independent home of Australian conversations, culture and stories.

Simpsons Gap, Northern Territory by ABC Open contributor Nik H (Rosanna, Victoria). White Gums, Northern Territory.

About the ABC 25

OUR VALUES The ABC is a truly independent media organisation for all Australians. Our values are the foundation of how we work.

Integrity We act with trustworthiness, honesty and fairness. We deliver on our commitments and are accountable.

Respect We treat our audiences and each other with consideration and dignity. We embrace diversity.

Collegiality We work together willingly. We cooperate and share in the ABC’s challenges and successes.

Innovation We foster creativity and distinctiveness. We encourage new thinking and strive to achieve quality in all that we do.

26 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2016

AUDIENCE

EXPERIENCES

CHAPTER TWO

The ABC is focused on keeping audiences at the centre, providing high-quality programming, independent news and information, and content that enriches Australian communities.

Contents:

Audience trends 30

Online 32

Television 42

Radio 51

Regional 58

News and current affairs 61

International services 67

Consumer experiences 73

Molly Daniels as Ellie in Tomorrow, When the War Began

Based on the novels by John Marsden, Tomorrow, When the War Began tells the story of a group of teenage friends, thrust into a war no one saw coming.

Audience Experiences 27

28 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2016

Audience Experiences 29

For more than 80 years the ABC has entertained, informed and educated the nation through quality, vibrant programming. Over that history, the Corporation has seized the opportunities created by new technologies to expand its offerings and to reach further into the community. Now, in the digital era, the ABC is using its expertise to better target its audiences and to offer them rich, interactive content at a time they want, on devices they use, and in formats they prefer.

The public overwhelmingly approve of the ABC’s performance and Charter remit, as evidenced by the latest independent appreciation survey. In a fragmented landscape, with people able to access content from every corner of the globe, there is belief in a strong enduring role for the ABC in providing innovative, trusted fare to both niche and mass audiences.

Over the next chapter, you will find details of the ABC’s many content achievements: distinctive programming that connects with different parts of the community or unites them as one; agenda-setting journalism that changes lives and laws; international services that bring Australia closer to its neighbours; and content that inspires and enriches us.

The stories include the growth of iview, Australia’s first and most popular catch-up television service, now a major platform in its own right; triple j with its record audiences; Four Corners with its impressive list of investigations that have sparked political, societal and institutional change; and the transition of ABC Retail from a bricks and mortar operation into an expanded digital service.

The chapter documents the evolution of the ABC Regional Division from a concept into reality: a dedicated team of more than 400 staff, working and living close to the audiences they serve, backed by the ABC’s national output and resources. The Division produced the acclaimed Back Roads series and continues to create and broadcast audience favourites such as Landline and Australia All Over.

The Audience Experiences chapter of the Annual Report demonstrates the ABC’s fulfilment of its Charter obligations, and also its commitment to creating extraordinary, insightful and innovative content for all its audiences—across traditional and digital platforms—every day.

New technologies create new opportunities for innovative and entertaining content for audiences. Warwick Gold - Australian Rodeo is the ABC’s first foray into the burgeoning world of immersive storytelling experiences. It was shot on cameras like this one, and can be viewed as a 360-degree video or experienced in virtual reality. For more on Warwick Gold, see page 56.

30 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2016

Audience trends

The ABC’s combined national audience reach across television, radio and online was estimated to be 69% over an average week in 2016,7 a decline of two percentage points compared to the ABC’s reach in 2015 (71%).8 While declines in reach were apparent across television and radio, there have been improvements reported in the ABC’s digital-only audience, from 1% to 2%, and a 1% unique reach delivered via third party platforms including Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and Apple News.

Since 2005, the ABC’s net reach has been measured through a fixed line telephone survey, managed by Newspoll. While this approach was truly representative for its time, in recent years the proportion of households with a fixed line has declined significantly, meaning results—especially in the digital space— were not as reflective of actual audience behaviours. In 2016, this measurement was changed to a web-based methodology.

Community satisfaction The annual ABC Appreciation Survey 9 provides insights into community perceptions and beliefs about the value of the ABC’s contribution to Australian society. In 2016, the survey was conducted by OmniPoll after Newspoll ceased commercial operations in early 2016.

Overall, community sentiment remains unchanged compared with 2014-15. A large majority of Australians—86% compared with 84% in 2015— believe the ABC performs a valuable role, with 49% rating the ABC as ‘very valuable’, the highest level since 2009. A large majority believe the Corporation provides quality content, and that is doing a good job satisfying its charter obligations.

Respondents were asked about their views on the quality of content on ABC Television. Consistent with previous surveys, most Australians (78%) remain of the view that the ABC provides good quality television programming, and two-thirds feel it does a ‘good job’ in terms of the number of shows it provides that they personally like to watch. By contrast, 44% of respondents describe the quality of commercial television as ‘good’.

63% of Australians believe the quality of radio programming on the ABC is ‘good’. 50% of the population believe that commercial radio offers good quality programming, consistent with last year.

Respondents were asked about their usage of the ABC website and online services. Among those who ever use the ABC website, the vast majority (91%) believe the quality of content is ‘good’, an increase from 89% in 2014-15. Consistent with last year, 40% of ABC online users rate the quality as ‘very good’. 91% of users also feel that ABC Online does a ‘good job’ with respect to the amount of relevant content it provides, with 42% describing it as ‘very good’.

The ABC Appreciation Survey explores public perceptions about the ABC’s performance in relation to aspects of the Corporation’s Charter. The majority of Australians remain of the view that the ABC is doing ‘a good job’ fulfilling its various Charter obligations. In 2015-16, there was a small rise in the number of Australians who believe the ABC does a ‘very good job’ of being efficient and well managed, up to 42% from 40% in 2014-15.

The ABC continues to outperform commercial media in the perception of provision of news and information about country and regional Australia. Overall, 79% of Australians believe that the ABC does a ‘good job’ covering country and regional issues, in comparison to the 43% that believe commercial media does the same.

For details regarding audiences’ sentiments on the value and quality of ABC content, see 2.1 on page 142 7 ABC Corporate Tracking Study, August 2016, ABC Audience Insights; (n=1 522) (Ppl 18+).

8 Newspoll, ABC Awareness and Usage Survey 2015, in combination with ratings data (Ppl 18+).

9 OmniPoll, ABC Appreciation Survey, 2016, national random sample (n=1 202) conducted by telephone, People aged 14+.

The ABC continues to provide engaging and relevant content to audiences, who are faced with EXTRAORDINARY choices.

Audience Experiences 31

Image: Lisa Clarke.

86% valuable role of Australians believe

the ABC performs a

32 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2016

In 2016, the measurement of online audiences changed with the introduction of Nielsen’s Digital Ratings Monthly (DRM). Under this new methodology, Nielsen fused its desktop panel with a mobile/tablet panel to measure a broader footprint of digital activity. DRM also captures all mobile smartphone and tablet activity, including apps. As this is a new measurement methodology, comparative data from 2014-15 is not available.

In 2016, the average monthly reach of ABC Online in Australia was 7.6 million, or 38% of online Australians. ABC content was access by 4.6 million desktop or laptop computers, 2.7 million people on smartphones, and 1.8 million people on tablets.10

There were an average of 8.4 million domestic and international visitors each week to ABC Online in 2015-16, up 14% from the 2014-15 average of 7.4 million. Visits in 2015-16 increased by 17% to an average 21.9 million per week.11

Visitors to the ABC homepage increased by 3% from an average of 449 000 weekly visitors in 2014-15 to 462 000 weekly visitors in 2015-16.12

In May 2016, a refresh of the homepage and mobile sites was launched. The new sites received an average 8 out of 10 rating from over 5 000 survey respondents. The same number of respondents reported they would recommend the sites.

Weekly visitors and visits to ABC Online are set out at 2.2 on page 144

ABC ID ABC ID, the ABC’s user registration and single sign-in system, enables the ABC to recognise an audience member across devices for ABC web services to support a more convenient and coherent digital experience.

Existing ABC websites which used older login systems were migrated to ABC ID by August 2015, and in October 2015 a simpler registration process was deployed. The registration process allows users to create a single login that works across ABC sites, and also supports ‘social sign-in’, whereby users can sign in to the ABC using their Facebook, Twitter or Google accounts.

At 30 June 2016, ABC ID had 857 224 active users, an increase of 360 658, or 42%, from 496 566 at 30 June 2015. The Classic FM Classic 100 and triple j Hottest 100 campaigns were the largest sources of new ABC ID users during 2015-16.13

News and current affairs online The ABC’s news and current affairs websites are a primary driver of online traffic. Information about the ABC’s news online services is available at page 63.

International online ABC International has a large social media presence, and shares ABC content as well as providing bespoke material for its online audiences. Information about ABC International online is available on page 69.

ABC Television online ABC Television’s digital presence continued to evolve in 2015-16, with both program websites and social media platforms working to serve existing audiences, reach new ones, and deepen engagement with both.

10 Nielsen DRM - Desktop (Ppl 2+), Smartphone and Tablet (Ppl 18+).

11 Webtrends.

12 Webtrends.

13 ABC ID user database.

Online

EVERYDAY the ABC provides a huge range of informative, entertaining and educational content to online audiences.

Audience Experiences 33

The most visited ABC Television program websites in 2015-16 included regular long-running programs such as Gardening Australia, Catalyst, and Good Game. The Media Watch and rage websites also experienced high numbers of visits.

iview and iview apps The ABC’s iview service experienced unprecedented audience growth in 2015 due to the addition of ABC KIDS iview. This upward trend continued in 2016, culminating in record traffic to the website and apps in June 2016 to the tune of 2.9 million visitors, 16.9 million visits, and 48 million program plays being reported that month alone.

ABC iview website and apps details are available at 2.3 on page 145

In 2015-16, there were an average of 2.4 million visitors and 14.7 million visits per month to ABC iview’s website and apps. Compared with 2014-15, this represents a 36% increase in visitors and a 48% increase in visits. Program plays increased by 79% to 42 million per month in 2015-16.

Drama is the most viewed non-children’s genre on iview, accounting for 31% of total non-children’s program plays. Australian dramas are a key driver of iview usage, with strong figures for Glitch (1.2 million plays), The Beautiful Lie (1 million plays), Rake Series 4 (1.2 million plays) and Janet King (1.1 million plays).

Glitch was the top performing non-children’s program on iview in 2015. It was also the first entire series to be made available for ‘binge’-watching on iview immediately following the broadcast of Episode 1.14

Online

ABC app The ABC’s flagship app, available on iOS and Android devices, is used by an average of 839 000 Australians each month,15 representing 4% of the online population.

The app achieved 238 000 average daily unique users in 2015-16, up 43% on the previous year. Average daily sessions also experienced growth of 46%, led by a rising appetite for breaking news, and a year permeated by major domestic and international events.

A major app update was released in December 2015 to enhance the app’s social media sharing capabilities and to refresh the brand. Another update went live early June 2016 with an election category and notification service.

In 2015-16, the number of article views within the ABC app grew 27% from 2014-15. In the same period, the number of articles shared from the ABC app to social networks, email, and messaging apps increased 138% with many of the shares referring traffic back. As all articles shared contained links to ABC News sites, this contributed to an increase in visits to ABC News Online.16

Catching up on the news by ABC Open contributor Jessica Payton. Brewarrina, New South Wales.

14 Source for the iview and iview apps section is Webtrends. 15 Nielsen DRM - Desktop (Ppl 2+), Smartphone and Tablet (Ppl 18+).

16 Source for all figures in ‘ABC App’ section: Flurry; ABC iPad, ABC iPhone and ABC Android; 2015-16 financial year vs 2014-15 financial year; Average Daily Unique Users (sum of devices).

34 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2016

In 2015-16, the ABC built its iview offering by providing exclusive content on the service, including programs such as The Katering Show, Canberra Al Desko with Annabel Crabb, When I Get A Minute, DAFUQ, the 8-hour live stream of the performance of Max Richter’s Sleep, Hello Stranger and Sammy J’s Playground Politics.

News and current affairs content has seen strong audience growth on iview in 2015-16, with average monthly program plays increasing 16% from 2014-15.18 Driving this growth were the ABC’s flagship current affairs programs, and the continued growth of the

ABC News 24 live stream. In 2016, this stream was complemented by the introduction of the ABC channel live stream, and the development of ABC iview’s first digital-only channel, ABC Arts.

Children’s content online In 2015-16, audiences for children’s online and mobile content continued to grow exponentially, with a great deal of the ABC’s overall reported iview traffic attributable to the success of the ABC KIDS iview app.

Online

Sammy J’s Playground Politics This 15-part special made for iview, hosted by comedian Sammy J and broadcast over the election campaign period, reached a whole new audience for the ABC. The program, which consisted of short satirical takes on the people, policies and postulations of the federal election, garnered 600 000 plays on iview and more than 3 million views on Facebook.17

17 Webtrends; Facebook. 18 Webtrends.

Audience Experiences 35

ABC KIDS iview app Since the launch of the ABC KIDS app in March 2015, visitors to the app have grown from an initial 127 000 (iOS only) in March 2015 to 625 000 in June 2016 across both the iOS and Android versions. Program plays grew from 6 million in March 2015 to 29 million in June 2016.

The app has become the dominant platform for consuming ABC KIDS content, accounting for 82% of ABC KIDS online plays in June 2016. Viewing of ABC KIDS content via desktop accounted for just 1% of total plays.

Popular UK brands continue to dominate ABC KIDS viewing on iview, including Bing, Peppa Pig, Ben & Holly’s Little Kingdom and Hey Duggee.

ABC3 ABC3 audience activity on iview has also grown in the past 12 months, with an average of 5.5 million program plays per month; an increase of 18% on the 2014-15 average.

This activity has displayed a high level of seasonality, with program plays increasing during school holiday months. The number of views peaked in January 2016 with a record-breaking 9.5 million program plays that month. ABC iview has capitalised on the ABC3 spike during school holiday months through its 3 Best Fest offering—more information on this at page 36.

Little Lunch was the most viewed ABC3 program on iview in 2015-16, with 3.5 million plays (for more on Little Lunch, see page 50).19

Online

Joel Lok, Matt Testro, Angourie Rice, Dougie Baldwin and Rahart Adams in Nowhere Boys: The Book of Shadows.

29million program plays on the ABC KIDS iview app

19 Webtrends.

36 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2016

ABC News is the most popular Australian news organisation on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and YouTube, and showed significant growth in 2015-16. ABC News ended 2015-16 with 2.1 million Facebook followers (up 66% from 2014-15), 1.1 million Twitter followers (up 52%), 117 000 Instagram followers (up 180%) and 81 000 YouTube subscribers (up 45%).

The number of followers on the ABC’s Facebook page grew by 22% in 2015-16, from 354 400 to 433 500.

On Facebook, ABC International’s Australia Plus Learn English account saw its audience rise to 3.9 million fans, up 30% from 2014-15 (for more on this, see page 71).

ABC RN’s new video and social strategies resulted in its most successful social media posts ever 2015-16. Examples of popular posts included: Dr Norman Swan’s health videos; Tiger Webb’s language videos; live Facebook Q&As with RN Drive host Patricia Karvelas; and Waleed Aly and Scott Stephens’ The Minefield head-to-head articles.

Also recording strong increases in social media audiences was triple j, which ended 2015-16 with 983 000 Facebook fans (up 15% on 2014-15), and 481 000 Twitter followers (up 28%). triple j also has the ABC’s top YouTube account, with 366 000 subscribers in 2015-16 (up 45%). Double J’s Facebook reach grew fivefold in 2015-16, to a weekly average of 1.35 million.21

The power of bespoke content on ABC social media to reach a wide audience was seen in a story broadcast on Catalyst in May. Repackaged and edited specifically for social, Catalyst’s ‘Exercise and Cancer’ mini-story video on ABC iview’s Facebook account reached 58 million people, attracted 90 000 comments, and was shared more than 400 000 times.22

For the ABC’s social media statistics, see 2.4 on page 146

Social media Social media platforms continued to expand their influence over media organisations’ interactions with audiences. In 2015-16, ABC websites had 14% of traffic referred from social media. This was up from 11% in 2014-15.20

In 2015-16, the ABC’s weekly Q&A program and the triple j Hack Live specials continued to invite audiences to participate live via tweets and Facebook comments. Shaun Micallef’s Mad as Hell, The Weekly with Charlie Pickering, and long-running shows Gardening Australia and Good Game have grown and served audiences by creating new or carefully edited content for social platforms. Gardening Australia alone reaches 1 million people each month on Facebook.

Online

School holiday breaks are the peak viewing time for teens and tweens on ABC iview. To keep kids entertained, and give them an opportunity to catch up on their favourite programs, ABC3 showcased line-ups of popular animation series on iview under its 3 Best Fest banner.

Shows such as The Flamin’ Thongs, Dance Academy, Slugterra and Mortified were available as whole series offerings, so viewers could pick an episode they missed or binge on a whole series during their break.

Overall, 3 Best Fests delivered a total of 7.5 million plays, accounting for approximately 27% of ABC3 plays during their respective months.

20 Webtrends.

21 Facebook.

22 Facebook.

Audience Experiences 37

Online

triple j on the radio, online, on TV, on social In 2015-16, the optimisation of its content for social discovery and distribution led to triple j’s highest sustained-engagement figures via social and third-party platforms. In particular, off-platform video on Facebook and YouTube averaged more than 7.5 million plays per month, with a peak of more than 12 million plays per month in both October 2015 and May 2016.23

Hack’s digital pilot project for youth current affairs saw its website traffic increase by more than 400%.24 Average monthly Facebook engagement has grown by a factor of 7, peaking in December 2015 at 800 000,25 coinciding with Hack’s ABC2 special.

Hottest 100 continued to be the biggest annual opportunity for digital engagement with the triple j audience. Notable trends for 2016 include the continued audience shift to mobile, with 68% of website visits during the countdown coming from mobile devices (up 5% from the previous year) and mobile app sessions growing by 34%.26 Social engagement also jumped markedly, with Facebook engagement in particular up 51% from the previous year.27

23 Facebook; YouTube.

24 Webtrends.

25 Facebook.

26 Webtrends; Flurry.

27 Facebook.

38 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2016

Radio Websites / Radio Player The move to consolidate ABC Radio’s digital properties into a single unified experience across sites and apps continued in 2015-16.

The ABC Radio Player website is a single destination for all of the ABC’s on-demand and live stream audio. Launched in February 2015, it had more than 40 million plays during 2015-16.28

Together, ABC Radio websites and apps reached an average of 1.8 million users each month in 2015-16.29

For ABC Radio websites and apps monthly audience reach, see 2.5 on page 146

In October 2015, detailed work commenced on new websites for capital city local radio. Initial trial programs were launched in May 2016 and full station websites for the eight capital cities will follow in the second half of 2016. These sites will be optimised for mobile viewing, and content will be focused on the provision of segmented audio, on-demand, to Radio audiences.

Podcasts While the average time spent by Australians listening to the radio is slowly decreasing, the popularity of podcasts has continued to rise. In 2015-16, 153 million ABC podcasts were downloaded or streamed.30

ABC RN continued to dominate the Australian podcast landscape with 71.3 million downloads or streams in 2015-16. RN produced 12 of the ABC’s top 20 podcasts in 2015-16. RN’s election podcast, The Party Room, hosted by RN Breakfast’s Fran Kelly and RN Drive’s Patricia Karvelas has gained traction quickly. Since launching in April 2016, the ‘digital first’ podcast has recorded 315 000 downloads and streams by 30 June 2016.

There were 29 million podcasts of Local Radio content downloaded or streamed in 2015-16. Local Radio’s Conversations was the highest ranked ABC podcast, with 18 million downloads and streams.31

In 2015-16, the ABC created a ‘podcast incubator’ project known as First Run, which is aimed at pursuing best-practice podcast strategies. This small research and development unit has developed a handful of podcasts in a range of new genres, with a focus on developing new talent and providing unique content for podcast audiences.

Podcasts produced so far include: popular technology podcast Control Z, Australian history musings in Rum, Rebels & Ratbags; live storytelling in Confession Booth; an ethics show for kids and parents called Short & Curly; and the successful Science Vs, which achieved more than two million downloads for its 10-episode first season.

153 million ABC podcasts downloaded or streamed

Online

28 Webtrends.

29 Nielsen DRM - Desktop (Ppl 2+), Smartphone and Tablet (Ppl 18+). Jan-Jun 2016. Due to change in methodology in January 2016 comparative data not available.

30 Webtrends; triple j’s Hottest 100 has recorded 14 million podcast streams during this period, excluded from the total above.

31 Webtrends; Due to change in methodology in January 2015 comparative data not available.

Hear Here. A new version of the ABC Radio app was released for iOS and Android in July 2015 using the new Radio branding, and was publicised to audiences via Radio’s biggest marketing campaign to date. As a result, growth in average daily users rose by 19% from the previous year.

Audience Experiences 39

Research and Development In 2015-16, the ABC continued to experiment with new ways of engaging with content and audiences.

The Digital Network R+D team launched a public website in November 2015 to share some of their explorative work with ABC audiences: rd.abc.net.au. The site showcases investigations into areas including virtual and augmented reality, intelligent computing, interfaces that transcend screens, personalised news services, and contexts such as commuting.

ABC in Future Homes ABC Digital Network R+D held a four-day Future Home Expo showcasing co-design workshop findings, audience research and prototypes. The Expo encouraged ABC staff to think about how Australian homes are changing, what these changes might mean for the ABC, and how media might be experienced in the homes of audience five or more years in the future. R+D also shared their findings at an evening industry event on 23 May, and made the same information and concepts publicly available at: http://rd.abc.net.au/futurehome.

Social Media Trials Social media experimentation during 2015-16 included live and interactive Facebook interviews with ABC talent such as Barry Cassidy and Annabel Crabb, live streaming of Q&A on Facebook, and an ABC News Snapchat account featuring behind the scenes footage and tailored content (see page 63).

The 2016 federal election campaign provided an opportunity for the ABC to engage new audiences in the election conversation; during this period an automated messaging ‘bot’ on Facebook Messenger and Twitter was run, to answer questions about the election campaign by responding to natural language queries.

Unique online services ABC Open and Heywire are unique ABC initiatives which showcase regional content and connect those communities with each other and broader Australian audiences. Information about ABC Open and Heywire is reported at pages 59-60.

Science and Health portals The ABC Science and ABC Health and Wellbeing portals assist audiences to locate ABC material related to these subjects. They also provide original content specifically tailored for the online medium.

ABC Science received an average of 163 000 weekly visitors in 2015-16, and also recorded extensive growth on social media: the ABC Science Facebook page showed 871 000 fans as of the end of June 2016, up 44% on 2014-15. Twitter followers also increased to 41 000, up 25% from 2014-15.

ABC Health and Wellbeing also recorded strong growth in its social audience, with Facebook fans up 50% since 2014-15 to 11 600, and Twitter followers increasing 25% to 41 000.32

Online

32 Webtrends.

40 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2016

Australian content on the ABC

The ABC’s vision is to be the home of Australian stories and conversations; its content aims to reflect Australian lives—everyday, and when the extraordinary occurs—and create entertaining, insightful, and enjoyable content for all its audiences.

In 2015-16, the ABC continued to keep Australians informed and entertained via flagship programs the 7pm News, AM and PM, Q&A, Conversations, Australian Story, Foreign Correspondent, Nightlife, Gruen, Play School, BTN and innovative, quality Australian drama and comedy series. The ABC is also continually searching for unique Australian ideas, insights, and stories, and opportunities to reach Australian audiences old and new in both traditional and groundbreaking ways.

ABC Radio Comedy was launched at the Melbourne Comedy Festival in April 2016 to create new Australian podcast content for the expanding audio-on-demand market. The emphasis is on opportunities for comedic talent from diverse backgrounds and the possibility of further developing content for television or online video platforms.

The project that kickstarted the initiative was ‘anti-travel’ podcast Burn Your Passport, hosted by popular comic Nazeem Hussain and featuring guests such as Waleed Aly, Hamish Blake and Meshel Laurie discussing their travel experiences. Five more podcast ideas submitted by Australian comedians are currently in development.

In new, unique factual content, four-part documentary Revolution School investigated how to improve secondary education in Australia, providing a unique insight into teaching methods, and the challenges and joys of student life. Hatch, Match and Dispatch, narrated by Marta Dusseldorp, stepped inside the Registry of Births, Deaths and Marriages, for an intimate look at the milestones that unite all Australians. Matilda & Me followed composer Tim Minchin as he grew from iconoclastic comedian to Australia’s most recognised musical theatre export. And Luke McGregor devised the at times hilarious, at times vulnerable and insightful, docu-comedy Luke Warm Sex.

In 2015-16, the ABC licensed approximately 950 hours of content to video-on-demand services Stan, Presto, Quickflix, kids’ services Hopster and PlayKids and specialist Factual service CuriosityStream. The ABC’s high quality Australian content was also marketed and distributed

Back Roads ABC journalist Heather Ewart transported audiences to some of the nation’s most remote and inspiring communities in Back Roads, to highlight rural Australia’s trademark grit, generosity, humour and innovation. The series was embraced by ABC audiences, achieving a combined metro and regional average audience of 1.2 million in its 8pm Monday slot on ABC main channel, and has been commissioned for a second series.

Hitting Home Sarah Ferguson’s unflinching two-part documentary Hitting Home explored the frontline of domestic violence in Australia. For six months, Sarah moved into a women’s refuge and was given unprecedented access to courts, safe rooms, domestic abuse programs in prison, forensic doctors and specialised police units, in order to bring audiences in-depth insight into this national crisis.

The ABC supported the documentary with a focus on family violence in news reporting, the radio series Rosie Batty’s Never Alone online and on ABC Radio; a Q&A episode devoted to a discussion of the issues; and a callout to ABC Open Drum for the public to share their stories.

Heather Ewert and the Back Roads crew in Derby, Western Australia.

Audience Experiences 41

Cleverman Original drama Cleverman, rooted in Aboriginal mythology, depicted a deeply conflicted and anxious society, fearful of a minority group who are endowed with extraordinary physical traits. One young man, The Cleverman, struggles with his own power and the responsibility to unite this divided world. Produced by ABC TV’s Indigenous unit, in partnership with Sundance Channel in the USA, Cleverman has been commissioned for a second series.

Maliyan (Adam Briggs) in Cleverman.

internationally to free-to-air broadcasters, subscription cable and satellite services, subscription video-on-demand platforms, and other new emerging digital platforms. The world now gets the opportunity to enjoy key ABC titles at a time and on a platform that suits them.

Initiatives that encouraged and developed new Australian work in 2015-16 included: the ABC/ Screen Australia Art Bites initiative which gave emerging content makers the opportunity to create a 6 x five-minute series suitable for iview’s new Arts channel; and the South Australian Film Corporation/ ABC TV LABS iview originals initiative, which funded three comedic and two documentary-style 6 x five-minute episodes for iview, reflecting diverse Australian experiences.

The ABC is committed to commissioning and producing unique Australian content that audiences love such as Black Comedy, The Doctor Blake Mysteries, and Glitch. New content in 2015-16 included Comedy Showroom which featured six new comedy pilots made by some of Australia’s most exciting comedians, comedy writers, directors and producers; and YouTube sensations The Katering Show, whose second series produced by ABC Original for iview surpassed one million views to become the most watched iview Original.

Building on the success of Giggle and Hoot, ABC Children’s and ABC Commercial produced the original comical adventure program Hoot Hoot Go!, a hybrid live-action puppetry and CGI series that sees Hoot, Hootabelle, and new character Hootly go on adventures and solve problems.

Ausmusic Month is held every year in November to promote and celebrate local music artists. In 2015 triple j took Home & Hosed to Adelaide, honoured local musicians in the J Awards and teamed up with Beats 1 on Apple Music for a series of broadcasts bringing Australian music to the world. The ABC honoured Archie Roach on the 25th anniversary of his award-winning album Charcoal Lane with a remastered release of the album, recorded with Paul Kelly, Briggs and Courtney Barnett amongst others, and a live performance on ABC Local Radio.

Tim Minchin in Matilda & Me.

42 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2016

Television

The ABC broadcasts television content on five services across four channels:

• ABC—the Corporation’s primary broadcast channel

• ABC2—a service comprising two distinct schedules:

- ABC2—content for a younger adult demographic between 7pm and 2am33

- ABC KIDS—content for preschoolers (2-6 years) between 5am and 7pm

• ABC3—a dedicated children’s channel (6-14 years)

• ABC News 24.

Evolving viewing behaviour With television and video content now available at audiences’ fingertips, the opportunity to view in different places, at different times, on more devices and with emerging technologies has never been greater.

Broadcast television remains dominant, despite the growth in screen and platform choices now available to Australians. Increasingly, however, Australians are viewing television content beyond the seven-day ‘consolidated data’ window (being the seven-day period that is used to determine ratings: it includes ‘live’ viewing of content as well as content that is played back through the television set within seven days of original broadcast). This ‘longer-tail’ viewing is available via encore showings, Personal Video Recorder (PVR) and video-on-demand, at a time of their choosing. Accordingly, the way audiences are measured has also evolved, to capture the increasingly varied content and platform options.

In 2016, there were significant advances in the measurement of viewing beyond the seven-day broadcast window. In February 2016, OzTAM announced the addition of Video Player Measurement (VPM). VPM is Australia’s first industry-wide measurement of internet-delivered television content from Foxtel and free-to-air online sources. It captures minute-by-minute viewing of content on connected devices, such as tablets and smartphones. In April

2016, OzTAM further announced the release of ‘8-28 day time-shifted viewing’ data. This new measurement allows the ABC to track the viewing of television programs played back through a television up to 28 days after a program’s original broadcast.

It is estimated that ‘8-28 day time-shifted viewing’ plus VPM viewing on connected devices accounts for approximately 3% of monthly broadcast content.34 The emergence of ‘longer-tail’ viewing has resulted in a reduction in time spent viewing live-to-air television, particularly in prime time.

Over the past year there has been an increase in the frequency of multi-screen use among online Australians, resulting in the spread of screen activity across multiple devices. Smart TVs or internet-capable TVs are now in 35% of Australian homes (up from 30% a year ago). 81% of Australians aged 14+ own a smartphone (76% in the first quarter of 2015) and 49% of Australian homes have a tablet (47% in the first quarter of 2015).35 As devices are upgraded, the older device is often retained for secondary use, and so the number of devices in homes has continued to grow.

Online Australians aged 16+ are taking advantage of the many online catch-up television and video services now available for viewing content outside of the traditional television schedules. In 2015, 59% of online Australians used video-on-demand, up from 55% last year, with younger viewers in particular more likely to access these services.36 In 2016, online video-on-demand usage surpassed traditional television usage among 16-24 year olds for the first time.37 ABC iview is the second most watched video-on-demand service (behind YouTube), with 44% of those who use online video claiming to use iview (43% in 2015).38

33 The end transmission time for ABC2 of 2am may vary; on average, transmission closes at 2am.

34 Australian Multi-Screen Report, Quarter 1, 2016.

35 Australian Multi-Screen Report, Quarter 1, 2016.

36 Nielsen Australian Connected Consumers Report March 2016, Online Australians 16+.

37 Nielsen Australian Connected Consumers Report March 2016, Online Australians 16+.

38 Nielsen Australian Connected Consumers Report March 2016, Online Australians 16+.

The ABC provides audiences with access to EXTRAORDINARY Australian content.

Audience Experiences 43

Overall performance Total ABC television reach was slightly down in 2015-16 compared to 2014-15.39 The decline of viewing via traditional linear television broadcast is evidence of the ever-increasing fragmented market, with audiences now able to access content through video-on-demand at a time and place, and on a device, of their choosing.

Total ABC metropolitan average weekly reach in 2015-16 was 9.1 million people, or 54.8% of the five-city metropolitan population (9.4 million or 57.7% in 2014-15).40 In the combined aggregated regional markets, total ABC average weekly reach in 2015-16 was 4.3 million people or 60.0% of the regional population (4.4 million or 62.2% in 2014-15).41

Total ABC metropolitan daytime share decreased in 2015-16, while prime-time share remained steady. Across the four channels, ABC television achieved a metropolitan free-to-air daytime share of 26.2%, down from 27.4% in 2014-15.42 Prime-time share for total ABC television across the five metropolitan cities was 17.6% in 2015-16 (17.7% in 2014-15).43

In 2015-16, total ABC regional daytime free-to-air share decreased to 30.1%, down from 31.6% in 2014-15. Total ABC regional share during prime-time was 19.4% in 2015-16, an increase from 19.2% in 2014-15.44

As the size of the free-to-air audience decreases, in particular due to the rise in popularity of subscription video-on-demand services, the ABC’s share of that audience is also declining.

For total ABC television metropolitan and regional reach and share, see 2.6 on page 147

Television

39 OzTAM Consolidated data 2014-15, 2015-16; reach based on five-minute consecutive viewing.

40 OzTAM Consolidated Data 2014-15, 2015-16 (Total ABC includes ABC main channel, ABC2, ABC3 and ABC News 24); reach based on five-minute consecutive viewing.

41 Regional TAM Consolidated Data 2014-15, 2015-16; reach based on five-minute consecutive viewing (including spill).

42 OzTAM Consolidated Data 2014-15, 2015-16.

43 OzTAM Consolidated Data 2014-15, 2015-16.

44 Regional TAM Consolidated Data 2014-15, 2015-16 (including spill).

The young stars of ABC3’s Ready for This, Liam Talty, Majeda Beatty, Aaron McGrath, Leonie Whyman, Christian Byers and Madeleine Madden.

44 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2016

ABC main channel The average weekly metropolitan reach of the ABC’s main channel in 2015-16 was 6.3 million people, or 37.8% of the five-city metropolitan population. This represents a decrease from 6.5 million people, or 39.9% of the five-city metropolitan population, in 2014-15.45

The main channel’s average weekly regional reach in 2015-16 was 2.9 million people, or 40.7% of the regional population. This is down compared to the 2014-15 average weekly regional reach of 3.1 million people, or 43.1% of the regional population.46

In 2015-16 ABC’s metropolitan daytime free-to-air share was steady at 8.0% (8.1% in 2014-15). ABC’s metropolitan share during prime time

declined slightly to 12.7% in 2015-16 (13.0% in 2014-15).47 Regional daytime free-to-air share was 9.0% (9.5% in 2014-15). ABC’s prime-time share in 2015-16 was 13.4% (the same as in 2014-15).48

Levels of first-run Australian content declined in 2015-16. In prime-time, this reflects the move of Lateline from ABC main channel to ABC News 24, which is not included in the current calculations of first-run Australian content. Similarly, first-run Australian content broadcast in day-time decreased due to the reduced coverage of regional sport, and the removal of Big Ideas from the schedule.

Television

45 OzTAM Consolidated Data 2014-15, 2015-16; reach based on five-minute consecutive viewing.

46 Regional TAM Consolidated Data 2014-15, 2015-16; reach based on five-minute consecutive viewing (including spill).

47 OzTAM Consolidated Data 2014-15, 2015-16.

48 Regional TAM Consolidated Data 2014-15, 2015-16 (including spill).

49 OzTAM and Regional TAM Consolidated 28 Data 2015-16.

50 Webtrends.

51 OzTAM and Regional TAM Consolidated 28 Data 2015.

52 Webtrends.

53 OzTAM and Regional TAM Consolidated 7 Data 2015.

54 Webtrends.

Series 4 of The Doctor Blake Mysteries was broadcast starting in March 2016 and was the most successful series of the franchise to date. The program achieved a combined (metropolitan and regional) series average of 1.6 million viewers.49 The series also drew 652 000 plays via iview (an average of 81 000 plays per episode).50

Glitch achieved a combined average audience of 744 000, with a peak audience of 970 000 for the series premiere.51 The program recorded 1.2 million plays via iview, an average of 198 000 plays per episode.52 Glitch was the most watched non-kids’ program on iview in 2015.

The Beautiful Lie had a combined average audience of 751 000,53 and was the second most viewed non-kids program on iview in 2015, behind Glitch. It achieved over 1 million total plays via iview, an average of 168 000 program plays per episode.54

Aussie Drama In 2015-16, Australian dramas once again drew significant audiences to the ABC’s flagship channel.

Audience Experiences 45

Documentary series such as Revolution School, Afghanistan: Inside Australia’s War, Making Families Happy and Keeping Australia Alive each reflected a modern Australia, exploring key issues that affect all Australians. Sarah Ferguson spent six months on the frontline of domestic violence services to produce the award-winning documentary series Hitting Home. Regional Australia was explored in Back Roads.

The ABC covered important national events like New Year’s Eve and Australian Of The Year and for the second year running, drove conversation and debate about mental health with the week-long Mental As initiative.

Popular comedy and entertainment programming returned in 2015-16. After a break in 2014, Gruen returned to enthusiastic audiences, achieving a combined average audience of 1.4 million viewers and a total of 726 000 plays via iview across the series.55

In its new timeslot of 9pm Wednesdays on ABC main channel, Black Comedy saw an increase in its audience with the series achieving a combined audience of 662 000 viewers.56 Social media weekly reach during the season peaked at 6.6 million, with about 5 million individual Australians engaged with Black Comedy content on the ABC Indigenous Facebook page.

ABC main channel’s top program in 2015-16 was the New Year’s Eve: Midnight Fireworks, with a combined metropolitan and regional average audience of 1.9 million.57 The ABC’s coverage reached 3.8 million viewers across ABC main channel, ABC3 and ABC News 24.58

Another ABC programming highlight in 2015-16 was the documentary series Keeping Australia Alive. The series achieved a combined average audience of 825 000,59 and recorded a total of 326 000 plays via iview (47 000 plays per episode).60

For more on Keeping Australia Alive, see the feature ‘OUR FOCUS: Health’ on pages 92-3

One-off documentary Matilda & Me achieved a combined average audience of 1.1 million viewers,61 and recorded a total of 44 000 plays via iview.62 Luke Warm Sex achieved a combined average audience of 808 000 viewers63 and recorded a total of 760 000 plays via iview.64

For ABC main channel’s Top 20 programs, ABC-commissioned first-release hours broadcast, Australian Content figures and Genre Mix, see 2.7 on page 148

Television

55 OzTAM and Regional TAM Consolidated 28 data; Webtrends. 56 OzTAM and Regional TAM Consolidated 28 data; Webtrends. 57 OzTAM and Regional TAM Consolidated 7 Data 2015-16.

58 OzTAM and Regional TAM Consolidated 28 Data 2015-16; reach based on five-minute consecutive viewing.

59 OzTAM and Regional TAM Consolidated 28 Data 2015-16.

60 Webtrends.

61 OzTAM and Regional TAM Consolidated 28 Data 2015-16.

62 Webtrends.

63 OzTAM and Regional TAM Consolidated 28 Data 2016.

64 Webtrends.

Deborah Mailman and Elizabeth Wymarra are Ginny and Marcia, the ‘Housewives of Narromine’ on Black Comedy.

46 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2016

ABC2 On ABC2, daytime content is programming for preschoolers (see ABC KIDS page 48). From 7pm until 2am, ABC turns to programming for young Australian adults.

In 2015-16, ABC2 continued to deliver on its remit to connect with younger Australians, by providing a mix of entertaining and informative programs from Australia and around the world that speak to their concerns and passions.

In 2015-16, ABC2’s average weekly metropolitan reach was 4.1 million people, or 24.6% of the five-city metropolitan population (4.2 million or 26.0% in 2014-15).65 ABC2’s average weekly regional reach in 2015-16 was 2 million people, or 28.6% of the regional population. This is steady compared to the 2014-15 average weekly regional reach of 2 million people, or 28.9% of the regional population.66

ABC2’s metropolitan daytime free-to-air share declined slightly to 10.7% (11.6% in 2014-15). ABC2’s prime-time metropolitan share was 3.0% in 2015-16 (2.8% in 2014-15).67 ABC2’s regional daytime free-to-air share in 2015-16 was 12.0% (down from 12.9% in 2014-15), and regional prime-time share was 3.7% in 2015-16 (up from 3.3% in 2014-15).68

Content highlights on ABC2 included the long-running Good Game series, which provided insightful and entertaining commentary to younger audiences on the world of gaming, and which consistently delivered large audiences of 25-34 year olds.

ABC2 also consistently provides exclusive reach across all demographics (viewers who do not watch any other ABC network) and therefore plays a vital role in the corporation’s overall reach.

For the Top 15 ABC2 programs, and a breakdown of the ABC2 Genre Mix, see 2.8 on page 150

Television

65 OzTAM Consolidated 7 Data 2014-15, 2015-16; reach based on five-minute consecutive viewing.

66 Regional TAM Consolidated 7 Data 2014-15, 2015-16; reach based on five-minute consecutive viewing (including spill).

67 OzTAM Consolidated 7 Data 2014-15, 2015-16.

68 Regional TAM Consolidated 7 Data 2014-15, 2015-16 (including spill).

Good Game’s Bajo and Hex.

Audience Experiences 47

Television

69 OzTAM and Regional TAM Consolidated 7 Data 2015; reach based on five-minute consecutive viewing.

70 OzTAM and Regional TAM Consolidated 7 Data 2015.

71 Webtrends.

72 OzTAM and Regional TAM Consolidated 7 Data 2015; reach based on five-minute consecutive viewing.

73 OzTAM and Regional TAM Consolidated 7 Data 2015.

74 Webtrends.

75 OzTAM and Regional TAM Consolidated 28 Data 2016; reach based on five-minute consecutive viewing.

76 OzTAM and Regional TAM Consolidated 28 Data 2016.

77 Webtrends.

ABC2 themed weeks ABC2 continued to deliver unique, focused content in 2015-16, by introducing themed weeks of programming, putting issues relevant to its core audience under the spotlight. The weeks were anchored by a live discussion program hosted by triple j’s Hack host Tom Tilley and presented a range of views with a particular emphasis on bringing young voices to the debate.

• The 2HIGH - A Week On Drugs programming event featured programming centred around drugs, and ran from 26 July to 2 August 2015, reaching a cumulative total of 2.4 million Australians.69 Australians On Drugs was the top viewed program during 2HIGH week, with a combined average audience of 290 000.70 The program had 91 000 program plays on iview, comprised of 58 000 plays of the documentary, 7 000 plays of the live stream and 26 000 plays of the Australians on Drugs Profiles.71

• 2$EXY - The Business of Sex was featured from 6-13 December 2015. Across the week, the programming reached a cumulative total of 2.9 million Australians.72 Australians On Porn was the top viewed program during 2$EXY week, with a combined average audience of 316 00073 and 89 000 plays via iview.74

• Naked As - No Body’s Perfect was broadcast from 13-20 March 2016. This event reached a cumulative total of 2 million Australians.75 Hack Live On Body Obsession was the top viewed program during Naked As week, with a combined first-run average audience of 194 000.76 The program also had 57 000 program plays on iview.77

• ABC2 also featured an election special looking at education, employment and housing issues facing young Australians today in Hack Live: The War on Young People.

48 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2016

ABC Children’s Television

ABC KIDS (5am-7pm, ABC2) In 2015-16, ABC KIDS remained the number one destination for preschoolers, strengthening its position as the highest ranking channel during the day among children aged 0-4.

In 2015-16, ABC KIDS’ average weekly metropolitan reach among children aged 0-4 was 674 000 or 61.8% of children aged 0-4 (722 000, or 67.5% in 2014-15).78 In 2015-16, ABC KIDS’ average weekly regional reach among children aged 0-4 was 310 000 or 69.9% (325 000 or 73.0% in 2014-15).79

ABC KIDS daytime metropolitan free-to-air share among 0-4s was 63.1% (64.5% in 2014-15),80 and regional daytime free-to-air share in that age group was 67.2% (66.7% in 2014-15).81

Flagship local productions Giggle & Hoot, Bananas in Pyjamas, and Play School continued to draw large, dedicated audiences throughout the year. Play School will celebrate its 50th birthday in July 2016, making it Australia’s longest running children’s program and the second oldest in the world. Content made especially for the anniversary was broadcast in 2015-16: included were ‘celebrity cover’ interstitials featuring a diversity of famous Australians on the set of Play School, and nostalgic videos with clips from Play School’s past shared on social media.

In October 2015, ABC KIDS launched the Play School spin-off short form Humpty’s Big Adventure featuring Australian preschoolers involved in all types of physical activity. In January 2016, ABC KIDS launched Maurice’s Big Adventures, which focused on milestones for Australian preschoolers, such as first day of school, first show-and-tell, and first excursion.

Curious George was the top ranked series on ABC KIDS in 2015-16. Popular new Australian programs also included The Legend of Pirate Hootbeard, Hoot Hoot Go!, Humpty’s Big Adventure and Maurice’s Big Adventure, along with favourites Bubble Bath Bay, Giggle and Hoot and Ready, Steady, Wiggle!.82

ABC3 In an increasingly competitive environment, ABC3 retained its position in 2015-16 as the number one ranked channel among children aged 5-12 during the day.83

In 2015-16, ABC3’s average weekly metropolitan reach among children aged 5-12 was 577 000 or 35.8% (647 000 or 41.1% of children aged 5-12 in 2014-15).84

Among children 5-12, ABC3 achieved a 2015-16 metropolitan free-to-air daytime share of 27.7% (29.3% in 2014-15). ABC3’s metropolitan 6-9pm share among children 5-12 was 7.2%, down from 8.6% in 2014-15.85 The prime-time timeslot is becoming increasingly competitive, with reality television programs popular amongst this demographic dominating the schedule.

In 2015-16, ABC3’s average weekly regional reach among children aged 5-12 was 323 000 or 44.2% of children aged 5-12. This is down compared to 2014-15 (355 000 or 49.0%).86 ABC3’s regional daytime free-to-air share among children 5-12 was steady at 33.7% (33.7% in 2014-15). ABC3’s share among children 5-12 during the 6pm-9pm timeslot was 10.6% in 2015-16, down from 12.7% in 2014-15.87

Investment in big-budget dramas such as Nowhere Boys and Tomorrow, When the War Began resulted in a lower volume of Australian content on ABC3 in 2015-16. The content market is increasingly competitive, particularly due to the targeted acquisition strategies of international SVOD services, which is impacting on the cost of Australian content.

Australian premieres included new series called Bushwhacked! Bugs—an online-friendly short form natural history spin-off of award-winning wildlife adventure series Bushwhacked!.

Television

78 OzTAM Consolidated 7 Data 2014-15, 2015-16; reach based on five-minute consecutive viewing, 6am-7pm daily.

79 Regional TAM Consolidated 7 Data 2014-15, 2015-16; reach based on five-minute consecutive viewing, 6am-7pm daily (including spill).

80 OzTAM Consolidated 7 Data 2014-15, 2015-16.

81 Regional TAM Consolidated 7 Data 2014-15, 2015-16 (including spill).

82 OzTAM and Regional TAM Consolidated 7 Data 2015-16. 83 OzTAM Consolidated 7 Data 2015-16.

84 OzTAM Consolidated 7 Data 2014-15, 2015-16; reach based on five-minute consecutive viewing.

85 OzTAM Consolidated 7 Data 2014-15, 2015-16.

86 Regional TAM Consolidated 7 Data 2014-15, 2015-16 (including spill). 87 Nielsen; GfK from Survey 1, 2014.

ABC3 was the #1 channel for children aged 5-12

Audience Experiences 49

Television

Kamil Ellis, popular host of Bushwhacked!, will play Luke in the third season of Nowhere Boys.

50 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2016

Television

Little Lunch is a kids’ mockumentary-style program, written by Robyn Butler and Wayne Hope.

Little Lunch In May 2016, ABC3 drama Little Lunch won the prestigious Prix Jeunesse International Award for Best Fiction Program for 7-10 year olds, at the festival event held in Munich. Little Lunch also won this year’s AACTA award for Best Children’s Program.

Bushwhacked! Bugs was hosted by Kamil Ellis, the talented co-host from the original series, who has gone on to star in other ABC productions such as Cleverman and Nowhere Boys.

ABC News program BTN partnered with ABC Children’s Television to provide the first ever election coverage for primary-school-aged children hosted by the Rookie Reporter, 12-year-old Australian schoolgirl Maya. The program premiered on iview as short form daily content and resulted in a documentary of her time on the campaign trail. The cross-divisional collaboration resulted in significant media coverage, including a report in The New York Times.

ABC3 premiered the children’s TV drama series Tomorrow, When The War Began based on John Marsden’s iconic Australian novels. The channel also premiered a feature film spin-off of award-winning program Nowhere Boys with the movie ABC3 Nowhere Boys: Book Of Shadows.

In 2015-16, the channel featured Logie-award-winning Australian Indigenous children’s drama Ready For This. Little Lunch premiered in July 2015 and won national and international awards.

Little Lunch was also the top program on ABC3 in 2015-16. Other popular Australian programs included the ABC3 Smackdown series, Tomorrow, When the War Began, Lockie Leonard and Mortified.88

88 OzTAM & Regional TAM Consolidated 7 Data 2015-16.

Audience Experiences 51

Radio

89 Nielsen; GfK from Survey 1, 2014. 90 OmniPoll, ABC Appreciation Survey, 2016, national random sample (n=1 202) conducted by telephone, People aged 14+.

91 Nielsen; GfK from Survey 1, 2014.

ABC Radio has undergone transformative measures in 2015-16 in response to the creation of the ABC’s Regional division, with its focus on local content production and community engagement, and to align with audience trends regarding the ongoing move to digital media platforms.

The ABC remains committed in its role as a significant arts broadcaster on radio, not only through the music stations triple j and Classic FM, but also through daily coverage and reviews of the arts in all its forms— literature, visual arts and drama—on Local Radio and RN.

Average weekly reach in the five-city metropolitan markets for ABC Radio was 4.74 million people aged 10+ in 2015-16, down 19 000 listeners on the 2014-15 record. Audience share was 23.9%, similar to 2014-15.89 The majority of Australians consider that the quality of programming on ABC radio is ‘good’.90

Levels of Australian music on the ABC Radio network are broken down at 2.9 on page 150

Capital City Radio Following the launch of ABC Regional Division on 1 July 2015, the ABC’s eight capital-city radio stations focused on their value to metropolitan and suburban audiences. In October 2015, ABC Drive program presenters came together to discuss the role of a Drive shift in an era where audiences were able to find traditional traffic, weather and news information from other sources; a conversation that will continue in the second half of 2016 amongst Mornings program presenters.

ABC Local Radio’s five-city metropolitan average weekly reach was 2.19 million, down 4% from 2.27 million in 2014-15. Audience share was 10%, down marginally from 10.2% in 2014-15.91

4.74million

average weekly metropolitan radio reach

Capital city stations connected with their communities through events such as the Melbourne Indian Film Festival and the OzAsia Festival Moon Lantern Parade (Adelaide) and Parramasala (Sydney). On 14 August 2015, 774 ABC Melbourne’s Mornings with Jon Faine broadcast live from the Melbourne Recital Centre for the opening of the Indian Film Festival of Melbourne.

891 ABC Adelaide’s Drive broadcast from the Adelaide Fringe Festival on 19 February 2016. The Fringe runs parallel to the Adelaide Festival of Arts, and is focused strongly on live comedy aimed at younger audiences. The broadcast was part of ‘Mad March’ coverage on 891, which broadcast programming from The Fringe, The Festival of Arts, Womadelaide, and the V8 Supercar event in the CBD.

The Capital City Radio Group was a dedicated participant in ABC-wide activities such as Australian Of The Year, Mental As, NAIDOC Week, and AusMusic Month, which this year included a special national broadcast from 774 ABC Melbourne celebrating the musical work of Archie Roach.

For Capital City Radio audience share and reach, see 2.10 on page 151

ABC Radio is a part of EVERYDAY life for millions of Australians.

52 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2016

Hottest 100 Now in its 23rd year, triple j’s Hottest 100 remains hugely popular. In 2016, 2 094 350 votes were cast by music fans from 172 countries, with Sydney band The Rubens—who were discovered in 2011 on triple j’s Unearthed—taking out the #1 spot with their track ‘Hoops’.

triple j/Unearthed In a year in which it was awarded ‘Radio Station of the Year’ at the 3rd International Music Industry Awards, the ABC’s national youth network triple j has continued to flourish, engaging young audience across all media platforms. The station is the #1 Australian radio station on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter and YouTube.

It was another year of record audiences for triple j in 2015-16. Five-city metropolitan average weekly reach among people aged 10 and over was up from 1.89 million to a record 1.93 million. Audience share was up from 6.8% in 2014-15 to 7.1% in 2015-16.92 There were 13.2 million triple j podcasts downloaded or streamed in 2015-16.93

Radio

92 Nielsen; GfK from Survey 1, 2014.

93 Webtrends; triple j’s Hottest 100 recorded 14 million podcast streams during this period, excluded from the total above.

2 094 350 votes cast in triple j’s Hottest 100

Audience Experiences 53

In 2016, triple j partnered with the Australian Indigenous Mentoring Experience (AIME) and raised more than $100 000 to go towards AIME’s continued support of Indigenous students through high school and into university.

Unearthed and rage also teamed up with the National Institute of Dramatic Art (NIDA) for a unique initiative pairing six of Unearthed’s most talented emerging musicians with a group of NIDA’s skilled and creative directing, design, and production students. The artists are assisting each other to make a music video to be aired on rage later in 2016.

On Saturday 9 April 2016, triple j’s free, all-ages regional concert One Night Stand was held in Geraldton, Western Australia. More than 10 000 people came to see Boy & Bear, Alison Wonderland and Urthboy, with special guests including Benjamin Joseph (SAFIA), Bernard Fanning, Bertie Blackman, BRAVE, Jess Kent, Kira Puru, Patience Hodgson (The Grates) and Sampa The Great, as well as local Unearthed band Alex The Kid. The concert was broadcast live around the country, with the audience further engaging by uploading videos and photo galleries to the triple j website and social media across the weekend.

Unearthed continued to play a significant role in the Australian music industry, championing unsigned Australian artists through the website, via airplay on

Unearthed on Digital Radio, and on triple j, as well as through partnerships with music festivals, conferences and organisations. In 2016, Unearthed launched an initiative to find Australia’s best Indigenous High School act through the annual Unearthed High competition, worked with ABC Television on a Play School remix competition, and celebrated 10 years of triplejunearthed.com.

In 2015-16 triple j CD releases 40 Years of Music and Like A Version Volume 11 reached Gold album status on the Australian music charts.

Radio

94 Newspoll Double J Listening Study - Wave 4, 21 June 2015.

Double J Double J celebrated two years on air in early 2016, and continued to show steady increases in audience engagement.

A Newspoll ‘Listening Study’ commissioned in July 2015 that considered the reach of the network on digital television and other platforms estimated a combined weekly audience of close to 680 000.94

Presenter Myf Warhurst continued to attract audiences to Double J, and through her regular appearances on ABC television, Local Radio and ABC News 24 continues to connect Double J with wider ABC audiences. In January 2016, Richard Kingsmill joined the station’s on-air line up with The Funhouse, a Friday night mix of classic and new party tracks.

Double J brought some of the biggest names in music in to host such programs as The Spot and Artist in Residence. Guest presenters have included Ed Kuepper, Sarah Blasko, the Violent Femmes, Neil Finn and Jarvis Cocker.

Double J has also taken on music programming responsibilities for Local Radio, allowing a strategic approach across Radio that reflects the station’s continued support for the contemporary Australian music industry. In December 2016, the station headed to Berry in regional New South Wales to broadcast live from the inaugural Fairgrounds music festival.

Double J host Myf Warhurst.

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RN (Radio National) In 2015-16, RN implemented strategic management and content changes to refocus its audio and digital production. Key to this was genre specialisation; creating content that worked well on traditional linear radio but also provided quality output for audiences in the digital space.

Changes in content saw RN decommission The List, Sunday Profile and Media Report and introduce TV Club, Best Practice and The Money.

Radio

Double J + David Bowie + Prince

On Saturday 18 July 2015, Myf Warhurst hosted a special Double J broadcast live from the foyer of the Australian Centre for the Moving Image (ACMI) in Melbourne’s Federation Square for the opening of the international blockbuster David Bowie Is.. exhibition.

Six months later, the musical and cultural icon passed away, and Double J paid him tribute with 24 hours of non-stop Bowie, with music, special programming, and archival content broadcast on-air and online.

In April 2016, the music world also suddenly lost the hugely influential artist Prince. After his death, Double J turned the station over to the music of Prince for an entire weekend, with parallel special broadcasting and archival content on triple j, ABC television, and online.

Included was the replay of a 1996 J Files episode on Prince hosted by Richard Kingsmill, a 3-hour tribute put together by Lance Ferguson on Sky High, and the classic Prince album Sign O’ The Times played in full on Caz Tran Classic Albums.

Audience Experiences 55

RN worked closely with the News Division to facilitate greater distribution of RN health content through the ABC News website. Science and Religion ‘verticals’ are planned to follow, further expanding and strengthening the breadth of Science, Health and Religion specialist content available to larger audiences.

RN’s five-city metropolitan average weekly reach was 640 000 in 2015-16, up 27 000 from 2014-15. Audience share remained steady at 2.3%.95 RN remains ABC Radio’s top podcast producer, with 71.3 million podcasts downloaded or streamed in 2015-16 (for more on this, see page 38).

RN was the media partner for The Moth’s visit to Australia for The Melbourne Writers’ Festival and Sydney’s Festival of Dangerous Ideas. The Moth is an acclaimed North American program dedicated to the art and craft of storytelling. To celebrate The Moth’s arrival, RN broadcast the program over four Saturdays in September 2015.

RN had a significant presence at the Sydney Writer’s Festival in May 2016. The Festival is Australia’s largest annual celebration of literature and ideas, and RN’s sound engineers captured dozens of sessions for live and future broadcast. Michael Cathcart hosted a live program for Books & Arts, featuring four authors discussing the pleasures and challenges of writing and reading in a globalised world. Conversations with Richard Fidler also broadcast live from the Festival.

In 2016, RN once again partnered with the University of New South Wales (UNSW) to support five early-career scientists via the 5 Under 40 initiative. Hundreds of applications were received from a national call-out for early-career researchers working in Australian universities and research organisations in the fields of science, medical research, technology, engineering and maths. The successful scientists take up their ABC residency in July and complete a 10-day media program as Scientists in Residence with the RN Science Unit in Sydney.

During the year, RN also partnered with the Australian Science Media Centre to mentor Indigenous scientists in media communication.

In October, the 2015 ABC Boyer Lecture Series was broadcast on RN (see page 96).

ABC Classic FM ABC Classic FM is Australia’s national classical music network, a major cultural resource for listeners across regional and urban Australia, and the leading national venue for Australian classical music performance.

Audiences remained solid for Classic FM in 2015-16, with the network achieving a record five-city metropolitan average weekly reach of 731 000, up from 729 000 in 2014-15, and an audience share of 3%.96

Classic FM achieved its target of recording 300 Australian concerts in 2015. For the first time, most concerts were broadcast live, or within hours or days of their performance, increasing the sense of concert broadcasts as ‘event’ radio, and subsequently heightening audience engagement.

Over the 2016 Easter weekend, Classic FM presented 1000 Years of Classical Music—a journey through the great classical works in the historical context of their creation and first performance. This launched a major collaboration between ABC Classic FM and ABC Classics, resulting in a CD box set released to coincide with the broadcast. The 1000 Years brand will continue to feature regularly in programming as the series is released.

In April 2016, Classic FM partnered with the BBC to broadcast the first ever season of BBC Proms concerts to be held outside the UK. With additional partners Musica Viva Australia and the Melbourne Recital Centre, a series of lunchtime chamber music Proms—including a main season of five orchestral Proms with the Melbourne and Queensland Symphony Orchestras—were broadcast live around Australia then recorded for broadcast on BBC Radio 3 the following week.

In June 2016, Classic FM collaborated with ABC Arts to broadcast ‘Sleep’ by contemporary UK composer Max Richter. This eight-hour work was the first ever overnight performance at the Sydney Opera House, and was broadcast live on ABC Television’s main channel and Classic 2.

The success of the 2015 Classic 100: Swoon countdown continued with ABC Classics’ Classic 100: Swoon CD box set becoming the year’s highest selling classical release in Australia. The 2016 Classic 100 countdown, on the theme of ‘Voice’, went to air in June 2016, and celebrated the best of choral music, opera, and classical song, as voted by thousands of Classic FM listeners.

Radio

95 Nielsen; GfK from Survey 1, 2014. 96 Nielsen; GfK from Survey 1, 2014.

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Milestones

ABC Rural 70 years In 2015, ABC Rural marked an extraordinary feat of longevity and service—70 years of broadcasting. A range of activities were held to celebrate, including the Decades Project which looked back at the key issues covered by the service, and Farming towards 2085 which profiled 70 young farmers who are the future of farming in Australia. Seven national ‘outside broadcasts’ by the Country Hour were held across the nation over seven months, and Landline’s final program for 2015 focused on 70 years of rural broadcasting, with long serving rural reporter Tim Lee drawing on the ABC’s rich archive of rural television, radio and online content.

ABC Classic FM 40 years In January 2016, ABC Classic FM celebrated its 40th birthday. The network first went to air as ABC FM, the ABC’s first FM network, from the ABC’s Collinswood building on 24 January 1976. ABC Radio made the anniversary a celebration of the Classic FM audience and the music they love, with a day of great classical music chosen by listeners.

The Music Show 25 years Radio National’s The Music Show turned 25 in February 2016. To commemorate the event, the program featured a series of ‘Top 25’ programs, which included ‘25 at the Piano’, ’25 Legends’ and ‘25 singer/songwriters’. Long-time presenter, composer Andy Ford, also published a reminiscence of his years broadcasting from diverse locations including music festivals, outside-broadcast buses in shopping malls, theatres, wineries and tents.

Warwick Gold: Australian Rodeo virtual reality experience In honour of the ABC’s 70 years of rural reporting, ABC Digital Network’s Research and Development (R+D) team alongside ABC Regional created an Australian content first: the virtual reality experience Warwick Gold: Australian Rodeo, in October 2015. The five-minute immersive experience takes its audience backstage to Australia’s most famous rodeo at Warwick in regional Queensland, and is also available in 360-degree video online at http://rd.abc.net.au/warwickgold. The ABC provided the audience with information about how to best use this new technology, and the initiative doubled as a training exercise to educate staff on creating narratives in a 360-degree environment. ABC R+D also shared their learnings with other content makers and media professionals at public and industry events in Sydney and Melbourne.

Audience Experiences 57

Australian Story 20 years In 2016 Australian Story broadcast its 20th season of unique stories, providing insight into Australian lives with all their complexities, their triumphs, their challenges. Produced by the News Division, the program’s documentary-style narrative approach to personal stories has resonated strongly with its large and dedicated audience and it has been the recipient of many professional accolades including Walkley and Logie awards.

Good Game 10 years Back in 2006, the fledgling digital channel ABC2 commissioned 13 episodes of a show devoted to what was considered, at the time, the niche activity of video gaming. Ten years on, gaming has grown enormously and Good Game with it. The program is now a suite of shows across ABC2, ABC3, iview, Australia Plus and online. Celebrations included various stage shows around the country, and a specially recorded show in front of a live audience which will go to air around the anniversary date in September.

Speaking Out 25 years Speaking Out celebrated 25 years on the air on 1 July 2015, and is Australia’s longest running Indigenous program. Exploring the lifestyle and culture of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, and the political issues that affect them, the program is produced and presented by Indigenous broadcasters. Speaking Out has covered a range of topical issues over its many years of broadcast, as well as profiling well-known and emerging Indigenous activists, performances, artists and actors.

Karen Dorante, Speaking Out’s longest-running presenter. Play School presenters Teo Gebert with Big Ted and Little Ted, Miranda Tapsell with Joey, and Karen Pang with Jemima and Humpty.

Presenter Caroline Jones celebrates 20 years of audience favourite Australian Story.

Play School 50 years Play School celebrated its 50th birthday in 2016, making it Australia’s longest running children’s show, and the second longest running children’s show in the world. The program is beloved by its large audience, and continues to grow with the nation, featuring presenters from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds and sharing stories from families and children all around Australia. As at 30 June 2016, celebrations were continuing, and a new character, Joey, will be introduced by Play School’s newest presenter Miranda Tapsell on the birthday episode ‘Come to the Party’ to be broadcast on 18 July 2016.

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Regional

The ABC’s Regional division was launched on 1 July 2015 to provide a more cohesive service for regional audiences. More than 400 staff previously working in the ABC News and ABC Radio divisions formed united teams in 48 regional locations, with some staff also based in capital cities.

The Division delivers regional radio and news services, the world’s largest specialist rural broadcasting service ABC Open, plus some of the Corporation’s most popular programs including Australia All Over, Landline and Saturday Night Country. Regional stations were among the first to broadcast when the ABC was established in 1932, and the new Division has been tasked with building on that commitment in the digital era, ensuring regional voices are heard locally, across regions and nationally on all platforms.

During 2015-16, the Regional division was quarantined from budget cuts affecting the rest of the Corporation and its development was cost-neutral. Following the launch of the division, the ABC invested in two major regional initiatives—the launch of a new television series, Back Roads, taking audiences on a journey through regional Australia to meet the people who breathe life into some of the nation’s smallest communities, and the addition of 14 live audio streaming services as the first step in delivering local station streaming across regional Australia.

The ABC began building its regional audience strategy from the opportunities presented by the ‘whole-of-team’ approach that enabled and encouraged station teams to work more closely together. The early objectives were to concentrate efforts on the early morning radio Breakfast program, social media and increasing the amount of video content from regional Australia.

As part of its commitment to improving services for audiences, ABC Regional conducted a comprehensive review of radio programming and bulletin schedules. The revised schedule, which commenced in January 2016, placed more radio resources into the Breakfast period, when audiences

are at their peak. Some subsequent minor revisions to the program schedule were made following audience engagement and feedback.

A small team of digital producers were employed, dedicated to improving the quality of regional stories and distributing them to broader audiences via the ABC News site. During 2015-16, approximately 1 000 stories a month were contributed to News platforms by staff in regional centres. The regional story that attained the largest audience reported more than 160 000 visits and more than 175 000 views. On average, 191 000 people a day visit Regional content.97

Projects My Vote was a project that invited everyday Australians to share a portrait photograph along with the election issue that mattered most to them. The project was designed as a way to surface the opinions of real voters as part of the 2016 federal election coverage. There were 290 contributions received during the nine-week project period. Stories were curated into collections covering 22 issues, and then embedded into over 50 digital articles published on the ABC News site. The articles received an aggregate of more than 1.9 million page views and more than 17 million engagement minutes.

In 2015-16, the ABC pioneered the use of virtual reality (VR) storytelling. The ABC’s first VR story, depicting a day in the life of a competitor at the Warwick Rodeo, showed the power of this medium to put the audience in the story, and allow them to decide what they want to experience. Warwick Gold - Australian Rodeo was demonstrated at the Country Hour 70th Anniversary event in October 2015, at the VRTOV VR salon in Melbourne in March 2016, and the Sydney Film Festival in June 2016. For more on this project, see page 56.

97 Webtrends.

The ABC showcases some of the EXTRAORDINARY stories from regional Australia.

Audience Experiences 59

Heywire Heywire is the ABC’s regional youth initiative, which starts as a competition inviting young people to share their first-person stories, and progresses to become a platform for young regional Australians to be heard on the ABC and in Canberra. The initiative is run in partnership with Australian Government bodies.

The Heywire storytelling competition received 678 entries from regional Australians aged between 16-22 years in 2015. This figure has risen steadily over the past six years, with 2015’s entries representing a 52% increase since 2010 (when there were 447 entries). The 44 young winners from around Australia received intensive leadership skills training at the Heywire Regional Youth Summit in February 2016, and their winning radio stories were developed and broadcast in collaboration with ABC Regional producers. In 2015-16, for the first time, the ABC produced a 12-part Heywire television series featuring candid and courageous stories from regional young people. The series screened on iview, ABC News 24 and ABC main channel.

In 2015-16, the Foundation for Rural and Regional Renewal and its philanthropic partners provided $178 000 to support ideas developed at the Heywire Regional Youth Summit (up from $100 000 in 2014-15). The funds enabled youth development projects, which had a positive impact on more than 70 rural and regional towns.

From 2016-17, Heywire will receive an additional $285 000 over three years from the Australian Government Department of Infrastructure and Regional Development to expand the program. The additional funding will enable Heywire to reach more of the young people driving social and economic development in regional Australia, and to tell their stories.

Regional

ABC at AgFest ABC Local Radio Tasmania and ABC Rural proudly support Tasmania’s premier rural event, the iconic AgFest, which is run entirely by Rural Youth Tasmania volunteers and attended by thousands each year. At the 2016 event, the ABC broadcast live from the venue, and there were visits from the Your Afternoon team, Mornings presenter Leon Compton, ABC News’s Peter Gee, and Macca from Australia All Over. ABC Rural’s Country Hour team also roamed the site, meeting lots of people and finding great stories to share on the program.

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ABC Open ABC Open provides ABC audiences with the opportunity, every day, to create their own stories and publish them on the ABC. The stories, photographs and videos of ABC Open form a vast and rich digital archive of Australian experiences.

In 2015-16, the restructure that accompanied the establishment of ABC Regional saw some significant changes to ABC Open, with an increased focus on high-value content and improving diversity, and less emphasis on digital literacy.

As part of this evolution to a ‘contributor hub’ based on distribution to platforms with large audiences, and to align with audience behaviours, ABC Open focused on connecting with local audiences via Facebook and other social media. This resulted in a 160% increase in average reach on the ABC Open Facebook page in 2015-16, compared to the previous year.

In July 2015, the Pic of the Week project was launched on the ABC Open website. This weekly photography competition asked ABC audience members to submit their images from across the country, from which a weekly gallery was curated and distributed by ABC News online.

An average of 1 000 photos were uploaded to ABC Open each week, and over 26 000 images had been contributed at 30 June 2016. The gallery’s pictures regularly receive in excess of 50 000 views per week when combined with ABC News social media.

The Pic of the Week project led to a 45% increase in overall contributions to ABC Open (29 175 contributions in 2015-16 compared with 20 085 in the previous year) and a 55% increase in photo and text contributions.

ABC Open reached two significant milestones in May 2016. The first was the 100 000th contribution uploaded to the ABC Open website.

The Pic of the Week project also hit its 20 000th contribution, significant given that the project has only been running since July 2015.

Regional

Wooden it be nice by ABC Open contributor UniquLee Woodagte. Woodgate, Queensland.

ABC Open - Humans of Bundaberg In November 2015, a group of photographers in Bundaberg, Queensland, spent three weeks taking portraits of locals for the ABC Open project ‘Humans of Bundaberg’. Of the 60 images and stories contributed to the project, 21 were selected for display at the Bundaberg Regional Art Gallery in December, shown alongside the National Photographic Portrait Prize exhibition.

Audience Experiences 61

News and current affairs

In 2015-16, the ABC continued to fulfil the vital role of informing its audiences of significant events affecting Australians at home and around the world.

The period began with the brutal mass murder of parishioners in Charleston, South Carolina on 17 July 2015. The ABC followed the tragedy’s ramifications, which culminated in the historic decision to remove the Confederate flag from outside the South Carolina State House.

The terrorist bombing of the Erawan Shrine in Bangkok in August 2015 was covered live by ABC News 24, with detailed coverage of the aftermath the following day. In October, terrorism struck Australia with the shooting of police employee Curtis Cheng in Parramatta. ABC News was quickly on the scene and reported extensively on the investigation and new terror laws that followed. The following month, the ABC’s London correspondents reported on coordinated attacks in Paris; and in 2016, attacks and mass shootings were covered by ABC correspondents in San Bernadino, California; Orlando, Florida; Istanbul, Turkey; Jakarta, Indonesia; and Beirut, Lebanon.

The year was marked by the massive surge of migrants from Africa and the Middle East to Europe. The ABC’s European and Middle East correspondents were deployed to cover the crisis. At its peak in the European autumn, coverage spanned large regions of the Continent, from Munich to the Hungarian-Serbian border, to Budapest, to Lesbos—where thousands of asylum seekers continued to come ashore. A special report for the 7pm News on Sunday 13 September 2016 linked the correspondents’ stories into a single piece exploring the journey asylum seekers were taking from Turkey through to Germany.

In Australia, during the Liberal leadership spill of September 2015, the ABC provided rolling coverage from the capital. The national 7pm News was also hosted from Canberra, and a delayed edition of Lateline wrapped up the television broadcast. ABC News Breakfast followed up proceedings the next day with an outside broadcast from the front of Parliament House.

Summer once again brought horrific bushfires, which raged along Victoria’s Great Ocean Road on Christmas Day, ultimately destroying more than 100 homes. News provided special coverage across all platforms, live crosses, and emergency broadcasting, and the 7pm News was anchored from Apollo Bay.

In early January 2016, fires in and around Waroona, Harvey and Yaloop in south-west Western Australia raged for 11 days. Almost every building in Yaloop was destroyed and two men were killed. ABC News provided live coverage from the area, including live links from reporters and video journalists in the fire zone. Stories were presented on all platforms, including the 7pm News and on ABC News 24; a designated digital team worked on coverage throughout; and News contributed to rolling emergency broadcasting on radio.

Anzac Day 2016 was marked by extensive multiplatform live coverage, with reporters at dawn services and marches across the country and in France, as well as live pictures from the Gallipoli Dawn Service. Chief foreign correspondent Phil Williams and Defence reporter Andrew Greene also travelled to Afghanistan and Iraq with the Australian Defence Force, to give audiences an insight into the current state of play in the Middle East, as part of the ABC’s Anzac Day coverage.

The first half of 2016 was Presidential primaries season in the United States. The ABC’s Washington-based correspondents travelled from New Hampshire to California to produce stories for all platforms, including ABC News’ first use of Facebook Live.

Domestic Australian politics was very much the focus of ABC News towards the end of 2015-16 with comprehensive cross-platform coverage of the 2016 federal election campaign and federal Budget.

On ABC television, Leigh Sales and Chris Uhlmann hosted a live Budget Special from Canberra with a panel of the ABC’s top political and economic correspondents as well as politicians, economists and business leaders. Eleanor Hall hosted a Budget Special on ABC Radio. News Breakfast was hosted from Canberra the next day, with ABC reporters in key metro and regional electorates broadcasting voters’ reactions.

Australians rely on the ABC EVERYDAY as the most trusted source of news and information.

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The election campaign quickly followed the Budget. The ABC’s Australia Votes website showcased the breadth of ABC content available, and the interactive Vote Compass policy alignment survey was again central to coverage with over 1.2 million respondents. Regular news stories discussing the Vote Compass data ran on television, radio, and online.

Canberra reporters and crews on the campaign trail filed for all platforms, contributing news stories, photos and video for the live blog, 360-degree videos for social media, and live coverage of key events for the continuous broadcast news services.

While Australia approached the end of the election campaign period, British citizens were deciding the future of their relationship with Europe. London correspondents Lisa Millar, James Glenday and Steve Cannane, alongside chief foreign correspondent, Phil Williams, covered the Brexit campaign leading up to the vote on 24 June 2016. They were joined by the Washington and Canberra bureaux and ABC News’s business team in detailed coverage of the political and economic impact of Brexit.

For audience responses on Balance in ABC news and current affairs, see 2.11 on page 151

ABC News’s focus is on producing and extending the reach of distinctive original journalism. A highlight during the period was the Four Corners program ‘The Panama Papers - Secrets of the Super Rich’, a joint investigation of the biggest leak of confidential information in journalism history. Coordinated by the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists (ICIJ) and reported by Marian Wilkinson, the story of the shadowy world of secret international finance and tax avoidance was complemented by a number of follow-up stories from both domestic and foreign correspondents.

In addition to reach, impact is an important metric for news and current affairs content. ABC News regularly reviews its coverage to assess the impact and influence of its original journalism. There were a number of major stories produced during the reporting period that sparked political, societal and institutional change:

• The Four Corners program ‘Jackson and Lawler: Inside the eye of the storm’ triggered a federal government inquiry into Michael Lawler’s conduct at the Fair Work Commission. Following mounting calls for Lawler to be removed from his powerful judicial position, he resigned from his vice presidency in March 2016.

• The joint Four Corners/Fairfax program ‘7-Eleven: The Price of Convenience’ revealed a business model relying on the exploitation of its workforce. Based on painstaking research and insider accounts, the investigation was months in the making and sparked multiple inquiries into 7-Eleven’s work practices, plunging the company into crisis.

• The 7.30 story ‘Australian Islamic State fighters accused of enslaving Yazidi women’ was an international exclusive. As speculation swirled around Australians Khaled Sharrouf and Mohamed Elomar’s activities with ISIS, an ABC team went to Northern Iraq and spoke to Yazidi women who had escaped from being held captive in Raqqa, Syria. The team verified the women’s claims of enslavement by Sharrouf, the story revealing the moral degradation of a Sydney man extolled as the poster-boy of Jihadi recruiters.

• Just days after the Four Corners story ‘Callous Disregard’ went to air in May 2016, the New South Wales Director of Public Prosecutions commissioned an independent review of the investigation into the murder of Lynette Daley at Ten Mile Beach in January 2011. Within a month, charges had been laid, with the matter to be seen in court in August 2016.

News and current affairs

Curious Campaign Curious Campaign invited voters to have a say in the kind of coverage they wanted to see during the election period, by submitting their questions directly to ABC News. Questions such as “What’s in place to stop people voting multiple times?” and “Why have voters not had access to electronic voting?” were voted on in rounds by the public to gauge the most pressing concerns. Winning questions were then investigated by an ABC News journalist, and written up online. A short piece about the questioner was provided at the end of some of the articles, giving the ABC and its audience extra insight into the views and voting preferences of everyday Australians.

Audience Experiences 63

ABC News Digital and social media In 2016, ABC News and Current Affairs websites reached an average 4.5 million Australian users each month, which was more than 1 in 5 (22.7%) of the active online Australian population.98 Desktop remained the dominant audience device for ABC news and current affairs, with a monthly average reach of 2.9 million, followed by smartphone at 1.3 million, and tablet at 739 000.99

The sites attracted an average of 4.6 million domestic and international visitors each week, up 21% on 2014-15. The number of visits was also up 17% to an average 9.1 million a week.100

Throughout the year, News Digital complemented and added depth to ABC stories with interactive graphics, photographic essays, and supplementary content. With the release of the Panama Papers, News Digital published more than 50 related stories, resulting in 1.52 million page views.101 On Budget day, coverage included a live blog, Budget explainers, a winners and losers interactive tool, analysis, a Facebook Q&A with Annabel Crabb, and short-form social media videos.

News and current affairs

7.30’s Matt Brown reported from Northern Iraq on the enslavement of Yazidi women in Syria.

98 Nielsen DRM - Desktop, Ppl 2+, Smartphone and Tablet, Ppl 18+, Jan-Jun 2016.

99 Nielsen DRM - Desktop, Ppl 2+, Smartphone and Tablet, Ppl 18+, Jan-Jun 2016.

100 Webtrends.

101 Webtrends.

102 Nielsen DRM - Smartphone and Tablet, Ppl 18+, Jan-Jun 2016.

ABC News on snapchat During the federal election campaign in 2016, ABC News took stock of the influence social media has on both the news and modern-day elections, and added a new platform to its social media suite: the mobile-only app Snapchat. Around 3.3 million Australians aged 18+ use the service, and the ABC saw an opportunity to deliver the news in a different way, to engage with this significant and important demographic.102

Incorporating short videos, stills, text, and other features, stories are posted on Snapchat, built on by reporters with further ‘snaps’, and expire after 24 hours. During the federal election campaign, there was a strong focus on behind-the-scenes footage, unrehearsed moments, policy issues, and a behind-the-scenes look at how the ABC creates the news.

4.5million average monthly reach of ABC News and Current Affairs websites

A dedicated Digital team contributed to coverage of the Yarloop fire in Western Australia, and during the Liberal leadership spill, News Digital produced a live blog throughout proceedings, and released pre-planned content including profiles of both Tony Abbott and Malcolm Turnbull.

64 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2016

During the federal election campaign of May and June of 2016, Digital coverage was a central focus, with the following priority projects:

• a daily live blog from early morning into the evening

• regular Facebook Live Q&As with key reporters

• audience engagement projects such as Curious Campaign (see page 62) and #electionin6words on Twitter

• interactive digital policy explainers, results, seat maps, and overviews of proceedings

• daily short-form videos produced for social media

• updates from the Mobile team such as ‘What you need to know’, election app alerts and WhatsApp

• Snapchat coverage with reporters providing behind the scenes insights (see page 63)

• comprehensive news and analysis for digital audiences

• a results service built specifically for mobile devices.

Information regarding ABC news and current affairs online, including social media, is available at 2.12 on page 152

News and Current Affairs on Radio News and Current affairs programs on Local Radio and RN reached, on average, 1.8 million people aged 10+ each week in the five-city metropolitan market in 2015-16,103 steady with 2014-15. There were 30.5 million podcasts of News content downloaded or streamed in 2015-16.104

ABC NewsRadio’s five-city metropolitan average weekly reach was 700 000 in 2015-16, down 6% from 746 000 in 2014-15. Audience share remained steady at 1.5% (1.6% in 2014-15).105

On 14 September 2015, 774 ABC Melbourne hosted a national evening show covering the night of the Liberal leadership challenge. NewsRadio also offered extended coverage of the Spill. Over 14 and 15 November 2015, in collaboration with colleagues in ABC news and current affairs, ABC Radio presented extensive coverage of the Paris bombings.

On 25 January 2016, 666 ABC Canberra hosted a national evening show from the lawns of Parliament House in Canberra for the announcement of the 2016 Australian of the Year. The following morning, the station conducted the first major feature-length interview with the recipient, former Lieutenant-General David Morrison AO.

From 12-15 April 2016, on the 10th anniversary of the Beaconsfield Mine Disaster, Statewide Mornings in Tasmania broadcast live from the community, as well as from Launceston and Burnie.

News and current affairs on television The year saw the ABC’s 7pm News audience remain stable compared to 2014-15 across weekdays and Saturdays, but with a 2% decline for the Sunday bulletin. Key current affairs programs 7.30, Four Corners and Australian Story experienced declines of between 4% and 6% year-on-year. However, Insiders and ABC News Breakfast saw strong growth in 2015-16, with the ABC and ABC News 24 simulcasts up 13% and 9% respectively compared to 2014-15.106

On ABC, the combined metro and regional average audience for the Monday to Friday 7pm News in 2015- 16 was 1.1 million, stable compared to 2014-15.107 The Saturday edition of the 7pm News averaged 1.2 million in 2015-16, stable compared to 2014-15,108 and the Sunday edition averaged 1.1 million in 2015- 16, a decline of 2% compared to 2014-15.109

On the ABC’s main channel, the combined average audience for 7.30 was 931 000 in 2015-16, a decrease of 4% compared to 2014-15.110

News and current affairs

103 GfK. Includes Local Radio programs: Early AM (Monday-Friday 6-6.15am), 7.45am News (Monday-Sunday 7.45-8am), AM (Monday-Saturday 8-8.30am), The World Today (Monday-Friday 12md-1pm) and PM (Monday-Friday 6-7pm) and RN programs: AM (Monday-Saturday 7-7.30am), The World Today (Monday-Friday 12md-1pm) and PM (Monday-Friday 5-5.30pm).

104 Webtrends.

105 GfK.

106 OzTAM and Regional TAM Consolidated 7 Data 2014-15, 2015-16.

107 OzTAM and Regional TAM Consolidated 7 Data 2014-15, 2015-16.

108 OzTAM and Regional TAM Consolidated 7 Data 2014-15, 2015-16.

109 OzTAM and Regional TAM Consolidated 7 Data 2014-15, 2015-16.

110 OzTAM and Regional TAM Consolidated 7 Data 2014-15, 2015-16.

Audience Experiences 65

Foreign Correspondent achieved a combined average audience of 667 000, a decline of 20% compared to 2014-15.111 A timeslot change in 2016 that saw the program move to Tuesday at 9.30pm impacted the program’s audience. The episode ‘Peter Greste: My Fight for Freedom (Part 1)’, broadcast on Tuesday 28 July 2015, achieved the highest audience for the program in 2015-16 with a combined average audience of 959 000.112

Four Corners achieved a combined average audience of 1 million on ABC’s main channel in 2015-16, a decrease of 5% on 2014-15.113 The episode ‘Dethroning Tony Abbott’, broadcast on Monday 21 September 2015, achieved a combined average audience of 1.4 million, the highest average audience for the program in 2015-16.114

News and current affairs

111 OzTAM and Regional TAM Consolidated 7 Data 2014-15, 2015-16.

112 OzTAM and Regional TAM Consolidated 7 Data 2014-15, 2015-16.

113 OzTAM and Regional TAM Consolidated 7 Data 2014-15, 2015-16.

114 OzTAM and Regional TAM Consolidated 7 Data 2014-15, 2015-16.

115 OzTAM and Regional TAM Consolidated 7 Data 2014-15, 2015-16.

1.1million combined average audience for the weekday 7pm News

Australian Story ‘Going with the Flow’, broadcast on Monday 26 October 2015, achieved the highest average audience for the program—1.6 million.115 The episode charted the transformative moments that followed Byron Bay inventor Cedar Anderson’s creation of the ‘Flow Hive’, a beehive that uses a plastic frame and lever mechanism to drain the honey directly from the hive, so the bees aren’t disturbed and stressed, and the process is far easier for the beekeeper. Cedar’s crowdfunding campaign seeking $70 000 for the project went viral, and he ended up with US$12.2 million of advance orders. Cedar and his father Stuart, who had assisted with the invention, went from tinkering in their shed to running a multimillion dollar company.

For more on the 20th Anniversary of Australian Story, see page 57.

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Across its ABC main channel and ABC News 24 simulcast, Insiders achieved a combined average audience of 550 000 in 2015-16, an increase of 13% on 2014-15.116 Lateline on ABC main channel achieved a combined audience of 225 000 in 2015-16, a 6% decline on the previous year,117 while on ABC News 24 the program achieved a combined average audience of 78 000, an increase of 5% compared to 2014-15. The Business achieved a combined average audience of 130 000 on ABC’s main channel, stable compared to the 2014-15 average.118

ABC News Breakfast is broadcast each weekday on ABC main channel and ABC News 24. In 2015-16, News Breakfast achieved a combined average audience of 237 000 (7am-9am) across ABC main channel and ABC News 24, up 9% on 2014-15.119

Australians have always loved a great story about one of their own, and in 2016 Australian Story saw its 20th year of delivering in-depth, involving, impactful stories about everyday Australians who have seen extraordinary times.

In 2015-16 the program achieved a combined average audience in 2015-16 of 1.2 million. Although this was a decline of 6% compared to 2014-15,120 the program remains hugely popular, with combined audiences of more than 1.5 million on three separate occasions during the year.

ABC News 24 In 2015-16, ABC News 24 maintained its position as Australia’s leading 24-hour news channel. The channel has increased its metropolitan reach year-on-year, driven by major news events. Top programs included coverage of the Liberal leadership change in September 2015, coverage of the Paris and Brussels attacks, Brexit, and the 2016 Federal Budget.121

In 2015-16, ABC News 24 strengthened its metropolitan average weekly reach by 2% compared to the 2014-15 average of 2.5 million people. This equates to a weekly reach of 14.9% of the five-city metropolitan population.122 Average weekly regional reach on ABC News 24 in 2015-16 was 1.3 million, or 18.9% of the regional population. This is down from the 2014-15 average of 1.4 million, or 19.1% of the regional population.123

Metropolitan daytime free-to-air share for ABC News 24 was 4.2% in 2015-16, up from 3.8% in 2014-15.124 Metropolitan prime-time free-to-air share was 1.3% in 2015-16, stable with 2014-15. Prime-time regional free-to-air share for ABC News 24 was 1.4% in 2015-16, steady compared to 2014-15. Regional daytime free-to-air share was 5.1% in 2015-16, up from 4.8% in 2014-15.125

Online Streams ABC News 24 is streamed live via the ABC News 24 website, ABC iview and the ABC flagship app.

ABC News 24 recorded a total of 2.9 million streams via ABC iview in 2015-16, up from 2.2 million in 2014-15. The monthly average in 2015-16 was 242 000, up from 184 000 in 2014-15.126

In 2015-16, a total of 3.5 million streams were recorded via the ABC News 24 website and ABC app, up from 3.4 million in 2014-15. The monthly average via the website in 2015-16 was 291 000, up from 282 000 in 2014-15.127

Streams of ABC News 24 via iview and the website peaked in September 2015, driven by coverage of the Liberal leadership change. A total of 427 000 streams were recorded via the ABC News 24 website and ABC app and a further 382 000 streams were recorded via iview.

News and current affairs

116 OzTAM and Regional TAM Consolidated 7 Data 2014-15, 2015-16.

117 OzTAM and Regional TAM Consolidated 7 Data 2014-15, 2015-16.

118 OzTAM and Regional TAM Consolidated 7 Data 2014-15, 2015-16. 119 OzTAM and Regional TAM Consolidated 7 Data 2014-15, 2015-16.

120 OzTAM and Regional TAM Consolidated 7 Data 2014-15, 2015-16.

121 OzTAM and Regional TAM Consolidated 7 Data 2014-15, 2015-16.

122 OzTAM Consolidated 7 Data 2014-15, 2015-16 (including spill); (reach based on five-minute consecutive viewing).

123 Regional TAM Consolidated 7 Data 2014-15, 2015-16 (including spill); (reach based on five-minute consecutive viewing).

124 OzTAM Consolidated 7 Data 2014-15, 2015-16.

125 Regional TAM Consolidated 7 Data 2014-15, 2015-16, includes spill.

126 Webtrends.

127 Webtrends.

Audience Experiences 67

International services

ABC International delivers a multiplatform international media service that presents selected ABC and Australian content to Australian expatriates and local audiences in the Asia-Pacific region. The reach of ABC International Services is extended through a network of local media partnership arrangements.

Australia Plus digital services are the centrepiece of the international media service, along with Radio Australia and Australia Plus TV—a service that provides the Asia-Pacific region with multi-genre programming, sourced from ABC, SBS and through co-production acquisition. In-country partnerships and agreements deliver programs and content directly to networks, websites, mobile and social media services utilised by local audiences.

ABC International is empowered by the ABC Act to receive commercial revenues, including advertising and sponsorship. Increased reach with local audiences has created an attractive proposition for potential commercial sponsors. ABC International resources are arranged to maximise potential to capitalise on opportunities for external revenues, whilst maintaining the service’s distinct content.

Research and Development As part of the ABC’s audience-at-the-centre strategy, ABC International conducted a series of audience research projects to better understand the key markets of Indonesia and China, and to inform digital product development.

Marshall Islands

Federated States Micronesia

Palau

French Polynesia

Tonga

Samoa

Fiji Vanuatu

Shepparton

Solomon Islands

New Caledonia

Wallis and Futuna Papua New Guinea

Singapore

Cambodia

China

Vietnam

Laos

Myanmar

Indonesia

di di di di di

Australia Plus TV

Satellite distribution/footprint

Shortwave transmission sites

Digital subscription sites

Foreign Language Services

Radio Australia Radio Australia’s 24-hour FM network

Key

ABC International content reaches an EXTRAORDINARY number of people in the region, particularly through growing social media platforms.

68 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2016

A qualitative approach was taken with audience interviews conducted remotely via Skype (in Jakarta, Yogjakarta, Bandung, Medan, and Timor) and face-to-face (in Beijing, Shanghai, and Chengdu). The research explored digital media habits, audience attitudes towards Australia, and responses to current Australia Plus digital properties, sponsored content, and genre categories.

The outcomes of the research provided validation of the Australia Plus content offering, confirming strong audience interest in connecting with Australian stories and opportunities. Importantly, the research also highlighted shortcomings in market-specific user interface design, which then influenced a new iteration of the Australia Plus China and Indonesia responsive websites, which were launched in May 2016.

In May 2016, AustraliaPlus.com was redesigned and started publishing content in the ABC’s enterprise web content management system. This provided audiences with optimised experiences across mobile, tablet, and desktop devices and allowed for greater sharing of content across ABC digital services. The iOS and Android apps developed in 2013 for users in Indonesia and China were discontinued in 2015-16.

Commercial development strategy ABC International launched a Commercial Partnership strategy in October 2015 to generate greater funding from advertising platforms and increase audience engagement through access to media partner distribution channels and associated content. Traditionally, advertising on the Australia Plus television service has been the primary form of commercial revenue for ABC International. The emergence of new digital assets on Australia Plus websites and mobile apps present an opportunity to increase commercial returns for reinvestment back into services.

The Commercial Partner Portfolio is a tiered model offering Foundation, Gold and Silver partnerships, awarded according to the level of investment. Foundation Partnerships provide for exclusive naming rights to specific audience genre categories. Gold and Silver levels are non-exclusive and provide a range of advertising and branding benefits relative to the investment. The commercial partner agreements are restricted to the sponsorship benefits outlined in contracts.

Commercial partnerships awarded in the first phase of implementation include Foundation Partners: Monash University, the Victorian Government; and Swisse Wellness.

News on Australia Plus and Radio Australia Regional news coverage highlights in 2015-16 included in-depth reporting from the ABC’s foreign correspondents in South-East Asia and China:

• Liam Cochrane covered the historic elections in Myanmar.

• Samantha Hawley reported on the attack on Jakarta’s CBD by ISIS sympathisers.

• Adam Harvey provided news from the presidential elections in the Philippines.

• Bill Birtles covered China’s decision to devalue the yuan and the resultant stock market volatility.

• Eric Tlozek’s investigated the corruption allegations against Papua New Guinea’s Prime Minister Peter O’Neill.

ABC International’s Tok Pisin language team provided comprehensive coverage of significant events throughout the year, including the anti-government protests and violence in Papua New Guinea and the leadership crisis in Vanuatu, as well as the Festival of Pacific Arts and the Pacific Games.

International services

A billboard promoting Window on Australia outside the Shanghai Media Group building on Weishai Road, Shanghai.

Audience Experiences 69

Stories from Pacific Beat and The World spawned numerous online articles and features for abc.net.au/news that were extended via the Australia Plus and Radio Australia sites. Additional content was also commissioned, including articles and photographic essays from freelancers around the world.

Australia Plus Digital In 2015-16, Australia Plus online services continued to showcase Australian stories and stimulate conversations with Australia’s neighbours and Australians living abroad.

Stories that featured Australians who have made their mark in the world, such as Australia’s biggest pop star in Vietnam, Thanh Bui, and Sydney maths teacher Eddie Woo, resonated with audiences. Also capturing audiences were stories highlighting the experiences of those who have come to Australia to study and pursue careers, for example Indonesia’s ‘PhD Mamas’ and Professor Tony Wong, who is a world expert in designing water sensitive cities.

ABC International also contributed to the diversity of content for domestic ABC services by providing stories of people from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds. Content produced for Lunar New Year, Ramadan, and key ABC events such as Mental As, Anzac Day, and OUR FOCUS: Health was regularly featured on the abc.net.au homepage.

In May 2016, ABC International launched a new Australia Plus website with seven content categories— Study + Innovation, In Person, Learn English, Style + Wellbeing, Business Matters, On the Menu and Explore + Experience. Publishing in eight languages online, Australia Plus is a gateway to Australian life, culture and business for international audiences.

The Australia Plus website had a total of 1.57 million visits in 2015-16, with an average time on site of 7 minutes 22 seconds.128 Among the foreign language sites, A+ Indonesia had 714 111 visits in 2015-16, followed closely by the A+ English International site with 675 405 visits.129

Australia Plus TV Australia Plus TV continues to offer a multi-genre television service across Asia and the Pacific, presenting audiences with a range of Australian news, kids’, drama, factual and entertainment programs, and sports content.

Australia Plus TV is available in 40 countries across Asia and the Pacific. New agreements adding six million households have been entered into with Tata Sky (India), Reliance Jio (India), Extreme Teleconnect (India), SingMeng Telemedia (Cambodia), Canal+ Calédonie (New Caledonia, Wallis and Futuna, and Vanuatu), ComClark (Philippines), Aruji Co (Japan), Peo TV (Sri Lanka), VTV Cab (Vietnam) and FPT Telecom (Vietnam). New syndication partners the Shanghai United Media Group and Chengdu Radio and Television were also added.

ABC news and current affairs content on Australia Plus TV includes ABC News Breakfast, Four Corners, Foreign Correspondent, Compass, Australian Story, Q&A and The World, a 30-minute program produced by the Asia Pacific News Centre.

Australia Plus TV delivers the most popular Australian kids’ programs, such as Bananas in Pyjamas, Ready, Steady, Wiggle!, Play School, Dance Academy, Totally Wild and Blue Water High. Some of this content is subtitled to assist with English learning for an international audience.

Collaborating with India’s public service broadcaster Doordarshan, Australia Plus TV broadcasts a children’s block on both Saturday and Sunday mornings with Giggle and Hoot and Ready, Steady, Wiggle! as well as Bananas in Pyjamas dubbed in Hindi for a local Indian audience. Proving just as popular with children in India, Bananas in Pyjamas is the third most watched children’s program in the 10am Sunday timeslot. A children’s program block is also broadcast on Indovision TV’s children’s channel.

Stories of life in Australia are showcased in the extensive factual and entertainment programming available on Australia Plus TV, including Julia Zemiro’s Home Delivery, Jillaroo School, Outback ER, and Flying Miners. Some of the popular Australian dramas to show on the network during 2015-16 were The Code, A Place to Call Home and Miss Fisher’s Murder Mysteries.

Australia Plus TV is the home of AFL in the Asia-Pacific, showing six live games a week. The Melbourne Cup and the Sydney to Hobart Yacht Race are also broadcast to audiences in the region.

In 2015-16, Australia Plus TV broadcast a special Cinema Pasifika series, introducing short films by some of the Pacific’s emerging filmmakers.

International services

128 Webtrends; Australia Plus.

129 Webtrends; Australia Plus.

70 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2016

AustraliaPlus.cn The first anniversary of the China portal AustraliaPlus.cn was celebrated with major television events broadcast by partners in Shanghai, Beijing and Chengdu. Celebrations coincided with Australia Week in China and the Australia China Business Awards, which Australia Plus sponsored.

The Window on Australia event was broadcast during Australia Week in April 2016 on Chengdu radio and television, on cable television, and on social media platforms. As part of this event, popular Australian lifestyle program specials and documentaries were broadcast in prime time on Shanghai Media Group’s International Channel Shanghai and Beijing Television’s documentary channel. 2016 was the first year ABC International and Beijing Television collaborated on the Window on Australia event.

Radio Australia Across Radio Australia’s English, Tok Pisin and French services, several extraordinary Pacific current affairs and celebratory events were covered in 2015-16. Special reports included coverage of the 2015 Pacific Games in Papua New Guinea, the coronation of Tupou VI, King of Tonga, the 50th anniversary of Cook Islands Independence, the 40th anniversary of independence in Papua New Guinea, the Festival of Pacific Arts in Guam, the 2016 Samoa General Election, Vanuatu’s leadership crisis, and the 2016 Melanesian Spearhead Group meeting.

In February 2016, Radio Australia provided comprehensive coverage of Tropical Cyclone Winston in the South Pacific, where Fiji was hardest hit. The Asia Pacific News Centre mounted additional programming related to Cyclone Winston in the immediate aftermath, with Radio Australia’s Pacific Beat providing extended bulletins on the hour at key broadcast times and special weekend editions of the program. Pacific affairs reporters travelled to Fiji to provide extensive cross-platform coverage, and returned again later to provide follow up reporting and insights in support of the ABC’s fundraising appeal, accompanied by a team from the Asia Pacific News Centre’s The World.

A major highlight for Radio Australia’s Burmese audiences was its coverage of the Myanmar presidential election in 2016. Prior to the election, Radio Australia also seconded its Burmese program producer to facilitate election coverage and reporting workshops in Myanmar.

High profile guests on the Khmer Service included political leaders and analysts, some of whom were also interviewed for domestic and international ABC News programs.

Radio Australia delivered simulcasts of special ABC Radio programs, including the 702 ABC Sydney Lunar New Year outside broadcast from Cabramatta, and State of Origin match broadcasts. Each of the simulcasts included special mentions of Radio Australia audiences, bringing international and local audiences together for a shared experience.

Across a 24-hour schedule, Radio Australia provides broad coverage of news and events in English from the Asia-Pacific region through bespoke news bulletins and the popular Pacific Beat program, which are produced by the Asia Pacific News Centre. ABC News flagship current affairs programs AM, PM and The World Today, as well as Saturday AM and NewsRadio Weekend Mornings also provide current affairs updates and reports from the Asia-Pacific region.

Social Media In 2015-16, ABC International used all of its social media channels to actively share content produced by other parts of the ABC. Stories produced by RN, ABC News, and ABC Open have all been shared with international audiences.

International services

Australia Plus Kids app The Australia Plus Kids ‘Learn English’ app is an interactive learning app that teaches basic vocabulary to children aged 2-4. The ‘flash-card’ style lessons are presented in lexical sets including the alphabet, numbers, animals, food, and musical instruments, using characters from ABC children’s programs Giggle and Hoot, The Bananas in Pyjamas, Play School, and The Wiggles. The app follows a basic foreign language learning pedagogy: presentation, practise and production, with a reward (PPPR). It was built for both iOS and Android devices, including tablets, and was promoted to the Australia Plus Learn English community on Facebook.

Audience Experiences 71

Australia Plus’s Learn English Facebook page is one of the most popular Facebook pages from Australia, and the largest operated by the ABC in terms of ‘likes’. The service provides highly shareable English lessons in the form of videos, audio and text, all of which are optimised for mobile engagement, assisting the 74% of followers who use mobile devices to access the page.130 It has 3.9 million followers and is adding about a million followers a year, with India, Pakistan and Vietnam the top three countries for number of followers attained throughout the period.131 The majority of the Learn English audience is in the 18-24 age range, and 82% are younger than 34.132

Lessons are designed to provide a sense of Australia through the use of locations, descriptions and imagery, which serve to build an audience interest in studying, travelling, and working in Australia. Posts about Australian slang and tips on how to learn English are amongst the page’s most popular content.

The service has explored collaborations, partnerships and sharing content from other parts of the ABC, and engaging with external organisations, to extend reach.

One initiative was to conduct live moderation sessions during the Asian English Olympics held in BINUS University in Jakarta, Indonesia. Video questions from participants were shared on the Australia Plus Learn English Facebook page and responses came from across the online community.

For information on social media milestones reached by ABC International in 2015-16, see 2.13 on page 153

ABC content-maker Shivali Nayak speaks to English language learning expert, senior teacher Paul Williams from the English Language Department of Central Queensland University on a Facebook Live chat.

Radio Australia primarily engages with audiences on social media platforms, including Twitter and Facebook, with accounts in English and in vernacular for Khmer, French and Burmese audiences. These platforms are attracting a new generation of followers. For example, Radio Australia’s Khmer Facebook page had a steep surge between March and June 2016, from 40 000 to 60 000 followers.133

For Radio Australia social media statistics, see 2.14 on page 153

International services

Learn English content manager Shivali Nayak speaks to Paul Williams, a senior teacher from the English Language Department of Central Queensland University, on a Facebook Live video program.

130 Facebook.

131 Facebook.

132 Facebook.

133 Facebook.

72 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2016

International services

FM stations and Radio Australia in Myanmar, and was funded by the Australian Embassy’s Direct Aid Program in Myanmar.

ABCID is contracted to manage the Pacific Media Assistance Scheme (PACMAS), a DFAT Australian Aid-funded program. PACMAS works across 14 countries to deliver support to partners, including public broadcasters, under four key components: capacity development; content; media systems; and media policy and legislation. During the reporting period key strategic activities undertaken by PACMAS included:

• skills training for Pacific journalists in areas including parliamentary reporting; finance and budget coverage; investigative journalism; reporting on the economics of the Pacific fisheries industry; and reporting on ending violence against women

• five new curriculum modules developed for journalism courses in Pacific Tertiary and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) institutions in Fiji, Samoa, Solomon Islands, Tonga and Vanuatu. TVET teachers were trained to deliver the new material

• a program of support in disaster and emergency broadcasting provided to broadcasters, national disaster management officers and partners in eight Pacific countries.

ABCID is an implementing partner of the Pacific Sports Partnerships (PSP), funded by Australian Aid. The program uses sport to promote healthier communities through active lifestyles, nutrition, and disease prevention. The sports also promote gender and disability inclusiveness. ABCID developed and implements a media and communication strategy working with all the sport program partners across the Pacific region helping them to improve their communication skills. ABCID also produces media content on PSP stories and, through this, community awareness is raised about the sports activities, development issues being tackled, and participants’ achievements.

ABCID also provided technical inputs on a communication strategy design project with Vanuatu Ministry of Education and Training which aims to increase the number of children enrolling in primary school at the correct age. Funding for this initiative was provided by the Vanuatu Education Support Program.

International Development ABC International Development (ABCID) is the media and communication development specialist branch of ABC International. ABCID is a self-funded enterprise with approximately 33 staff (including 17 locally engaged staff) in Australia, Cambodia, Papua New Guinea, Vanuatu and Myanmar. The unit supports partner countries and media to collectively engage on important issues in the Asia-Pacific region. Projects and initiatives are primarily funded via the Australian Aid program, overseen by the Australian Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade (DFAT).

ABCID’s work reflects the ABC’s strengths in public broadcasting, with core competencies focusing on disaster preparedness, rural/agricultural affairs, education, gender equality, youth programming and organisational management. The unit also plays a role in enhancing and building on long-term regional relationships that ABC has maintained through Radio Australia and its other international media services.

In 2015-16, ABCID continued to work with public broadcasters and media organisations across the Asia-Pacific region.

This work included the Media Development Initiative (MDI) in Papua New Guinea which focused on strengthening the PNG national broadcaster’s internal governance and its content output in order to facilitate community engagement and increase citizen access to information.

ABCID continued its Cambodia Communications Assistance Project (CCAP) with the Cambodian Government’s Ministry of Information and Provincial Departments of Information, moving into a second phase of support in October 2015. The project provided support to Provincial Departments of Information radio stations in Siem Reap, Kampot, Battambang, Kampong Cham and Krati, with a focus on talkback programming to promote accountability and transparency, and programming centred on ending violence against women.

ABCID worked with Myanmar Radio and Television (MRTV) as it built organisational and staff capacity and developed new content formats. Support included media craft skills training, organisational management advice, digital online assistance, election coverage and developing interactive content. Funding for this initiative was provided by the Governments of Norway, Sweden and Finland, through International Media Support. ABCID also worked with MRTV to produce a radio drama in Burmese on maternal and child health issues. This series was broadcast on MRTV,

Audience Experiences 73

Consumer experiences

ABC Commercial manages a range of media businesses which create, market and license products, content and services related to the programming and Charter activities of the ABC. The Division extends the reach of high-quality Australian content, and identifies and develops new revenue streams with a particular focus on the expansion of revenue opportunities in the digital sector.

Financial Performance Over the course of the financial year, ABC Commercial’s operations were fundamentally transformed with the closure of the ABC Shops network after 35 years of operation. This decision impacted the net result in both the 2015 and 2016 financial years.

The actual cost of closure was lower than the initial estimate and provision reported in the 2015 Annual Report. A significant portion of the reduced closure costs can be attributed to the motivation and engagement of ABC Retail staff whose commitment saw the ABC Shops trading at a higher level of profitability than forecast, resulting in lower stock writedowns compared to original estimates.

Excluding ABC Retail, the ABC Commercial net profit result in 2015-16 was $3.5 million.

In 2015-16, ABC Commercial contributed $12.3 million back to the external creative industries through the payments of royalties and advances. In addition, the Division has contributed funds back to ABC content areas for the creation of content which will then be available to ABC Commercial to exploit. These contributions are separate to any net revenue the Division contributes back to the organisation.

For ABC Commercial’s breakdown of gross revenue by activity, see 2.15 on page 153 Richard Roxburgh in Rake.

EVERYDAY, the ABC’s commercial activities contribute to extending the life of ABC content and generating revenue for reinvestment.

74 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2016

Up to 300 ABC Retail staff were made redundant as a result of the Shop closures. Shop staff remained engaged and motivated up to the end of trade and the final days of their employment. Retail Head Office consultations regarding the required support office restructure began in January 2016. The finalised structure for the future ABC Retail operation consists of 10 staff in Ultimo, and a team of 7 staff located at the Shop Online Fulfilment Centre in Artarmon, New South Wales. The Retail business is led by the new position of Sales and Merchandise Manager.

The two main financial costs of the transition were ABC staff redundancies and the surrender payments for non-expiring shop leases. Costs associated with the transition of the ABC Retail business out of the physical shop network to the Shop Online and ABC Centres model will be funded from future earnings of ABC Commercial.

Following the ABC Shop closure announcement, work commenced on a revised ABC Retail model, with ABC Shop Online as the focus to be accompanied by an expanded network of ABC Centres across the country. As at 1 July 2015 there were 81 ABC Centres—licensed ABC concessions within existing retailers—across Australia. A new ABC Centres licence agreement was developed with a view to signing up a larger number of Centres across the country to ensure that a substantial physical footprint is maintained for ABC audiences. Existing Centres were invited to sign up to the new agreement and the majority took up this option. At 30 June 2016 there were 224 ABC Centres across Australia.

ABC Shop closures In 1981, the ABC opened its first standalone shop in Hobart. Over the following decades, the ABC Shop network became the public face of the ABC and a touchpoint for ABC audiences around Australia. At its peak, the physical shop network served more than 10 million customers each year and generated profits that were returned to the ABC for investment in content making.

Revenues from the network began to slide from 2011-12 with the decline in demand for product formats such as DVD and CD. Customers were increasingly purchasing books, CDs and DVDs online and accessing content digitally through online subscription, download and streaming services. While the adoption of strategies to improve performance and efficiency had some limited success, ultimately these strategies and further reviews of the business were unable to find a path to sustained profitability for the ABC Shops.

By the end of 2014-15, the ABC Board had resolved to conduct a phased exit from the ABC Shop network with all 50 stores to be closed by March 2016. The closure of the ABC Shop network was announced internally and to the public on 23 July 2015.

Seven ABC Shops closed before Christmas 2015. The remaining 43 stores traded through this period and into 2016 and were progressively closed through the first quarter of 2016, with the last shop closing its doors on 31 March 2016. As much as possible, closure dates were timed to coincide with lease expiries or following negotiations to minimise lease payouts.

Consumer experiences

Audience Experiences 75

ABC Events was the logo licence partner of Opera on the Harbour for the second year running. ABC Classics will be distributing Opera Australia’s audio visual recording of Turandot and releasing the performance on DVD internationally.

Publishing

Magazines ABC Magazines produces the Gardening Australia, and Organic Gardener magazines. In addition to its periodicals, ABC Magazines also publishes a number of feature publications such as gardening diaries, calendars and special interest annual publications such as the triple j magazine, and ABC Cricket.

In 2015-16, ABC Magazines published (in physical and digital formats) 12 issues of ABC Gardening Australia and seven issues of ABC Organic Gardener. Gardening Australia was once again the leading Australian magazine in the gardening category, retaining a strong readership in a declining magazines market.

ABC Magazines re-launched Organic Gardener magazine with a fresh new look and design in October 2015, and in May 2016 entered into a new licence agreement with nextmedia to publish the title.

Books ABC Books publishes Australian non-fiction and children’s books in partnership with HarperCollins Publishers Australia. In 2015-16, ABC Books released 71 titles: 36 titles for adult readers and 35 titles for children.

ABC Shop online ABC Shop Online performed well in the 2015-16 financial year, with an increase on budget from the year prior. During the reporting period, ABC Shop Online brokered deals with both BBC Australia and The Wiggles, under which both entities will redirect customers shopping for product on their home site to ABC Shop Online to purchase product.

ABC Music ABC Music is a leading independent record label in the Australian market. It releases music across a range of genres from children’s, classics, jazz, and country, through to the triple j imprint. The label also represents leading classical music artists and Australian classical music companies, including symphony orchestras and ensembles, and contributes to the fulfilment of the ABC Charter obligation to encourage and promote the musical, dramatic and other performing arts in Australia. The ABC Music Publishing business represents writers and composers within the ABC and externally.

During the year, ABC Music released 170 titles: 102 titles for ABC Classics; and 68 titles for Contemporary (including 14 ABC KIDS titles). The label released 185 albums digitally across a number of platforms, most notably iTunes, and there was significant growth in revenues for the business from streaming services in both the domestic and global markets.

A number of ABC Music releases performed well in the industry. Of note, triple j’s Like a Version Volume 11 and Hottest 100 Volume 23 both reached the number one position on the overall ARIA chart. The ABC Classics DVD release The Royal Edinburgh Military Tattoo Melbourne 2016 was at the end of June 2016 the highest selling music DVD of the calendar year. The CD set The Classic 100 - Voice reached #1 on the Core Classical and Crossover Charts chart upon release.

ABC Events ABC Events stages markets, concerts and events for ABC audiences across Australia.

More than 330 000 people around Australia were entertained by ABC Events throughout 2015-16. ABC KIDS performances included the national touring concert Play School: Humpty puts on a show, teen and adult audiences were entertained by Good Game Live, and the ABC Events logo licensed popular comedy acts such as Jimmy Carr, Dylan Moran, and Agony Aunts Live.

Consumer experiences

76 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2016

In 2015-16, the ABC continued to operate ABC KIDS WORLD in partnership with Dreamworld on the Gold Coast. ABC KIDS WORLD is a branded precinct in the Dreamworld theme park which features activities and rides appropriately branded as Giggle and Hoot, The Wiggles, Play School and Bananas in Pyjamas. ABC KIDS WORLD also includes a retail outlet which stocks a wide range ABC KIDS product relating to ABC broadcast content.

Video Entertainment and Distribution ABC Video Entertainment and Distribution (VED) acquires and sells video content under the ABC DVD and ABC KIDS labels as physical DVD products in Australia and New Zealand, and through a range of digital and online partners within Australia and internationally.

VED’s digital business continued to grow in 2015-16 through its deals with the three major Subscription Video on Demand (SVOD) platforms within Australia— Netflix, Stan and Presto. Over 2 071 hours of content134 were licensed across all Australia and New Zealand SVOD services throughout the financial year.

DVD and digital download activities continued to expand throughout 2015-16, with VED releasing 155 new titles on DVD, five titles on Blu-Ray, and 235 titles to Electronic Sell Through (iTunes, Google Play, Quickflix, and Microsoft platforms).

The ABC KIDS label continued as the leading brand in the market, with approximately 45% market share.

ABC Books sales were up by 28% year-on-year, and the business delivered its strongest financial performance in three years.

The top five bestselling titles for the year across past and new releases were: Slow Cooker Central by Paulene Christie; Flesh Wounds by Richard Glover; Penguin Bloom by Cameron Bloom and Bradley Trevor Greive; Tales from the Honey Badger by Nick Cummins; and There is a Monster Under My Bed Who Farts by Tim Miller and Matt Stanton.

ABC Books’ commitment to building a diverse slate of authors and publishing portfolio continued with key new author acquisitions during this year including Richard Fidler, Lyn White and Nikki Barrowclough, Tracey Spicer, Eddie Perfect, and Jamelle Wells.

Licensing ABC Licensing develops and licenses product for core ABC brands. The business’s leading properties are Play School and Giggle and Hoot.

A number of commemorative products were developed for Play School’s 50th birthday celebrations including: a 50c collectable coin set with the Royal Australian Mint; a Play School Birth Certificate registered through the NSW Registry of Births, Deaths and Marriages; and exclusive Australia Post product including a collectable stamp, postcards and medallions.

Consumer experiences

134 Includes non-Australian content for which VED has the distribution rights.

Audience Experiences 77

Inflight sales remained strong, with output deals in place with all Australian-based airlines and numerous international content aggregators. The ABC News licence with Virgin Australia was extended, retaining ABC exclusivity as the supplier of Virgin inflight news bulletins and updates.

During 2015-16, a video syndication platform, ABC Now, was launched which is currently in the test phase.

Studios and Media Production For a number of years, Studios and Media Production (SMP) has marketed the surplus production services—operational facilities and staff capacity—of ABC News and ABC Television, in order to generate revenue to return to the ABC. In the past 12 months, SMP also began to market the surplus production services of ABC Radio and ABC Regional.

Production services offered include studio production with and without production staff, outside broadcast facilities, video and audio post-production, field based acquisition and access to the ABC’s suite of rehearsal rooms, auditoriums, radio recording studios, and production recording studios across the country.

Clients include ABC Television co-production partners, commercial television networks, television production companies, theatre production companies, state symphony orchestras, podcast producers, independent production companies, sporting bodies and individual groups seeking specialist support from our services.

During 2015-16, television studio and outside broadcast services clients included Ambience Entertainment, Jam TV, McWaters productions, Matchbox Pictures, NITV, AFL Media, the Seven Network, the Nine Network, Southern Cross Television, a range of symphony and other arts company orchestras, Opera Australia, The Gordon Frost Organisation, and Melba Recordings.

Sales and Business Development ABC Sales and Business Development (SBD) manages the sales of ABC-produced and acquired content across digital, library sales, footage, audio and stills categories. Its customers include broadcasters, digital platforms, educational institutions, video and DVD distributors, airlines, production companies, museums, and internet and mobile operators worldwide.

The business achieved significant year-on-year growth, with sales reflecting the shift in audience viewing preferences and content consumption as digital sales become the dominant revenue stream for the business, representing 47% of program sales. This sales growth was also linked to a strategic focus, in collaboration with ABC Commercial’s Acquisitions team, to expand the catalogue with high-quality content acquisitions that have broad market appeal.

Throughout the year, SBD focused on strengthening market connections, leveraging the ABC brand and building on client relationships through a presence at key trade shows and markets. As it has done for many years, SBD hosted an ABC stand at Marche International des Programmes de Communication (MIPCOM) and Marche International des Programmes de TV (MIPTV), and was present at all other key industry trade shows. SBD utilises these opportunities to showcase Australian content and the work of the Australian production sector to international markets. Attendance at these markets and events results in the sale of content, and enables the team to foster and grow important relationships which lead to international investment in Australian productions.

More than 30 new titles were launched during the year including the Comedy Showroom series, Luke Warm Sex, Catalyst’s Becoming Superhuman, SplashDance, Hoot Hoot Go! and Emma!.

There was also growth in format sales and options during the year with licences issued for Spicks and Specks, Review with Myles Barlow, It’s a Date, MDA, Twentysomething, Mother and Son, and Let’s Get Inventin’.

Consumer experiences

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INSIDE THE ABC The ABC is committed to building a culture that is creative and engaged. This includes striving for creative excellence, looking for new and smarter ways of doing things, and creating a workforce that reflects the broader community.

Contents:

Editorial quality 80

Infrastructure and operations 84 People 88

Work health and safety 94

Corporate services 96

Dr Jordan Nguyen and Riley in Catalyst: ‘Becoming Superhuman’.

In Catalyst’s ‘Becoming Superhuman’, Dr Jordan Nguyen looks for cutting edge technology to give 13-year-old Riley superhuman powers.

CHAPTER THREE

Inside the ABC 79

80 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2016

Editorial quality

ABC Editorial Policies The ABC Editorial Policies and associated guidance outline the principles and set the standards that govern ABC content, and are a day-to-day reference for content makers. They are critical to the ABC’s ability to meet its statutory obligations and the expectations of audiences. They also form the basis of the ABC Code of Practice, which the ABC provides to the industry regulator, the Australian Communications and Media Authority (ACMA). In addition, they give practical shape to statutory obligations in the ABC Act, in particular the obligations to: provide services of a high standard; maintain independence and integrity; and ensure that the gathering and presentation of news and information is accurate and impartial according to the recognised standards of objective journalism.

Management of editorial matters In April 2016, the role that had previously overseen editorial matters was expanded to Editorial Director, to ensure a more centralised approach to advising on all significant and controversial editorial issues, as well as overseeing editorial training, editorial guidance and complaints investigation.

The Editorial Director is responsible for setting editorial standards, overseeing the continuous development and revision of those standards, and providing editorial advice and guidance for all content areas of the ABC. The Editorial Director also oversees the independent investigation of editorial complaints, provides advice and assistance to the Managing Director on all editorial issues, and reports to the ABC Board on compliance with editorial standards.

The Editorial Policy Group, chaired by the Editorial Director, brings together editorial policy specialists and other senior staff from content-making divisions, Legal, and Audience and Consumer Affairs. It is responsible for providing advice to the Corporation in relation to the interpretation and application of the ABC Editorial Policies, and the ongoing review

and revision of those policies. On a day-to-day basis, editorial advice is provided by editorial policy specialists within each content-making division, following the longstanding procedure for upward referral.

Review of editorial performance, principles and standards

Editorial Reviews In December 2013, ABC Chairman James Spigelman announced that the ABC would embark on a regular series of independent editorial reviews as part of the Board’s responsibility to monitor the quality and integrity of ABC content, with particular reference to section 4 of the ABC Editorial Policies (Impartiality and diversity of perspectives). Three reviews (Editorial Review No. 5, Editorial Review No. 6, and Editorial Review No. 7) were completed in 2015-16. The reviews involve an assessment of selected ABC content by an independent external reviewer. Each reviewer is asked to assess content against a range of criteria, including different aspects of the ABC Editorial Policies and other yardsticks of quality. The subject of each review and the identity of the reviewer are approved by the ABC Board, and assistance in managing the process is provided by the Editorial Director.

Editorial Review No. 5, completed in July 2015, examined the ABC’s coverage of the Higher Education Research and Reform Bill (2014). The review was conducted by Steve Harris, former Editor and/or Editor-in-Chief of The Age, The Herald and the Sunday Age.

The review noted a range of areas for improvement in the ABC’s coverage, including an overemphasis on politics over policy, an oversimplification of some issues, and a tendency to deliver more heat than light on key issues. All of these points were noted and accepted by the ABC, and formed the basis for considering improvements in the coverage of future issues.

The ABC Editorial Policies are the principles and standards which are applied across the Corporation EVERYDAY to maintain high-quality output and performance.

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Editorial quality

The ABC Board commissioned journalist Ray Martin and former SBS Managing Director Shaun Brown to undertake ABC Editorial Review No. 6, a review of the Q&A program, with a particular focus on impartiality standards. The reviewers assessed 23 episodes of the program that were broadcast between February and June 2015, focusing on production and editorial processes in addition to content.

The reviewers found no breach of impartiality standards. However, they made a number of observations and recommendations intended to bolster Q&A’s production standards. These included: increased female representation on the program; recommendations around diversity of perspectives; further diversification of the program’s broadcast location; and recommendations around program principles.

Former journalist and media executive Peter Cavanagh was commissioned by the ABC Board to conduct Editorial Review No. 7, a review of the ABC’s coverage of the China-Australia Free Trade agreement. The content on three ABC Radio current affairs programs, and Radio National’s Breakfast and Drive programs, was assessed over a four-month period. The review focused on impartiality and balance and diversity of perspectives, and coverage was found to be fair and impartial. Some recommendations were made around providing additional background information for the audience when reporting on issues where the facts are contested.

Two further editorial reviews were commissioned by the Board in 2015-16. Journalist Kerry Blackburn and former ANZ CEO Mike Smith were commissioned to conduct Editorial Review No. 8, examining the impartiality of business coverage on the ABC. Editorial Review No. 9, a review into ABC coverage relating to the proposed Shenhua coal mine, was also commenced, conducted by freelance writer Mark Skulley. Both reviews were in progress as at 30 June 2016.

Editorial guidance The ABC Editorial Policies were adjusted in April 2016 to reflect the role of the Editorial Director in editorial decision-making and maintaining of editorial standards. The Principles in section 1 (Independence, integrity and responsibility) were expanded to capture the role of the Editorial Director in upward referral. An additional Standard 1.7 was also added to incorporate the Editorial Director into the decision making process for significant editorial matters.

Standard 5.8, Secret Recording and other types of deception, was also amended in March 2016. This amendment reinforced that the potential for harm must always be taken into consideration regardless of the reasons secret recording and/or other types of deception have been deemed necessary.

A minor amendment was made to the ABC Code of Practice on 1 March 2016. The wording of Standard 5.8, Secret Recording and other types of deception, was amended to reflect the changes made to section 5.8 of the ABC Editorial Policies as outlined above.

In February 2016, the ABC Board approved amendments to the timezones in the Television Classification Standard, which forms part of the ABC Code of Practice. The timezones were adjusted to reflect changes in audience expectations and community and industry standards. They also ensure that ABC2 has sufficient flexibility to schedule appropriate content for the intended audience, and the ABC is able to broadcast programs that appeal to the upper-age bracket of its audience.

During the reporting period, ABC Editorial Policies issued Guidance Notes on:

• ABC Indigenous Content (October 2015) - to provide advice and information on working with Australia’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, culture and heritage in ABC content making

• Filming with a Remotely Piloted Aircraft (RPA) or drone (October 2015) - to provide guidance on the use of RPAs or drones in the collection of content for ABC programs

• Advertising and Sponsorship on Australia Plus (November 2015) - to provide guidance around accepting advertising and sponsorship on Australia Plus (the ABC’s international content service)

• Domestic Violence (December 2015) - to assist staff reporting on domestic or family violence in factual ABC content.

Guidance Notes that underwent revisions during the period were:

• Consulting ABC Legal and Handling External Requests for Access to Contentious Program Material (revised October 2015)

• Corrections and Clarifications (revised December 2015)

• Suicide and Self-Harm (revised December 2015).

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Editorial quality

Corrections and clarifications The ABC publishes a Corrections and Clarifications page on its corporate website which brings together in one place the corrections and clarifications made to ABC content across radio, television and digital platforms, whether as a result of complaints or for any other reason. Where possible, links to the original content are provided.

In 2015-16, 56 corrections or clarifications were posted to the page. Entries ranged from correction of minor factual errors to correction or clarification of programs which had attracted public interest or concern.

Election coverage review The Election Coverage Review Committee (ECRC) is convened during each federal, state or territory election campaign to monitor ABC coverage and ensure ABC editorial standards are met. The Committee is chaired by the Editorial Director and comprises representatives from all relevant ABC Divisions. It is principally a committee of review and does not supplant the usual lines of editorial authority in each Division during an election campaign.

For federal elections, the ECRC reviews the externally commissioned share of voice data to ensure appropriate editorial balance is maintained and no single political party is disproportionately represented. Audience complaints over election coverage are also monitored and reviewed by the Committee. Further, the Chair of the ECRC is responsible for administering the free broadcast time allocated to eligible political parties. Broadcast slots are provided on television and radio for policy announcements by political parties who meet the eligibility criteria.135

The ECRC convened once in 2016, for the federal election (May-June 2016), and was chaired by the Editorial Director. In addition to the major parties, the Greens, Family First, the Liberal Democratic Party, Palmer United Party and Nick Xenophon Team all met the eligibility criteria for free broadcast time which was allocated accordingly.

Editorial balance was broadly achieved, with external share of voice data apportioning broadcast time to the major parties at 35.9% Labor and 42.6% Coalition. The Greens share of voice was 8% and the remaining 13.4% was shared among other minor parties and independents. While the share of voice data was influenced by a range of factors, including the challenges of properly measuring share across

Sarah Ferguson interviewed Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull and Opposition Leader Bill Shorten on the Four Corners special, ‘The Leaders’.

135 More information about the ECRC and free broadcast time is available on the ABC’s corporate website: http://about.abc.net.au/how-the-abc-is-run/what-guides-us/election-coverage-review-committee-ecrc/

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Editorial quality

continuously updating live news coverage on 24-hour platforms, the underlying data confirmed that the Prime Minister and Opposition leader received fair and equal treatment across the campaign: 12.1% of all recorded comments went to the Opposition Leader compared to 11.9% to the Prime Minister.

The ABC received 1 189 complaints relating to its election coverage. Of these, 669 alleged bias, with 63% believing the ABC favoured the Coalition, 24% Labor, and 13% other parties. No significant or systemic problems were identified during the investigation of the complaints, which were ongoing as of 30 June 2016.

The ABC again utilised the Vote Compass tool for the campaign. Vote Compass is an interactive online program that allows the public to engage with the policy positions of the three major political parties in order to ‘map’ themselves against the views of each. The results allowed ABC News and Radio to better understand audience interest in specific policy areas and to provide more in-depth coverage of those issues, complementing the day-to-day reporting of campaign events.

Behind the News’s Rookie Reporter, Maya, who updated the ABC’s younger viewers on political happenings throughout the election period. Maya interviewed many politicians, including Penny Wong, Scott Morrison and Richard di Natale.

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Infrastructure and operations

Technology The ABC’s Technology department provides maintenance, refreshment and support for the majority of information, communications and technology (ICT) and broadcast systems and processes across the ABC.

The ABC’s ICT Strategy is part of the ABC’s Integrated Capital Strategy (ICS) framework. It enables and supports the ABC in meeting strategic goals and in assessing capital investments. This involves prioritising proposed technology investments and utilising the ABC wide ICT Roadmap to support strategic goals through:

• alignment with ABC Wide strategy and Divisional strategic plans

• addressing the need to sustain what the Corporation has and to make the ABC’s resources go further

• recognising the need to maximise value-for-money in the available ICT spend.

Key projects completed during the reporting period include: a successful proof-of-concept for the Collaboration Toolkit project and initial rollout of Microsoft Office 365, which provides a new suite of email and other ICT business tools to all ABC users; completion of the National Core Network Upgrade Project; and leadership and collaboration on the Future Technology State Architecture (FTSA).

The FTSA is leveraging the ABC-Wide ICT Roadmap work. This assists capital investment by identifying opportunities to reduce duplication and provide service enhancement, primarily through increased virtualisation on site and in the cloud.

In 2015, Technology implemented a Service Strategy Review, which included efficiency and improvement measures in procurement activities, service optimisation (for example, increasing the use of cloud services) and structural alignment across the information technology and broadcast support teams.

Information and Cyber Security management Managing the risk of a failure in technology information systems, infrastructure or security is core business for the Technology department. This has become more critical as the key systems used in broadcast production have evolved from electro-mechanical to digital technologies. Technology has an extensive program to maintain and address the

evolving challenges in building an effective digital security management framework in a modern media organisation.

Business Continuity Management The Business Continuity Program supports service continuity during major business disruption, focusing on:

• effectively managing foreseeable business disruptions through a reliable and mature risk management practice

• continuing to build capacity in organisational resilience to better prepare and respond to unforeseen business disruptions with a key aim to develop confident, competent staff and agile management teams

• continuing to enhance strong information sharing and collaboration to manage business disruption risk and resilience improvements.

Transmission and distribution of ABC Services During 2015-16, the Communications Networks Division undertook a significant procurement project in cooperation with the SBS for the acquisition of Digital Terrestrial Television transmission services. Significant costs savings were realised with the addition of new and favourable terms and conditions from the successful vendor.

The overall network performance on an end-to-end basis was above the contracted service level targets and was generally slightly above the previous year’s figures. However the figures were affected by maintenance work undertaken by the tower infrastructure provider due to the roll out of the National Broadband Network (NBN) fixed wireless project in regional Australia. The ABC and its tower infrastructure provider expect that this work is mostly complete and will cease to impact on the performance of transmissions to the audience in the future.

In 2015-16, work continued on the upgrade of the Digital Electronic News (DENG) gathering network which has resulted in improved live news coverage from external locations outside of the ABC studios.

For broadcast coverage, and distribution and transmission network performance, see 3.1 and 3.2 on pages 154-5

Inside the ABC 85

The kunanyi / Mount Wellington radio and television transmission tower near Hobart Tasmania. Image courtesy of Broadcast Australia (a BAI Communications company). Photographer: Ben Wilkinson.

Capital works In 2015-16, 141 projects were progressed across the ABC, Television, News, Radio, Communications, Information Technology and Property with a combined budget allowance of $140 million.

Web Content Management System (WCMS) The WCMS product build project was completed with the final release of software loaded into the production system in October 2015. The remainder of project activities were also completed, including operational and support documentation. All ongoing production activities were handed over to the continuing support and production teams in December 2015.

The WCMS project had commenced in February 2013 with Board approved capital expenditure. With its 2015 acceptance by content divisions, the project realised its primary goal of providing the ABC with an enterprise web content publishing product that facilitates easy, quick and reliable content creation. It is being used to process and publish content to meet the ABC’s increasing online needs as well as community expectations for the online delivery of ABC services.

Melbourne Accommodation Project (MAP) Stage one of MAP has been completed with new building construction finished and a certificate of occupancy provided to the ABC. During May 2016 staff moved out of the existing building and into temporary accommodation in the new facility. These movements are part of the staging plans, and enable refurbishment of the existing building.

Construction and refurbishment work will continue until about March 2017. Once completed, the technical fit-out work will commence. The staging plans will see staff located into their final work areas, with staff from the Elsternwick site joining their colleagues in the new facility in the first quarter of 2017.

Integrated Media System (IMS) The IMS project replaces three key current News, Radio and Regional content production systems. With each production system reaching the end of its technology lifecycle, the opportunity arose to replace three systems with an integrated system that would allow teams across the ABC to collaborate and enhance delivery of content for our audiences.

In February 2016, the Board approved the IMS contract with systems integrator Grass Valley. During the year the project completed the Proof of Concept phase and detailed designs for the first site, Hobart, and commenced the process of purchasing equipment for that site. That stage of the project is due to be completed by November 2016. Planning for training over 3 000 content makers was also completed in preparation for the future rollout.

Upgrade of Regional Radio Studios The project to upgrade regional radio studios is the next phase of a replacement program that replaces and/or upgrades all regional radio studio facilities with standardised technology. A rationalisation review by Radio and Regional has resulted in reduced facilities requirements. These reductions have translated into budget savings of $1.3 million, with the savings to be allocated against the capital program.

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ABC 2015 Staff Engagement Survey

The Staff Engagement Survey was launched in November 2015 to collect staff feedback, and to measure the alignment between existing ABC culture and the strategic pillars and values of the ABC. The survey provided a mechanism to obtain data on staff views, and to identify the drivers for improving engagement.

At the outset, the ABC Executive committed to sharing results with staff, acting on the results in a visible, meaningful way, and repeating the survey again to see if improvements have been made.

The survey was designed and collated by external consulting firm, Aon Hewitt, which has expertise in employee engagement. It had a response rate from staff of 65.6%.136

Outcomes The engagement score result for the ABC was 52%, which falls into the moderate zone of engagement.137 By way of comparison, the Australia and New Zealand average score is 57% for the general market, and 52% for the media market.

Beyond the overall engagement result, the survey revealed a number of things staff value about working at the ABC. Employees have a strong connection to the Corporation’s brand and purpose and are proud to work for the ABC. The ABC’s commitment to diversity, safety and workplace flexibility were all rated highly by staff.

The survey revealed a number of areas for improvement including a need for:

• greater visibility of the ABC Executive and for them to inspire strategy

• culture and infrastructure which enables staff to perform to the best of their ability

• improved capability amongst managers to have critical conversations with their staff about performance, career and recognition.

A summary of ABC-wide results was provided to staff early in 2016, with further detail for each Division presented to staff by their Director.

The ABC Executive undertook an organisation-wide action planning process in response to the Survey, and an action plan to address the three priority areas was developed (see below). To ensure staff engagement continued to be a priority across the ABC, engagement objectives and KPIs have been embedded into manager performance agreements.

136 Not including employees engaged as casuals.

137 Based on results of all companies in Australia and New Zealand whose engagement level is measured by Aon Hewitt.

One of the three key elements of the ABC 2015-2020 Strategy is to build a creative and engaged workforce. A vital part of that was to ask staff about what they like about working at the ABC and for their views on improving the ABC as a place to work.

Inside the ABC 87

Action plan

1 Senior Leadership - People and Future Focus The focus of this action plan is to improve the ABC Executive’s visibility and communication with staff, increase staff awareness of the broader corporate strategy, and improve the engagement of all senior managers across the ABC. Activities include the introduction of a regular leadership forum for approximately 200 managers who are invited to engage with the Managing Director and the ABC Executive team, supported by an online collaboration tool.

Executive Sponsors Each member of the ABC Executive is a ‘sponsor’ for a State or Territory, and will regularly visit their allocated region throughout the year to discuss issues directly with staff.

2 High Performance and Career development A number of initiatives have been planned to act on staff feedback including: development of a staff mobility program; inclusion of engagement principles into the four ABC leadership programs; workshops for managers to improve their capability in performance management, career development and coaching. Insights from thirty two workshops across the ABC were held in April and May 2016 provided additional feedback on possible improvements to performance management processes.

‘Career Moves’ The program aims to offer more opportunities across divisions and states for staff, which will deepen networks and facilitate cross collaboration. Staff can register their interest in career development in a particular area or to grow their skills, or register their interest in a specific mobility placement.

3 Enabling Infrastructure (tool and processes) A number of internal processes, systems and tools are being improved to enable staff to more effectively undertake their day-to-day work.

Business Automation The Business Automation projects aims to automate and simplify a number of finance, employment and travel processes. Building systems to auto-populate some forms and moving workflows online will remove ‘red tape’ and enable a transition to self service.

In addition to the ABC-wide action planning process, a number of Divisions and areas are talking with staff on improvements that can be implemented in their local area to improve engagement.

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People

In 2015-16, the ABC employed 4 908 people across every State and Territory, equivalent to 4 183 full time employees. The majority of staff were content makers.

For ABC Employees: Full-time Equivalent, see 3.4 on page 156

The ABC was again recognised as one of Australia’s most attractive employers, placing fifth at the 2016 Randstad awards which measure employer attractiveness.

ABC values and workplace behaviour The ABC strives to foster a values-based culture, incorporating its values—Integrity, Respect, Collegiality and Innovation—into all aspects of its organisational behaviour.

The ABC Values, and values-based behaviour, are embedded in the Performance Management system for all ABC executives. The Executive Behavioural Framework is a values-based capability framework linked to how executives achieve their performance objectives. The inclusion of the Framework provides an opportunity to measure how the ABC Values are translated into appropriate behaviours and enables feedback to be given on the way executives demonstrate the values in action.

In 2015-16, the ABC’s comprehensive Workplace Behaviours Online training course for staff (including casuals) and contractors was again part of the ABC’s Induction programme. This training course was completed by new starters and covers the ABC’s Discrimination, Bullying and other Workplace Behaviours Policy including providing information on the meaning of bullying, harassment and discrimination as part of the ABC’s commitment to supporting a positive workplace culture.

Indigenous employment and Diversity

Indigenous employment Indigenous employment remained a priority for the ABC in 2015-16.

The ABC launched its third Reconciliation Action Plan (RAP) in January 2016. The ABC Stretch Reconciliation Action Plan 2016-18 commits the Corporation to reaching new targets and extending itself in a range of areas. Strategies include progressively increasing levels of Indigenous employment to 3% of the ABC workforce by 2018, and increasing the number of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander employees in content making, editorial decision-making, and management roles—particularly at a senior level. All Indigenous staff are provided with the opportunity to create a professional development plan and the ABC aims to ensure that at least 70% of Indigenous staff have completed a plan. Succession plans are required, in line with job and training plans, for all staff in senior content making, editorial decision making and management roles.

For further detail regarding Indigenous employment, see 3.3 on page 156

Two scholarships to assist the career development of Indigenous staff were offered in the areas of Content/Editorial and Technical/Operations/ Administration. In 2015-16, scholarship winners were Margaret Ross from Television and Dux Newton from ABC Commercial.

There are currently eight Indigenous interns employed by the ABC. Six of the internships are part of the Indigenous Cadetships Scheme (ICS) conducted by the Australian Government’s Department of Prime Minister and Cabinet, and two are ABC-advertised positions. ABC News also has two Indigenous cadets who will graduate at the end of 2016 into full-time employment.

The ABC’s success is built on the EXTRAORDINARY skills, creativity and commitment of its people.

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People

Information about the ABC’s performance and reporting against targets in the Stretch RAP 2016-18 is at page 134.

Diversity The ABC is required by the Equal Employment Opportunity (Commonwealth Authorities) Act 1987 (the EEO Act) to develop a program designed to eliminate discrimination and promote equal opportunity for women, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, people from a non-English speaking background, and people with disabilities.

The ABC, through its Equity and Diversity Plans, sets out the strategies the Corporation will pursue to achieve its objectives relating to equity and diversity. During the year, the Equity and Diversity Plan 2012-15 expired on 31 December 2015. It was based on three key themes:

• Being Inclusive

• Being Audience Focused

• Being Audience Accessible

The Equity and Diversity Plan 2016-18 came into effect on 1 January 2016 and is based on three strategic objectives:

• We encourage a culture of diversity, engagement and flexibility.

• We embrace diversity in the workplace.

• We represent, connect and engage communities.

The ABC is required by section 9(2) of the EEO Act to report its performance annually for the period 1 September to 31 August. The ABC’s Equity and Diversity Annual Report is submitted to the Minister for Communications and tabled in parliament.

Current and historical Equity and Diversity Annual Reports are available on the ABC’s website: http://about.abc.net.au/how-the-abc-is-run/ reports-and-publications/

Additional information about equity and diversity is at page 116.

Dr Tim Soutphommasane, Race Discrimination Commissioner, Australian Human Rights Commission (AHRC), with News Presenter Emma Alberici at a staff Cultural Diversity Forum, ABC Ultimo. Image: Amanda Curness.

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People

Training and development Learning and development opportunities in the ABC are designed for staff to build and enhance the capabilities needed to deliver the organisation’s strategy. A wide range of content is available across a range of platforms to provide quality learning opportunities to suit differing needs.

2015-16 continued the to be a period of change for the ABC with the establishment of the Regional Division, ongoing areas of restructure across different divisions, the move to increased business automation of previously paper-based processes, and the development of new media technologies. Learning and development activities focused on supporting staff through these and other changes and ensuring they had ongoing opportunities to continue building their skills.

Face-to-face sessions such as longer form workshops, short focused sessions, and masterclasses continued to be well attended. Increased offerings in the online learning area provided more options for staff who are geographically dispersed.

For further details regarding training and development, see 3.5 on pages 156-7

During the period, 1 755 learning events were delivered internally, externally, and online including via webinar, and 41 466 hours of training were attended by staff. These figures are similar to the previous year, demonstrating an ongoing commitment to providing a range of shorter-form learning and development opportunities focusing on specific capability development needs.

Training included:

• content-making skills programs such as producing for social media and vision editing

• updating technical skills including business automation and IT Cloud infrastructure

• digital skills programs such as digital news awareness

• Work Health and Safety (WHS) induction and refresher programs

• leadership development focusing on key leadership capabilities

• on-the-job training such as cadetships, peer-to-peer training, action learning groups and coaching.

Peter Greste at home with his parents. From the two-part Foreign Correspondent story ‘My Fight for Freedom’.

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People

‘Just-in-time’ learning opportunities were a key component of the rollout of the Business Automation project. The first phase of this project was delivered during early 2016 when invoice payments, expense management, and travel bookings shifted from paper-based to online, mobile processes. Staff were provided with a range of learning options including face-to-face workshops, instructional videos, online resources, webinars, and support from ‘super-users’ located across the organisation.

New podcast commissioning guidelines and processes, linked to the ABC Radio Content Development Fund, were trialled in 2015-16. The fund supports staff mobility and new podcast initiatives from the ABC’s radio networks. The ABC has continued to look at a ‘pan-ABC’ approach to podcast creation. A two-day training ‘boot camp’ was delivered by ABC Regional and Radio to help kickstart producers into digital-first thinking and new production models. To raise awareness amongst staff, the lunchtime ABC Podcast Club met semi-regularly in Sydney and Melbourne, hosting international and local podcast-makers in an informal forum to discuss content, production and distribution challenges.

Editorial training In 2015-16, a total of 413 staff attended 47 formal training sessions addressing the ABC Editorial Policies. Sessions included refresher training on the key editorial policies of accuracy and impartiality in preparation for coverage of the 2016 Federal Election, as well as more general sessions dealing with all aspects of editorial compliance.

In addition to the face-to-face training sessions, a new online training course on editorial policies was launched in 2015-16, and has already been accessed by more than 350 staff. This ‘just-in-time’ learning resource can be accessed by any staff member at any time, allowing editorial decisions to be made more quickly and accurately. The resource was enhanced by including scenarios that staff could explore to consider the issues related to editorial decisions.

Leadership Training A total of 139 staff attended internal Leadership Development programs provided by the ABC in 2015-16. The Leadership Bites program was extended to include sessions on leading change, resilience, and teamwork, and the series was offered in both Sydney and Melbourne. Foundations of Leadership was extended to a three-day program with an increased focus on building engagement and culture. All programs were aligned to ABC corporate objectives and business plans, with an emphasis on developing the skills necessary to lead in a rapidly changing and disrupted media environment. In addition to the figure mentioned above, 33 members of staff attended externally presented courses specifically focusing on leadership and change management.

Industrial instruments The ABC Senior Employment Agreement 2016 came into operation in March 2016, and will reach its nominal expiry date in March 2017. This Agreement replaced both the Senior Employment Agreement 2011-2013 (Executive Levels 1 and 2) and Senior Employment Agreement 2011-2013 (Executive Levels 3 and 4). In April 2016, the ABC commenced negotiations for a new agreement to replace the ABC Enterprise Agreement 2013-2016.

Employee distribution by Division, job group and region is at 3.6 on page 157

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OUR FOCUS: Health

Inspired by the success of previous pan-ABC content initiatives such as MentalAs and Australia Remembers, a panel of cross-divisional representatives were convened at the beginning of 2016 to shape a new, ongoing, priority initiative: OUR FOCUS. Under this brand, a calendar of tentpole events was formulated, with each event bringing together people and skills from across the Corporation to tell stories and create conversations about issues that matter to Australians.

OUR FOCUS: Health was the first of these events, and comprised a week-long slate of television, radio and online content exploring the state of Australians’ health

in regional and metropolitan areas, and that of the services and service-people dedicated to preserving and promoting ‘wellness’ in the community.

In the days leading up to OUR FOCUS: Health week, triple j’s Hack news and current affairs program explored the theme of body image. Listeners heard from experts on every subject from ‘fitspo’, steroids and fat-shaming to selfies and plastic surgery, and Hack presenter Tom Tilley hosted the discussion program Hack Live on Body Obsession which was broadcast live on ABC2 and streamed on iview, with audiences invited to contribute via social media.

With 100 cameras in hospitals situated around Australia, groundbreaking series Keeping Australia Alive captured a cross-section of the everyday challenges, the extraordinary moments, and the human stories found in our health institutions. Episodes such as ‘What’s In A Postcode’, which explored the way a person’s location could mean life or death, and ‘The Front Line - GP v Emergency Department’ which gave an insight into emergency services, combined to give audiences an in-depth understanding of the vast and complex Australian health system.

The OUR FOCUS: Health campaign was supported online, with a branded website that acted as a pivot to all contributing ABC websites. Health content was also shared through the ABC Facebook page and featured on the ABC’s flagship app.

Audiences joined the conversation using the hashtag #ABCHealth

Inside the ABC 93

ABC Television also broadcast an episode of Catalyst focused on back pain and the ABC Arts documentary Michelle’s Story about a dancer’s Multiple Sclerosis (MS) diagnosis, while iview provided catch-up viewing for all health-related television content, as well as a suite of curated archival programming such as Changing Minds, The Agony of the Body, Kids on Speed and The Ugly Face of Disability Hate Crime.

The ABC’s Regional teams focused on particular health issues in locations across Australia: renal dialysis in Alice Springs; issues with having cancer in Kalgoorlie; Parkinson’s Disease in Wodonga; dementia in the Sunshine Coast; and the life of a rural specialist GP in Longreach. ABC Darwin listeners heard an Iraq war veteran speak about his experience with mental illness following his service abroad, which included his feeling suicidal every day for eight years. His comments came after a Senate inquiry found nearly one in four returned soldiers had experienced a mental disorder in the previous 12 months, and the rate of suicidality was double that of the general population.

774 ABC Melbourne spoke with bestselling Australian children’s book author and educator Louise Park, who is passionate about tackling the alarmingly high level of anxiety in Generation Z (young people born between 1995 and 2009). She attempts to do so partly by encouraging children to read interactive books with engaging characters that help them identify with real-life situations, emotions, and behaviours.

The Drum on ABC main channel and ABC News 24 explored new health technologies and alternative therapies; Australia Wide explored the city/bush divide when it comes to accessible care; and ABC International’s Australia Plus spent a day in the life of an international medical student on rounds in an Australian hospital. Collaborating with ABC Regional, Australia Plus also explored the experiences of migrant doctors and medical professionals in rural and urban Australia, and the linguistically diverse community’s perspective and needs with regard to Community Health in Australia.

Health stories old and new were collated on the ABC’s Health & Wellbeing website where they remain available for audiences www.abc.net.au/health. Alongside this comprehensive collection of news and articles sat two online exclusives examining emergency and end-of-life issues: ‘Staying alive: what those working at the coal face want you to know’; and ‘Where we die’.

All in the Mind on RN took a rigorous look at the limits of mind body medicine, and the growing body of scientific evidence exploring the effect of a person’s mental state on their overall health. Also on RN, Life Matters focused on heart attacks and improving positive outcomes for sufferers—using the curious comparison of the survival rate of heart attack victims in Seattle in the US (62%) against that of Australian sufferers (9%). The Health Report spoke to intensive care specialist Bill Silvester about end-of-life care.

‘Michelle’s Story’ on Catalyst.

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Work health and safety

Management of WHS In 2015-16, the ABC developed and implemented a series of WHS plans in accordance with the ABC Work Health and Safety (WHS) Management Framework. Part of ABC WHS planning was the development of a corporation-wide operational WHS risk profile to assist Executive and Divisional managers to better understand their operational WHS risk and control actions. Supporting this operational WHS risk profile a corporate-wide WHS training matrix was developed identifying all mandatory and specific WHS training requirements.

In 2015-16, the corporation’s A-Z of Safety was reviewed. Safety Rules, guidelines, information sheets and Safe Work Method Statements were consolidated into:

• WHS guidance material specifying what is reasonably practical for the ABC to follow in managing particular WHS risks

• Standard Operating Procedures for identified hazardous tasks.

Position descriptions of staff with specific WHS responsibilities were reviewed to ensure a specific statement of their WHS responsibility was made clear in those descriptions. First aid arrangements throughout the ABC were reviewed, ensuring adequate first aid officer coverage and available first aid equipment across each ABC workplace.

Consistent with previous years, a flu vaccination service was offered to staff. A total of 1805 staff (40%) participated in the program, a 7% increase from 2014-15.

Health and Safety Induction In 2015-16, there was a 99% completion rate for the ABC’s Online WHS Induction (compared with 93.4% in 2014-15).

Work-related incidents ABC Worksafe is the ABC’s database for recording all WHS incidents, including those involving visitors, contractors and ABC employees. In 2015-16, a total of 221 work-related incidents were reported in ABC Worksafe (compared with 206 in 2014-15).138

Of the 221 work-related incidents reported in 2015-16, five incidents were notified to Comcare by the ABC. One was downgraded by Comcare as not notifiable. An incident is notifiable to Comcare if it results in death, medical treatment as an inpatient in a hospital, immediate treatment for a serious injury, infection with a prescribed illness, or if it involves a dangerous occurrence. The ABC must ensure that notification is made to Comcare immediately after becoming aware that a notifiable incident has occurred.

Brietta Hague in Sweden, January 2016.

138 17 additional incidents were reported in ABC Worksafe but were excluded as either non-work-related incidents or duplicated entries.

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Once an incident is notified in ABC Worksafe, the nominated manager is responsible for managing the incident, investigating the root causes and contributing factors surrounding the incident, and implementing reasonably practicable WHS risk control measures to prevent similar incidents from occurring in the future. Some incidents remain outstanding due to the incident remaining open during investigation, particularly if the date of the incident is close to the data calculation cut off period.

As at 30 June 2016, these steps had been completed in 91% of the reported work-related incidents occurring in 2015-16.

Statistics regarding work-related incidents and compensation claims are tabled in 3.7 on pages 158-9

Workers’ compensation claims Of the 221 work-related incidents reported in 2015-16, 21 resulted in workers’ compensation claims being accepted by Comcare (compared with 41 in 2014-15).

Analysis of the workers’ compensation claims accepted in 2015-16 shows the majority of injuries (67%) continue to be body stressing, which includes all musculoskeletal disorders such as occupational overuse and manual handling injuries. The results show a reduction in claims but the mechanism of injury is consistent with previous year’s data.

The number of mental stress claims continues to be low. No new mental stress claims have been accepted since 2013-14. The average costs of mental stress claims are high relative to other claim types and represent a significant percentage of total workers compensation costs for the ABC in years prior to 2014.

Notices and investigations Comcare has the power to conduct an investigation at an ABC workplace at any time to ascertain whether the requirements of WHS legislation are being complied with, regarding a breach or suspected breach, or concerning an accident or dangerous occurrence that occurred. During 2015-16, there were no investigations conducted by Comcare as a result of any Comcare-notified incidents.

There were no Prohibition Notices or Non-disturbance Notices served on the ABC during 2015-16, and as at 30 June 2016 there were no outstanding actions arising from, or relating to, previous years.

Workers’ compensation premiums The ABC Premium rate increased marginally, from 1.38% in 2014-15 to 1.39% in 2015-16. This revision is in response to poorer than expected developments in lifetime cost estimates for ABC claims for employees who suffered injuries in 2012-13 and 2014-15.

The overall premium rate for all Commonwealth agencies decreased from 1.93% in 2014-15 to 1.85% in 2015-16, in response to the 30% fewer overall physical claims accepted by the Comcare scheme.

The ABC received a penalty of $190 000, as a result of the upward revision of the 2014-15 premium rate and the poorer than expected developments in the lifetime cost estimates for ABC claims from employees who suffered compensable injuries in 2012-13.

Comcare again imposed a recovery margin contribution on all agencies to restore the central premium pool to full funding. The ABC’s contribution was $453 564, which was a decrease of 4% from 2014-15.

The ABC’s workers’ compensation premium for 2016-17, incorporating the additional Comcare recovery margin, is $6 385 000 (compared with $5 505 722 in 2015-16).

Premium rates for the last four years can be viewed at 3.8 on page 159

Health and Safety Committees A total of 24 WHS Committees operate across the ABC. All committees are National WHS Committees representing their relevant Division, except for News which has a national committee as well as individual state and territory WHS Committees.

The WHS consultation arrangements cover 100% of the Workforce. Where no Divisional WHS Committees exist, elected Health and Safety Representatives represent Workers.

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Corporate services

The Boyer Lectures are a series of talks by prominent Australians chosen by the ABC Board to present ideas on major social, scientific or cultural issues. The lectures have been broadcast on ABC Radio for more than 50 years and have stimulated thought, discussion and debate in Australia on an astonishing range of subjects, from great thinkers such as jurist Professor Julius Stone, historian Manning Clark AC, author Geraldine Brooks, and the Hon. Quentin Bryce AC CVO, former Governor-General of the Commonwealth of Australia.

The Boyer Lectures began in 1959 and are named after the late Sir Richard Boyer, who was Chairman of the ABC.

In 2015, the ABC Boyer Lectures entitled ‘A Larger Australia’ were delivered by Dr Michael Fullilove, Executive Director of the Lowy Institute for International Policy. The lectures examined Australia’s place in the world in light of the current challenges to the global order and the shift of wealth and power eastwards, towards Asia. For the first time in the Boyers’ history, one of the lectures was delivered overseas. The first of Dr Fullilove’s lectures, Present at the Destruction, was delivered at Peking University in Beijing, China. The 2016 ABC Boyer Lecture Series is available online: http://www.abc.net.au/ radionational/programs/boyerlectures/.

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Corporate Strategy and Planning In 2015-16, the Corporate Strategy and Planning division continued to lead the development and implementation of corporate strategy, policy formulation and planning for the ABC.

A key focus for the ABC in 2015-16 was the development of a sustainable Continuous Improvement program to bring about cultural change and support future investment in content and digital services and products. In partnership with UTS Business School, the Corporation conducted pilot training in Lean Six Sigma and Organisational Improvement methodologies in 2015. The Continuous Improvement program formally commenced in June 2016, when a number of senior staff began a tailored ‘Leading Improvement’ course.

In 2015-16, the Enterprise Project Management Office continued to oversee the ‘ABC Projects 2014’ program of initiatives arising from the reduction in the Corporation’s budget appropriation that was announced in November 2014. That work is expected to be finalised in 2016-17.

Submissions In 2015-16, the ABC made 11 submissions to Government Departments, Parliamentary committees and review bodies on a range of topics. These included submissions to the Department of Finance regarding amendments to the rules made under the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013, to the Senate Environment and Communications Legislation Committee Inquiry into the Australian Broadcasting Corporation Amendment (Rural and Regional Advocacy) Bill 2015, and to the House of Representatives Standing Committee on Communications and the Arts Inquiry into the importance of public and commercial broadcasting, online content and live production to rural and regional Australia, including the arts, news and other services.

Mark Scott speaks to the National Press Club, 24 February 2016.

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Corporate services

Corporate Affairs

Corporate Communications Mark Scott AO delivered his final address as ABC Managing Director to the National Press Club in Canberra on 24 February 2016, entitled One Sure Bet: The Future of Public Broadcasting.

During the year he also delivered the inaugural Brian Johns AO Lecture at Macquarie University on The Future of the Australian Story (15 September 2015), and an address to the New News Conference at the Centre for Advancing Journalism, University of Melbourne on Digital Discordance and the ABC (9 October 2015).

The Managing Director’s speeches are publicly available on the ABC’s website: http://about.abc.net.au/speeches/

Corporate Governance Information about the ABC’s corporate governance is provided in Chapter 5 (see page 120).

Audience and Marketing In 2015-16, the Audience and Marketing Division focused on:

• refining approaches to audience insight research, in response to ABC audiences’ experiences of a fast moving and ever-changing array of media options

• improving internal collaborative processes

• growing strong in-house skills and knowledge bases.

In order to capture increasingly fragmented audience activity and understand changing audience behaviours, the Audience Insights team introduced new internal KPIs, produced and automated audience dashboards, and launched an online community panel, YourSpace, in late May. At 30 June 2016, YourSpace had more than 4 000 members engaging with the Insights team through blogs, surveys and discussion forums.

Audience and Marketing also established ABC Made, an internal creative agency of TV and Radio promo producers, digital and print designers, motion designers and production teams led by senior Creative Services staff. ABC Made diversified its creative skill set and adopted digital technologies to support all of the Corporation’s creative marketing needs; covering brand, strategic creative direction and development, design and production.

In 2016, a succinct brand architecture framework was created by Audience and Marketing: the Brand Expression (BE) project. Responding to the challenge of audience fragmentation occurring via myriad content, platform and device choices, the BE project was designed to assist ABC audiences in finding content they enjoy, in a place that suits them—and at the same time, position the ABC brand as a united ‘home’ for content they trust that also keeps pace with the changing world around them.

Audience Insights In 2015-16, the ABC subscribed to a range of quantitative services to measure audiences. The Corporation also commissioned a range of quantitative and qualitative research to help inform strategy, programming, scheduling and marketing decisions, and to gauge audience attitudes to its services.

Information about the ABC’s audiences in 2015-16 is in Chapter 2, Audience Experiences (page 26), and Chapter 6, Charts, Graphs and Tables (page 140).

Legal ABC Legal provides a comprehensive range of legal services to the Corporation including pre-publication advice on a 24-hour, seven-days-per-week basis; conducting litigation; and negotiating and advising on contracts, rights issues, regulatory regimes and statutory obligations. ABC Legal also contributes to various cross-divisional groups and initiatives, provides advice on legal aspects of policy issues, and develops submissions to parliament, government and other organisations about law reform.

In 2015-16, the Legal team finalised two major technology contracts for the ABC: its major contract for the transmission of the ABC’s digital terrestrial television services throughout Australia and the contract for a new integrated media system for News, Radio and Regional Divisions to gather, produce, store and share content. ABC Legal also assisted with key contracts relating to captioning, content delivery, broadcast equipment, cloud-based services, building construction, management and maintenance, ABC Commercial activities such as book and magazine publishing, music recording, and the international transmission and distribution of Australia Plus.

The ABC also finalised contracts with ARIA/PPCA for the use of commercial sound recordings across all ABC content platforms, and managed the ABC’s extensive trademark portfolio.

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In a strong year for Australian content, ABC Legal prepared and settled finance and production agreements with Australian producers, and Australian and international financiers, for television programs including Australian dramas Cleverman Series 2, Barracuda, Seven Types of Ambiguity and Rake Series 5; comedy and entertainment programs Shaun Micallef’s Mad as Hell Series 6, Please Like Me Series 4, Rosehaven, and Soul Mates Series 2; children’s projects Tomorrow When the War Began and Nowhere Boys Series 3; as well as significant factual programs Keeping Australia Alive and Howard on Menzies.

Legal supported a number of cross-platform initiatives, including Mental As, and contracted major sports and events agreements for the 2016 Rio Olympics, Sydney New Year’s Eve celebrations, and Australia Day activities.

ABC lawyers assisted News on its pivotal tender for the acquisition of external news services, comprising services in video, text, images and finance data.

Legal advice was provided throughout the Corporation on digital initiatives and strategies, for example enhancements to the ABC’s iview service.

In 2015-16, ABC Legal continued to provide extensive pre-publication advice to ABC program makers around the clock on a huge volume of often complex and groundbreaking news, current affairs and other stories across a range of platforms, including for Lateline, 7.30, Background Briefing, Compass and Australian Story; and various award-winning investigations for Four Corners. Advice was also provided for information and entertainment programs such as The Chaser’s Election Desk, Shaun Micallef’s Mad as Hell, The Checkout and The Weekly with Charlie Pickering.

ABC Legal resolved or defended as necessary a number of complaints, threatened legal actions and litigation. Lawyers also challenged suppression orders and made applications for access to court materials to assist story research.

ABC Legal continued its media law training program, delivering a series of specialised media law workshops for journalists and content-makers across the country. The program aims to minimise the Corporation’s exposure to legal liability while ensuring important stories can be told. It covers topics such as contempt of court, defamation, and newsgathering risks. Legal also provided copyright training to relevant staff, including through remote delivery to various regional areas.

Business Affairs Business Affairs negotiates the rights and deal terms required by the ABC in content produced, commissioned and acquired by the ABC content divisions and ABC International, as well as associated rights required by ABC Commercial. Business Affairs works in consultation with, but independently of, the ABC content divisions, and continues to play an important role in maintaining good corporate governance.

In 2015-16, Business Affairs continued to work closely with ABC Television to secure updated broadcast and online rights, to meet audience expectations that the ABC’s content be available on multiple platforms and to deliver value for money for the ABC. Business Affairs has been a key participant in the ABC’s terms of trade negotiations with producers for television content, and has been negotiating updated rights for all content commissioned since October 2015 when current terms of trade expired. Business Affairs has been working closely with industry stakeholders to provide input into the new actors agreement recently finalised between television producers and the actors’ union which underpins the new terms of trade for scripted content. Business Affairs has also worked closely with ABC Commercial on the interaction between the ABC’s free services and its distribution activities.

In 2015-16, Business Affairs worked with ABC Television to set new standard deal terms for programs commissioned primarily for online broadcast as part of ABC Television’s digital strategy, such as Sammy J’s Playground Politics and You Can’t Ask That. Joint online initiatives contracted between the ABC and the state and federal Screen Agencies have resulted in funding for a wide range of new online series for ABC audiences, including the continuation of the successful ABC/Screen Australia Fresh Blood initiative. Another significant digital development requiring Business Affairs involvement in rights negotiations was the launch of simulcast streaming of the ABC main channel in December 2015.

Business Affairs continues to support the strategy of ABC International through its acquisition of rights to reflect the Australia Plus service and associated online activities.

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The ABC is committed to fulfilling its functions in a manner that is ethical, financially responsible, minimises any adverse impacts on the environment and individuals, and is beneficial to the community.

Contents:

Corporate responsibility 102 Corporate responsibility in a broadcasting context 104 Environmental responsibility 108 Social responsibility 111

Aaron Pederson, Roy Billing and Guy Pearce in Jack Irish.

The Jack Irish telemovies feature an outstanding cast of top Australian talent, led by Emmy Award-winning actor Guy Pearce.

CORPORATE RESPONSIBILITY

CHAPTER FOUR

Corporate Responsibility 101

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Corporate responsibility

Management of Corporate Responsibility The ABC contributes significant social value to the Australian community. The ABC is committed to conducting its day-to-day activities with integrity, and maintaining the trust of the community.

Responsibility for implementing and demonstrating corporate social responsibility rests with every employee and Manager across the Corporation. A number of senior management positions within the ABC include a reference to corporate responsibility priorities in their roles, including: Head, Corporate Governance; Manager, Diversity; Manager, Work Health and Safety; and National Manager, Property Compliance.

The ABC’s Corporate Responsibility Policy reinforces the ABC’s commitment to acting ethically and responsibly in all areas of its operations. The Policy outlines the ABC’s commitment to key principles of corporate social responsibility, which include adhering to relevant laws and regulations, respecting human rights, being accountable and transparent, and engaging with both internal and external stakeholder groups.

Reporting performance The ABC reports its corporate responsibility and sustainability performance each financial year in the Annual Report, and on the Corporate Responsibility website at http://about.abc.net.au/how-the-abc-is-run/what-guides-us/corporate-responsibility/.

The ABC is guided by the Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) Sustainability Reporting Guidelines and the associated Media Sector Supplement document to report its performance.139 The GRI framework provides a common language for organisations to measure and report their sustainability performance so that stakeholders are able to view a more complete picture of the organisation’s financial and non-financial activities and performance. The Media Sector Supplement contains guidance on reporting key aspects of sustainability performance that are relevant and meaningful to the media sector.

In 2015-16, the ABC continued the review of its framework for achieving environmental targets. The outcomes of the review will be used to update the strategies and priorities relevant to reducing the ABC’s environmental footprint.

Scope and boundary Additional corporate responsibility and sustainability information is available on the ABC’s website:

http://about.abc.net.au/how-the-abc-is-run/what-guides-us/corporate-responsibility/

Other than references to the activities of ABC International, the report is limited to domestic operations within the direct control of the ABC. Sustainability information about the ABC’s investments in MediaHub Australia Pty Limited, Freeview Australia Limited, and National DAB Licence Company Limited are not included in the report. Any additional limitations to the scope or completeness of particular data are identified within the reported data.

Stakeholder inclusiveness The ABC provides opportunities for its audiences and other stakeholders to provide input into the content and sustainability related subjects of the Corporation. The outcome of this engagement informs the report content.

In 2015-16, mechanisms for engaging with external stakeholders included:

• the annual ABC Appreciation Survey— conducted in 2016 by OmniPoll (see page 142)

• formal audience contacts and complaints processes (see page 123)

• online feedback mechanisms specific to ABC content areas

• ABC Advisory Council processes (see page 136).

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Corporate responsibility

Materiality A detailed materiality analysis was conducted in 2010-11. The ABC periodically reviews and updates that materiality analysis, most recently in 2013-14. At that time, the relative importance of each indicator in the materiality analysis was determined according to the extent to which it:

• contributed to the successful implementation of corporate strategy or reinforced ABC Values

• presented an opportunity for the ABC to manage its impacts or affect the priorities of its stakeholders

• emerged as important to stakeholders

• was recognised as a risk in the corporate risk process

• constituted a future challenge for the media and broadcasting sector

• was regularly reported by others in the industry

• was recognised by experts or the scientific community as a risk for sustainability.

The review included a scan of performance against the ABC Strategic Plan 2013-16, the ABC’s updated corporate risk profile, outcomes from stakeholder engagement processes, developments relevant to the media sector, and relevant submissions to government.

Contact The ABC welcomes feedback on the 2016 Corporate Responsibility Report. Comments, questions or feedback can be addressed to:

Head, Corporate Governance +61 2 8333 1500 700 Harris Street Ultimo NSW 2007

Corporate.responsibility@your.abc.net.au

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Corporate responsibility in a broadcasting context Protecting freedom of expression Freedom of expression is enshrined in the ABC Editorial Policies. Article 19 of the United Nations’ Universal Declaration of Human Rights recognises freedom of expression as a fundamental human right. The ABC’s commitment to impartiality and diversity of perspectives reflects the need for a democratic society to deliver diverse sources of reliable information and contending opinions.

In pursuing impartiality, the ABC is guided by the following:

• a balance that follows the weight of evidence

• fair treatment

• open-mindedness

• opportunities over time for principal relevant perspectives on matters of contention to be expressed.

The ABC seeks to balance the public interest in disclosure of information and freedom of expression, with respect for privacy.

Improving access to content and services In 2015-16 the ABC continued to take steps to improve the accessibility of its content and services.

90% of ABC television content is captioned Improving access for people with a hearing impedimentCaptioning is the process by which speech or scenes are described in text for viewing on screen. Closed captioning indicates the availability of text that can be activated by users if required. The ABC provides a closed captioning television service on ABC main channel, ABC2, ABC KIDS, ABC3 and ABC News 24. In 2015-16, over 10 000 hours of first-run programming across all channels were available with captions, including all scheduled news programming.

In prime time (6pm-midnight), the ABC captioned more than 90% of television content on all channels, similar to 2014-15: 100% of programs on ABC main channel; 88% on ABC2; and 96% on ABC3. On ABC KIDS, over 85% of the programming broadcast was available with closed captions. In 2015-16, 94% of news content broadcast on ABC News 24 in prime time (6pm-midnight) was captioned and, when available, included signing for the hearing impaired.

The ABC provided greater access to key events by providing captions for broadcasts of Anzac Day marches and memorial services, Australia Day and New Year’s Eve events, and various significant memorial and anniversary services held during the year. Extensive coverage of the 2016 federal election campaign, the Paris and Jakarta attacks, and Brexit Votes was also captioned.

Closed captions are available on the ABC’s internet television service, iview. In 2015-16, the majority of all prime-time ABC main channel and ABC2 content, including all news and current affairs, was captioned on iview. The ABC captioned a range of programming in advance of broadcast for iview binges including Glitch and Cleverman. Exclusive captioned content included Glitch Extras, 100 Years of ANZAC, Sammy J’s Playground Politics and special editions of Good Game. An increased selection of children’s content was available with closed captions such as Nowhere Boys, Tomorrow When The War Began, Degrassi, Play School and Fireman Sam.

ABC Commercial has an undertaking with the Australian Human Rights Commission that the Division will always attempt to source items that have closed captions where the Australian distributor has the authorship rights to allow for this. Most ABC DVDs (excluding preschool titles) have closed captions. ABC Retail has included the requirement for closed captioning into their supplier terms of trade.

Corporate Responsibility 105

Improving access for people with a visual impairment In response to a request by the Minister for Communications, ABC Television continued its Department-funded trial of Audio Description programs on iview across iOS devices, Android devices and on desktop. The ABC has communicated with advocacy groups representing the blind and vision-impaired community about upcoming programs and the availability of a video clip on how to access Audio Description. The trial has provided approximately 14 new hours of audio-described content on iview per week over a period of 15 months. The ABC will provide the Minister with a report on the outcome of the trial following its conclusion in July 2016.

expert was appointed to develop the ABC Digital Accessibility Standards, and maintain quality and health checks for current and future systems.

In line with the Federal Government’s commitment to the W3C Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG 2.0), in 2015-16 the ABC delivered accessibility improvements for the top 20 ABC websites (based on traffic and importance of the site for accessibility) and continued migration of its systems to an accessibility-optimised content management system. In addition, a subject matter

A range of titles published by ABC Books were made available through the Australian publishing operation Read How You Want. This customised book publishing service offers a print-on-demand service for people unable to read standard formatted books. Titles available through Read How You Want are available in various large format editions to suit the capabilities of each customer.

ABC Books made 10 titles available through Read How You Want during 2015-16.

ABC Audio makes available an extensive range of audio books across a wide range of genres for all ages that are accessible to the vision impaired and people with a print handicap. In 2015-16, ABC Audio released, through the licence agreement with audio book publisher Bolinda, 77 titles in both physical and digital formats. Eleven of these titles were from ABC originated content, 44 were adult titles, and 33 were children’s titles.

Sally & Possum In 2016, ABC KIDS premiered Australia’s first Auslan children’s television program for young hearing-impaired and deaf children, acquired from the Queensland Department of Education. Sally & Possum is designed to enhance children’s foundational literacy and numeracy skills as they find fun solutions to everyday problems. The program received significant praise from the families of hearing impaired and deaf preschoolers.

Corporate responsibility in a broadcasting context

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Protecting young or vulnerable audiences The ABC’s Editorial Policy framework sets out guidelines to protect vulnerable audiences such as children. ABC Television has developed an in-house resource of policy expertise available to those making editorial and other decisions. Advice and training in the ABC Editorial Policies is delivered on an ongoing basis. Upward referral is a key concept of the policies which ensures difficult decisions are not made in isolation.

All television programs other than news, current affairs, and sporting events are classified and scheduled for broadcast in accordance with the ABC’s Associated Standard on Television Program Classification. Some amendments were made to the classification timezones in 2015-16 (see page 81).

The ABC ensures that graphic or distressing news content is preceded by a warning to give readers, listeners or viewers the opportunity to avoid the content if they choose.

The ABC children’s mobile ecosystem initiative serves digital content across a range of mobile touch points to children. The KIDS iview app is part of this ecosystem, and the app, along with the main iview service, includes a parental filter so parents can control their children’s viewing boundaries.

The ABC websites for children follow strict protocols in line with editorial policies to minimise risk to children, for example regarding privacy. With the creation of content and experiences for children across all platforms, consideration of sensitivities and risk is paramount. The online protection of children is a shared responsibility between the ABC, the parent/ guardian, and the child. The ABC aims to ensure that children and young people who engage with the ABC’s online spaces understand the possible risks they face and how to minimise them. Providing information about online safety is encouraged on ABC sites designed for children.

ABC Regional’s user-generated content projects, ABC Open and ABC Heywire, have clear moderation guidelines that address how they handle sensitive content and ‘at risk’ contributors or audiences. Where required, measures are taken to protect the anonymity of contributors who are writing about sensitive issues, such as domestic violence or mental illness. Contributors are invited to use an alias and generic file images when writing about sensitive topics. On occasion, details may be edited or removed from a contribution or user profile to protect the identity of the author.

ABC Open works closely with organisations such as Mindframe and the Luke Batty Foundation to make sure that the ABC’s editorial processes are aligned with the best-practice approach for handling this type of content. In consultation with these organisations, ABC Open has developed a list of support services to add to the end of contributions that touch on sensitive issues. Trigger warnings are added to pieces of content as required.

In 2015-16, the ABC developed a comprehensive Child Protection Framework, which includes a clear policy and procedures for working with and around children and young people. In 2015-16, Heywire reviewed its working with children policies to ensure they were in line with the new framework and new regulations for working with vulnerable people in the ACT (where the Heywire Regional Youth Summit is held). The program’s policies met or exceeded the standards in both.

All ABC DVD product is subject to formal classification by the Classification Board and appropriate warnings/ guides are attached to each product. ABC CDs display appropriate warnings regarding language and content.

ABC Commercial’s Events business contracts event management to third-party promoters. Under these event management contracts promoters are require to warrant that all venues will be safe and fit for the purpose of each event. The contracts also stipulate that the promoters must conduct themselves in accordance with all international, national, federal, state and local laws and treaties. ABC Commercial is in the process of updating all its external promote agreements to explicitly ensure current compliance with state and territory based legislation regarding working with children.

d

r

Improving digital literacy ABC Open is a unique initiative which, as well as enabling Australians in rural and regional areas to share their stories on ABC platforms, provides opportunities for them to develop digital media skills.

In 2015-16, the restructure which accompanied the establishment of the ABC Regional Division saw ABC Open move to reduce its reliance on teaching digital literacy in order to focus on high-value content and improve diversity. This included a focus on projects that were easier for people to contribute to, such as ‘Pic of the Week’.

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Corporate Responsibility 107

ABC Regional has also placed greater emphasis on connecting with local audiences via Facebook, which has seen significant growth in the Facebook audiences for ABC Regional offices—with user-generated content playing a large role. ABC Open’s Facebook account saw a 160% increase in its average reach in 2015-16 compared to 2014-15, largely due to an increased focus on publishing content natively within Facebook.

The ABC undertook a bespoke marketing campaign for iview, featuring Charlie Pickering, to extend iview’s reach to older Australians. This resulted in a 30% increase in iview usage among older Australians,140 demonstrating an increase in confidence of this demographic in the digital sphere.

Digital Network’s Research and Development (R+D) team have documented and shared their learnings from the ABC’s first virtual reality experience, Warwick Gold: Australian Rodeo (for more information, see page 56). R+D has also collaborated with universities to improve the digital literacy of journalism students, and to encourage creative ideation about future media experiences.

Corporate responsibility in a broadcasting context

ABC Open’s Pic of the Week ABC Regional’s focus on ABC Open’s ‘Pic of the Week’ initiative saw a 28% increase in the number of contributors and a 45% increase in overall contributions from 20 085 contributions in 2014-15 to 29 175 in 2015-16.141

140 Webtrends.

141 ABC Open.

Mt Buangor Sunset by ABC Open contributor dsallai (Ballarat East, Victoria). Bayindeen, Victoria.

ABC Open contributor dsallai won the weekly Pic of the Week competition on 5 February 2016, with this serene image of two campers chatting over a cup of ‘cheap whisky’ at their campsite on the summit of Mt Buangor in Victoria, as a storm moves over the town of Ararat.

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Energy In 2015-16, overall ABC energy consumption increased slightly, by 116GJ (0.1%) compared to 2014-15.

For data regarding energy consumption, see 4.1 on page 160

In 2015-16, the ABC sought to implement a range of initiatives to reduce energy consumption. The nature of the ABC business, in particular its reliance on technology, necessarily involves high levels of energy consumption. This is reflected in the energy use figures for New South Wales where there is a significant concentration of the ABC’s workforce and production. Energy reduction initiatives included:

• Hobart (Tasmania) - 150 T5 Fluorescent tubes were replaced with LED lights in Local Radio, the newsroom, technical support areas and the central equipment room. The overall cost saving, including electricity, lamp costs and labour, is estimated to be $8 000 per annum.

• East Perth (Western Australia) - Emergency and exit lights, corridor lights, and toilet lights were all replaced with LED lights; the electric storage hot water system in the shower was replaced with a heat pump; and the runway sink electric storage hot water system was replaced with an electric instantaneous system. The overall cost saving, including electricity, lamp costs and labour, is estimated to be $16 580 per annum.

• Collinswood, Port Pirie, Mount Gambier, Renmark (South Australia) and Broken Hill (New South Wales) - Office lighting was replaced with high efficiency LED lights. The overall cost saving, including electricity, lamp costs and labour, is estimated to be $15 114 per annum.

• Canberra (Australian Capital Territory) - The renovation of news studios in Canberra and the replacement of old lighting reduced the studio’s power consumption by approximately 80%. The ABC is also replacing inefficient tungsten lighting with low power LED panels across its entire news field operations.

More broadly, the ABC is implementing a range of initiatives to reduce power consumption, such as continued expansion of server virtualisation and improved power management on computers. This includes encouraging behavioural change, with all staff strongly encouraged to shut down or put computers into sleep or power saver mode at end of the day (unless it is not feasible for operational reasons).

Solar hot water systems are installed in 10 sites: Port Macquarie and Newcastle (New South Wales), Canberra (Australian Capital Territory), Brisbane and Gold Coast (Queensland), Port Pirie (South Australia), Launceston (Tasmania), Albany and Broome (Western Australia) and Alice Springs (Northern Territory).

The impact of the ABC’s solar hot water usage on its direct energy consumption is not measured. The ABC does not directly source energy from other renewable energy sources although suppliers of electricity may use renewable energy sources to generate the electricity consumed by the ABC. This is not measured by the ABC, and the information is not currently available from the ABC’s electricity suppliers.

Emissions In 2015-16, the ABC used the National Greenhouse Accounts (NGA) Factors published by the Department of the Environment to identify and quantify greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. These are further classified as electricity, waste and fuel. This methodology of measurement is unchanged from 2014-15, however the NGA Factors were updated in August 2015 to include the latest amendments to methodologies within the National Greenhouse and Energy Reporting (Measurement) Determination 2015.

Approximately 94% of the ABC’s GHG emissions are generated via electricity usage. The ABC has instituted a number of initiatives to reduce this usage, as discussed above.

In 2015-16, the ABC’s GHG emissions decreased by 2.0% compared to 2014-15 levels.

For a breakdown of GHG emissions, including comparisons with 2014-15 levels, see 4.2 on page 160

2%reduction in emissions

Corporate Responsibility 109

Waste and recycling The ABC produces non-hazardous waste. In 2015-16, the ABC produced 5 700m3 of waste from its capital city sites (a 16% reduction from 6 793m3 in 2014-15). A total of 44% of waste was recycled (51% in 2014-15), and 56% was directed to landfill.142

The recycled waste produced by the ABC in 2015-16 included co-mingled recycling (1 834m3), recycled paper (150m3) and recycled cardboard (551m3). These items were separated from general waste and all fully recycled. The ABC is working to reduce waste by providing facilities for recycling at all sites. While the facilities for waste directed to landfill have been maintained, the Corporation has added more facilities that accept recycling of co-mingled waste, paper and cardboard, glass, fluorescent light tubes, batteries and electronic waste.

E-waste recycling of old computer hard drives, screens, cables and other technological equipment is available at all capital city sites. The ABC is seeking to reduce e-waste by extending the life of display monitors, and replacing physical RSA tokens with ‘soft’ tokens accessible via a mobile app.

In 2015-16, ABC Television’s Digital File Acceptance Project enabled the ABC to accept digital files instead of tapes, resulting in a reduction in tapes, tape storage and paper tape reports. ABC News introduced rechargeable batteries for radio microphones, which has reduced battery waste.

The ABC has continued to develop electronic workflows aimed to reduce the use of paper. Documents are printed double-sided wherever possible to reduce paper use and 90% recycled copy paper is used in all printers.

For data regarding waste and recycling in 2015-16, see 4.3 on page 161

Environmental sustainability in the supply chain Where appropriate, tender documentation and evaluation criteria required information about suppliers’ corporate responsibility (including environmental) commitments and practices.

The ABC does not manage the businesses of service providers Broadcast Australia Infrastructure (BIA), Telstra or OPTUS and as such has no clauses within the contracts to enforce any green initiatives. Where ever possible it is assumed these businesses attempt to reduce energy consumption at any opportunity which in turn reduces costs and increases margins.

Mandatory environmental standards (ES1 and ES2) of the Federal Government’s ICT Sustainability Plan 2010-2015 are applied to all ABC procurements of ICT equipment.

All ABC magazines are printed under ISO 14001 Environmental Certification. In addition, the Organic Gardener magazine is printed on paper which is Forest Stewardship Certified (FSC) from Mixed Sources.

All ABC HarperCollins black and white book titles on paper (for example, paperback non-pictorial) are printed on paper manufactured from wood grown in sustainable plantation forests. The fibre source and manufacturing processes meet recognised international environmental standards and carry certification.

Environmental responsibility

142 Reported data is based on billing information provided by waste contractors for capital cities only.

16.5 %reduction in paper use

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Travel and transport Although the nature of the ABC’s operations, in particular its news and current affairs activities, necessitates frequent domestic and international travel, the ABC encourages staff to reduce domestic travel as much as possible.

Staff are encouraged to consider alternatives to travel where appropriate, for instance utilising video conferencing. The ABC encourages staff to use sustainable travel methods to get to and from work such as walking, cycling or taking public transport. End-of-trip facilities for staff including secure bike parking, showers and lockers are provided at most capital city and some regional sites. Information about public transport is provided on the ABC intranet.

The ABC continued to support and promote Steptember, National Walk to Work Day and National Ride to Work Day with staff participating at many capital city and some regional sites.

ABC staff travelled a total of 23 634 321 km by air in 2015-16, a 9% increase from 2014-15.

In 2015-16, domestic fleet vehicles travelled approximately 4 097 720 km, an increase of 2.4% in kilometres travelled from approximately 4 002 237 km in 2014-15. Of the 355 vehicles in the ABC fleet, 57 were owned and 298 leased. One was a hybrid vehicle.

In 2015-16, the ABC’s consumption of fuels directly related to transport was 477 839L, a 6% decrease from 2014-15 (508 331L).143 The renewable ethanol content of E10 fuels is not measured.

Detail regarding fuel consumption (LPG, E10, Petrol and Diesel) is available at 4.2 on page 160

Water consumption In 2015-16, the ABC’s water consumption was 74 781kL (compared with 72 830kL in 2014-15).

Detail regarding Water Consumption at capital city sites is available at 4.4 on page 162

Rainwater collection at ABC sites Rainwater was collected in 13 separate ABC sites across the country:

• Rainwater collected at East Perth was utilised to supplement water to the cooling towers of the HVAC system.

• The rainwater collected in the Gold Coast (Queensland), Port Pirie (South Australia), Sale (Victoria), Port Macquarie (New South Wales) and Broome (Western Australia) was utilised solely for toilet flushing.

• Rainwater in Brisbane (Queensland) and Bendigo (Victoria) was used for irrigation and also toilet flushing.

For rainwater collection capacity and collection at ABC sites, see 4.5 on page 162

Heritage Strategy The ABC’s Heritage Strategy 2014-17 was prepared in accordance with section 341ZA of the Environmental Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (Cth) (the EPBC Act). The EPBC Act sets out the ABC’s responsibilities to protect and conserve the Commonwealth Heritage values of places which it owns or controls. The Strategy is intended to inform the Minister and the Australian Heritage Council of the identification, assessment and monitoring of Commonwealth Heritage values demonstrated by places owned or controlled by the Australian ABC. The Heritage Strategy is available online at: about.abc.net.au/how-the-abc-is-run/what-guides-us/heritage-management/.

Environmental responsibility

143 Information about aviation turbine fuel consumption is no longer available. The 2014-15 results have been adjusted for comparative purposes.

Corporate Responsibility 111

Social responsibility

The ABC has a long history of contributing social value to the communities in which it operates. It does this through activities such as emergency broadcasting, Community Service Announcements that support Australian communities, and building the capacity of media organisations in the Asia-Pacific region.

The ABC’s Role as Emergency Broadcaster During times of emergency the ABC provides an important service to communities.

Emergency broadcasting Local Radio stations in affected communities broadcast updates, emergency information and warnings as required. Updates were provided on television, social media, via online streaming, and through the ABC Emergency website.

Coverage for 2015-16 included:

• From 19 November 2015, multiple fires on the southern coast of Western Australia and also around Perth led to several days of rolling coverage by ABC Esperance and 720 ABC Perth.

• 891 ABC Adelaide conducted rolling coverage of the major bushfire near Pinery in the northern Barossa region from 25 November to 2 December 2015. The station provided full emergency coverage for the first 48 hours of the fire, with hourly updates provided once fire authorities downgraded their warnings.

• In early December 2015, ABC Ballarat covered the Scotsburn fire, in which 12 houses and other parts of properties were lost.

• 702 ABC Sydney provided rolling coverage during and immediately after a tornado struck Kurnell, New South Wales on 17 December 2015.

• A major bushfire situation along the Great Ocean Road in Victoria on Christmas Day 2015 triggered several days of rolling coverage for 774 ABC Melbourne.

• Further bushfires in Western Australia in the second week of January 2016 prompted a major series of emergency broadcasts by 720 ABC Perth staff. This involved rolling coverage during critical periods throughout the eight full days of evacuations and bushfire flare-ups. Ultimately, the bushfire destroyed the town of Yarloop, Western Australia (for more on this, see page 112).

• In early February 2016, the ABC’s Northern Tasmanian team swung into emergency broadcasting mode in response to bushfires in the remote north-west of the state, and the area around Cradle Mountain. Staff at 936 ABC Hobart worked hand-in-hand with the Launceston staff to provide valuable information and reassurance to the affected communities.

• An East Coast Low in June 2016 saw several stations in three different states conducting rolling emergency coverage. These included 612 ABC Brisbane, ABC Gold Coast, ABC Sunshine Coast, ABC North Coast, ABC Mid North Coast, 702 ABC Sydney, ABC Illawarra, ABC South East (New South Wales), 936 ABC Hobart and ABC Northern Tasmania.

As well as broadcasting emergency information, the ABC works with communities in the aftermath of natural disasters to raise awareness and help rebuild those communities. For instance, in the days following the Christmas Day fires at Wye River in 2015, 774 ABC Melbourne prepared reports from the town. Jon Faine, one of the station’s key presenters, visited with emergency staff behind containment lines and reported back on the impact of the fire event.

Following the devastating storms in June 2016, the Mayor of Latrobe, Peter Freshney, gave his thanks to ABC Northern Tasmania: During these unprecedented times of crisis it is imperative to quickly and accurately convey information to residents ... and this was undertaken by your station with the utmost professionalism whilst being sensitive to the raw emotions felt by the community. I would also like to acknowledge the positive stories arising from this disaster which were conveyed to the community. These stories greatly assisted in lifting the community’s spirits.

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Preparing for emergencies ABC Emergency Broadcasting and Community Development (EBCD) Managers have represented the ABC at national workshops for emergency agencies. These workshops are preparing a national framework for emergency warnings. The ABC is the only media organisation to have been invited to participate, due to its strong reputation in emergency broadcasting.

Many ABC managers are members of district disaster management groups. This gives them a seat at the table as planning information is shared about likely emergency events. For instance, managers in Western Australia regularly attend the Perth Information Reference Group meeting (a sub-committee of the State Emergency Management Committee). Similarly, managers in Adelaide attend quarterly meetings of the South Australian State Disaster Recovery Committee. 891 ABC Adelaide is also represented on the South Australian Communications Sector Forum in conjunction with the Department of Premier and Cabinet, to plan for major information and communication infrastructure failures.

Social responsibility

A Tasmanian firefighter rests on a rake. Image by Jess Davis / ABC RN.

During the January 2016 bushfires at Yarloop, Western Australia, ABC Radio provided updates throughout the night rather than providing rolling emergency broadcasting covering. This was in part due to the fact that the Department of Fire and Emergency Services (DFES)— Western Australia’s primary emergency service—did not notify ABC Local Radio that Yarloop was burning. They had not expected their containment lines to fail. This impacted on the ABC’s ability to keep listeners informed with up-to-date information, and throughout the evening talkback callers queried the level of warning for Tarcoola Forest. The DFES was unable to explain why it was at ‘emergency warning’ level, and their media office were unavailable to speak on-air until well after the emergency had passed, by which time the warning was downgraded to ‘advice’ level. These issues have been raised with DFES Media in order to improve future communication with the ABC.

Corporate Responsibility 113

Radio managers (including Regional Editors and Chiefs of Staff in the Regional Division, and Local Managers and Content Directors in the Radio Division) regularly meet with local emergency agencies and other relevant groups. These meetings include high-level briefings before and after major events, pre-season awareness campaigns designed to prepare the community, and pre-season staff briefings in which the emergency services brief ABC staff about the season ahead.

The ABC seeks to provide information to emergency service agencies and community groups about its emergency broadcasting activities. For instance, in 2015-16:

• The ABC’s Director of News and the Acting EBCD Manager addressed the 2016 Emergency Media and Public Affairs (EMPA) conference for emergency media professionals.

• In April 2016, the 612 ABC Brisbane Local Manager and the Regional Editor Queensland hosted a group of new forecasters for a Q&A session on weather reporting and emergency broadcasting.

• In May 2016, at the invitation of the Queensland Government, the Regional Editor Queensland and the Far North Queensland Chief of Staff presented at a Local Disaster Management Officers Conference in Cairns on the ABC’s Emergency Broadcasting policy and procedures.

• In June 2016, a similar presentation was delivered by the Capricornia Chief of Staff to the Gladstone Disaster Management Group.

ABC in the Community

Community Service Announcements The ABC broadcasts announcements about community issues or events which are in the public interest, subject to the ABC Editorial Policies Standard 9 (Public access and participation). Due to its localisation and immediacy, radio is the primary medium via which the ABC broadcasts Community Service Announcements.

Workplace giving In 2015-16, ABC employees raised $102 698 which was distributed to a range of charities through the ABC’s Workplace Giving program (compared with $104 396 in 2014-15).

Humanitarian appeals The ABC works with aid agencies during crises and humanitarian aid appeals when it is appropriate and possible to do so.

On 4 March 2016 the ABC partnered with the Australian Red Cross to conduct the ABC Red Cross Fiji Relief Appeal following the widespread damage caused by Cyclone Winston on 21-22 February 2016. The cyclone completely destroyed at least 2 000 homes and damaged thousands of others. Whole communities were flattened, and many communities hit hard by the strong winds and storm surge then faced flood warnings for days afterwards. Thousands of acres of root crops had been destroyed across the country

The Appeal raised awareness about the plight of the people of Fiji and raised more than $1.4 million for relief activities.

Connecting with communities ABC Regional’s North and West team in South Australia worked with the Radio and News divisions to provide comprehensive coverage of the difficulties facing Whyalla, South Australia, after the Arrium steelworks went into receivership in April 2016. The team balanced the need to keep the local audience informed with the broader national demand for information. Local reporters were on the ground in Whyalla and worked with the Breakfast, Mornings, Drive, Rural, News and Online teams to ensure wide-ranging, in-depth and sensitive coverage for local audiences, as well as packaging the story for broadcast across the country.

Supporting Public Broadcasters in the Region ABC International Development works to support the development of robust media institutions in the Asia-Pacific region (see page 72).

Social responsibility

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Product Responsibility

Product information and labelling The ABC ensures all products are appropriately labelled. No changes to the ABC’s policy or practices regulating product information or labelling were made during 2015-16.

If applicable, packaging does display information about appropriate disposal of packaging. Examples include:

• “ Warning! Plastic Bag can be dangerous. To avoid danger of suffocation keep this bag away from babies and children please dispose of all packaging responsibly.”

• “ Dispose of all packaging ties before giving to your child.”

• “Battery disposal notification symbol.”

ABC licensed merchandise packaging is clearly marked if the packing is a potential hazard.

Information on DVD packaging is provided about the nature and classification of the content, including running time; aspect ratio; sound format; region encoding; number of discs; and captioning information.

ABC CDs display appropriate warnings regarding language and content.

Consistent with safety testing procedures for toys (such as AS/NZS ISO 8124), products were appropriately labelled. For instance, products which contain small parts included a “Not suitable for children under 18 months of age” warning.

Quality assurance All licensees of ABC branded merchandise have contractual obligations to manufacture high quality products that meet Australian Standards applicable to the product. Children’s products are Safety Tested to the Standards AS/NZS ISO 8124 parts 1, 2 and 3 if applicable. Products aimed at adults may also be required to be tested to relevant standards. Licensees are required to provide certificates to prove the test results. If there are no applicable Australian Standards or testing procedures for a product aimed at children, the ABC requires that licensees or manufacturers perform tests that conform to American or European testing, to safeguard product safety and quality. Licensees test for colourfastness, shrinkage and flammability of apparel products. These products are required to meet retailers’ individual standards.

Product complaints and recalls In 2015-16, there were no product recalls or instances of non-compliance with safety standards associated with products produced, distributed, licensed or sold by the ABC.

In light of the legislated requirement to report products that have caused, or may cause, serious injury or death within 48 hours to the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC), the ABC has developed a comprehensive Product Recall Procedure. The Procedure covers all products that ABC Commercial produces, distributes, licenses and sells though ABC Retail, as well as ABC branded products that are sold through other retailers.

In 2015-16, following the closure of the ABC Shops and a restructuring of the ABC’s Commercial Licensing business unit, ABC Commercial revised and updated the complaints handling procedure for ABC Retail, as well as the ABC Licensing and Direct Sales Complaints Procedure. The procedures were revised to remove references to ABC Shops and redundant positions in both Retail and Licensing.

The procedures stipulate that once a product recall has been initiated, ACCC guidelines must be followed. Customer safety and satisfaction is of paramount concern to the ABC when it comes to the creation and distribution of quality products and services.

Head Office staff in Retail, Licensing and Direct Sales participated in a refresher workshop on the procedures following their revision which was conducted by ABC Legal and the ABC Commercial Policy Manager. All ABC Shop Online Fulfilment Centre staff, including the Customer Care team, underwent the same training.

Protecting Privacy Information about the ABC’s compliance with privacy obligations is set out at page 123.

Social responsibility

Corporate Responsibility 115

Social responsibility in the workplace

Values at work The ABC is committed to demonstrating values-based leadership, fostering attitudes and behaviours that contribute to a safety conscious, creative and vibrant working environment that fosters innovation (see page 24).

Workplace health and safety Information about the ABC’s workplace health and safety framework and performance is set out at page 94.

Mental health in the workplace The ABC is aware of the potential risks to the mental health of employees who are involved in the production of news and current affairs, particularly when dealing with stories which are confronting or distressing. The ABC’s Trauma Awareness Program was developed with the Dart Centre for Journalism and Trauma in recognition of the benefits of supporting staff to cope with exposure to trauma. The program supports staff when they are dealing with potentially traumatic events. A major part of the support occurs via a peer support network. Training is provided for employees participating in the Peer Support program. Resilience building workshops have also been conducted in some locations. Employees can also be referred to a network of trauma clinicians.

Managers closely monitor the hours of staff working in emergency broadcasting. This is done with the awareness of the stress and trauma that emergencies can cause. Trauma awareness sessions are regularly conducted, in conjunction with the ABC Trauma Manager, to build resilience and support for ABC staff involved with emergency broadcasting.

Many members of both the Regional and Radio divisions are Peer Supporters. These staff provide support to those involved in all aspects of emergency broadcasting, from content-makers through to managers. After major events, and where appropriate, managers regularly promote the counselling services available to staff from the ABC’s Employee Assistance Provider (EAP).

Converge International provides ABC staff with comprehensive, independent EAP services through qualified specialists. These services are confidential and free-of-charge, and are available to all staff and their immediate family through self-referral. Face-to-face, telephone and Skype sessions are available.

Converge International is also available to assist employees who are retiring. Services offered include short-term solution based counselling to work through some of the changes the employee may face in relation to retirement, and ‘Money Assist’ financial counselling to help work through financial wellbeing concerns. These services are also made available to employees whose employment is terminated due to redundancy, along with ‘Career Assist’ career development and planning assistance. This assistance provides independent and impartial advice around resumes, job-seeking, interview skills and vocational counselling, from professional career consultants.

In addition, the ABC offers access to an outplacement service to employees whose position is redundant. The outplacement service provider delivers a tailored career transition program to those employees, which includes a range of topics to help employees deal with change including analysing career options, assistance with resume preparation, and developing job search and interview skills.

Diversity in the workplace Information about diversity is at page 89.

Social responsibility

51%of the ABC’s workforce are women

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Gender profile While the ABC is not governed by the Workplace Gender Equality Act 2012, the gender equality indicators in that legislation provide a useful benchmark for monitoring gender equality. Those indicators include gender composition of the workforce, and the equality of remuneration between women and men.

Detail regarding gender composition at the ABC, included comparisons by job description, location and remuneration, is available at 4.6 on page 163

Indigenous employment The ABC has developed and implemented a range of initiatives aimed at increasing Indigenous employment levels (see page 88).

Continuous learning and skills development The rapidly changing nature of the environment in which the ABC operates requires that ongoing learning and development opportunities are provided for staff working in diverse areas across the ABC.

In 2015-16, 1 700 training events were delivered internally, externally, online and via webinar, and 41 466 hours of training were attended by staff. In line with industry trends, the ABC continues to shift from formal classroom based courses to more flexible methods of delivery, as well as increase informal training.

Additional information about training and development is at page 90.

Social responsibility

Presenters of The Book Club, Marieke Hardy, Jennifer Byrne and Jason Steger.

Corporate Responsibility 117

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Governance 119

GOVERNANCE CHAPTER FIVE

Q&A invites the audience to start discussions on the big issues that set Australians thinking, talking and debating.

The ABC is accountable to all Australians, and continues to look for ways of operating efficiently and maximising investment in content for audiences.

Contents:

Corporate governance 120 Annual Performance Statements 126 Bonner Committee 134

ABC Advisory Council 136

Q&A’s Tony Jones

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The ABC Board and management apply a corporate governance framework that aims to balance the ABC’s performance as a creative media organisation on the one hand, and its need to comply with the formal obligations of a statutory corporation on the other.

Enabling legislation ABC corporate objectives, strategies, policies and activities derive from the requirements of the Australian Broadcasting Corporation Act 1983 (the ABC Act). In particular, section 6 of the Act— the ABC Charter—outlines the functions of the Corporation, and section 8 lays out the duties of the Board (see Appendix 1, page 218). The ABC Act expressly provides for both the editorial and administrative independence of the Corporation, thereby investing the Board with considerable discretion. In acknowledgement of that independence, the ABC accepts the obligation to meet the highest standards of public accountability.

Accountability The ABC is an agency within the portfolio of the Department of Communications and the Arts.

As at 30 June 2016, the responsible Minister was Senator The Honourable Mitch Fifield.

During the reporting period, The Honourable Malcolm Turnbull MP (as he then was) also served as responsible Minister (for the then Department of Communications).

Governance and management processes

Board Governance The roles and responsibilities of the Board are described on page 8.

The ABC Board held six meetings during 2015-16.

The Audit and Risk Committee met on five occasions and the Finance Committee met on two occasions. Further information about the ABC Board and its Committees is provided in Appendix 2 (see page 219).

Management Processes The Managing Director chairs a monthly, day long meeting of the ABC Executive, comprising Divisional Directors and the Heads of specialist support units reporting to her. The monthly meetings enable the Executive to discuss and make decisions regarding strategic, operational and compliance issues, including matters relating to the ABC’s cross-divisional audience strategy. The Executive also meets briefly each week.

The ABC’s governance framework includes a number of executive and advisory groups which provide guidance and leadership around areas such as digital strategy, risk management, information technology, work health and safety, and policy development.

Internal Audit Group Audit provides an independent and objective audit and advisory service which is designed to add value and improve the ABC’s operations. Group Audit helps the ABC to achieve its objectives by bringing a systematic and disciplined approach to evaluate and improve the effectiveness of risk management, control and governance processes.

In 2015-16, Group Audit completed 44 scheduled audits which included comprehensive, compliance, information technology and project assurance audits. Group Audit also performed unscheduled reviews at the specific request of management and the Audit and Risk Committee, and continued to use technology to undertake continuous auditing and monitoring of transactional data. As in previous years, Group Audit used a combination of in-house staff and external firms to deliver audits and provide the most appropriate industry experience and technical expertise.

Corporate governance

About the ABC 121

Group Audit also provided guidance and advice to ABC management and staff on good governance, risk management, controls and policies. As part of the ABC’s best practice arrangements, the Head Group Audit met regularly with the Chair of the Audit and Risk Committee and External Member during the course of the year in addition to attending formal Committee meetings.

Further information is provided in Appendix 2 (see page 219).

Risk Management The ABC conducts a review of the ABC’s Corporate Risk Profile of strategic risks twice annually, to ensure they adequately reflect the current operating environment. The review is conducted by the Executive Risk Committee, which comprises representatives from each Division. The outcome of that review is discussed and endorsed by the Executive and the Audit and Risk Committee.

During the year a more fundamental review of the ABC’s top risks was undertaken by the Executive and together with the implementation of risk related software will form part of an enhanced risk assessment and reporting process planned for 2017.

Operational risks are identified and reviewed on an ongoing basis, and may be proactive and relate to planning activities, or reactive and relate to incidents that have occurred. The management of operational risks in this manner provides a day-to-day identification and reporting mechanism of risk within the respective Divisions.

The ABC participated in Comcover’s 2016 Risk Management Benchmarking Survey of all government agencies, which rated the Corporation’s risk management practices as ‘Advanced’. The ABC continues to maintain strong results when compared to the average maturity level of overall Commonwealth government entities, where the average of all participants was ‘Integrated’. The benchmarking survey found that the areas in which the ABC has the strongest risk management capability are: establishing a risk management policy; embedding systematic risk management into business processes; and reviewing and continuously improving the management of risk.

The ABC is committed to maintaining the stability and resilience of its operations, as well as prioritising the safety and wellbeing of employees during and after any business disruption event. The ABC’s Business Continuity Management program operates independently and supports the Corporation’s

broader governance, policy and risk management framework, to maintain and improve the planning and response activity to adverse events that may impact ABC people, facilities or operations. The Business Continuity Management program aims to continually improve the leadership, process and communications requirements of the ABC’s emergency coordination, crisis management and business continuity and recovery processes. Understanding and effectively managing these risks through the Business Continuity Management program is part of the ABC’s commitment to building organisational resilience.

Corporate Strategy Setting In 2015-16, the Corporate Strategy and Planning division continued to lead the development and implementation of corporate strategy, policy formulation and planning for the ABC.

In 2015, the Corporation finalised an Audience and Content Strategy that expanded the ‘audiences at the centre’ pillar of the ABC Strategy 2020 into a set of specific directions and priorities in order to inform business plans and reinvestment decisions.

In May 2016, the new Managing Director brought the ABC Executive together to consider the Corporation’s strategic position through to 2025. The discussion took account of anticipated population growth, platform trends, evolving technologies and the ABC’s investment in content. Based on the outcomes of that work, Corporate Strategy and Planning is developing an ABC-wide Strategic Portfolio to coordinate major activities, decisions, and events aligned with the key elements of the ABC Strategy 2020. This work built on the outcomes of a combined Board and Executive strategy day held in April 2016.

The ABC’s strategy is informed by the broader corporate objectives and outcomes in the ABC Corporate Plan.

The requirement to prepare a corporate plan in accordance with the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 (the PGPA Act) came into effect on 1 July 2015. Under section 35 of the PGPA Act, the accountable authority of the ABC is required to prepare a corporate plan at least once each reporting period. The corporate plan must be prepared in accordance with the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Rule 2014 (PGPA Rule). The ABC Corporate Plan 2015-16 meets the requirements of the PGPA Act and PGPA Rule and is published on the ABC’s corporate website: http://about.abc.net.au/how-the-abc-is-run/our-plans/.

Corporate governance

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Corporate governance

The ABC Corporate Plan 2015-16 also meets the requirements of section 31B(1) of the ABC Act by outlining the overall strategies and policies that the Corporation will follow to ensure that the Board fulfils its duties under section 8 of the ABC Act, and includes a forecast of the revenue and expenditure of the Corporation and its subsidiaries, including a forecast of capital expenditure and borrowings.

During 2015-16, the Board oversaw the development of the ABC Corporate Plan 2016-17.

In 2015-16, the Enterprise Project Management Office continued to oversee the ‘ABC Projects 2014’ program of initiatives arising from the reduction in the Corporation’s budget appropriation that was announced in November 2014. As part of this program, the ABC Lanceley Place site was identified for divestment. Preparations including council approvals, due diligence reports, legislative and probity obligations are underway to subdivide and sell part of the site. In addition, the ABC is considering opportunities to rationalise office space and identify spare capacity which may become available for commercial rental. The Projects 2014 work is expected to be finalised in 2016-17.

Corporate reporting and compliance

Compliance Reporting With effect from the 2015-16 reporting period, the ABC is no longer required to submit a Certificate of Compliance to the Finance Minister through the Secretary of the Department of Finance and the Minister of Communications by 15 October each year. In its place, any significant non-compliance with the finance law must be reported to the responsible Minister under section 19(1)(e) of the PGPA Act and must also be disclosed in the Annual Report together with an outline of the action taken to remedy the non-compliance.

To meet these requirements, the ABC continued to implement its internal compliance reporting framework. The compliance framework comprises internal controls and governance procedures together with other sources of assurance and information to ensure that relevant PGPA reporting requirements are achieved.

The Board signed and submitted the Compliance Report relating to the 2014-15 reporting period before the due date in October 2015 and there are no instances of significant non-compliance required to be notified to the responsible Minister under section 19(1)(e) of the PGPA Act during the 2015-16 reporting period.

Annual Report The ABC was required by section 46 of the PGPA Act to prepare an annual report. The report must be submitted to the responsible minister for presentation to the Parliament. The ABC Annual Report 2014-15 was submitted to the Minister for Communications and was tabled in Parliament on 30 October 2015.

Report against the ABC Corporate Plan Performance against the ABC Corporate Plan 2015-16 is set out in the ABC’s 2016 Annual Performance Statements at page 126.

Freedom of Information The Freedom of Information Act 1982 (the FOI Act) gives the public the right to access documents held by the ABC. During 2015-16, the ABC received 36 requests for access to documents under the FOI Act.

Two requests were granted, four were granted in part, 11 were refused, 12 were withdrawn or deemed to be withdrawn, and part of one request was dealt with outside of the formal FOI process. Seven requests were still being processed at the end of the financial year. Of the 11 requests that were refused, five were outside the scope of the FOI Act. Part II of Schedule 2 of the FOI Act specifically excludes documents relating to the ABC’s program material from the operation of the FOI Act.

Two matters were the subject of Internal Review. One decision was affirmed on review, however access to part of an additional document was granted on the basis that it was incidental administrative content. The second matter was deemed to be withdrawn. Access to documents was refused on review on the basis of a practical refusal reason. One decision was the subject of review by the Office of the Australian Information Commissioner. The review was closed under section 54W(a)(i) of the FOI Act on the basis that the application is lacking in substance.

Governance 123

Corporate governance

In accordance with section 8(1) of the FOI Act, the ABC has prepared an Agency Plan which describes how the ABC will comply with the Information Publication Scheme requirements set out in Part II of the FOI Act. The ABC’s Agency Plan and Disclosure Log are published on the ABC’s website: http://about.abc.net.au/how-the-abc-is-run/what-guides-us/freedom-of-information/

Privacy The ABC is required to comply with the Australian Privacy Principles (APPs) in the Privacy Act 1988. An up-to-date Privacy Policy is published on the ABC’s corporate website which meets the requirements of APP 1 regarding the open and transparent management of personal information. The Policy sets out the kind of information the ABC will collect, how individuals may access their personal information, and how and to whom individuals may complain about a breach of privacy.

In 2015-16, there were no privacy breaches which required the ABC to notify the Privacy Commissioner.

Audience contact Another important avenue for assessing the ABC’s performance with its core constituency is through audience feedback, including complaints.

Written complaints about issues such as factual inaccuracy, bias or inappropriate content are referred to the ABC’s Audience and Consumer Affairs unit. Audience and Consumer Affairs is independent of ABC program areas and can investigate written complaints referring to possible breaches of the ABC Editorial Policies or the ABC Code of Practice. The unit also coordinates responses to a range of programming and policy enquiries.

The Reception Advice Line is the first point of contact for viewers and listeners experiencing technical problems receiving ABC television or radio. A summary of audience contacts to the Reception Advice Line is set out at page 133.

In 2015-16, Audience and Consumer Affairs logged 50 233 audience contacts, a 28% decrease on the 69 578 contacts logged by Audience and Consumer Affairs in 2014-15.

The profile of contacts reported by Audience and Consumer Affairs reflects the particular remit of the unit. Written complaints alleging a breach of the ABC Code of Practice or ABC Editorial Policies received elsewhere in the ABC are required to be referred to Audience and Consumer Affairs in the first instance, whereas requests, suggestions, praise and other comments are not. This, and the unit’s specialist complaints-handling focus, means that the proportion of contacts received by Audience and Consumer Affairs which are complaints will generally be higher than the proportion received elsewhere throughout the Corporation.

Summary of Contacts Received

Contact type

Email/ Letter/ Other

%

Total

Complaint 24 002 47.8

Request/Suggestion 19 912 39.6

Appreciation 3 300 6.6

Other 3 019 6.0

Total 50 233 100.0

Subject Matter of Contacts Received

Subject

Email/ Letter/ Other

%

Total

Requests for information, programs, product availability and other matters 22 931 45.6

Complaints about program standards, scheduling and other matters 19 166 38.2

Appreciation of programs and presenters 3 300 6.6

Bias (other than party political)* 1 923 3.8

Party political bias 1 407 2.8

Complaints of factual inaccuracy 1 029 2.0

Lack of balance 477 1.0

Total 50 233 100.0

* Includes claims of bias in relation to issues such as sport and religion.

Key concerns reflected in audience contacts received by Audience and Consumer Affairs this year included 3 703 complaints from audience members who experienced technical difficulties accessing content on the iview service.

124 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2016

Corporate governance

In the 2015-16 period, Audience and Consumer Affairs logged 1 104 contacts in relation to ABC coverage of the 2016 federal election, 867 of which were complaints. Of the complaints, 514 (59%) were claims of bias; 64% alleged anti-ALP/pro-Coalition bias, 23% alleged anti-Coalition/pro-ALP bias and 13% alleged other bias or were unspecified. Additional election-related contacts were received outside this reporting period.

Timeliness Audience and Consumer Affairs seeks to reply to all contacts requiring response within 30 days of receipt, in accordance with the timeliness standard for complaint handling that is specified in the ABC’s Complaint Handling Procedures.

Between 1 July 2015 and 30 June 2016, ABC Audience and Consumer Affairs responded directly to 12 224 audience contacts. Of these, 10 440 (85.4%) received responses within 30 days.

Complaint outcomes During 2015-16, 24 724 written complaints were finalised by Audience and Consumer Affairs. The unit provided a personal response to 6 503 of these complaints (comprising 6 558 issues), of which 4 778 (73.5%) received responses within 30 days. There were 11 142 complaint contacts referred to other areas of the Corporation for direct response (including 1 409 editorial complaints) and no substantive response was required for 7 079 complaint contacts.

The 6 503 responses to complaints sent by Audience and Consumer Affairs this year includes two distinct groups of complaints:

• Complaints investigated by Audience and Consumer Affairs which alleged breaches of the ABC Editorial Policies or ABC Code of Practice.

• Complaints about matters of personal preference which do not raise issues of compliance with the ABC’s editorial standards, and for which Audience and Consumer Affairs provide an audience liaison service.

This latter group of complaints makes up the larger number of the total. As these complaints do not go to the ABC’s editorial standards, they are not formally investigated and are not capable of being upheld.

During 2015-16, 2 575 complaint issues were investigated. A total of 54 (2.1%) were upheld in cases where Audience and Consumer Affairs determined that ABC editorial standards had not been met. A further 927 issues were resolved (36.0%) after the relevant content area took prompt and appropriate action to remedy the cause of the complaint. Of the 927 complaint issues resolved, 677 were in relation to a controversial episode of Q&A first broadcast on 22 June 2015; the ABC acknowledged it had made an error of judgement in allowing audience member Mr Zaky Mallah to join the audience and ask a question.

All findings in relation to upheld and resolved complaints are brought to the attention of the senior editorial staff responsible. In 2015-16, actions taken in response to upheld and resolved complaints included written apologies to complainants; on-air corrections; counselling or other action with staff; removal of inappropriate content or correction of material on ABC Online; and reviews of, and improvements to, procedures.

Written complaints finalised:

Total

number %

Response required from A&CA

Response within 30 days 4 778

6 503 26.3

Response between 31 and 60 days 1 704

Total response within 60 days 6 482 99.7%

Response after 60 days 21 0.3%

Total response from A&CA 6 503 100%

Referred to other areas for direct response 11 142 45.1

No response required 7 079 28.6

TOTAL WRITTEN COMPLAINTS FINALISED 24 724 100%

Governance 125

Summaries of upheld and resolved complaints are published on abc.net.au as individual complaints are finalised, providing timely access to complaint decisions. The ABC also publishes a quarterly statistical overview of audience contacts on its website.

Australian Communications and Media Authority Members of the public who complain to the ABC about matters covered by the ABC Code of Practice and who are dissatisfied with the ABC’s response, or who do not receive a response to their complaint within 60 days, may seek review from the Australian Communications and Media Authority (ACMA).

During 2015-16, the ACMA advised the ABC that it had finalised investigations into 23 such matters (compared with 42 in 2014-15).

In one case in 2015-16, the ACMA found a breach of the ABC Code of Practice:

Privacy: the ACMA found that a 7.30 story breached the ABC’s privacy standards. The story examined the case of a former foster carer acquitted of sexually abusing eight children under his care who went on to father two children via an international surrogate. The ACMA did not consider that public interest issues addressed in the story justified the disclosure of certain information concerning the two children.

Commonwealth Ombudsman The Ombudsman’s office did not notify the ABC of any investigations into the ABC’s handling of complaints commenced or finalised during the current reporting period.

Corporate governance

Revolution School, a series about everyday Australian kids and the science behind improving education, was broadcast in June 2016.

126 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2016

Annual Performance Statements

Purpose The ABC’s purpose is to fulfil its functions as set out in the ABC Act, particularly the ABC Charter.

Results Criterion Radio share - Levels achieved in 2015-16 compared with results in 2014-15. See also pages 51-5

Result The ABC’s overall five-city metropolitan aggregate radio share in 2015-16 was 23.9%, compared with 23.7% in 2014-15.

Metropolitan Share

2015-16 %

2014-15 %

Sydney 24.4 22.5

Melbourne 22.2 23.0

Brisbane 23.5 24.3

Adelaide 26.3 25.9

Perth 25.6 26.2

Five-city Metro 23.9 23.7

GFK from S1, 2014, Monday-Sunday 5.30-12mn

Source Programme 1.1, Portfolio Budget Statements 2015-16, page 60

ABC Corporate Plan 2015-16

Criterion Radio reach - Levels achieved in 2015-16 compared with results in 2014-15. See also pages 51-5

Result The ABC’s overall five-city metropolitan radio reach in 2015-16 was 4.74 million, compared with 4.76 million in 2014-15.

Metropolitan Avg Weekly Reach144 2015-16 2014-15

Sydney 1 497 000 1 474 000

Melbourne 1 457 000 1 477 000

Brisbane 698 000 709 000

Adelaide 425 000 426 000

Perth 665 000 674 000

Five-city Metro 4 742 000 4 761 000

Nielsen, GFK from S1, 2014, Monday-Sunday 5.30-12mn, People 10+

Source Programme 1.1, Portfolio Budget Statements 2015-16, page 60

ABC Corporate Plan 2015-16

144 Reach data for each market and the total market has been rounded.

Introductory statement We, the ABC Board, as the accountable authority of the Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC), present the 2015-16 annual performance statements of the ABC, as required under paragraph 39(1)(a) of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 (the PGPA Act). In our opinion, these annual performance statements are based on properly maintained records, accurately present the performance of the entity, and comply with subsection 39(2) of the PGPA Act.

Governance 127

Annual Performance Statements

Criterion Television reach - Levels achieved in 2015-16 compared with results in 2014-15. See also pages 42-50

Result In 2015-16, average weekly reach in the five metropolitan cities for total ABC Television (ABC main channel, ABC2, ABC3 and ABC News 24) was 54.8%, compared with 57.7% in 2014-15. Average weekly Regional reach was 60.0%, compared with 62.2% in 2014-15.

Average Weekly Metropolitan Reach 2015-16 %

2014-15 %

Sydney 50.5 54.3

Melbourne 56.5 59.1

Brisbane 54.4 58.0

Adelaide 61.8 63.2

Perth 56.4 58.2

Five-city Metro 54.8 57.7

Regional Reach

2015-16 %

2014-15 %

Southern NSW 60.3 62.4

Northern NSW 58.9 61.6

Vic 63.9 66.1

Qld 57.0 58.7

Tas 65.4 67.9

Regional 60.0 62.2

OzTAM and Regional TAM consolidated 7 data

Source Programme 1.1, Portfolio Budget Statements 2015-16, page 60

ABC Corporate Plan 2015-16

128 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2016

Annual Performance Statements

Criterion Television share - Levels achieved in 2015-16 compared with results in 2014-15. See also pages 42-50

Result In daytime (6am-6pm), total ABC Television (ABC main channel, ABC2, ABC3 and ABC News 24) five-city metropolitan free-to-air share in 2015-16 was 26.2%, compared with 27.4% in 2014-15. Regional free-to-air share in the daytime timeslot was 30.1% in 2015-16, compared with 31.6% in 2014-15.

Daytime (6am-6pm), Free-to-air share

Metropolitan Share

2015-16 %

2014-15 %

Sydney 24.2 26.6

Melbourne 26.4 26.2

Brisbane 28.2 29.2

Adelaide 27.4 28.4

Perth 25.5 27.7

Five-city Metro 26.2 27.4

Regional Share

2015-16 %

2014-15 %

Southern NSW 31.6 32.3

Northern NSW 32.5 34.7

Vic 28.6 30.4

Qld 28.8 28.8

Tas 26.8 31.3145

Regional 30.1 31.6146

In prime time (6pm-midnight), total ABC Television (ABC main channel, ABC2, ABC3 and ABC News 24) five-city metropolitan free-to-air share in 2015-16 was 17.6%, compared with 17.7% in 2014-15. Regional free-to-air share in the daytime timeslot was 19.4% in 2015-16, compared with 19.2% in 2014-15.

Prime time (6pm-midnight), Free-to-air share

Metropolitan Share

2015-16 %

2014-15 %

Sydney 17.7 17.6

Melbourne 16.9 17.4

Brisbane 18.5 18.4

Adelaide 18.4 18.2

Perth 17.4 17.3

Five-city Metro 17.6 17.7

Regional Share

2015-16 %

2014-15 %

Southern NSW 21.2 20.4

Northern NSW 21.1 22.8

Vic 18.2 16.8

Qld 17.3 15.8

Tas 19.4 20.1147

Regional 19.4 19.2148

OzTAM and Regional TAM consolidated 7 data

Source Programme 1.1, Portfolio Budget Statements 2015-16, page 60

ABC Corporate Plan 2015-16

145 Reported as 35.2% in the 2015 Annual Report. As of 1 July 2016, the recoding of channels in the measurement software has resulted in small changes retrospectively, and is the likely explanation for the differences in share in the Tasmanian market.

146 Reported as 31.9% in the 2015 Annual Report. The updated result for Tasmania affected the total regional result.

147 Reported as 23.4% in the 2015 Annual Report. The results for prime-time share in Tasmania were updated in 2015-16 for the same reasons as outlined for daytime share results.

148 Reported as 19.4% in the 2015 Annual report. The updated result for Tasmania affected the total regional result.

Governance 129

Annual Performance Statements

Criterion Online audience reach - Levels achieved in 2015-16 compared with results in 2014-15. See also pages 32-9

Result ABC Online’s monthly reach in the active Australian internet population averaged 38% in 2016, with a peak of 40.7% in June 2016.149 Nielsen Digital Ratings Monthly; Desktop (Ppl 2+), Smartphone and Tablet (Ppl 18+), Jan-Jun 2016.

Source Programme 1.1, Portfolio Budget Statements 2015-16, page 60

ABC Corporate Plan 2015-16

Criterion International reach - Levels achieved in 2015-16 compared with previous years and based on available research in particular countries. See also pages 67-72

Result There is no research available which would enable international reach to be reliably reported in the same manner that reach of domestic services is reported. The ABC is able to measure the availability of its international services in the region:

• Australia Plus TV is available in 40 countries across Asia and the Pacific (the same as in 2014-15) via 218 rebroadcast partners (205 in 2014-15).

• The ABC’s International media services are available via 89 syndication partners (52 radio, 12 television and 25 online). This is an increase from 87 in 2014-15 (52 radio, 11 television and 24 online).

Source Programme 1.1, Portfolio Budget Statements 2015-16, page 60

ABC Corporate Plan 2015-16

Criterion Audience/Community appreciation - Percentage of people who consider the quality of programming on ABC Radio, ABC Television and ABC Online is good in 2015-16 compared with results in 2014-15. See also pages 30 and 142

Result 2015-16 2014-15

Television 78% 78%

Radio 63% 62%

Online 91% 89%

Omnipoll and Newspoll surveys

Source Programme 1.1, Portfolio Budget Statements 2015-16, page 60

ABC Corporate Plan 2015-16

Criterion Editorial standards - Efficiency of complaints management measured by performance against statutory timelines. See also pages 123-5

Result The ABC is required by the Broadcasting Services Act 1992 to respond to complaints that it has acted contrary to its Code of Practice within 60 days.

ABC Audience and Consumer Affairs seeks to meet the timeliness standard for complaint handling that is specified in the ABC’s Complaint Handling Procedures, which include but are not limited to complaints relating to the Code of Practice.

Written complaints finalised Number %

Response required from A&CA150 Response made within 60 days 151 6 482 99.7

Response made after 60 days 21 0.3

Total 6 503 100%

Source Programme 1.1, Portfolio Budget Statements 2015-16, page 60

ABC Corporate Plan 2015-16

149 In 2016, a new online measurement methodology was adopted. The new Nielsen Digital Ratings Monthly (DRM) captures a broader range of online activity, including mobile smartphones and tablets, and applications. Full year data is not available. Data cannot be directly compared with 2014-15 performance, which was measured using Nielsen Online Ratings.

150 A total of 24 724 written complaints were received in 2015-16. Only 6 503 required a response from Audience and Consumer Affairs. Further information about complaints handling is set out at page 124.

151 Includes complaints finalised in accordance with the Broadcasting Services Act 1992 and the ABC’s Complaint Handling Procedures.

130 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2016

Annual Performance Statements

Criterion Editorial standards - Results of Editorial Policy Assurance Surveys relating to news and information on ABC Radio, ABC Television and ABC Online. See also pages 80-3

Result In December 2013, ABC Chairman James Spigelman announced that the ABC would embark on a regular series of independent editorial reviews as part of the Board’s responsibility to monitor the quality and integrity of ABC content, with particular reference to section 4 of the ABC Editorial Policies (Impartiality and diversity of perspectives).

The reviews involve an assessment of selected ABC content by an independent external reviewer. Each reviewer is asked to assess content against a range of criteria, including different aspects of the ABC Editorial Policies and other yardsticks of quality.

In 2015-16:

• One review was completed which had been commissioned in the previous year:

Editorial Review No. 5 - Coverage of the Higher Education Research and Reform Bill (2014) on ABC television, radio and online in March 2015, conducted by Steve Harris.

• Two reviews were commissioned and completed:

Editorial Review No. 6 - Content, conduct and panel composition of the Q&A program (February - June 2015) conducted by Ray Martin and Shaun Brown.

Editorial Review No. 7 - Coverage of the China-Australia Free Trade Agreement provided by three ABC Radio current affairs programs and the Breakfast and Drive programs on Radio National (June - October 2015), conducted by Peter Cavanagh.

• Two reviews were commissioned and are in the process of being finalised:

Editorial Review No. 8 - Impartiality of business coverage on the ABC (7-13 February 2016), conducted by Kerry Blackburn with the assistance of Mike Smith.

Editorial Review No. 9 - Selected coverage of the proposed Shenhua coal mine on ABC television, radio and online (8 July 2015 - 1 March 2016), conducted by Mark Skulley.

The Editorial Reviews and managements’ responses are published on the ABC’s corporate website: http://about.abc.net.au/how-the-abc-is-run/what-guides-us/our-editorial-policies/

Source Programme 1.1, Portfolio Budget Statements 2015-16, page 60

ABC Corporate Plan 2015-16

Criterion Australian content - Percentage of first-run Australian content in 2015-16 compared with 2014-15. See also pages 42-5

Result 6pm-midnight: 37% on ABC main channel (42% in 2014-15)

6am-midnight: 47% on ABC main channel (52% in 2014-15)

These results reflect the hours broadcast from the Sydney transmitter, comprising national and local New South Wales transmission. Figures may differ slightly in other States and Territories as a result of varying levels of content. Results have been rounded to the nearest whole number.

Source Programme 1.1, Portfolio Budget Statements 2015-16, page 60

ABC Corporate Plan 2015-16

Criterion Australian content - Percentage of Australian children’s television programs on ABC KIDS and ABC3 in 2015-16 compared with 2014-15. See also pages 46-50

Result 2015-16

%

2014-15 %

ABC KIDS 33.3 32.8

ABC3 36.3 43.9

Source Programme 1.1, Portfolio Budget Statements 2015-16, page 60

ABC Corporate Plan 2015-16

Governance 131

Annual Performance Statements

Criterion Podcasts - Levels achieved in 2015-16 compared with results in 2014-15. See also page 38

Result 153 million ABC podcasts were downloaded or streamed in 2015-16.152

Comparative data from 2014-15 is not available due to a change in reporting methodology in January 2015. Source: Webtrends

Source Programme 1.1, Portfolio Budget Statements 2015-16, page 60

Criterion Australian music - Levels of Australian music on those radio networks that broadcast music. See also pages 51-5

Result All radio networks that broadcast music have a strong commitment to Australian music and have set annual targets. In 2015-16, all radio networks other than Double J exceeded their annual target.

Target 2015-16 2014-15

ABC RN 25% 38.0% 40.7

ABC Local Radio153 25% 46.9% 30.7

ABC Classic FM 30% 43.0% 48.1

triple j 40% 51.5% 49.6

Double J 40% 32.2% 33.1

ABC Jazz 25% 30.0% 32.5

ABC Country 25% 67.0% 49.7

triple j unearthed 100% 100% 100

Source Programme 1.1, Portfolio Budget Statements 2015-16, page 60

ABC Corporate Plan 2015-16

Criterion State/Local television - Percentage of state/local ‘breakout’ television broadcast hours in 2015-16 compared with 2014-15.

Result Of the 10 673 total ABC main channel primary channel television hours, 2 133 hours (20%) were unduplicated, state-based, first-run television broadcast hours, compared with 18.6% in 2014-15.

Source ABC Corporate Plan 2015-16

Criterion Digital classroom - Level of audio/video clips, hours of contemporary educational content and number of interactive educational activities.

Result 2015-16154 2014-15

Number of video clips 575 1 080

Number of audio clips 65 20

Hours of educational content Approximately 70 hours* Approximately 130 hours*

Interactive educational activities (Includes games in the library collection, student collections and teacher resource)** 90 307

* Based on 6.5-minute average per media item ** Includes games in the library collection, student collections and teacher resources

Source ABC Corporate Plan 2015-16

152 Reported data excludes 14 million podcast streams of triple j’s Hottest 100.

153 Reported data based on levels of Australian music in playlists provided to Local Radio networks.

154 Funding for ABC Splash ceased in December 2014. This had a direct impact on the number of staff working in digital education content, which reduced from approximately 19 Full Time Equivalent (FTE) staff to 6 FTEs. There was a consequent decline in the publication of new material in 2015-16.

132 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2016

Annual Performance Statements

Criterion Access to analog radio transmission - Degree to which the Australian population has access to ABC analog radio transmissions in 2015-16 compared with 2014-15. See also page 249

Result In 2015-16, there were 710 domestic radio analog terrestrial transmission services, compared with 710 in 2014-15.

Source Programme 1.2, Portfolio Budget Statements 2015-16, page 62

Criterion International analog radio transmission - Number of terrestrial transmission services in 2015-16 compared with 2014-15. See also pages 256-7

Result In 2015-16, there were three International radio analog terrestrial transmission services, compared with eight in 2014-15.

Source Programme 1.2, Portfolio Budget Statements 2015-16, page 62

Criterion Analog transmission services - Number of analog terrestrial transmission services in 2015-16 compared with 2014-15.

Result Analog television transmission ceased in Australia on 10 December 2013. The ABC did not provide any analog terrestrial transmission services in 2014-15 or 2015-16.

Source ABC Corporate Plan 2015-16

Criterion Access to ABC digital television transmission - Degree to which the Australian population has access to ABC digital television transmissions in 2015-16 compared with 2014-15. See also page 154

Result The coverage of ABC digital television transmissions by percentage of the population was as follows:

2015-16 %

2014-15 %

Australia 98.49 98.49

NSW/ACT 98.85 98.87

Vic 99.50 99.48

Qld 97.67 97.66

WA 97.58 97.57

SA 99.24 99.24

Tas 98.24 98.24

NT 83.15 83.15

Notes: 2015-16 and 2014-15 population was derived from Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) 2011 Census data.

The coverage percentages are for Managed Services provided by Broadcast Australia for which the ABC holds an apparatus licence.

Source Programme 1.2, Portfolio Budget Statements 2015-16, page 62

ABC Corporate Plan 2015-16

Criterion Access to ABC digital radio transmissions - Number of mainland state capital cities that have access to ABC digital radio transmissions in 2015-16 compared with 2014-15. See also page 251

Result Digital radio services continued in the five mainland state capital cities throughout 2015-16.

Source Programme 1.2, Portfolio Budget Statements 2015-16, page 62

ABC Corporate Plan 2015-16

Governance 133

Annual Performance Statements

Criterion Audience contacts via the ABC Reception Advice Line - Number in 2015-16 compared with 2014-15.

Result The ABC monitors audience responses to transmission issues via its Reception Advice Line (RAL). The unit assists the public to improve their ABC television and radio reception, responds to broader ABC transmission enquiries, and works with the ABC’s transmission providers to identify and resolve transmission faults.

In 2015-16, this unit received the following television and radio services enquiries:

2015-16 2014-15

Total number of emails received 1 588 2 182

Total number of letters received 3 8

Total number of telephone enquiries received 14 294 22 533

Total enquiries 15 885 24 723

Total number of hits to the RAL website 710 930 741 592155

Source Programme 1.2, Portfolio Budget Statements 2015-16, page 62

ABC Corporate Plan 2015-16

Criterion Transmission performance - Levels of Total Network Availability and Total ‘On-air-Availability’ (as reported by Broadcast Australia, the ABC’s transmission services provider) in 2015-16 compared with 2014-15.

Result See page 155.

Source Programme 1.2, Portfolio Budget Statements 2015-16, page 62

ABC Corporate Plan 2015-16

Criterion Facilities in operation against the approved Implementation Plans - Number of digital terrestrial television facilities in operation and in test mode compared with approved Implementation Plans.

Result There were 421 digital terrestrial television services in operation as at the end of June 2016.156 There were no facilities in test mode and no Implementation Plan. Implementation Plans are no longer required for digital television services.

Source ABC Corporate Plan 2015-16

Criterion Terrestrial facilities - Extent to which terrestrial facilities operate within the limits set by the relevant Transmitter Licence and the approved Implementation Plan.

Result All facilities meet the relevant Transmitter Licence requirements. Implementation Plans are no longer required for digital television services.

Source Programme 1.2, Portfolio Budget Statements 2015-16, page 62

ABC Corporate Plan 2015-16

Analysis In 2015-16, the ABC fulfilled its functions as outlined in the ABC Charter, and in doing so, achieved its purpose.

The ABC’s performance is measured broadly in terms of the nature and appeal of content across platforms (for instance, levels of Australian content, quality of content, reach and share) and the delivery of that content to audiences (for instance, transmission performance).

Details of the ABC’s activities and performance in relation to its content across platforms is set out in Chapter 2 of the ABC Annual Report (see pages 26-77).

Network performance is managed and reported by Broadcast Australia. In 2015-16, performance on an end-to-end basis was above the contracted service level targets, and generally reflected an increase on 2014-15 performance. Details of transmission performance is set out in Chapter 3 of the Annual Report (see page 155).

155 Reported as 742 071 in the 2015 Annual Report based on data provided by Webtrends. A review of reported data during the year identified an error in the initial report that was provided.

156 Including the capital city and Newcastle redundant sites. Five metropolitan services consist of two sites but are each reported as one service.

134 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2016

Bonner Committee

The Bonner Committee is the ABC’s primary advisory body on issues relating to Indigenous staff, content, and communities. It is responsible for monitoring progress against the ABC’s Stretch Reconciliation Action Plan 2016-18.

The Committee is named after the late Neville Bonner AO, who was an ABC Board Director from 1983 to 1991 and Australia’s first Indigenous Senator.

The Committee comprises a geographically-diverse mix of Indigenous and non-Indigenous staff. The Committee’s Chair provides advice to the Managing Director in relation to issues of relevance to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander staff, as well as the ABC’s relationship with Indigenous communities.

The Bonner Committee met four times during the reporting period, two of which were face-to-face. The Committee discussed and considered a range of issues, including increasing Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander employment in the ABC; providing opportunities for individuals, organisations and communities; progress against RAP key indicators; and appropriate coverage of key Indigenous events.

At the beginning of 2016, the ABC launched its third Reconciliation Action Plan (RAP), which will operate through to 2018. The Plan is a Stretch RAP under Reconciliation Australia’s RISE (Reflect, Innovate, Stretch, and Elevate) framework. It commits the ABC to a set of concrete objectives and actions that acknowledge and value Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and their heritage and culture, as well as increasing employment opportunities and developing content that is about, created by, or features Indigenous Australians.

The RAP has four key areas of focus:

• Relationships

• Respect

• Opportunities - Employment and Supplier Diversity

• Opportunities - Content.

The RAP operates on a calendar-year basis. The ABC reported its performance most recently for the period 1 January - 31 December 2015. The RAP and the ABC’s performance reports are published on the Corporation’s website available at about.abc.net.au/ how-the-abc-is-run/our-plans/

As of 30 June 2016, the ABC had made good progress against the actions identified in the Stretch RAP, particularly in delivering a variety of high-quality Indigenous content on television, radio and online— reflecting its commitment to supporting the place of Indigenous issues and voices in the national conversation. During the period, the Corporation worked to develop relationships with a number of Indigenous communities and organisations, and with educational institutions in order to encourage Indigenous students to consider work at the ABC or in the wider media; this reversed a decline in such engagement that followed the cessation of the ABC’s State and Territory Director roles at the end of June 2015.

During the year, the ABC steadily increased Indigenous staff numbers to 2.48%, in line with its commitment to increase Indigenous employment beyond 2.5% by the end of 2016.

Overall, the Corporation delivered results against all areas of the RAP framework. The commitment to its RAP, and the spirit of reconciliation that underlies it, continue to have a positive influence on the ABC as a public broadcaster for all Australians.

ABC Stretch Reconciliation Action Plan 2016-18

Relationships • Continue to support the Bonner Committee, the ABC’s Indigenous advisory group, which monitors and coordinates the ABC’s Reconciliation

Action Plan.

• Maintain formal groups at the divisional and state/territory branch level with responsibility for advancing reconciliation and relationships with Indigenous communities.

• Create further opportunities to build strategic partnerships and projects with Indigenous communities, peak bodies and other relevant external organisations, with a focus on regional opportunities.

Governance 135

Bonner Committee

• Provide opportunities for ABC staff to participate in National Reconciliation Week each year.

• Raise internal and external awareness of the ABC RAP to promote reconciliation across the Corporation and sector.

• Highlight ABC Indigenous achievement and activity within the ABC.

Respect • Provide staff with ongoing access to training that enhances their knowledge and awareness of Australia’s Indigenous peoples, cultures

and history.

• Use appropriate cultural protocols, including Acknowledgement of and/or Welcome to Country, at ABC events.

• Apply Indigenous Content editorial principles in content making.

• Recognise and participate in NAIDOC Week each year.

• Maintain the Indigenous site on the ABC Intranet to provide a unified source of information in relation to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander staff and issues.

• Install signage and other physical recognition of the traditional owners of land and the contribution of Indigenous ABC staff in the public foyers and reception areas of ABC regional offices.

Opportunities—Employment and Supplier Diversity • Implement the ABC Indigenous Employment Strategy 2016-18.

• Progressively increase the number of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander employees at the ABC.

• Undertake activities to increase the number of Indigenous employees in content-making, editorial decision-making and management roles, particularly at a senior level.

• Encourage awareness of potential careers at the ABC and in the wider media sector among Indigenous secondary and tertiary students.

• Provide career development planning support and opportunities for Indigenous employees.

• Maximise retention of Indigenous employees.

• Contribute to the growth of Indigenous employment opportunities in the wider media industry.

• Increase opportunities for Indigenous suppliers to work with the ABC.

Opportunities—Content • Demonstrate a stronger Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander presence in ABC content, including regional content, and in subsequent scheduling.

• Maximise audiences for Indigenous content and other initiatives through effective promotion.

• Increase the number of Indigenous on-air presenters across all platforms.

• Support the Indigenous community media sector.

Tracking Progress and Reporting • Monitor and report on progress against RAP commitments.

• Provide data to Reconciliation Australia on RAP progress.

• Refresh and update the ABC RAP.

Neville Bonner

136 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2016

ABC Advisory Council

The ABC Advisory Council was established in 1983 under the provisions of section 11 of the ABC Act, to provide advice to the Board on matters relating to the Corporation’s broadcast programs.

The 12 members of the Advisory Council are appointed by the Board. Applications to join the Council are invited through promotions on ABC Radio, Television, Online, and advertisements in the press in September and October each year.

The members of the Advisory Council for 2015-16 bring to discussions a wide range of experience and perspectives, as well as consultation with the communities they represent. The Council is made up of:

Professor Andrea Hull AO, Convenor (Albert Park, Vic) - Professor Hull has had a distinguished career in the arts, arts education, and cultural policy, and was Director/CEO of the Victorian College of the Arts from 1995 to 2009. She was CEO of the WA Department for the Arts and a Director of the Australia Council. Her current roles include the National Museum of Australia (as Deputy Chair), the Florey Neuroscience Institute, the Breast Cancer Network of Australia (as Deputy Chair), The Melbourne Prize, Melbourne Forum and the Advisory Panel to Lirrwi (East Arnhem) Cultural Tourism. Andrea currently has a consultancy practice, and is an executive coach.

Standing (L-R): Mr Sam Almaliki (South Melbourne Vic), Ms Kez Hall (Nhulunbuy NT), Ms Kate Duncan (Northcote Vic), Mr James Curtis (Inglewood WA), Mr Wade Dabinett (Parilla SA), Professor Andrea Hull AO Chairman (Albert Park Vic), Ms Heron Loban (Sherwood Qld), Mr Robert Macaulay (Singleton NSW), Mrs Nina Trad Azam (Wollongong NSW) and Adjunct Professor Peter Norden AO (Bentleigh Vic).

Seated (L-R): Ms Fiona Duggan (Youngstown Tas) and Ms Sarah Burr (Braddon ACT).

Governance 137

ABC Advisory Council

Mr Sam Almaliki (South Melbourne, Vic) - Mr Almaliki is currently the Head of Community Engagement and Diversity Council Secretary at Cricket Australia. Further, he is a Non-Executive Director, serving as a Commissioner on the Victorian Multicultural Commission and also Chairperson of the Loddon Mallee Regional Advisory Council. Mr Almaliki is also a Refugee Week ambassador, member of the Australia India Business Council and a member of the Australian Institute of International Affairs.

Ms Sarah Burr (Braddon, ACT) - Ms Burr is an Adviser in the Indigenous Affairs Group at the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet in Canberra. She has experience in Indigenous, social, and land management policy. Sarah is a board director of the YWCA Canberra, a foundation member of the World Economic Forum’s Global Shapers Canberra Hub, a violinist in the National Capital Orchestra, and has been awarded a public speaking and mentoring role to support Indigenous graduates across the Australian Public Service.

Mr James Curtis (Inglewood, WA) - Mr Curtis is currently the Chief Executive Office of Football West. He was previously the Executive Director for Community Development within the WA State Government and a Senior Management Consultant providing advice to State and Commonwealth government agencies.

Mr Wade Dabinett (Parilla, SA) - Mr Dabinett is a farmer and Vice Chairman of Grain Producers SA and Chair for the Transport & Supply Chain Committee. He is involved in local Cricket and Football Clubs as a player and committee member and was recently Vice-Chair of the Pinnaroo and Districts Connected Community.

Ms Fiona Duggan (Youngtown, Tas) - Ms Duggan is a veterinary surgeon and is currently the Secretary of the Stewart Child Care Services Board of Management. Fiona is involved in a number of community groups in Tasmania and the Launceston region, including child and youth organisations.

Ms Kate Duncan (Coburg North, Vic) - Ms Duncan is a Youth Music Development Officer for the Darebin City Council. Ms Duncan, as a youth worker, is employed to develop and facilitate youth music programs for young people aged 12-25 within the Darebin community. She oversees a youth-run record label and a youth events organising committee.

Ms Kez Hall (Nhulunbuy, NT) - Ms Hall is a public servant in Darwin. Ms Hall is an Indigenous Territorian and speaks a number of languages; Kungarakany is her mother tongue and Kriol in Aboriginal and Torres Strait. She has extensive experience in Indigenous affairs, nationally and internationally, having worked in the UN and been involved in developing Nations and First Nation Affairs issues and ideas. She has a background in health and medical research as well as experience on governing boards, working parties, committees and volunteer groups.

Ms Heron Loban (Sherwood, Qld) - Ms Loban is a Senior Lecturer in Law and currently Director of the Centre for Appropriate Technology, which has offices across northern Australia; in that role she advocates for the technological needs of Indigenous people. Ms Loban is a Torres Strait Islander and is keenly interested in the content of the ABC, as the public broadcaster, not only being physically and technically accessible to Indigenous people but also being culturally accessible, reflecting both Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal people.

Mr Robert Macaulay (Westbrook, via Singleton, NSW) - Mr Macaulay is a solicitor and primary producer. He is involved in various professional and community groups in both the Hunter Valley and Sydney.

Professor Peter Norden AO (Bentleigh, Vic) - Professor Norden is an Adjunct Professor in the School of Global, Social and Urban Studies at RMIT University. He has long involvement with faith-based communities and the non-government community services sector. Peter has acted as a policy adviser at federal, state and local government level.

Mrs Nina Trad Azam (Figtree, NSW) - Mrs Trad Azam is a mental health social worker and was until recently Secretary for Illawarra People 4 Peace. Nina is also Managing Director of the Russell Vale Family Medical and Acupuncture Practice.

138 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2016

ABC Advisory Council

The roles of members and functions of the ABC Advisory Council are to:

• either on its own initiative or at the request of the ABC Board, advise the Board on matters relating to the Corporation’s broadcasting programs

• provide a broad representation of Australian community concerns and interests in relation to programming

• analyse and consider reports and papers in relation to programming provided by the ABC

• facilitate communication between the community and the ABC Board

• within the framework of the Council’s annual work plan, carry out consultation seeking community views on ABC programming initiatives

• at its discretion, hold interest group meetings from time to time.

The Council met three times during the year: August 2015 (Melbourne, Victoria); December 2015 and April 2016 (Sydney, New South Wales). It provided feedback to the ABC Board on a wide range of the Corporation’s programs and services.

Either the ABC Board Chairman or the Managing Director, or both, met with the Advisory Council at each Council meeting. ABC Divisional Directors also met with the Council to discuss key areas of interest including radio, television, online and audience research.

At the request of the Managing Director, Council members undertook detailed consultations with their communities on the following issues:

• Children’s content and services - An assessment of the 13-17 year old age group, and what parents want their children to watch.

• iview and online video - The frequency and ease of access, the various streaming services used, and whether those services are used as a ‘catch-up’ service or for demand-driven programming.

Council members also undertook detailed consultations focussing on the following topics:

• Review of Indigenous content - The preferences and habits of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander youth (12-24 years old) regarding technology use, information sources, Indigenous content on television and the internet, and social media use.

• Arts programming (in consultation with the ABC Arts Reference Panel) - Which arts programs are viewed/listened to across the ABC’s platforms, and the ease with which they can be accessed.

The Advisory Council’s recommendations and commendations for the year, together with responses from ABC management, are reported in Appendix 4 (page 224).

Governance 139

Annabel Crabb hosts Kitchen Cabinet.

140 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2016

CHARTS, GRAPHS AND TABLES

CHAPTER SIX

The Party Room podcast discussed the winners, losers, voter issues and all the gossip from the corridors of Parliament House.

The ABC measures audience engagement, fiscal responsibility, and internal and external performance, to continue to provide content that Australians want— from a Corporation they are proud to support.

Contents:

Audience experiences 142

Inside the ABC 154

Corporate responsibility 160 Financial performance 164

The Party Room podcast hosts Fran Kelly and Patricia Karvelas.

Charts, Graphs and Tables 141

142 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2016

Charts, graphs and tables

2.1 Community satisfaction (from page 30)

Measures of community satisfaction

Providing a quality service: 2016 2015 2014 2013 2012

% of people who believe the ABC provides quality programming Television 78 78 78 78 78

Radio 63 62 61 64 61

Online (among ABC Online users) 91 89 90 86 89

% of people who believe the ABC is balanced and even-handed when reporting news and current affairs 77 77 77 78 80

Providing a valuable service: 2016 2015 2014 2013 2012

% of people who value the ABC and its services to the community 86 84 84 85 86

Meeting the ABC’s Charter obligations 2016 2015 2014 2013 2012

% of people who regard the ABC to be distinctively Australian and contributing to Australia’s national identity 81 82 82 82 83

% of people who believe the ABC reflects the cultural diversity of the Australian community 79 80 80 79 80

% of people who consider the ABC:

• encourages and promotes Australian performing arts such as music and drama 77 77 80 79 79

• provides programs of an educational nature 82 84 83 83 82

• achieves a good balance between programs of wide appeal and specialised interest 80 82 80 80 82

% of people who perceive the ABC to be innovative 73 74 71 73 72

Providing an efficient service: 2016 2015 2014 2013 2012

% of people who believe the ABC is efficient and well managed 69 69 68 69 66

Source: Newspoll, ABC Appreciation Survey 2012-2015; OmniPoll, ABC Appreciation Survey 2016.

Charts, Graphs and Tables 143

Charts, graphs and tables

ABC Television: Quality of programming

-60%

-40%

-20%

0%

20%

40%

60%

80%

100%

78

27

9

1

78

26

10 2

78

26

11 3

78

24

11 4

78

24

10 2

49

9

45

16

44

7

48

17

43

6

52

20

40

6

52

19

42

6

52

19

2012 2013 2015 2016 2014

Based on a total sample aged 14 years and over. ‘Don’t know’ responses are not displayed. Source: Newspoll, ABC Appreciation Survey 2012-2015; OmniPoll, ABC Appreciation Survey 2016.

ABC Television Commercial Television

2012 2013 2015 2016 2014

Total Good Very Good

Total Poor Very Poor

ABC Online: Quality of content Overall value of the ABC

ABC Radio: Quality of programming

0%

20%

40%

60%

80%

100%

86

45

85

47

84

47

84

47

86

49

Total Valuable

2012 2013 2015 2016 2014

Very Valuable

Based on a total sample aged 14 years and over. ‘Don’t Know’ and ‘Not Valuable’ responses are not displayed. Source: Newspoll, ABC Appreciation Survey 2012-2015; OmniPoll, ABC Appreciation Survey 2016.

0%

20%

40%

60%

80%

100%

89

34

86

34

90

37

89

40

91

40

Total Good

2012 2013 2015 2016 2014

Very Good

Based on those aged 14 years and over who ever visit the website. Does not include ‘Don’t Know’ or ‘Poor’ responses. Source: Newspoll, ABC Appreciation Survey 2012-2015; OmniPoll, ABC Appreciation Survey 2016.

-60%

-40%

-20%

0%

20%

40%

60%

80%

100%

61

22

8

2

64

25

11 3

61

21

12 3

62

22

13 4

63

20

9

2

53

15

30

13

51

13

35

16

51

11

34

14

51

12

33

13

50

13

33

13

2012 2013 2015 2016 2014

Based on a total sample aged 14 years and over. ‘Don’t know’ responses are not displayed. Source: Newspoll, ABC Appreciation Survey 2012-2015; OmniPoll, ABC Appreciation Survey 2016.

ABC Radio Commercial Radio

2012 2013 2015 2016 2014

Total Good Very Good

Total Poor Very Poor

144 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2016

Charts, graphs and tables

2.2 ABC Online (from page 32)

ABC Online: Weekly visitors and visits

0

2

4

6

8

10

0

5

10

15

20

25

30

July 2015 June 2016

Weekly visitors and visits 2015-16

Visitors

Visits (millions)

Visitors (millions)

Visits

Source: Webtrends.

ABC Online: Monthly audience reach

0

2 000

4 000

6 000

8 000

10 000

2016

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun

Unique Audience 000s Active Audience Reach %

7 023

7 315

7 335

7 659

7 976

8 046

36.2 37.3 37.3

38.9

40.5 40.7

Unique Audience 000s

Active Audience Reach %

Source: Nielsen Digital Ratings Monthly; Desktop (Ppl 2+), Smartphone and Tablet (Ppl 18+).

0

10

20

30

40

50

‘Visits’ measure the number of sessions on a particular online property. ‘Visitors’ measures the number of unique browsers (not individual people) which have accessed a

particular online property, identified by cookies.

Charts, Graphs and Tables 145

Charts, graphs and tables

ABC Online: Monthly unique audience by device

2.3 iview (from page 33)

ABC iview website and apps: Monthly visitors and visits

0

1 000

2 000

3 000

4 000

5 000

Desktop Smartphone Tablet

4 137

4 781

4 291

4 570

4 968

4 795

2 542

2 463

2 673

2 670

2 726

2 976

1 698

1 444

1 741

1 936

1 873

1 923

Monthly Unique Audience 000s by Device

Feb 16 Mar 16

Jun 16 Apr 16 May 16 Jan 16

Source: Nielsen DRM; Desktop (Ppl 2+), Smartphone and Tablet (Ppl 18+).

0

500

1 000

1 500

2 000

2 500

3 000

3 500

Source: Webtrends.

Jul Aug Sep

2015 2016

Oct Nov Dec Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun

Visitors Visits

2 078

2 072

2 183

2 264

2 228

2 179

2 232

2 217

2 503

2 701

2 828

2 898

12 626

13 107 13 291

13 940 14 142 13 780

15 634

14 012

15 503

16 278 16 644

16 862

Visitors (thousands)

Visits (thousands)

0

2 000

4 000

6 000

8 000

10 000

12 000

14 000

16 000

18 000

146 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2016

Charts, graphs and tables

2.4 Social media (from page 36)

Top 5 Facebook Accounts by Page Likes

Page June 2016 June 2015

A+ Learn English 3 886 000 2 990 000

Bananas in Pyjamas 2 590 800 2 682 000

ABC News 2 084 000 1 255 000

triple j 983 000 853 000

ABC Science 870 600 605 000

Source: Webtrends.

Top 5 Twitter Accounts by Followers

Account June 2016 June 2015

ABC News @abcnews 1 111 500 733 200

triple j @triplej 480 900 376 300

ABC News 24 @ ABCNews24 393 000 249 500

ABC Q&A @QandA 311 400 243 300

ABC Radio Melbourne @774melbourne 160 300 132 700

Source: Webtrends.

Top YouTube Channels by Subscribers

Channel June 2016 June 2015

triple j 365 700 251 400

ABC News 80 600 60 500

Australia Plus 71 600 54 700

Good Game 62 100 46 200

ABC TV 28 400 23 600

Source: Webtrends.

2.5 Radio websites and apps (from page 38)

Unique Audience

0

500 000

1 000 000

1 500 000

2 000 000

Jan Feb Apr Jun May Mar

Source: Nielsen, DRM, 2016, Desktop (Ppl 2+), Smartphone and Tablet (Ppl 18+).

Charts, Graphs and Tables 147

Charts, graphs and tables

ABC Television: Regional prime-time share

Total ABC, free-to-air audience, 6pm-midnight

0% 5% 10% 15% 20% 25%

Combined Agg. Mkts

Tasmania

Queensland

Victoria

Northern NSW

Southern NSW

2014-15 2015-16

Source: Regional TAM Consolidated 7 Data.

0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70%

2014-15 2015-16

Source: OzTAM Metropolitan Consolidated 7 data.

5 City Metro

Perth

Adelaide

Brisbane

Melbourne

Sydney

ABC Television: Average weekly metropolitan reach

Total ABC, 24-hour, five-minute consecutive viewing

0% 10% 20% 30% 40%

Combined Agg. Mkts

Tasmania

Queensland

Victoria

Northern NSW

Southern NSW

2014-15 2015-16

Source: Regional TAM Consolidated 7 Data.

ABC Television: Regional daytime share

Total ABC, free-to-air audience, 6am- 6pm

0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80%

Combined Agg. Mkts

Tasmania

Queensland

Victoria

Northern NSW

Southern NSW

2014-15 2015-16

Source: Regional TAM Consolidated 7 data.

ABC Television: Average weekly regional reach

Total ABC, 24-hour, five-minute consecutive viewing

0% 5% 10% 15% 20%

2014-15 2015-16

Source: OzTAM Metropolitan Consolidated 7 data.

5 City Metro

Perth

Adelaide

Brisbane

Melbourne

Sydney

ABC Television: Metropolitan prime-time share

Total ABC, free-to-air audience, 6pm-midnight

0% 10% 20% 30% 40%

2014-15 2015-16

Source: OzTAM Metropolitan Consolidated 7 data.

5 City Metro

Perth

Adelaide

Brisbane

Melbourne

Sydney

2.6 Total ABC Television (from page 43)

ABC Television: Metropolitan daytime share

Total ABC, free-to-air audience, 6am-6pm

‘Reach’ measures the total number of people who have watched or listened to the ABC over a specified timeframe. It is reported as a percentage of the population.

‘Share’ measures the percentage of the audience who have watched or listened to the ABC over a specified timeframe. It is reported as a percentage of the actual viewing or listening audience, not the total population.

148 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2016

Charts, graphs and tables

Top ABC programs by peak episode

Combined metropolitan and regional average audience

Ten of the top 20 ABC programs were Australian.

Ave Audience

1 New Year’s Eve 2015: Midnight Fireworks 1 900 000

2 Doc Martin 1 740 000

3 The Doctor Blake Mysteries 1 667 000

4 Australian Story 1 587 000

5 Gruen 1 521 000

6 New Tricks 1 518 000

7 Death In Paradise 1 518 000

8 Grand Designs 1 485 000

9 ABC News 1 435 000

10 Four Corners 1 403 000

11 Grand Designs Revisited 1 362 000

12 7.30 1 358 000

13 David Attenborough’s Great Barrier Reef 1 354 000

14 Father Brown 1 353 000

15 Back Roads 1 346 000

16 Utopia 1 335 000

17 Inspector George Gently 1 330 000

18 Midsomer Murders 1 290 000

19 The Coroner 1 253 000

20 The Ex-Pm 1 249 000

Source: OzTAM and Regional TAM Consolidated 7 Data 2015-16.

* Note: Highlighted programs are Australian content.

ABC (main channel): Australian Content

Repeat and 1st release, as a percentage of linear hours broadcast

ABC (main channel): ABC-commissioned programs

First-release, linear hours broadcast

0 500 1 000 1 500 2 000 2 500 3 000

2011-12

2012-13

2013-14

2015-16

2014-15

6pm to midnight 6am to midnight

Hours

Notes: Includes ABC internal productions, co-productions and pre-purchased programs. This graph reflects linear hours broadcast from the Sydney transmitter, comprising national and New South Wales transmission. Figures may differ slightly in other states and territories as a result of varying levels of local content. Hours have been rounded to nearest whole number.

0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80%

6am to midnight 6pm to midnight

Notes: This graph reflects linear hours broadcast from the Sydney transmitter, comprising national and New South Wales transmission. Figures may differ slightly in other states and territories as a result of varying levels of local content. Hours have been rounded to nearest whole number.

2011-12

2012-13

2013-14

2015-16

2014-15

2.7 ABC main channel (from page 45)

Charts, Graphs and Tables 149

Charts, graphs and tables

ABC (main channel): Prime-time first-release and repeat Australian content

Percentage of linear hours broadcast, 6pm-midnight

ABC (main channel): Daytime first-release and repeat Australian content

Percentage of linear hours broadcast, 6am-midnight

0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80%

2011-12

2012-13

2013-14

2015-16

2014-15

First Release Repeat

Notes: This graph reflects linear hours broadcast from the Sydney transmitter, comprising national and New South Wales transmission. Figures may differ slightly in other states and territories as a result of varying levels of local content. Hours have been rounded to nearest whole number.

0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80%

2011-12

2012-13

2013-14

2015-16

2014-15

First Release Repeat

Notes: This graph reflects linear hours broadcast from the Sydney transmitter, comprising national and New South Wales transmission. Figures may differ slightly in other states and territories as a result of varying levels of local content. Hours have been rounded to nearest whole number.

ABC (main channel): Genre Mix

Percentage of linear hours broadcast, 6am-midnight, excluding interstitial material

Religion and Politics 1.2%

News 28.5%

Movies 0.1%

Sport 1.2% Arts and Culture 2.3%

Documentary 5.0%

Drama 17.3%

Entertainment 14.2%

Factual 14.7%

Indigenous 0.3%

Current Affairs 15.3%

Notes: This graph reflects linear hours broadcast from the Sydney transmitter, comprising national and New South Wales transmission. Figures may differ slightly in other states and territories as a result of varying levels of local content. Hours have been rounded to nearest whole number. Children's content is broadcast on ABC KIDS and ABC3.

150 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2016

Charts, graphs and tables

Top ABC2 programs by peak episode

Combined metropolitan and regional average audience

Four of the top 15 ABC2 programs were Australian.

Ave Audience

1 Spicks and Specks 377 000

2 Doctor Who: The Day of the Doctor 338 000

3 Australians on Porn 316 000

4 Amy Schumer: Mostly Sex Stuff 316 000

5 Humans 314 000

6 Doctor Who 310 000

7 Sunday Best: Freddie Mercury: The Great Pretender 301 000

8 Video Killed the Radio Star: David Bowie 295 000

9 Doctor Who: The Time of the Doctor 294 000

10 Live at the Apollo 290 000

11 Australians on Drugs 290 000

12 Gruen Xl 288 000

13 Revenge Porn 281 000

14 David Bowie: Five Years in the Making of an Icon 277 000

15 Penn and Teller: Fool Us 265 000

Source: OzTAM and Regional TAM Consolidated 7 Data 2015-16.

* Note: Highlighted programs are Australian content.

ABC2: Genre Mix

Percentage of linear hours broadcast, 7pm-2am, excluding interstitial material

2.8 ABC2 (from page 46)

Documentary 28.2%

Current Affairs 0.1%

Arts and Culture 1.0% Sports 0.0% Religion and Politics 0.0% News 0.4%

Drama 21.8%

Entertainment 37.4%

Factual 10.2%

Indigenous 0.1% Movies 0.7%

Notes: This graph reflects linear hours broadcast from the Sydney transmitter, comprising national and New South Wales transmission. Figures may differ slightly in other states and territories as a result of varying levels of local content. Hours have been rounded to nearest whole number. Children's content is broadcast on ABC KIDS and ABC3.

The ABC2 transmission hours, schedule and content varied in this reporting period and should not be used as a direct comparison to previous years. The end transmission time for ABC2 of 2am may vary, on average transmission closes at 2am. These statistics are calculated until transmission closes.

2.9 Levels of Australian music on ABC Radio (from page 51)

Network Target 1 July 2015-30 June 2016 1 July 2014-30 June 2015

ABC RN 25% 38.0% 40.7%

ABC Local Radio 25% 46.9% 30.7%

ABC Classic FM 30% 43.0% 48.1%

triple j 40% 51.5% 49.6%

Double J 35% 32.2% 33.1%

ABC Jazz 25% 30.0% 32.5%

ABC Country 25% 67.0% 49.7%

triple j Unearthed 100% 100.0% 100.0%

Charts, Graphs and Tables 151

Charts, graphs and tables

2.10 Capital City Radio (from page 51)

2.11 Balance in news and current affairs programs (from page 62)

Balance: news and current affairs programs

Percentage who believe program does a good job of being balanced and even-handed

0% 5% 10% 15% 20% 25% 30%

Source: Nielsen; GFK from Survey 1, 2014, Monday-Sunday 5.30-12mn

2012-13 2013-14

2014-15 2015-16 2011-12

5-City Metro

Perth

Adelaide

Brisbane

Melbourne

Sydney 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5

Source: Nielsen; GFK from Survey 1, 2014, Monday-Sunday 5.30-12mn

2012-13 2013-14

2014-15 2015-16 2011-12

NewsRadio

ABC Classic FM

triple j

Radio National

Local Radio

Millions

ABC Radio: Average weekly reach

Five-city metropolitan market, people aged 10 years and over

ABC Radio: Aggregate audience share

Five-city metropolitan market, people aged 10 years and over

0%

10%

20%

30%

40%

50%

60%

70%

80%

90%

100%

2012 2013 2014 2015 2016

ABC 7pm News

2012 2013 2014 2015 2016

The 7.30 Report / 7.30

Total Good Job Very Good Job

Based on those aged 14 years and over who ever watch/listen to the respective program. Does not include ‘Don’t Know’ or ‘Poor’ responses. Source: Newspoll, ABC Appreciation Survey 2012-2015; OmniPoll, ABC Appreciation Survey 2016.

2012 2013 2014 2015 2016

AM/PM

2012 2013 2014 2015 2016

The World Today

92 91 92 90 88 87 87 89 87 87 90 85 86 84 85 84 85 86 80 81

46 47 46 47 46

39

43 43 45 44

42

44

47

44 43 41

45

48

41 40

152 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2016

Charts, graphs and tables

2.12 ABC news and current affairs online, including social media (from page 64)

Average Weekly Visits (000s) 2011-12 2012-13 2013-14 2014-15 2015-16

Four Corners 22 35 27 43 42

7.30 36 52 52 66 62

Lateline 32 32 26 28 20

AM 40 39 30 34 23

PM 36 35 31 27 23

World Today 36 29 29 28 21

Source: Webtrends; does not include stories published to news.

ABC News & Current Affairs 2016 YTD

Monthly Reach 4 469 000

Monthly Reach 22.7%

Sessions per person/per month 8.3

Time per person/per month 26.0

Source: Nielsen DRM; based on January-June 2016 monthly averages.

Social 2013-14 2014-15 2015-16

Facebook ABC News

Likes 590 000 1 255 000 2 084 000

Interactions 11% 12% 9%

Facebook ABC News 24

Likes 197 000 365 000 682 000

Interactions 9% 9% 8%

Twitter ABC News

Followers 346 000 733 000 1 112 000

Source: Webtrends.

Charts, Graphs and Tables 153

Charts, graphs and tables

2.14 Radio Australia on social media (from page 71)

Social media performance

Radio Australia 24% increase in total Facebook fans

Radio Australia Myanmar 150% increase in total Facebook fans

Radio Australia Khmer 99% increase in total Facebook fans

@RadioAustralia 20% increase in total Twitter followers

2.13 International social media (from page 71)

Facebook

Property Increase Milestones reached

Australia Plus 16% Passed 150K fans

A+ Pacific 96% Passed 30K fans

A+ Expats 11%

A+ Learn English 27% Passed 3.5 million fans

A+ Indonesia 79% Passed 200K fans

A+ Chinese 49% Passed 30K fans

A+ Vietnam 19%

YouTube

Property Increase Milestones reached

Australia Plus 30% Passed 70K subscribers

Twitter

Property Increase Milestones reached

Australia Plus 71% Passed 2.5K followers

A+ Pacific 32% Passed 3K followers

2.15 ABC Commercial: Gross revenue by activity (from page 73)

Video entertainment and distribution 15.8%

Publishing 3.0%

Sales and business development 12.0%

Music and events 10.3%

Licensing 0.7% Studios and media production 3.2%

Retail 54.6%

Digital 0.3%

154 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2016

Charts, graphs and tables

3.1 Broadcasting coverage as at 30 June 2016 (from page 84)

Proportion of the population able to receive terrestrial transmissions from ABC broadcasting services

Australia NSW/ACT Vic Qld WA SA Tas NT

Digital Television 98.49% 98.85% 99.50% 97.67% 97.58% 99.24% 98.24% 83.15%

Local Radio 99.58% 99.84% 99.94% 99.69% 99.10% 99.74% 99.64% 84.24%

RN 99.00% 99.47% 99.72% 98.78% 97.14% 99.67% 99.31% 84.33%

Classic FM 96.55% 98.17% 98.46% 95.69% 91.70% 95.62% 96.32% 70.63%

triple j 96.09% 97.75% 98.40% 94.64% 90.89% 95.38% 96.32% 70.63%

NewsRadio 96.51% 98.14% 97.82% 94.10% 94.06% 97.88% 95.68% 74.84%

Digital Radio 56.70% 50.27% 71.42% 41.72% 76.86% 74.11% 0.00% 0.00%

Domestic Shortwave 0.75% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.04% 0.14% 0.00% 74.72%

Notes:

Population was derived from Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) 2011 Census data.

The coverage percentages are for Managed Services provided by Broadcast Australia for which the ABC holds an apparatus licence.

Proportion of the population able to receive ABC digital terrestrial television transmissions

Australia NSW/ACT Vic Qld WA SA Tas NT

2015-16 98.49% 98.85% 99.50% 97.67% 97.58% 99.24% 98.24% 83.15%

2014-15 98.49% 98.87% 99.48% 97.66% 97.57% 99.24% 98.24% 83.15%

2013-14 98.62% 99.07% 99.50% 98.03% 97.53% 99.23% 97.79% 83.15%

2012-13 98.53% 98.98% 99.50% 97.98% 97.53% 99.23% 97.73% 78.00%

2011-12 97.97% 98.54% 99.19% 97.21% 96.71% 98.94% 97.04% 74.05%

2010-11 97.93% 98.54% 99.18% 97.02% 96.71% 98.94% 97.04% 74.05%

2009-10 97.83% 98.54% 99.18% 96.95% 96.71% 98.23% 96.37% 72.57%

2008-09 97.66% 98.46% 99.18% 96.67% 95.88% 98.23% 96.37% 72.57%

2007-08 97.30% 98.45% 99.18% 96.19% 93.57% 97.85% 95.98% 72.57%

2006-07 97.02% 98.23% 98.93% 95.73% 93.52% 97.85% 93.77% 72.56%

Notes:

Population was derived from Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) 2011 Census data.

The coverage percentages are for Managed Services provided by Broadcast Australia for which the ABC holds an apparatus licence.

Charts, Graphs and Tables 155

Charts, graphs and tables

No. of

Transmitters (See Note 1)

Broadcast Australia Transmission Network (See Note 2)

Total Network Availability (See Note 3)

Total ‘On-Air’ Availability (See Note 4)

Target %

2015/ 2016 %

2014/ 2015 %

2015/ 2016 %

2014/ 2015 %

2015/ 2016 %

2014/ 2015 %

NSW/ACT 95 99.78 99.96 99.95 94.30 98.53 99.84 99.72

NT 15 99.76 99.99 99.98 99.56 99.76 99.56 99.77

Qld 113 99.76 99.95 99.93 92.45 96.82 99.82 99.68

SA 32 99.77 99.95 99.96 98.40 98.96 99.87 99.90

Tas 42 99.76 99.90 99.88 94.82 97.05 99.77 99.65

Vic 53 99.77 99.89 99.83 89.98 94.78 99.80 99.56

WA 71 99.76 99.97 99.94 99.09 99.24 99.86 99.81

Notes 1. No. of Transmitters: The number of transmitters includes Analog Radio, Digital Television and Digital Radio operated by Broadcast Australia on behalf of the ABC. If a transmitter was operational during the period for one or more days it is included in the report. The state and territory numbers for Analog Radio excludes NewsRadio Extension transmission services. These are reported separately.

2. Broadcast Australia Transmission Network (ABC Transmission Contractor): The transmission network performance data is reported by Broadcast Australia. This is a contracted deliverable and is measured against the Service Level Agreement (SLA) for each service, network or sub-national network. The data is regularly reviewed and authenticated by ABC Transmission Network Services.

3. Total Network Availability shows the impact of all outages on the overall network: This reflects all faults across the transmission networks regardless of severity or cause or whether subject to a Service Level Agreement (SLA) or not. The vast majority of these faults are services not meeting full specification, such as lower transmission power, as agreed by the ABC on a case by case basis.

4. Total ‘On-Air’ Availability: The figures show ‘off-air’ occurrences where no service was provided due to faults and/or maintenance activity. It is important to note that the majority of maintenance activity is undertaken after midnight to reduce audience impact.

General comments:

Transmission and distribution performance was within expectations and contracted SLAs across all radio and television networks. There has been a small impact on the transmission performance in regional areas, in particular due to tower works including the NBN Co. wireless network rollout, and the installation of new 4G mobile throughout Australia by the telecommunication companies. In addition to these works, Broadcast Australia commenced a replacement program for some of the higher powered FM transmitters in the network.

No. of

Transmitters (See Note 1)

Broadcast Australia Transmission Network (See Note 2)

Total Network Availability (See Note 3)

Total ‘On-Air’ Availability (See Note 4)

Target %

2015/ 2016 %

2014/ 2015 %

2015/ 2016 %

2014/ 2015 %

2015/ 2016 %

2014/ 2015 %

NSW/ACT 159 99.80 99.91 99.89 94.18 96.11 99.80 99.85

NT 38 99.71 99.67 99.68 99.36 99.37 99.57 99.58

Qld 188 99.76 99.88 99.84 95.40 98.90 99.77 99.76

SA 43 99.79 99.85 99.92 89.87 92.48 99.75 99.84

Tas 37 99.81 99.88 99.88 99.27 99.59 99.79 99.79

Vic 67 99.82 99.87 99.88 88.42 91.63 99.78 99.79

WA 106 99.75 99.86 99.87 97.91 99.19 99.71 99.80

Analog Radio by State and Territory

Digital Television by State and Territory

3.2 ABC Distribution and Transmission Network Performance (from page 84)

ABC Service

No. of

Transmitters (See Note 1)

Broadcast Australia Transmission Network (See Note 2)

Total Network Availability (See Note 3)

Total ‘On-Air’ Availability (See Note 4)

Target %

2015/ 2016 %

2014/ 2015 %

2015/ 2016 %

2014/ 2015 %

2015/ 2016 %

2014/ 2015 %

Classic FM 68 99.83 99.96 99.94 93.37 91.16 99.83 99.86

triple j 58 99.82 99.95 99.91 95.08 95.90 99.78 99.83

Local Radio 242 99.79 99.86 99.87 94.37 97.72 99.73 99.77

NewsRadio 13 99.89 99.92 99.97 95.33 97.59 99.79 99.91

RN 257 99.74 99.83 99.81 96.07 98.39 99.76 99.76

NewsRadio Extension 71 99.83 99.98 99.95 98.12 94.29 99.93 99.87

Digital Television 421 99.77 99.94 99.92 94.16 96.94 99.82 99.71

Digital (DAB) Radio 5 99.98 100.00 99.98 98.05 99.80 99.70 99.93

156 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2016

Charts, graphs and tables

3.3 Number of Indigenous employees by state/territory and Division (from page 88)

Division NSW VIC QLD SA WA TAS ACT NT Grand Total

ABC Commercial 4 4

ABC International 1 1

Audience & Marketing 1 1

Digital Network 2 2

Legal & Business Affairs 2 2

News 9 4 4 2 2 1 4 5 31

People 4 1 5

Radio 9 2 1 4 16

Regional 2 1 3 1 1 1 9

Television 9 2 11

Broadcast Operations 1 1

Capital Works 1 1 2

Finance & Operations 1 1

Operations Planning 3 3

Property 4 4

Technology 4 1 1 1 1 1 9

Corporate Affairs 1 1

Grand Total 57 9 10 5 5 1 5 11 103

3.4 ABC Employees (from page 88)

ABC Employees: Full-time Equivalent (FTE)

3.5 Training and development (from page 90)

Training hours by gender and job classification

Job Female Male Total

Technologist 1 378 8 750 10 128

Senior Executive 1 356 1 926 3 282

Retail 261 65 326

Content Maker 12 306 10 554 22 860

Admin/Professional 3 630 1 139 4 769

Contractors 36 65 101

Totals 18 967 22 499 41 466

Leadership Training

Course

No of

Participants

Total

Participant Hours

Leadership Bites 74 148

Foundations of Leadership 48 888

Leadership Development Program 17 1 136

Total 139 2 172

0 1 000 2 000 3 000 4 000 5 000

2008-09

2007-08

2006-07

2009-10

2010-11

2011-12

2012-13

2013-14

2015-16

2014-15

4 183

4 313

4 679

4 664

4 603

4 599

4 557

4 535

4 499

4 461

Numbers current as at the end of the last pay period in 2015-16 (26 June 2016).

Charts, Graphs and Tables 157

Charts, graphs and tables

Vic 15.98%

WA 4.72%

ACT 3.87%

NSW 53.61%

NT 2.74%

Qld 9.27% Overseas 0.52%

Tas 3.17%

SA 6.12%

Training hours - technological learning

Program Total events Total Participants Total Participant Training hours

Digital Literacy Series 109 641 805

News Digital Awareness 41 419 1 272

Business Automation 39 358 517

IT Cloud infrastructure and security 10 21 376

Social Media Tools (Facebook) 14 120 142

Using social media in an election campaign 8 94 94

Data reported in these graphs current as at the end of the last pay period in 2015-16 (26 June 2016).

0 500 1 000 1 500 2 000 2 500 3 000

Administrative/ Professional

Content Maker

Retail

Senior

Executive

Technologist

632

2 856

15

325

355

3.6 ABC Employee distribution (from page 91)

ABC Employees: Distribution by Division

Full-time equivalent

ABC Employees: Distribution by Job Group

Full-time equivalent

Television 12.5%

Technology 7.69%

Regional 10.07%

Radio 13.78%

Property 1.59% People 1.47% Operations Planning 3.46%

News 32.69%

Finance and Operations 2.34%

Digital Network 3.2%

Corporate Management* 2.04%

Communications Networks 0.45%

Capital Works 0.82% Broadcast Operations 1.60%

Audience and Marketing 2.83% ABC International 1.03%

ABC Commercial 2.44%

* Includes Managing Director’s Office, ABC Secretariat, Corporate Affairs, Corporate Strategy and Planning, Editorial Policies, Legal and Business Affairs and the Office of the Chief Operating Officer.

ABC Employees: Distribution by Region

Full-time equivalent

158 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2016

Charts, graphs and tables

3.7 Work-related incidents and compensation claims (from page 95)

Work-Related Incidents

Severity of Incident

2015-16 2014-15

Work Related Incidents % of total

Work Related Incidents % of total

No treatment required / no injury 45 20% 38 18%

Near hit incident / no treatment required 28 13% 34 17%

Dangerous occurrence 4 2% 2 1%

First aid treatment only 62 28% 43 21%

Personal injury/illness - Off work for one day or less 63 28% 67 33%

Serious personal injury/illness - Off work for two days or more 19 9% 19 9%

Medical treatment as an inpatient in a hospital 0 0% 3 1%

Fatality 0 0% 0 0%

Total 221 100% 206 100%

Incident Management

Division Incidents Reported Incidents Managed Completion Rate (%)

ABC Commercial 15 15 100

ABC Corporate 1 1 100

ABC International 1 0 0

Audience and Marketing 5 5 100

Digital Network 2 2 100

News 67 52 77.61

Operations Group 50 50 100

People 3 3 100

Legal & Business Affairs 0 0 0

Radio 26 26 100

Regional 15 12 80

Television 36 35 97.22

TOTAL 221 200 90.95

Charts, Graphs and Tables 159

Charts, graphs and tables

Number of claims by mechanism of incident group

Mechanism of Incident Major Groups

Average cost-to-date($) (2015-16)‡ 2015-16* 2014-15* 2013-14* 2012-13*

Falls, trips and slips of a person $11 934 3 8 8 15

Hitting objects with a part of the body $ 3 4 3

Being hit by moving objects $4 718 3 1 3 4

Sound and pressure $ 1 1

Body stressing $14 686 14 23 27 34

Heat, electricity and other environmental factors $ 1 1

Chemicals and other substances $ 2

Stepping, kneeling or sitting on objects $ 3

Mental stress $ 1 2 4

Other and unspecified $ 1

Vehicle accidents $227.50 1 3 1

Total Claims no 21 21 41 48 65

Average cost-to-date($) (2015-16)‡ $12 180 $12 180 $24 431 $15 538 $36 304

* The data is immature and the ultimate number and cost of accepted claims may differ from the data reported as new claims may be lodged in a later period. Data is accurate as at 3 July 2016.

‡ Claim costs are based on estimates as at 28 February 2016.

3.8 ABC Workers’ Compensation premiums (from page 95)

ABC Workers’ Compensation performance against Australian Government agencies combined

Premium rates 2015-16 2014-15 2013-14 2012-13

ABC premium rates 1.39% 1.38% 1.35% 1.58%

Premium rates—all Australian Government agencies combined 1.85% 1.93% 1.65% 1.61%

160 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2016

Charts, graphs and tables

4.1 Energy (from page 108)

2015-16

2014-15 (actual)

2014-15 (reported)* % change

(from actual) Total GJ Total GJ Total GJ

NSW 71 859 70 572 70 207 1.8%

ACT 6 000 5 643 5 525 6.3%

Vic 29 491 29 361 29 352 0.4%

Qld 13 799 13 753 13 778 0.3%

SA 16 467 17 967 18 059 -8.3%

WA 9 457 9 584 9 553 -1.3%

Tas 7 959 8 043 8 043 -1.0%

NT 5 159 5 152 5 152 0.1%

Total ABC 160 191 160 075 159 669 0.1%

* Figures reported in 2014-15 were based on 91% actual billed electricity consumption and 9% forecast consumption. Gas consumption is based on 76% actual consumption and 24% forecast consumption.

4.2 Emissions (from page 108)

Greenhouse gas emissions

Categories UNIT

Raw Figure and Unit of Measurement 2015-16* 2014-15

%

change 2015-16 2014-15 Scope 1 Scope

2

Scope 3 GHG tCO2-e

Scope 1 Scope 2

Scope 3 GHG tCO2-e

Electricity (kWh) 40 286 468 40 216 612 0 32 907 4 612 37 519 0 33 576 4 671 38 247 -1.9%

Natural gas (MJ) 15 159 740 15 295 019 781 0 149 930 785 0 158 943 -1.4%

Automotive Diesel (non-transport) (L) 10,000 10 000 27 0 2 29 27 0 2 29 0.0%

Other Building

E10 (L) 78 376 96 147 163 0 27 190 200 0 33 233 -18.5%

Automotive Gasoline (petrol) (L) 205 022 211 906 474 0 25 499 490 0 26 516 -3.3%

Passenger Vehicles

Automotive Diesel (transport) (L) 194 441 200 278 529 0 27 556 545 0 28 573 -3.0%

Aviation Turbine Fuel (L) # 95 615 247 0 13 260 247 0 13 260 0.0%

Other Transport

All Categories 2 221 32 907 4 855 39 983 2 294 33 576 4 931 40 801 -2.0%

# Information about the Aviation Turbine Fuel consumption is no longer available.

* 2015-16 figures incorporates the updated Global Warming Potentials (GWPs) adopted by Parties to the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change and its Kyoto Protocol. The updates to the GWPs resulted in changes to emission factors across all sectors.

Charts, Graphs and Tables 161

Charts, graphs and tables

4.3 Waste and recycling (from page 109)

The waste disposal data that informs the ABC’s reporting is based on billing information received from the ABC’s waste contractors, and limited to capital cities only. This method is identical to that used for reporting in 2014-15.

Recycled Waste and Landfill Waste*

2015-16

2014-15 (actual)

2014-15 (reported)

% change (from actual)

Recycled m3 Landfill m3

Recycled m3 Landfill m3

Recycled m3 Landfill m3

Recycled m3 Landfill m3

NSW 776 946 1 046 897 998 900 25.8% -5.5%

ACT 44 188 79 203 88 226 44.3% 7.4%

Vic 346 881 540 924 536 940 35.9% 4.7%

Qld 271 529 240 429 236 440 -12.9% -23.3%

SA 785 29 840 29 1 005 29 6.5% 0.0%

WA 140 265 145 264 157 300 3.4% -0.4%

Tas1 86 258 115 314 113 330 25.2% 17.8%

NT2 86 69 343 134 350 148 74.9% 48.5%

Total ABC 2 536 3 164 3 348 3 194 3 483 3 313 24.3% 0.9%

* Waste disposal data that informs this report is sourced from billing information of the ABC’s waste contractors for the capital cities only.

1. Billing Data available for 10 months only.

2. Billing Data available for 7 months only.

Materials Consumed

Material Measure 2015-16 2014-15

Copy Paper Volume - Quantity consumed (specify unit of measure - weight or quantity) 21 282 25 480

% recycled content of total copy paper purchased 90% 94%

Volume of paper disposed of by recycling† 150m 3 93m3

Toner Volume - quantity consumed (specify unit of measure - weight or quantity) * *

% recycled content in toner * *

Volume of toner disposed of by recycling (specify unit of measure - weight or quantity) # 1.1 tonnes

Mobile Phones Volume recycled/ diverted from landfill (specify unit of measure - weight or units) # 53kg

e-waste - disposed of via waste contractors (e.g. Sita)

Total volume disposed (in kilograms) 755 1 453.45

- Volume to landfill 0 0

- Volume recycled 755 1 453.45

- Volume reused (for example, sold to other companies for re-use) 0 0

e-waste - disposed via e-waste contractor (e.g. Pickles)

Total volume disposed (in kilograms) 7 3 567

- Volume to landfill 0 0

- Volume recycled 7 3 567

- Volume reused (for example, sold to other companies for re-use) 0 0

* Information about the number and recycling composition of the toner cartridges used is no longer available.

# Information about the volume of toner and mobile phones recycled is no longer available.

† Based on Waste Billing Data. Does not include paper recycled as co-mingled recycling.

162 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2016

Charts, graphs and tables

4.4 Water consumption (from page 110)

Water consumption at capital city sites

2015-16

2014-15 (actual)

2014-15 (reported)* % change

(from actual) Kl Kl Kl

NSW 39 646 38 276 38 521 3.6%

ACT 596 620 646 -3.9%

Vic 8 915 8 950 9 172 -0.4%

Qld 2 120 2 008 1 964 5.6%

SA 10 817 9 868 11 559 9.6%

WA 8 659 8 999 9 312 -3.8%

Tas 2 205 2 192 3 047 0.6%

NT 1 823 1 918 1 969 -4.9%

Total ABC 74 781 72 830 76 190 2.7%

* Figures reported in 2015-16 are based on 63% actual consumption and 37% forecast consumption. Total ABC consumption includes 10 out of 16 capital city sites and 38 out of 51 regional sites.

4.5 Rainwater collection at ABC sites (from page 110)

Location Capacity Quantity

Total Capacity (kL)

NSW Orange 2 100 1 2.1

Port Macquarie 500 6 3.0

Wollongong 750 3 2.3

Wagga Wagga 2 200 1 2.2

WA East Perth 11 365 2 22.7

5 518 2 11.6

Broome - Hamersely St 10 000 1 10.0

SA Port Pirie 10 000 1 10.0

Vic Sale 13 000 1 13.0

Bendigo 24 500 1 24.5

NT Alice Springs 4 500 1 4.5

Qld Brisbane - South Bank 25 000 6 150.0

Gold Coast 5 000 1 5.0

Longreach 10 000 1 10.0

Charts, Graphs and Tables 163

Charts, graphs and tables

4.6 Gender profile (from page 116)

Gender composition: Management

Board, Executive Director and Senior Executives

Female Male Total

Board 5 4 9

Executive Director 5 9 14

Senior Executive 152 167 319

Notes:

Numbers reported are current as at the end of the last pay period in 2015-16 (26 June 2016). Board includes the Managing Director and Staff Elected Director. Michelle Guthrie was Acting Managing Director at the relevant time for the purposes of this report. Mark Scott was granted a leave of absence by the Board from 30 April to 4 July 2016.

Executive Director excludes Managing Director and Directors reporting to the Chief Operating Officer.

Senior Executive includes Directors reporting to Chief Operating Officer.

Gender composition: ongoing employees by classification

Pay Classification Female % Male % Total % of Grand Total

Administrative/Professional 516 71.27% 208 28.73% 724 14.75%

Content Maker 1 769 51.08% 1 694 48.92% 3 463 70.56%

Retail 11 61.11% 7 38.89% 18 0.37%

Senior Executive 158 47.16% 177 52.84% 335 6.83%

Technologist 56 15.22% 312 84.78% 368 7.50%

Grand Total 2 510 51.14% 2 398 48.86% 4 908 100.00%

Gender composition: Salary ranges

Salary range Female % Male % Total % of Grand Total

Over 145 000 133 41.82% 185 58.18% 318 6.48%

130 001 - 145 000 90 42.65% 121 57.35% 211 4.30%

115 001 - 130 000 146 46.50% 168 53.50% 314 6.40%

100 001 - 115 000 250 44.40% 313 55.60% 563 11.47%

85 001 - 100 000 489 48.56% 518 51.44% 1 007 20.52%

70 001 - 85 000 824 53.06% 729 46.94% 1 553 31.64%

55 001 - 70 000 502 61.90% 309 38.10% 811 16.52%

40 001 - 55 000 66 61.11% 42 38.89% 108 2.20%

Under 40 000 10 43.48% 13 56.52% 23 0.47%

Grand Total 2 510 51.14% 2 398 48.86% 4 908 100.00%

Salaries includes allowances and buyouts grouped under IT0008 of the payroll system.

164 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2016

Charts, graphs and tables

7.1 ABC Source of funds (from page 168)

ABC Source of Funds

7.2 Revenue by programme (from page 168)

ABC Revenue from Government by Programme 2016-17

ABC Transmission and Distribution Services 19.1%

ABC General Operational Activities 80.9%

0 100 200 300 400 500 600 700 800 900 1 000

General

Appropriation

Loan

ABC

Commercial Revenue

Other Revenue

Transmission and Distribution Services

871 871

838

194 194 198

20 20

105

84

46

22 24 24

2015-16 Actual 2016-17 Budget 2015-16 Budget

Government Funding Independent

Charts, Graphs and Tables 165

Charts, graphs and tables

7.3 Operational revenue (from page 169)

ABC Operational Revenue from Government

Including Capital indexed at 2015-16 levels. December 2015 6 months CPI Index - 29.2% reduction from 1985-86 to 2016-17.

600

650

700

750

800

850

900

950

1 000

1 050

1 100

1 150

1 200

Years

$ Millions

$1 184

$838

15-16

16-17

14-15

13-14

12-13

11-12

10-11

09-10

08-09

07-08

06-07

05-06

04-05

03-04

02-03

01-02

00-01

99-00

98-99

97-98

96-97

95-96

94-95

93-94

92-93

91-92

90-91

89-90

88-89

87-88

86-87

85-86

166 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2016

FINANCIAL

PERFORMANCE

CHAPTER SEVEN

The Katering Show—the journey of a food intolerant and an intolerable foodie.

As a publicly-funded broadcaster, the ABC is committed to maintaining the highest standards of financial management.

Contents:

Financial summary 168

Independent auditor’s report 170 Financial statements 172

Kate McCartney and Kate McLennan host The Katering Show

Financial Performance 167

168 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2016

Completion of Annual Financial Statements On 4 August 2016, the Audit and Risk Committee endorsed and the Board approved the signing of the 2015-16 Financial Statements and the Australian National Audit Office (ANAO) issued an unqualified audit opinion.

Financial Outcome 2015-16 As in previous years, the ABC operated within its total sources of funds and revenue from Government for the 2015-16 financial year.

Sources of Funds 2015-16 The ABC was allocated $1 084.4 million in the May 2015 Federal Budget.

The ABC also received $120.0 million from other sources, including ABC Commercial.

The chart ‘ABC Source of Funds’ depicts the ABC’s budgeted funds for the various categories against actual sources for 2015-16 and its budgeted sources for 2016-17.

For ABC Source of Funds, see 7.1 on page 164

The Year Ahead

Revenue from Government In the 2016-17 Budget the Government has announced additional funding of $41.4 million over three years for continuation of the Enhanced News Services initiative. The new funding is for three years only, terminating on 30 June 2019, and is at a slightly lower level to the funding from the previous triennium, for a slightly reduced scope of activities.

The Government did not provide any additional funding for the Digital Delivery initiative, which had previously received funding of $30 million over three years in the May 2013 Budget and which terminated on 30 June 2016.

ABC funding in the 2016-17 Budget also included a further year-on-year base funding decrease of $27 million related to the previously announced ABC/SBS Additional Efficiency Savings Measure. This was partly offset by increases for indexation on base funding, and additional funding to cover the expense impact of revised employer superannuation contribution rates.

The ABC’s funding for the 2016-17 financial year is:

$ million

Total revenue from Government per Outcome 1 and including equity injection/loan 1 036.1 Less Transmission and Distribution Services 198.1 Total Revenue from Government available for ABC General Activities 838.0

The chart ‘ABC Revenue from Government by Programme 2016-17’ broadly represents the ABC’s budgeted appropriation of funds by programme for the 2016-17 financial year.

For ABC Revenue from Government by Programme 2016-17, see 7.2 on page 164

Budget Strategy The 2016-17 Financial Year is the second year of previously announced Government funding reductions as part of the ABC/SBS Additional Efficiency Savings Measure. This had an overall impact of $41 million on budget funding for the year, with a year-on-year increase of $27 million in the cut to base funding, plus a $14 million one-off capital repayment to Government.

The ABC continued to implement various savings initiatives to address the funding cuts, comprising efficiency savings in support functions and transmission, as well as applying the proceeds of asset sales. At the same time, the ABC also pursued savings targets in content areas, with those savings to be reinvested into priority content activities.

The funding over the next three years for continuation of the Enhanced News Services initiative will allow ABC News to maintain as many of the previous initiatives as possible, with a focus on delivering services for Australians in regional and outer-suburban areas, albeit with some reduced scope in line with the reduced level of annual funding.

Financial summary

Financial Performance 169

Financial summary

Comparative Revenue from Government The 2016-17 operational revenue from Government of $838 million represents a decrease in real funding of $346 million or 29.2% since 1985-86 as depicted in the chart ‘ABC Operational Revenue from Government’.

For ABC Operational Revenue from Government, see 7.3 on page 165

Five year analysis

ABC Operating

2016 $’000

2015 $’000

2014 $’000

2013 $’000

2012 $’000

Cost of Services 1 170 579 1 256 985 1 238 722 1 167 877 1 179,929

Operating Revenue 120 005 155 355 177 223 158 853 173 134

Net Cost of Services(a) 1 505 574 1 101 630 1 061 499 1 009 024 1 006 795

Share of (deficit)/surplus from jointly controlled entities n/a n/a n/a (2 311) (2 317)

Revenue from Government 1 064 413 1 063 215 1 053 853 1 023 700 997 403

Financial Position

2016 $’000

2015 $’000

2014 $’000

2013 $’000

2012 $’000

Current Assets 397 312 386 371 365 415 314 343 228 804

Non-Current Assets 1 011 754 998 671 999 135 976 657 1 012 702

Total Assets 1 409 066 1 385 042 1 364 550 1 291 000 1 124 506

Current Liabilities 257 192 264 881 255 255 242 107 224 033

Non-Current Liabilities 98 691 99 146 51 318 35 081 28 907

Total Liabilities 355 883 363 900 306 573 277 188 252 940

Total Equity 1 053 183 1 021 142 1 057 977 1 013 812 988 566

Ratios Current Ratio(b) 1.54 1.46 1.43 1.30 1.02

Equity(c) 75% 74% 78% 79% 88%

(a) Net cost of services is cost of services less operating revenue

(b) Current assets divided by current liabilities

(c) Equity as a percentage of total assets

170 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2016

INDEPENDENT AUDITOR’S REPORT To the Minister for Communications,

I have audited the accompanying annual financial statements of the Australian Broadcasting Corporation for the year ended 30 June 2016, which comprise:

• Statement by the Directors and Chief Financial Officer

• Statement of Comprehensive Income

• Statement of Financial Position

• Statement of Changes in Equity

• Cash Flow Statement; and

• Notes to and forming part of the financial statements including a summary of significant accounting policies and other explanatory information.

Opinion In my opinion, the financial statements of the Australian Broadcasting Corporation:

a. comply with Australian Accounting Standards and the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability (Financial Reporting) Rule 2015; and

b. present fairly the financial position of the Australian Broadcasting Corporation as at 30 June 2016 and its financial performance and cash flows for the year then ended.

Directors’ Responsibility for the Financial Statements The Directors of the Australian Broadcasting Corporation are responsible under the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 for the preparation and fair presentation of annual financial statements that comply with Australian Accounting Standards and the rules made under that Act and are also responsible for such internal control as the Directors determine is necessary to enable the preparation and fair presentation of financial statements that are free from material misstatement, whether due to fraud or error.

Auditor’s Responsibility My responsibility is to express an opinion on the financial statements based on my audit. I have conducted my audit in accordance with the Australian National Audit Office Auditing Standards, which incorporate the Australian Auditing Standards. These auditing standards require that I comply with relevant ethical requirements relating to audit engagements and plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free from material misstatement.

Independent auditor’s report

Financial Performance 171

Independent auditor’s report

An audit involves performing procedures to obtain audit evidence about the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. The procedures selected depend on the auditor’s judgement, including the assessment of the risks of material misstatement of the financial statements, whether due to fraud or error. In making those risk assessments, the auditor considers internal control relevant to the entity’s preparation and fair presentation of the financial statements in order to design audit procedures that are appropriate in the circumstances, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the entity’s internal control. An audit also includes evaluating the appropriateness of the accounting policies used and the reasonableness of accounting estimates made by the Accountable Authority of the entity, as well as evaluating the overall presentation of the financial statements.

I believe that the audit evidence I have obtained is sufficient and appropriate to provide a basis for my audit opinion.

Independence In conducting my audit, I have followed the independence requirements of the Australian National Audit Office, which incorporate the requirements of the Australian accounting profession.

Australian National Audit Office

Grant Hehir

Auditor-General

Canberra

4 August 2016

172 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2016

Financial statements

Statement by the Directors and Chief Financial Officer 173

Statement of Comprehensive Income 174

Statement of Financial Position 175

Statement of Changes in Equity 176

Cash Flow Statement 177

Notes to and Forming Part of the Financial Statements

1. Cash Flow Reconciliation 178

2. Explanation of Major Variances between Actual Results and Original Budget 179 3. General Accounting Policies 180

Financial Performance 183

4. Expenses 183

5. Own Source Income 187

Financial Position 189

6. Financial Assets 190

7. Non-Financial Assets 193

8. Payables 198

9. Interest Bearing Liabilities 199

10. Other Provisions 200

People and Relationships 201

11. Employee Provisions 201

12. Directors’ and Officers’ Remuneration 202

13. Related Party Disclosures 203

Financial Risks and Disclosure 207

14. Financial Instruments 207

Contingent Items 215

15. Contingent Assets and Liabilities 215

Financial Statements for the year ended 30 June 2016

Financial Performance 173

Financial statements

JAMES SPIGELMAN AC QC Chairman 4 August 2016

MICHELLE GUTHRIE Managing Director 4 August 2016

DAVID PENDLETON FCPA Chief Financial Officer 4 August 2016

Statement by the Directors and Chief Financial Officer In our opinion, the attached financial statements for the year ended 30 June 2016 comply with subsection 42(2) of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 (PGPA Act), and are based on properly maintained financial records as per subsection 41(2) of the PGPA Act.

In our opinion, at the date of this statement, there are reasonable grounds to believe that the Australian Broadcasting Corporation will be able to pay its debts as and when they become due and payable.

This statement is made in accordance with a resolution of the Directors.

174 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2016

Financial statements

Statement of Comprehensive Income for the year ended 30 June 2016

2016 to Original Budget explanation note reference (Note 2) Notes

2016 $’000

2015 $’000

2016

Original Budget $’000

EXPENSES Employee benefits A, B, C, D, E 4A 511 072 529 284 478 898

Suppliers A, B, C, D, F 4B 401 917 448 662 483 643

Depreciation and amortisation 4C 90 752 90 560 96 184

Program amortisation G 4D 161 999 179 654 140 000

Finance costs 4E 1 596 810 2 683

Write-down and impairment of assets 4F 1 122 15 671 -

Net loss/(gain) from disposal of assets 4G 1 831 (5 869) -

Net foreign exchange loss/(gain) 4H 290 (1 787) -

Total expenses 1 170 579 1 256 985 1 201 408

OWN-SOURCE INCOME Own-source revenue Sale of goods and rendering of services B, D 5A 96 623 118 794 138 285

Interest 5B 8 245 7 975 4 393

Other revenue 5C 15 137 28 586 -

Total own-source revenue 120 005 155 355 142 678

Total own-source income 120 005 155 355 142 678

Net cost of services 1 050 574 1 101 630 1 058 730

Revenue from Government 1 064 413 1 063 215 1 064 413

Surplus/(deficit) 13 839 (38 415) 5 683

OTHER COMPREHENSIVE INCOME Items not subject to subsequent reclassification to profit or loss Changes in asset revaluation reserve K(i) 7A 17 932 13 425 -

Items subject to subsequent reclassification to profit or loss Gains on cash flow hedging instruments 14.2B 270 10 -

Total other comprehensive income 18 202 13 435 -

Total comprehensive income/(loss) 32 041 (24 980) 5 683

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

Financial Performance 175

Financial statements

Statement of Financial Position as at 30 June 2016

2016 to Original Budget explanation note reference (Note 2) Notes

2016 $’000

2015 $’000

2016

Original Budget $’000

ASSETS Financial assets Cash and cash equivalents D 6A 6 811 8 790 4 813

Receivables D 6B 13 785 19 257 14 392

Other investments A, H 6C 266 650 246 300 209 729

Accrued revenue 6D 10 211 8 151 5 817

Total financial assets 297 457 282 498 234 751

Non-financial assets Land and buildings D, H, K(i) 7A 727 215 690 579 726 981

Infrastructure, plant and equipment A, D, H 7A 218 562 238 159 276 611

Intangibles 7A 33 723 37 200 44 336

Inventories I 7B 108 042 115 790 143 144

Prepayments 7C 20 159 16 829 15 788

Other non-financial assets 7D 3 908 3 987 -

Total non-financial assets 1 111 609 1 102 544 1 206 860

Total assets 1 409 066 1 385 042 1 441 611

LIABILITIES Payables Suppliers D 8A 76 202 77 963 73 449

Other payables 8B 37 834 48 499 48 108

Total payables 114 036 126 462 121 557

Interest bearing liabilities Loans 9 90 000 70 000 90 000

Total interest bearing liabilities 90 000 70 000 90 000

Provisions Other provisions 10 1 614 14 418 2 400

Employee provisions 11 150 233 153 020 160 613

Total provisions 151 847 167 438 163 013

Total liabilities 355 883 363 900 374 570

NET ASSETS 1 053 183 1 021 142 1 067 041

EQUITY Contributed equity 107 640 107 640 107 640

Reserves K(i) 684 762 666 560 653 125

Retained surplus J 260 781 246 942 306 276

Total equity 1 053 183 1 021 142 1 067 041

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

176 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2016

Financial statements

Statement of Changes in Equity for the year ended 30 June 2016

2016 to Original Budget explanation note reference (Note 2)

2016 $’000

2015 $’000

2016

Original Budget $’000

Contributed equity Opening balance as at 1 July 107 640 119 495 107 640

Return of capital - (11 855) -

Contributions by owner - - -

Closing balance as at 30 June 107 640 107 640 107 640

Asset revaluation reserve Opening balance as at 1 July 666 550 653 125 653 125

Net revaluation of land and buildings K(i) 17 932 13 425 -

Closing balance as at 30 June 684 482 666 550 653 125

Other reserves Opening balance as at 1 July 10 - -

Movement in cash flow hedging instruments 270 10 -

Closing balance as at 30 June 280 10 -

Retained Surplus Opening balance as at 1 July J 246 942 285 357 300 593

Surplus/(deficit) 13 839 (38 415) 5 683

Closing balance as at 30 June J 260 781 246 942 306 276

Total equity as at 30 June 1 053 183 1 021 142 1 067 041

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

Accounting Policy - Transactions with Government as Owner In the event the Australian Broadcasting Corporation is required to return unspent funds to the Government and this return is discretionary, amounts returned are recognised as a return of capital in the year in which the payment is made.

Financial Performance 177

Financial statements

Cash Flow Statement for the year ended 30 June 2016

2016 to Original Budget explanation note reference (Note 2) Notes

2016 $’000

2015 $’000

2016

Original Budget $’000

Inflows (Outflows)

Inflows (Outflows)

Inflows (Outflows)

OPERATING ACTIVITIES Cash received Receipts from Government 1 064 413 1 063 215 1 064 413

Sales of goods and rendering of services B, D, L 96 508 106 312 138 285

Interest 8 137 7 811 4 393

Net GST received C, F, L 48 852 41 462 76 856

Realised foreign exchange gains 270 10 -

Other 17 240 32 194 -

Total cash received 1 235 420 1 251 004 1 283 947

Cash used Employees A, B, C, E (523 115) (534 508) (478 898)

Suppliers (including GST) A, B, C, L (622 381) (639 734) (700 499)

Finance costs (1 505) (604) (2 683)

Total cash used (1 147 001) (1 174 846) (1 182 080)

Net cash from operating activities 88 419 76 158 101 867

INVESTING ACTIVITIES Cash received Proceeds from sale of property, plant and equipment A, L 824 19 251 25 000

Proceeds from investments K(ii) 146 500 195 800 -

Total cash received 147 324 215 051 25 000

Cash used Purchase of property, plant and equipment, and intangibles A, L (90 872) (77 980) (144 890)

Purchase of investments K(ii) (166 850) (248 000) (1 977)

Total cash used (257 722) (325 980) (146 867)

Net cash used in investing activities (110 398) (110 929) (121 867)

FINANCING ACTIVITIES Cash received Proceeds from long-term borrowings 20 000 50 000 20 000

Total cash received 20 000 50 000 20 000

Cash used Return of capital - (11 855) -

Total cash used - (11 855) -

Net cash used in financing activities 20 000 38 145 20 000

Net (decrease)/increase in cash and cash equivalents (1 979) 3 374 -

Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of year 8 790 5 416 4 813

Cash and cash equivalents at end of year 6A 6 811 8 790 4 813

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

178 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2016

Financial statements Notes to and Forming Part of the Financial Statements for the year ended 30 June 2016

1. Cash Flow Reconciliation as at 30 June 2016

2016 $’000

2015 $’000

Reconciliation of cash and cash equivalents between Statement of Financial Position and Cash Flow Statement

Cash and cash equivalents per:

Cash Flow Statement 6 811 8 790

Statement of Financial Position 6 811 8 790

Difference - -

Reconciliation of net cost of services to net cash from operating activities

Net cost of services (1 050 574) (1 101 630)

Revenue from Government 1 064 413 1 063 215

Adjustment for non-cash items Depreciation of property, plant and equipment 79 679 81 410

Amortisation of intangibles 11 073 9 150

Transfer (from) employee provisions (2 787) (7 593)

Transfer (from)/to other provisions (12 804) 12 018

Write-down and impairment of/(reversal of prior year impairments of):

- receivables and advances 1 322 1 697

- land and buildings (16) 2 689

- infrastructure, plant and equipment (62) 1 247

- intangibles (139) 431

- inventories 16 9 607

- other non-fixed assets 1 -

Loss/(gain) from disposal of assets 1 831 (5 869)

Unrealised foreign exchange loss/(gain) 560 (1 777)

Changes in assets and liabilities Decrease in receivables 3 883 709

(Increase) in accrued revenue (2 060) (2 334)

(Increase) in prepayments (3 330) (978)

Decrease in inventories 7 732 17 747

Increase in supplier payables 346 433

(Decrease) in other payables (10 665) (4 014)

Net cash from operating activities 88 419 76 158

Financial Performance 179

Notes to and Forming Part of the Financial Statements for the year ended 30 June 2016

Financial statements

2. Explanation of Major Variances between Actual Results and Original Budget

Explanations are provided for significant variances between actual results and the original budget, being the Portfolio Budget Statements (PBS). Significant variances are those relevant to the performance of the Australian Broadcasting Corporation and are typically those greater than $20 000 000.

A. Timing of original budget The original budget amounts were prepared prior to the completion and finalisation of the ABC’s internal budget, approved by the ABC Board resulting in a number of differences between the original budget and the actual results at 30 June 2016.

B. Closure of ABC retail shops The original budget amounts outlined in the PBS were prepared and published prior to the ABC Board’s decision to cease retail operations through ABC shops. As a result, a full year’s normal trading by ABC shops was included in the original budget. ABC shops closed progressively throughout the year to March 2016, leading to significant differences between the figures shown in the original budget and actual results at 30 June 2016, in particular in relation to Employee benefits, Suppliers and Sale of goods and rendering of services.

C. Funding reductions In line with the announcement by the then Minister for Communications in November 2014, ABC funding was reduced by $20 400 000 during the year as part of a total funding reduction of $206 780 000 over four years.

A number of efficiency and cost savings measures continued to be implemented in 2015/16 in order to deliver the total savings, with the current savings program exceeding that estimated in the original budget, impacting both Employee benefits and Suppliers.

D. MediaHub Australia Pty Limited (MediaHub) MediaHub is classified as a joint operation and the actual results at 30 June 2016 include the ABC’s share of MediaHub’s assets, liabilities, revenues and expenses while the original budget was prepared on the ‘equity method’ basis showing a single line item representing the ABC’s investment in MediaHub. As a result, a number of differences are reported between the original budget and the actual results at 30 June 2016, as outlined in Note 13.

E. Employee benefits The increase in Employee benefits of $32 174 000 over the original budget is due to the change in Leave and other entitlements of $10 948 000 due primarily to the actuarial valuation of the long service leave provision, an increase in Separation and redundancy payments of $11 760 000 due to the savings measures (refer Note 2C) and the treatment of MediaHub of $4 156 000 (refer Note 2D).

F. Suppliers The closure of ABC retail shops, in particular in relation to the decrease in Cost of sales estimated at around $47 465 000 and the decrease in Operating lease payments of $13 037 000, coupled with the reduction in costs due to recently negotiated transmission and other procurement contracts resulted in the decrease in Supplier expenses from the original budget.

G. Program amortisation Television program inventory is amortised in accordance with the accounting policy outlined in Note 7B Inventories and is not incurred evenly year on year.

Program amortisation was $21 999 000 higher than the original budget due to the timing of broadcast of purchased and produced program inventory during the year.

This should also be considered in the context of the reduction in the value of Inventories (refer Note 2I), which indicates that a higher value of program inventory than expected in the original budget was broadcast or utilised during the year.

In addition, a further $2 600 000 was expensed during the year due to a change in the basis of amortisation for some television programs.

180 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2016

Notes to and Forming Part of the Financial Statements for the year ended 30 June 2016

Financial statements

H. Other investments and Infrastructure, plant and equipment At the time the original budget was prepared, it was anticipated that funds expended on the ABC’s 2015/16 capital program would be higher, reducing cash with the corresponding amounts recorded in Infrastructure, plant and equipment.

The actual capital program approved was lower than anticipated reducing project spend during the year, impacting the value of Other investments and Infrastructure, plant and equipment at 30 June 2016.

I. Inventories The reduction in Inventories against the amount recorded in the original budget reflects the closure of ABC retail shops resulting in lower than budgeted retail inventory being held at 30 June 2016 and higher utilisation of television program inventory for broadcast during the year.

J. Retained surplus At the time the original budget was prepared, the ABC expected to achieve a surplus in the 2015 financial year. Following the decision to cease retail operations through ABC shops, the expected closure costs were provided for in the 2015 financial year resulting in a loss of $38 415 000 instead. The effect of this change resulted in a lower opening Retained surplus than in the original budget.

K. Changes in accounting estimates, standards and basis of preparation The following changes during the year ended 30 June 2016 resulted in variances against the original budget:

(i) Revaluation of properties - the ABC revalued its Ultimo, NSW property at 30 June 2016, resulting in an increment of $17 900 000 in the value of Land and buildings and the Asset revaluation reserve, which was not anticipated nor could be forecast at the time the original budget was prepared.

(ii) Investments - the Cash Flow Statement shows the gross amounts related to the purchase and proceeds of investments separately under investment activities whilst the original budget shows a net figure.

L. Cash Flow Statement Movements in the Cash Flow Statement reflect lower than anticipated levels of cash received from Sales of goods and rendering of services of $41 777 000 and cash used on Suppliers (refer Note 2F) due to the decision to close the ABC’s retail shops while lower than anticipated project spend has reduced cash used in investing activities (net) when compared against the original budget (refer Note 2H).

3. General Accounting Policies

Overview

The Australian Broadcasting Corporation (the “Corporation” or “ABC”) is a Corporate Commonwealth, not-for-profit entity.

Its functions are set out in s.6 of the Australian Broadcasting Corporation Act 1983. Those functions are reflected in the statement of purpose in the ABC Corporate Plan 2015-16, which was prepared in accordance with s.35 of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 (PGPA Act).

The Corporation sets out to achieve one outcome: informed, educated and entertained audiences throughout Australia and overseas through innovative and comprehensive media and related services.

The continued existence of the Corporation in its present form and with its present programs is dependent on Government policy and on continued funding by Parliament for the Corporation’s administration and programs.

Accounting Framework

The principal accounting policies adopted in preparing the financial statements of the Corporation are stated to assist in a general understanding of these financial statements.

The financial report for the Corporation for the year ended 30 June 2016 was authorised for issue by the Directors on 4 August 2016.

2. Explanation of Major Variances between Actual Results and Original Budget continued

Financial Performance 181

Notes to and Forming Part of the Financial Statements for the year ended 30 June 2016

Financial statements

Basis of Preparation of Financial Statements

The financial statements are general purpose financial statements and are required by section 42 of the PGPA Act.

The financial statements and notes have been prepared in accordance with:

a) P ublic Governance, Performance and Accountability (Financial Reporting) Rule 2015 (FRR) for reporting periods ending on or after 1 July 2015; and

b) Australian Accounting Standards issued by the Australian Accounting Standards Board (AASB) that apply for the reporting period.

The Corporation’s financial statements have been prepared on an accrual basis and in accordance with the historical cost convention, except for certain assets and liabilities which are at fair value. Except where stated, no allowance is made for the effect of changing prices on the results or the financial position.

The financial statements are presented in Australian dollars and values are rounded to the nearest thousand dollars unless otherwise specified.

Unless an alternative treatment is specifically required by an accounting standard or the FRR, assets and liabilities are recognised in the Statement of Financial Position when and only when it is probable that future economic benefits will flow to the Corporation or a future sacrifice of economic benefits will be required and the amounts of the assets or liabilities can be reliably measured. However, assets and liabilities arising under executory agreements are not recognised unless required by an accounting standard.

Assets and liabilities that are not recognised are reported throughout the notes as lease commitments or at Note 15 Contingent Assets and Liabilities.

Unless an accounting standard requires alternative treatment, income and expenses are recognised in the Statement of Comprehensive Income when and only when the flow, consumption or loss of economic benefits has occurred and can be reliably measured.

nificant Accounting Estimates d Assumptions Sig an

Significant Accounting Judgements

In the process of applying the accounting policies listed throughout the financial statements and accompanying notes, the Corporation has taken the fair value of freehold land to be the market value of similar locations and the fair value of freehold buildings to be the depreciated replacement cost, as determined by an independent valuer.

The Corporation has applied estimates and assumptions to the following:

• Provision for long service leave, as detailed in Note 11 Employee Provisions;

• Provision for make good, as detailed in Note 10 Other Provisions;

• Valuation of properties, plant and equipment, as detailed in Note 7 Non-Financial Assets;

• Depreciation, as detailed in Note 7 Non-Financial Assets and Note 4C Depreciation and amortisation;

• Impairment of non-financial assets, as detailed in Note 4F Write-down and impairment of assets;

• Program amortisation, as detailed in Note 7 Non-Financial Assets and Note 4D Program amortisation; and

• Provision for redundancy, as detailed in Note 11 Employee Provisions.

No other accounting assumptions or estimates have been identified that have a significant risk of causing a material adjustment to carrying amounts of assets and liabilities.

New Accounting Standards

Adoption of New Australian Accounting Standard Requirements There were no new, revised or amending standards applicable to the current reporting period that had a material effect on the Corporation’s financial statements.

All other new, revised or amending standards that are applicable to the current reporting period did not have a material effect, and are not expected to have a future material effect, on the entity’s financial statements.

3. General Accounting Policies continued

182 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2016

Notes to and Forming Part of the Financial Statements for the year ended 30 June 2016

Financial statements

New Accounting Standards continued

Future Australian Accounting Standard Requirements The following new standards and amendments to standards were issued by the AASB but are effective for future reporting periods. The impact of adopting these pronouncements has not been assessed and may have a material financial impact on the Corporation’s financial statements.

AASB 9 Financial Instruments This Standard replaces AASB 139 Financial Instruments: Recognition and Measurement. It amends the classification and measurement requirements for financial assets and liabilities and the recognition and de-recognition requirements for financial instruments. Changes to hedge accounting align the accounting with risk management objectives. AASB 9 applies allowances for impairment based on expected credit losses, rather than as and when an impairment event occurs. This takes effect for reporting periods beginning on or after 1 January 2018.

AASB 15 Revenue from Contracts with Customers The Standard contains a single model that applies to customers and two approaches to recognising revenue; at a point in time or over time. The model features a five-step analysis of transactions to determine whether, how much and when revenue is recognised. This Standard applies to reporting periods beginning on or after 1 January 2018.

AASB 16 Leases Under this Standard, there will no longer be a distinction between operating and finance leases. Instead there will be one treatment and a requirement to recognise an asset and a lease liability for all leases. The effective date is for reporting periods beginning on or after 1 January 2019.

Other new, revised or amending standards that were issued and are applicable to future reporting periods are not expected to have a material financial impact on the Corporation.

Income Tax

The Corporation is not subject to income tax pursuant to section 71 of the Australian Broadcasting Corporation Act 1983.

Three of the Corporation’s controlled entities, Music Choice Australia Pty Ltd, The News Channel Pty Limited and Splash Education Limited, while subject to income tax, have been inactive up to and including 30 June 2016.

The Corporation’s interests in MediaHub Australia Pty Limited, Freeview Australia Limited and National DAB Licence Company Limited are subject to income tax.

ABC AustraliaPlus (Shanghai) Cultural Development Co. Ltd, incorporated in the People’s Republic of China, is not subject to Australian income tax.

Goods and Services Tax (GST)

Revenues, gains, expenses and losses are recognised net of the amount of GST except where the amount of GST incurred is not recoverable from the Australian Taxation Office (ATO). In these circumstances, the GST is recognised as part of the revenue or expense.

Receivables and payables are stated with the amount of GST included. The net amount of GST receivable from the ATO is included as a financial asset in the Statement of Financial Position while any net amount of GST payable to the ATO is included as a liability in the Statement of Financial Position.

Assets are recognised net of the amount of GST except where the amount of GST incurred is not recoverable from the ATO. In these circumstances, the GST is recognised as part of the cost of acquisition of the asset.

Cash flows are included in the Cash Flow Statement on a net basis. The GST components arising from investing and financing activities which are recoverable from or payable to the ATO are classified as operating cash flows.

Events after Reporting Period

There were no material events after the Reporting Period that would have a material impact on the operations of or finances of the Corporation.

3. General Accounting Policies continued

Financial Performance 183

Notes to and Forming Part of the Financial Statements for the year ended 30 June 2016

Financial statements

Financial Performance

Accounting Policy - Revenue from Government From 1 July 2016, ABC transmission and distribution funds are now appropriated under a single ABC Transmission and Distribution Services Programme under Outcome 1, rather than under the previous three separate transmission Outcomes 2, 3 and 4.

ABC operational funding continues to be appropriated under the General Operational Activities Programme under Outcome 1.

Income is measured at the fair value of the contributions received or receivable. Income arising from the contribution of an asset to the Corporation is recognised when the entity obtains control of the contribution or the right to receive the contribution, it is probable that the economic benefits comprising the contribution will flow to the Corporation and the amount of the contribution can be measured reliably.

Accounting Policy - Foreign currency transactions The Corporation enters into foreign currency hedging arrangements to protect its purchasing power in relation to foreign currency exposures. Revenues and expenditures denominated in foreign currencies are converted to Australian dollars at the exchange rates prevailing at the date of the transaction or at the hedged rate.

All gains and losses are taken to profit or loss with the exception of forward exchange contracts that are classified as cash flow hedges used to hedge highly probable transactions. Gains and losses on cash flow hedges held at balance date are taken to equity.

4. Expenses

2016 $’000

2015 $’000

4A Employee benefits Wages and salaries 366 020 366 455

Superannuation - defined contribution plans 33 332 32 372

Superannuation - defined benefit plans 34 464 36 071

Leave and other entitlements 57 068 39 528

Separation and redundancies 11 760 47 147

Other employee benefits 8 428 7 711

Total employee benefits 511 072 529 284

Accounting Policy - Employee benefits Refer to Note 11 - Employee Provisions.

2016 $’000

2015 $’000

4B Suppliers Goods 90 911 100 327

Services 299 907 310 395

Remuneration to the Auditor General for auditing the financial statements for the period (a) 225 225

Operating lease rental payments 4 963 29 848

Workers’ compensation premiums 5 208 7 054

Freight 703 813

Total suppliers 401 917 448 662

(a) KPMG has been contracted by the Australian National Audit Office to provide audit services to the Corporation on their behalf. In 2016, KPMG has earned additional fees of $48 100 (2015 $15 400) for services that were separately contracted by the Corporation.

184 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2016

Notes to and Forming Part of the Financial Statements for the year ended 30 June 2016

Financial statements

Accounting Policy - Repairs and maintenance Maintenance, repair expenses and minor renewals which do not constitute an upgrade or enhancement of equipment are expensed as incurred. These expenses are in Note 4B Suppliers, under Services.

Accounting Policy - Leases A distinction is made between finance leases and operating leases. Finance leases effectively transfer substantially all the risks and benefits incidental to ownership of leased non-current assets from the lessor to the lessee. With operating leases, the lessor effectively retains substantially all such risks and benefits.

Operating lease payments are expensed on a straight line basis which is representative of the pattern of benefits derived from the leased assets. Operating lease rentals are not segregated between minimum

lease payments, contingent rents and sublease payments, as required by AASB 117 Leases as these components are not individually material.

Lease incentives taking the form of ‘free’ leasehold improvements and rent holidays are recognised as liabilities. These liabilities are reduced by allocating lease payments between rental expense and reduction of the liability.

Commitments and contingencies are disclosed on a GST inclusive basis as appropriate. GST commitments recoverable from the ATO are disclosed separately.

The Corporation in its capacity as lessee enters into operating leases which are effectively non-cancellable and the majority of which are outlined in the following table.

Nature of Lease General description of leasing arrangement

Motor vehicles - business and senior executive Fully maintained operating lease over 24/36 months and/ or 40 000/60 000km; no contingent rentals; no renewal or purchase options available.

Property leases - office and business premises Lease payments subject to increase in accordance with CPI or other agreed increment; initial period of lease ranges from 1 year to 6 years; options to extend in accordance with lease.

Operating lease expense commitments

Commitments are GST inclusive where relevant. GST recoverable is disclosed separately. Net commitments for minimum lease payments in relation to non-cancellable operating leases are payable as follows:

2016 $’000

2015 $’000

Operating lease expense commitments One year or less 3 479 10 098

From one to five years 4 836 6 485

Over five years 2 769 2 490

Total operating lease expense commitments 11 084 19 073

Net GST receivable on operating lease expense commitments One year or less (237) (759)

From one to five years (110) (174)

Over five years (31) (31)

Total net GST receivable on operating lease expense commitments (378) (964)

4. Expenses continued

Financial Performance 185

Notes to and Forming Part of the Financial Statements for the year ended 30 June 2016

Financial statements

2016 $’000

2015 $’000

4C Depreciation and amortisation Depreciation Land and buildings 32 367 30 436

Leasehold improvements 3 458 6 988

Infrastructure, plant and equipment 43 854 43 986

Total depreciation 79 679 81 410

Amortisation Intangibles 11 073 9 150

Total amortisation 11 073 9 150

Total depreciation and amortisation 90 752 90 560

Accounting Policy - Depreciation and amortisation - land, buildings, infrastructure, plant and equipment and intangibles Refer to Note 7A - Accounting Policy - Land, buildings, infrastructure, plant and equipment and intangibles.

2016 $’000

2015 $’000

4D Program amortisation Purchased 36 280 40 763

Produced 125 719 138 891

Total program amortisation 161 999 179 654

Accounting Policy - Program amortisation Refer to Note 7B - Accounting Policy - Inventories.

Notes

2016 $’000

2015 $’000

4E Finance costs Loans from Department of Finance 1 593 810

Other finance costs 3 -

Total finance costs 14.2C 1 596 810

Accounting Policy - Finance costs All borrowing costs are expensed as incurred.

2016 $’000

2015 $’000

4F Write-down and impairment of assets Receivables and advances 1 322 1 697

Land and buildings (16) 2 689

Infrastructure, plant and equipment (62) 551

Intangibles (139) 431

Assets under construction - 696

Other non-fixed assets 1 -

Inventory held for sale 16 9 607

Total write-down and impairment of assets 1 122 15 671

4. Expenses continued

186 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2016

Notes to and Forming Part of the Financial Statements for the year ended 30 June 2016

Financial statements

Accounting Policy - Write-down and impairment of assets All non-current assets except:

• inventories;

• assets arising from employee benefits;

• financial assets that are within the scope of AASB 139 Financial Instruments: Recognition and Measurement; and

• non-current assets (or disposal groups) classified as held for sale in accordance with AASB 5 Non-current Assets Held for Sale and Discontinued Operations;

are subject to an assessment as to indicators of impairment under AASB 136 Impairment of Assets.

At 30 June 2016, the Corporation has assessed whether there are any indications that assets may be impaired.

Where indications of impairment exist, the asset’s recoverable amount is estimated and an impairment adjustment made if the asset’s recoverable amount is less than its carrying amount.

The recoverable amount of an asset is the greater of its fair value less costs to sell and its value in use. Value in use is the present value of the future cash flows expected to be derived from the asset. Where the future economic benefit of an asset is not primarily dependent on the asset’s ability to generate future cash flows, and the asset would be replaced if the Corporation were deprived of the asset, its value in use is taken to be its depreciated replacement cost.

2016 $’000

2015 $’000

4G Net loss/(gain) from disposal of assets Land and buildings Total proceeds from sale (200) (19 000)

Carrying value of assets sold 120 12 061

Cost of disposal 34 790

Net gain from disposal of land and buildings (46) (6 149)

Infrastructure, plant and equipment Total proceeds from disposal (624) (251)

Carrying value of assets disposed 2 439 469

Cost of disposal 62 62

Net loss from disposal of infrastructure, plant and equipment 1 877 280

Total Net loss/(gain) from disposal of assets Total proceeds from disposal (824) (19 251)

Total carrying value of assets disposed 2 559 12 530

Total costs of disposal 96 852

Total net loss/(gain) from disposal of assets 1 831 (5 869)

Accounting Policy - Gains or losses on sale of assets Gains or losses from disposal of assets are recognised when control of the asset has passed to the buyer.

Notes

2016 $’000

2015 $’000

4H Net foreign exchange loss/(gain) Non-speculative 290 (1 787)

Total net foreign exchange loss/(gain) 14.2B 290 (1 787)

4. Expenses continued

Financial Performance 187

Notes to and Forming Part of the Financial Statements for the year ended 30 June 2016

Financial statements

5. Own Source Income

Notes

2016 $’000

2015 $’000

5A Sale of goods and rendering of services Goods 77 217 97 671

Services 19 406 21 123

Total sale of goods and rendering of services 96 623 118 794

Cost of sales of goods 42 420 63 817

5B Interest Deposits 8 245 7 975

Total interest 14.2B 8 245 7 975

5C Other revenue Subsidies, grants and contract revenue (a) 8 950 27 297

Insurance settlement 2 633 20

Other 3 554 1 269

Total other revenue 15 137 28 586

(a) Subsidies, grants and contract revenue no longer includes monies from the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade (DFAT) for the provision of Australia’s international television service, Australia Network (2015 $4 588 000). The Australia Network Service ceased on 18 September 2014. No further monies were received in 2016 to fund cessation of this service (2015 $6 000 000).

Accounting Policy - Sale of goods, rendering of services and revenue recognition Revenue from the sale of goods is recognised when:

• the risks and rewards of ownership have been transferred to the buyer;

• the Corporation retains no managerial involvement or effective control over the goods;

• the revenue and transaction costs incurred can be reliably measured; and

• it is probable that the economic benefit associated with the transaction will flow to the Corporation.

Revenue from the sale of goods is recognised at fair value of the amount received on delivery of goods, net of GST upon delivery of the goods to customers.

Revenue from rendering of services is recognised by reference to the stage of completion of contracts at the reporting date. Revenue is recognised when:

• the amount of revenue, stage of completion and transaction costs incurred can be reliably measured; and

• the probable economic benefits with the transaction will flow to the Corporation.

The stage of completion of contracts at the reporting date is determined by reference to the proportion that costs incurred to date bear to the estimated total costs of the transaction.

Credit sales are on normal commercial terms. Receivables for goods and services, which have 30 day terms, are recognised at the nominal amounts due, less any impairment allowance for bad and doubtful debts. The collectability of debts is reviewed at the balance date. Allowances are made when the collectability of debt is no longer probable.

Accounting Policy - Subsidies and grants The Corporation receives grant monies from time to time. Most grant agreements require the Corporation to perform services or provide facilities, or to meet eligibility criteria. Subsidies, grants, sponsorships and donations are recognised on receipt unless paid to the Corporation for a specific purpose where recognition of revenue will be recognised in accordance with the agreement.

Accounting Policy - Interest Revenue Interest revenue is recognised using the effective interest method as set out in AASB 139 Financial Instruments: Recognition and Measurement.

188 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2016

Notes to and Forming Part of the Financial Statements for the year ended 30 June 2016

Financial statements

Accounting Policy - Revenue from leases A distinction is made between finance leases and operating leases. Finance leases effectively transfer substantially all the risks and benefits incidental to ownership of leased non-current assets from the lessor to the lessee. With operating leases, the lessor effectively retains substantially all such risks and benefits.

Operating lease revenues are recognised on a straight line basis which is representative of the pattern of benefits derived from the leased assets.

Operating lease rentals are not segregated between minimum lease payments, contingent rents and sublease payments, as required by AASB 117 Leases as these components are not individually material.

The Corporation in its capacity as lessor enters into operating leases which are effectively non-cancellable and comprise property leases relating to office and business premises. Lease payments to the Corporation are subject to increases in accordance with CPI or other agreed increment. The initial lease periods range from 1 year to 6 years with options to extend in accordance with leases.

Operating lease revenue commitments

These commitments, largely rental income for letting out office space, are GST inclusive where relevant. GST payable to the ATO is disclosed separately.

Net commitments for minimum lease payments in relation to non-cancellable operating leases are receivable as follows:

2016 $’000

2015 $’000

Operating lease revenue commitments One year or less (1 590) (1 406)

From one to five years (2 429) (2 528)

Over five years (206) -

Total operating lease revenue commitments (4 225) (3 934)

Net GST payable on operating lease revenue commitments One year or less 144 128

From one to five years 221 230

Over five years 18 -

Total net GST payable on operating lease revenue commitments 383 358

5. Own Source Income continued

Financial Performance 189

Notes to and Forming Part of the Financial Statements for the year ended 30 June 2016

Financial statements

Financial Position

Accounting Policy - Acquisition of assets Assets are recorded at cost at the time of acquisition except as stated below. The cost of acquisition includes the fair value of assets transferred in exchange and liabilities undertaken. Following initial recognition at cost, property, infrastructure, plant and equipment are carried at fair value less accumulated depreciation and accumulated impairment losses.

Land and buildings are subject to revaluation to fair value at the reporting date.

Assets acquired at no cost, or for nominal consideration, are recognised as assets at their fair value, at acquisition date.

Accounting Policy - Fair value measurement of assets and liabilities The Corporation has adopted the following general policies relating to the determination of fair value of assets and liabilities.

The fair value of buildings, fit-out and site improvements is determined by reference to depreciated replacement cost as they are typically specialist in nature, with broadcasting in mind. This also applies to the Corporation’s plant and equipment.

The fair value of land is determined by reference to the market value of the land component of ABC property because it is possible to base the fair value on recent sales of comparable sites. The Corporation’s valuers have detailed these reference sites in individual valuation reports for each property.

Generally the fair value of the Corporation’s financial assets and liabilities (excluding long term loans) is deemed to be their carrying value. The fair value of long term loans is the net present value of future discounted cash-flows arising.

AASB 7 Financial Instruments: Disclosures requires disclosure of fair value measurements by level in accordance with the following fair value measurement hierarchy:

• Level 1 - quoted prices (unadjusted) in active markets for identical assets or liabilities;

• Level 2 - inputs other than quoted prices included within Level 1 that are observable for the asset or liability, either directly or indirectly; and

• Level 3 - unobservable inputs for an asset or liability.

The Corporation does not hold any assets or liabilities that are classified as Level 1 inputs (i.e. with reference to quoted prices (unadjusted) in active markets for identical assets or liabilities).

The carrying value of cash and cash equivalents, financial assets and non-interest bearing financial liabilities (with the exception of derivatives used for hedging) of the Corporation approximates their fair value and as such they have been omitted from these disclosures.

There have been no recurring fair value measurements transferred between the respective levels for assets and liabilities to 30 June 2016.

Accounting Policy - Foreign currency transactions The Corporation enters into foreign currency hedging arrangements to protect its purchasing power in relation to foreign currency exposures. Revenues and expenditures denominated in foreign currencies are converted to Australian dollars at the exchange rates prevailing at the date of the transaction or at the hedged rate.

All monetary foreign currency balances are converted to Australian dollars at the exchange rates prevailing at balance date. Monetary assets and liabilities of overseas branches and amounts payable to or by the Corporation in foreign currencies are translated into Australian dollars at the applicable exchange rate at balance date.

190 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2016

Notes to and Forming Part of the Financial Statements for the year ended 30 June 2016

Financial statements

6. Financial Assets

Notes

2016 $’000

2015 $’000

6A Cash and cash equivalents Cash on hand or on deposit 6 366 8 422

Salary sacrifice funds 445 368

Total cash and cash equivalents 14.2A 6 811 8 790

Accounting Policy - Cash and cash equivalents Cash and cash equivalents are recognised at their nominal amounts and include:

• cash on hand;

• cash in special accounts; and

• cash at bank and short term deposits with an original maturity of three months or less that are readily convertible to known amounts of cash and subject to insignificant risk of changes in value.

Notes

2016 $’000

2015 $’000

6B Receivables Goods and services Goods and services 3 203 7 931

Total goods and services 14.2A 3 203 7 931

Other receivables Net GST receivable from the Australian Taxation Office 5 270 4 139

Forward exchange contracts 14.2A 172 242

Finance lease receivable 14.2A 200 -

Other 14.2A 5 432 7 665

Total other receivables 11 074 12 046

Total receivables (gross) 14 277 19 977

Less impairment allowance account Goods and services (492) (720)

Total impairment allowance (492) (720)

Total receivables (net) 13 785 19 257

No more than 12 months 13 264 18 815

More than 12 months 521 442

Receivables (gross) are aged as follows:

Not Overdue 13 340 18 422

Overdue by:

- 0 to 30 days 31 472

- 31 to 60 days 256 387

- 61 to 90 days 43 216

- more than 90 days 607 480

Total receivables (gross) 14 277 19 977

Financial Performance 191

Notes to and Forming Part of the Financial Statements for the year ended 30 June 2016

Financial statements

Notes

2016 $’000

2015 $’000

6B Receivables continued The impairment allowance account is aged as follows:

Not Overdue - -

Overdue by:

- 0 to 30 days - (355)

- 31 to 60 days (1) (173)

- 61 to 90 days - -

- more than 90 days (491) (192)

Total impairment allowance account (492) (720)

Reconciliation of the impairment allowance account Opening balance (720) (104)

Amounts written off 118 82

Amounts recovered or reversed 153 32

Net increase recognised in surplus/(deficit) (43) (730)

Closing balance (492) (720)

Accounting Policy - Receivables Trade receivables, loans and other receivables that have fixed or determinable payments that are not quoted in an active market are classified as loans and receivables in accordance with AASB 139 Financial Instruments: Recognition and Measurement.

They are included in current assets, unless they mature more than 12 months after the Statement of Financial Position date, in which case they are classified as non-current assets.

Loans and receivables are measured at amortised cost using the effective interest method less impairment. Interest is recognised by applying the effective interest rate.

Trade receivables are normally settled within 30 days unless otherwise agreed and are carried at amounts due, less an allowance for impairment.

Accounting Policy - Impairment of financial assets Financial assets are assessed for impairment at the end of each reporting period as outlined below:

Financial assets held at amortised cost If there is objective evidence that an impairment loss has been incurred for loans and receivables or held-to-maturity investments held at amortised cost, the amount of the loss is measured as the difference between the asset’s carrying amount and the present value of estimated future cash flows discounted at the asset’s original effective interest rate. The carrying amount is reduced by way of an impairment allowance account. The loss is taken to the Statement of Comprehensive Income.

Bad and doubtful debts The Corporation makes a specific provision for debts considered doubtful by conducting a detailed review of material debtors, making an assessment of the likelihood of recovery of those debts and taking into account past bad debts experience. Bad debts are written off when identified.

Other Receivables

Other receivables includes forward exchange contracts (FECs) at fair value through profit and loss of $43 743 (2015 $241 768) and those as cash flow hedges of $127 709 (2015 nil).

Under the fair value measurement hierarchy, these are Level 2 financial instruments as defined in Accounting Policy - Fair value measurement of assets and liabilities.

The balance represents estimated future cash flows, based on market forward exchange rates at 30 June 2016 and the forward contract rate, discounted by the observable yield curves of the respective currencies. The above amount reflects a 1.1% average depreciation (2015 6.6%) of the Australian dollar against those currencies for which FECs have been taken out, where the market forward rate at 30 June 2016 is lower than the contracted rate.

Other receivables also includes the fair value of a finance lease receivable. The Corporation leased a fully depreciated item of equipment, considered surplus to requirements, to an external party. The balance receivable represents the present value of the future cash flows due to the Corporation. The timing of monies receivable under the lease is $150 000 less than one year (2015 nil) and $50 000 from one to five years (2015 nil).

6. Financial Assets continued

192 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2016

Notes to and Forming Part of the Financial Statements for the year ended 30 June 2016

Financial statements

Notes

2016 $’000

2015 $’000

6C Other investments Held-to-maturity financial assets 14.2A 266 650 246 300

Total other investments 266 650 246 300

Accounting Policy - Other investments Non-derivative financial assets with fixed or determinable payments and fixed maturity dates that the Corporation has the positive intent and ability to hold to maturity are classified as held-to-maturity investments in accordance with AASB 139 Financial Instruments: Recognition and Measurement. Held-to-maturity investments are recorded at amortised cost using the effective interest method less impairment, with revenue recognised on an effective yield basis.

Surplus cash is invested into short term investments with maturities at acquisition date of greater than three months. These investments are classified as ‘other investments’ and are due to be settled within 12 months.

Notes

2016 $’000

2015 $’000

6D Accrued revenue Goods and services 9 637 7 685

Interest receivable 574 466

Total accrued revenue 14.2A 10 211 8 151

Accrued revenues are all due to be settled within 12 months.

6. Financial Assets continued

Financial Performance 193

Notes to and Forming Part of the Financial Statements for the year ended 30 June 2016

Financial statements

7. Non-Financial Assets

7A Land, buildings, infrastructure, plant and equipment and intangibles

Reconciliation of opening and closing balances of land, buildings, infrastructure, plant and equipment and intangibles for years ended 30 June 2015 and 30 June 2016

Land

(Level 2)

$’000

Buildings (Level 3)

$’000

Infrastructure, plant and equipment (Level 3)

$’000

Intangibles(a) (Level 3)

$’000

Total

$’000

As at 1 July 2014 Gross book value 182 965 499 117 605 292 86 962 1 374 336

Assets under construction - 14 159 36 249 9 475 59 883

Accumulated depreciation and amortisation (15) (21 940) (400 417) (60 150) (482 522)

Net book value as at 1 July 2014 182 950 491 336 241 124 36 287 951 697

Adjustment attributable to change in accounting policies - joint operations 1 772 4 779 5 156 - 11 707

Adjusted net book value as at 1 July 2014 184 722 496 115 246 280 36 287 963 404

Assets controlled by ABC Additions by purchase or internally developed - 3 584 45 611 15 245 64 440

Revaluations and impairments recognised in other comprehensive income 1 234 12 191 - - 13 425

Depreciation and amortisation (216) (36 903) (40 721) (9 150) (86 990)

Write-down and impairment - (2 689) (551) (431) (3 671)

Disposals - (37) (469) - (506)

Transfers/reclassifications - 20 (20) - -

Net additions to assets under construction - 44 403 23 707 3 216 71 326

Net transfers from assets under construction - (11 546) (33 372) (7 967) (52 885)

Assets attributable to joint operations Additions - 6 374 - 380

Depreciation - (305) (3 265) - (3 570)

Net additions to assets under construction - - 657 - 657

Net transfers from assets under construction - - (72) - (72)

Net book value as at 30 June 2015 185 740 504 839 238 159 37 200 965 938

194 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2016

Notes to and Forming Part of the Financial Statements for the year ended 30 June 2016

Financial statements

Land

(Level 2)

$’000

Buildings (Level 3)

$’000

Infrastructure, plant and equipment (Level 3)

$’000

Intangibles(a) (Level 3)

$’000

Total

$’000

Carrying amount as at 30 June 2015 represented by Gross book value 185 971 493 531 613 715 99 035 1 392 252

Assets under construction - 47 016 27 169 4 724 78 909

Accumulated depreciation and amortisation (231) (35 708) (402 725) (66 559) (505 223)

Closing net book value as at 30 June 2015 185 740 504 839 238 159 37 200 965 938

Assets controlled by ABC Additions by purchase or internally developed - 92 824 23 082 6 722 122 628

Revaluations and impairments recognised in other comprehensive income 5 500 12 432 - - 17 932

Depreciation and amortisation (215) (35 305) (42 713) (11 073) (89 306)

Write-down and impairment - - (117) - (117)

Reversal of prior years write-down and impairment - 16 179 139 334

Disposals (49) (71) (2 439) - (2 559)

Net additions to assets under construction - 1 877 14 036 3 660 19 573

Net transfers from assets under construction - (40 076) (14 533) (2 925) (57 534)

Assets attributable to joint operations Additions - 8 3 697 - 3 705

Depreciation - (305) (1 141) - (1 446)

Net additions to assets under construction - - 744 - 744

Net transfers from assets under construction - - (392) - (392)

Net book value 190 976 536 239 218 562 33 723 979 500

Carrying amount as at 30 June 2016 represented by Gross book value 191 422 568 279 593 865 103 709 1 457 275

Assets under construction - 8 817 27 024 5 459 41 300

Accumulated depreciation and amortisation (446) (40 857) (402 327) (75 445) (519 075)

Closing net book value as at 30 June 2016 190 976 536 239 218 562 33 723 979 500

(a) The Corporation holds the right to use licences by the Australian Government in the broadcast of analog and digital television and radio. Due to the conditions attached to these licences, which are asset specific, their fair value is determined on the basis of discounted future cash flows. The Corporation has assessed its licences and considers that their fair value is nil (2015 nil).

7. Non-Financial Assets continued

7A Land, buildings, infrastructure, plant and equipment and intangibles continued

Financial Performance 195

Notes to and Forming Part of the Financial Statements for the year ended 30 June 2016

Financial statements

7A Land, buildings, infrastructure, plant and equipment and intangibles continued

Fair value measurement

In the previous table, under the fair value measurement hierarchy as defined in Accounting Policy - Fair value measurement of assets and liabilities (at the beginning of the Financial Position note), Level 3 non-financial assets comprise buildings, infrastructure, plant and equipment, and intangibles, with no observable market data for the assets. For the year to 30 June 2016 there were no issues, settlements or transfers into, or out of Level 3.

Given the specialised nature of the Corporation’s buildings, fair value is determined with reference to the cost to replace the asset, hence depreciated replacement cost is used.

The Corporation’s infrastructure, plant and equipment’s fair value represents its carrying value, namely depreciated replacement cost.

Land is a Level 2 non-financial asset. The fair value of land is determined on the basis of market comparability, using recent sales history for comparable sites as referenced by independent valuers.

Land, buildings, infrastructure, plant and equipment reflects Management’s determination that fair value was not materially different to carrying amount at 30 June 2016. The exception to this was a desktop valuation update, performed by McGees Property, for a select property where Management considered additional valuation input was required. As a consequence, a revaluation increment of $5 500 000 (2015 $1 234 000) for land and an increment of $12 431 841 (2015 $12 190 698) for buildings on freehold land was credited to the asset revaluation reserve and included in “Changes in asset revaluation reserve” within Other Comprehensive Income in the Statement of Comprehensive Income and in Reserves within the Statement of Financial Position.

Capital purchases commitments

Commitments are GST inclusive and outlined below:

2016 $’000

2015 $’000

Capital purchases commitments Buildings 33 539 50 312

Infrastructure, plant and equipment (a) 17 495 7 710

Intangibles (b) 5 238 -

Total capital purchases commitments 56 272 58 022

Capital purchases commitments One year or less 49 598 49 834

From one to five years 6 674 8 188

Total capital purchases commitments 56 272 58 022

Net GST receivable on capital purchases commitments One year or less (4 509) (4 655)

From one to five years (607) (744)

Total net GST receivable on capital purchases commitments (5 116) (5 399)

(a) Outstanding contractual commitments associated with the purchase of infrastructure, plant and equipment, including communications upgrades and technical equipment fit out.

(b) Outstanding contractual commitments associated with the purchase or development of software.

7. Non-Financial Assets continued

196 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2016

Notes to and Forming Part of the Financial Statements for the year ended 30 June 2016

Financial statements

Accounting Policy - Land, buildings, infrastructure, plant and equipment and intangibles

Asset Recognition Threshold Purchases of property, infrastructure, plant and equipment are recognised initially at cost in the Statement of Financial Position.

Purchases costing less than $2 000 are expensed in the year of acquisition except where they form part of a project or group of similar items, which are significant in total.

Asset Class Fair Value Measured at Useful Life

Freehold land Market value Nil

Freehold buildings Depreciated replacement cost 50 years

Leasehold land - long term Market value 99 to 120 years

Leasehold buildings Depreciated replacement cost Life of lease (up to 50 years)

Leasehold improvements Depreciated replacement cost 5 to 50 years

Infrastructure, plant and equipment Depreciated replacement cost 3 to 15 years

Revaluations Land, buildings, infrastructure, plant and equipment are carried at fair value as outlined in the preceding table.

Following initial recognition at cost, property, infrastructure, plant and equipment are carried at fair value less accumulated depreciation and accumulated impairment losses.

Valuations are conducted with sufficient frequency to ensure that the carrying amounts of assets do not materially vary from the assets’ fair values as at the reporting date. The regularity of independent valuations depends upon the volatility of movements in market values for the relevant assets.

Revaluation adjustments are made on a class basis. Any revaluation increment is credited to equity under the heading of revaluation reserve except to the extent that it reverses a previous revaluation decrement of the same asset class, previously recognised through profit or loss. Revaluation decrements for a class of assets are recognised directly through profit or loss except to the extent that they reverse a previous revaluation increment for that class. Any accumulated depreciation at the revaluation date is eliminated against the gross carrying amount of the asset and the asset restated to the re-valued amount.

Impairment of Non-Current Assets The aforementioned classes of assets are subject to an assessment as to indicators of impairment under AASB 136 Impairment of Assets.

Depreciation Depreciable property, infrastructure, plant and equipment assets are written-off to their estimated residual values over their estimated useful lives using the straight-line method.

Leasehold improvements are depreciated on a straight-line basis over the lesser of the estimated useful life of the improvements or the unexpired period of the lease.

Depreciation rates are initially based on their useful lives, reviewed each year and adjusted as appropriate. Depreciation rates applying to each class of depreciable asset are outlined in the preceding table.

The aggregate amount of depreciation allocated for each class of asset during the reporting period is disclosed in Note 4C Depreciation and amortisation.

Amortisation of intangibles No intangibles are expected to be sold or disposed of within the next 12 months. The Corporation’s intangibles comprise software for internal use, broadcast licences and spectrum provided by the Australian Government and are held at fair value.

Software is initially recognised at cost and amortised on a straight-line basis over anticipated useful lives between 3-8 years (2015 3-8 years). These assets were assessed for indications of impairment. The carrying amounts of impaired assets are written down to the lower of their net market selling price or depreciated replacement cost.

7. Non-Financial Assets continued

7A Land, buildings, infrastructure, plant and equipment and intangibles continued

Financial Performance 197

Notes to and Forming Part of the Financial Statements for the year ended 30 June 2016

Financial statements

2016 $’000

2015 $’000

7B Inventories Retail inventory held for sale 3 157 7 753

Provision for stock obsolescence (2) (27)

Purchased for television 18 564 22 161

Produced for television 46 030 44 614

In progress 40 293 41 289

Total inventories 108 042 115 790

During 2016 $25 232 873 (2015 $36 950 238) of inventory held for sale was recognised as an expense.

During 2016 $1 215 001 (2015 $1 720 930) of inventory held for distribution was recognised as an expense.

Accounting Policy - Inventories Inventories held for resale are valued at the lower of cost and net realisable value. Inventories not held for resale are valued at the lower of cost, adjusted for any loss in service potential, based on the existence of a current replacement cost that is lower than the original acquisition cost or other subsequent carrying amount. This is detailed below:

Write-down of inventory held for distribution When inventories held for distribution are distributed, the carrying amount of those inventories is recognised as an expense. The amount of any write-down of inventories for loss of service potential, and all losses of inventories are recognised as an expense in the period the write-down or loss occurs. The amount of any reversal of any write-down of inventories arising from a reversal of the circumstances that gave rise to the loss of service potential will be recognised as a reduction in the amount of inventories recognised as an expense in the period in which the reversal occurs.

Produced programs Television programs are produced for domestic transmission and include direct salaries and expenses and production overheads allocated on a usage basis to the program. Production overheads not allocated to programs are expensed in the period in which they are incurred. External contributions received in respect of co-production of television programs are offset against production costs which are recorded as Inventories in the Statement of Financial Position.

Write-down of merchandise inventory The amount of any write-down of inventories to net realisable value and all losses of inventory are recognised as an expense in the period the write-down or loss occurs. The amount of any reversal of any write-down of inventories arising from an increase in the net realisable value will be recognised as a reduction in the amount of inventories recognised as an expense in the period in which the reversal occurs.

Amortisation of produced programs The cost of produced television program inventory is amortised as follows:

• News, Current Affairs, Live Programs, Factual and Entertainment programs based on current topics - 100% on first screening;

• Childrens, Education and Movies - straight line over three years from completion of production;

• All other programs not covered above - 90% first screening and 10% second screening or after twelve months.

The costs of programs produced for Radio are expensed as incurred. Such programs are normally broadcast soon after production, stock on hand at any time being minimal.

Amortisation of purchased programs Purchased program inventory is amortised in accordance with the policy noted above or over the rights period of the contract (whichever is lesser). Subsequent sales of residual rights are recognised in the period in which they occur.

7. Non-Financial Assets continued

198 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2016

Notes to and Forming Part of the Financial Statements for the year ended 30 June 2016

Financial statements

2016 $’000

2015 $’000

7C Prepayments Prepaid property rentals 120 124

Prepaid royalties 10 179 10 431

Other prepayments 9 860 6 274

Total prepayments 20 159 16 829

Current 15 838 15 011

Non-current 4 321 1 818

7D Other non-financial assets Share of deferred tax asset in joint operations 3 908 3 987

Total other non-financial assets 3 908 3 987

8. Payables

Notes

2016 $’000

2015 $’000

8A Suppliers Trade creditors 14.2A 76 202 77 963

Total suppliers 76 202 77 963

No more than 12 months 75 980 77 836

More than 12 months 222 127

8B Other payables Interest payable 14.2A 436 345

Salaries and wages 14.2A 15 510 24 973

Superannuation 14.2A 646 439

Unearned revenue 18 449 18 569

Unearned finance lease income 200 -

Other payables 14.2A 2 469 4 144

Forward exchange contracts 14.2A 124 29

Total other payables 37 834 48 499

No more than 12 months 25 359 35 125

More than 12 months 12 475 13 374

Fair value measurement

Other payables includes forward exchange contracts (FECs) at fair value through profit and loss of $17 815 (2015 nil) and those as cash flow hedges of $105 841 (2015 $28 778). Under the fair value measurement hierarchy, these are Level 2 financial liabilities as defined in Accounting Policy - Fair value measurement of assets and liabilities.

Any balance represents estimated future cash flows, based on market forward exchange rates at 30 June 2016 and the forward contract rate, discounted by the observable yield curves of the respective currencies. The above reflects a 3.0% (2015 0.9%) average appreciation of the Australian dollar against those currencies for which FECs have been taken out.

7. Non-Financial Assets continued

Financial Performance 199

Notes to and Forming Part of the Financial Statements for the year ended 30 June 2016

Financial statements

9. Interest Bearing Liabilities

Notes

2016 $’000

2015 $’000

9. Loans Loans from Department of Finance 14.2A 90 000 70 000

Total loans 90 000 70 000

Loan Structure

Loans are classified as current liabilities unless the Corporation has the unconditional right to defer settlement for at least twelve months after the Statement of Financial Position date. The balance above represents the three drawdowns under a loan facility entered into with the Department of Finance to cash-flow the construction of a purpose-built facility in Southbank, VIC.

The total loan facility is $90 000 000. Each drawdown thus far is provided on a long term fixed interest rate basis at a weighted average interest rate of 2.15%. The loan is repayable in full at maturity, with individual drawdown repayment dates ranging between 2017 and 2021. Interest is payable annually in arrears at anniversary date for each drawdown.

Fair value measurement

The fair value of loans from Government is deemed to be the initial principal amount. The fair value of the loan at 30 June 2016 is $91 075 777 (2015 $69 919 425). Under the fair value measurement hierarchy, this is a Level 2 financial instrument as defined in Accounting Policy - Fair value measurement of assets and liabilities. This has been derived on future cash flows based on timing of contractual borrowing costs and the principal repayment, discounted by the Australian Government bond rate for a bond of equivalent duration. The discount rate applied to the cash flow forecasts and the principal values of each drawdown were the following as at 30 June 2016; the Australian Government 2 year bond rate, 1.59% (2015 n/a) the Australian Government 3 year bond rate, 1.55% (2015 2.05%) and the Australian Government 5 year bond rate, 1.65% (2015 2.32%) respectively.

200 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2016

Notes to and Forming Part of the Financial Statements for the year ended 30 June 2016

Financial statements

10. Other Provisions

2016 $’000

2015 $’000

10. Other provisions Make good 1 614 1 902

Onerous leases - 12 516

Total other provisions 1 614 14 418

No more than 12 months 691 13 344

More than 12 months 923 1 074

Reconciliation of the make good provision Opening balance 1 902 2 400

Additional provision made 348 110

Amounts used (444) (330)

Amounts reversed (201) (235)

Unwinding of discount or change in discount rate 9 (43)

Closing balance 1 614 1 902

Reconciliation of the onerous leases provision Opening balance 12 516 -

Additional provision made - 12 516

Amounts used (5 069) -

Amounts reversed (7 447) -

Closing balance - 12 516

Recognition and measurement

Provisions are recognised when the Corporation has a present legal or constructive obligation as a result of a past event, where it is probable that an outflow of resources embodying economic benefits will be required to settle the obligation and a reliable estimate can be made of the amount of the obligation.

Provision for make good

The provision for make good represents the estimated cost to make good leased properties at the end of the lease term. The estimated cost is based on management’s best estimate of the average cost to make good each site, plus an allowance for inflation.

Provision for onerous leases

A provision for onerous leases exists when the Corporation has contractual lease commitments that are deemed onerous when the unavoidable costs of meeting the lease obligations exceed the economic benefits expected to be earned.

Financial Performance 201

Notes to and Forming Part of the Financial Statements for the year ended 30 June 2016

Financial statements

People and Relationships

11. Employee Provisions

2016 $’000

2015 $’000

11. Employee provisions Annual leave 47 487 47 493

Long service leave (a) 102 112 96 194

Redundancy 634 9 333

Total employee provisions 150 233 153 020

No more than 12 months 135 162 138 576

More than 12 months 15 071 14 444

The calculation is based on the anticipated length of time taken for an employee to fully settle his/her leave entitlement.

(a) The settlement of employee provisions is based on the individual employee’s entitlement to leave. Where an employee has a current entitlement to leave (i.e. could apply to take that leave straight away), the value of that entitlement is included in the employee provisions expected to settle in no more than 12 months. Where the Corporation expects that an employee will eventually meet an entitlement for leave (i.e. at some time in the future), but is not yet entitled to that leave, the value of the leave is included in the employee provision expected to settle in more than 12 months.

Employee provisions

Liabilities for short-term employee benefits and termination benefits expected within twelve months of the end of reporting period are measured at their nominal amounts. Other long-term employee benefits are measured as net total of the present value of the defined benefit obligation at the end of the reporting period minus the fair value at the end of the reporting period of plan assets (if any) out of which the obligations are to be settled directly.

Leave

The leave liabilities are calculated on the basis of employees’ remuneration at the estimated salary rates that will apply at the time the leave is taken, including the employer superannuation contribution rates to the extent that the leave is likely to be taken during service rather than paid out on termination.

The liability for long service leave has been determined by reference to the work of an actuary, PricewaterhouseCoopers Securities Ltd. The liability for long service leave is the present value of the estimated future cash outflows to be made by the Corporation resulting from employees’ services provided up to 30 June 2016. The estimate of the present value of the liability takes into account attrition rates and pay increases through promotion and inflation.

Redundancy

A provision exists for those employees who will be made redundant in future periods and either had a reasonable expectation of being made redundant, or Management had begun to execute a formal plan which created a valid expectation of redundancies by affected staff, at 30 June 2016.

Superannuation

Employees are members of the Commonwealth Superannuation Scheme (CSS), Public Sector Superannuation Scheme (PSS), the Public Sector Superannuation Accumulation Plan Scheme (PSSap) or another non-Commonwealth Superannuation fund.

The CSS and PSS are defined benefit schemes for the Australian Government. The PSSap and other non-Commonwealth funds are defined contribution schemes.

The liability for defined benefits is recognised in the financial statements of the Australian Government and is settled by the Australian Government in due course. This liability is reported in the Department of Finance’s administered schedules and notes.

The Corporation makes employer contributions to the employee defined benefit superannuation schemes at rates determined by an actuary to be sufficient to meet the current cost to the Government of the superannuation entitlements of the Corporation’s employees. The Corporation accounts for the contributions in the same manner as contributions to defined contribution plans.

The liability for superannuation recognised as at 30 June 2016 represents outstanding contributions at the end of the period.

202 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2016

Notes to and Forming Part of the Financial Statements for the year ended 30 June 2016

Financial statements

12. Directors’ and Officers’ Remuneration

Directors Officers Total

2016 $

2015 $

2016 $

2015 $

2016 $

2015 $

Short-term employee benefits Salary (including leave taken) 504 175 530 315 2 594 144 2 280 520 3 098 319 2 810 835

Remuneration at risk - - 304 000 248 000 304 000 248 000

Other 106 - 68 959 54 441 69 065 54 441

Total short-term employee benefits 504 281 530 315 2 967 103 2 582 961 3 471 384 3 113 276

Post-employment benefits Superannuation 65 104 66 637 322 495 291 744 387 599 358 381

Total post-employment benefits 65 104 66 637 322 495 291 744 387 599 358 381

Other long-term employee benefits Annual leave accrued - - 26 697 (9 052) 26 697 (9 052)

Long service leave - - 97 216 72 493 97 216 72 493

Total long-term employee benefits - - 123 913 63 441 123 913 63 441

Total remuneration benefits 569 385 596 952 3 413 511 2 938 146 3 982 896 3 535 098

Directors Officers Total

2016

Number

2015

Number

2016

Number

2015

Number

2016

Number

2015

Number

Number of individuals 8 8 8 5 16 13

Notes

a) Officers’ remuneration includes officers concerned with or taking part in the management of the Corporation, as well as the former Managing Director and the former Director News.

b) The number and remuneration totals (on a pro rata basis) for Officers includes those staff who ceased in those roles as well as their replacements.

c) The above table is prepared on an accrual basis, including remuneration at risk.

Termination Payments

There were no termination payments made to Directors or Officers in 2016 (2015 nil) other than accumulated accrued entitlements.

Financial Performance 203

Notes to and Forming Part of the Financial Statements for the year ended 30 June 2016

Financial statements

13. Related Party Disclosures

Reporting by Outcomes

The Corporation principally provides a national television, radio and digital media service within the broadcasting industry. It is therefore considered for segmental reporting to operate predominantly in one industry and in one geographical area, Australia. Any intra-government costs are eliminated in calculating the actual budget outcome for the Government overall.

The Corporation is now structured to meet one outcome: Informed, educated and entertained audiences throughout Australia and overseas through innovative and comprehensive media and related services. All revenues, expenses, assets and liabilities are incurred or employed to achieve this one outcome and are reflected in the primary statements.

Directors of the Corporation

The Directors of the Corporation during the year were:

• The Hon James Spigelman AC QC (Chair)

• Donny Walford (appointed 24 November 2015)

• Dr Kirstin Ferguson (appointed 12 November 2015)

• Jane Bennett (term ended 30 June 2016)

• Simon Mordant AM

• Matt Peacock

• Peter Lewis

• Michelle Guthrie (Acting Managing Director from 30 April 2016. Managing Director from 5 July 2016)

• Mark Scott AO (Managing Director to 29 April 2016. Leave of absence to 4 July 2016)

• Steven Skala AO (term ended 24 November 2015)

• Dr Fiona Stanley AC FAA FASSA (term ended 30 June 2016)

The aggregate remuneration of non-executive Directors is disclosed in Note 12 Directors’ and Officers’ Remuneration.

204 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2016

Notes to and Forming Part of the Financial Statements for the year ended 30 June 2016

Financial statements

Transactions with entities in the wholly owned group

Transactions between related parties are on normal commercial terms and conditions no more favourable than those available to other parties unless otherwise stated.

Controlled Entities

Country of incorporation

Beneficial percentage held by ABC

2016

Beneficial percentage held by ABC

2015

Ultimate parent entity:

Australian Broadcasting Corporation

Controlled entities of Australian Broadcasting Corporation:

Music Choice Australia Pty Ltd Australia 100% 100%

The News Channel Pty Limited Australia 100% 100%

ABC AustraliaPlus (Shanghai) Cultural Development Co., Ltd People’s Republic of China 100% 100% Splash Education Limited Australia 100% -

Music Choice Australia Pty Ltd and The News Channel Pty Limited These companies are wholly owned subsidiaries of the Corporation that did not trade during the year to 30 June 2016 and have been dormant since 2000.

ABC AustraliaPlus (Shanghai) Cultural Development Co., Ltd (AustraliaPlus) This company is a wholly owned subsidiary of the Corporation, incorporated in the People’s Republic of China.

Splash Education Limited Splash Education Limited is a company limited by guarantee and was incorporated on 17 March 2016. The vehicle has been established to operate the Splash online education portal and is dormant.

The Corporation provided secretarial and accounting services for all these entities during the year free of charge.

As a result, consolidated financial statements for the ABC Group have not been presented as the operations and results of the Corporation are reflective of those of the consolidated entity. The Corporation does not report consolidated financial statements on the basis of materiality.

13. Related Party Disclosures continued

Financial Performance 205

Notes to and Forming Part of the Financial Statements for the year ended 30 June 2016

Financial statements

Relationships with parties to Joint Arrangements

The Corporation has commercial relationships with the following entities, determined at reporting date to be joint operations. The Corporation’s interests in these entities are accounted for applying proportionate consolidation in accordance with AASB 11 Joint Arrangements.

The Corporation’s interest in assets employed in MediaHub Australia Pty Limited (MediaHub) is detailed in the table overleaf. The amounts are included in the Corporation’s financial statements under their respective categories. Interests in Freeview Australia Limited (Freeview) and National DAB Licence Company Limited (DAB) are not material.

The Corporation is involved in the following joint operations

Share of Ownership %

2016 $’000

2015 $’000

Party to the joint operation Principal activity MediaHub Australia Pty Limited Operating facility for television presentation 50% 50%

Freeview Australia Limited Promote adoption of free-to-air digital television 16% 20%

National DAB Licence Company Limited Operates the digital radio multiples licence 50% 50%

Summarised financial information of MediaHub Australia Pty Limited

2016 $’000

2015 $’000

Statement of financial position Financial assets 8 659 12 372

Non-financial assets 31 654 26 322

Financial liabilities (7 978) (4 138)

Net assets 32 335 34 556

Statement of comprehensive income Income 16 088 22 197

Expense 15 605 20 913

Surplus before tax 483 1 284

Share of surplus of joint arrangements after tax Share of net surplus before tax 242 642

Income tax expense 79 200

Share of surplus of joint arrangements after tax 163 442

MediaHub Australia Pty Limited MediaHub is a joint operation between the Corporation and WIN Television Network Pty Ltd (WIN) to operate a custom designed play-out facility for television presentation.

Both the ABC and WIN own an equal number of ordinary shares in MediaHub.

Freeview Australia Limited Freeview is a joint operation between many of Australia’s free-to-air national and commercial television broadcasters to promote consumer adoption of free-to-air digital television within Australia.

The ABC jointly controls Freeview and holds 160 $0.10 shares (2015 160 $0.10 shares) equating to a 16% (2015 20%) share.

National DAB Licence Company Limited DAB is a joint operation between the ABC and Special Broadcasting Service (SBS) to hold the digital radio multiplex licence. Both the ABC and SBS each hold one $1 share in DAB.

DAB is not a party to any service contracts for the provision of digital radio and does not receive the funds for digital radio operations / broadcast from the Government as these are paid directly to the ABC and SBS.

13. Related Party Disclosures continued

206 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2016

Notes to and Forming Part of the Financial Statements for the year ended 30 June 2016

Financial statements

Transactions with parties to Joint Arrangements

MediaHub Australia Pty Limited Two ABC employees are directors of MediaHub. Neither is remunerated nor do they receive any other benefits from MediaHub.

The ABC incurred expenses with MediaHub totalling $6 418 109 (2015 $7 605 492) for user fees and other services. The ABC made no capital contributions during the year to 30 June 2016 (2015 nil).

The ABC received $2 548 140 as its proportion of a share buyback (2015 $3 800 304) and $1 093 299 (2015 $1 643 817) in service fees from MediaHub during the year.

The ABC has commitments similar to the above transactions in future years.

All transactions with MediaHub were at arm’s length.

Freeview Australia Limited Two ABC employees are directors of Freeview. Neither is remunerated nor do they receive any other benefits from Freeview.

The Corporation contributes towards the operational costs of Freeview in proportion to its shareholding, and may also provide other operational services to Freeview as required.

The Corporation did not receive any material income from Freeview. The ABC paid $650 000 (2015 $481 233) towards the operational costs of Freeview. These costs did not constitute a capital contribution and were recognised directly in the Corporation’s Statement of Comprehensive Income.

All transactions with Freeview were at arm’s length.

National DAB Licence Company Limited Two ABC employees are directors of DAB. Neither is remunerated nor do they receive any other benefits from DAB.

The ABC made contributions of $2 800 (2015 $2 800) towards the operational costs of DAB. The ABC also made a capital contribution of $1 485 (2015 nil). Both amounts were recognised directly in the ABCs Statement of Comprehensive Income.

All transactions with DAB were at arm’s length.

No dividends were received from any of these entities in 2016 (2015 nil).

13. Related Party Disclosures continued

Financial Performance 207

Notes to and Forming Part of the Financial Statements for the year ended 30 June 2016

Financial statements

Financial Risks and Disclosure

14. Financial Instruments

14.1 Capital Risk Management

The Corporation manages its capital to ensure that it is able to continue as a going concern through aligning operations with Government funded objectives.

The Corporation’s overall strategy remains unchanged from previous years with borrowings limited to supporting major capital projects.

14.2 Categories of Financial Instruments

Notes

2016 $’000

2015 $’000

14.2A Categories of financial instruments Financial Assets Held-to-maturity:

Term deposits with an original maturity date greater than 90 days 6C 266 650 246 300

Total held-to-maturity financial assets 266 650 246 300

Loans, receivables and cash:

Cash and cash equivalents 6A 6 811 8 790

Goods and services receivables 6B 3 203 7 931

Finance lease receivable 6B 200 -

Other receivables 6B 5 432 7 665

Accrued revenue 6D 10 211 8 151

Total loans, receivables and cash 25 857 32 537

Forward exchange contracts Fair value through profit or loss 6B 172 242

Total forward exchange contracts 172 242

Carrying amount of financial assets 292 679 279,079

Financial liabilities At amortised cost:

Loans from Government 9 90 000 70 000

Trade creditors 8A 76 202 77 963

Interest payable 8B 436 345

Salaries and wages 8B 15 510 24 973

Superannuation 8B 646 439

Other payables 8B 2 469 4 144

Total financial liabilities at amortised cost 185 263 177 864

Forward exchange contracts Fair value through profit or loss 8B 124 29

Total forward exchange contracts 124 29

Carrying amount of financial liabilities 185 387 177 893

208 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2016

Notes to and Forming Part of the Financial Statements for the year ended 30 June 2016

Financial statements

Accounting Policy - Financial assets The Corporation classifies its financial assets in the following categories:

• financial assets at fair value through profit or loss;

• held-to-maturity investments; and

• loans and receivables.

The classification depends on the nature and purpose of the financial assets and is determined at the time of initial recognition. Financial assets are recognised and derecognised upon trade date.

Effective Interest Method The effective interest method is a method of calculating the amortised cost of a financial asset and of allocating interest income over the relevant period. The effective interest rate is the rate that exactly discounts estimated future cash receipts through the expected life of the financial asset, or, where appropriate, a shorter period.

Income is recognised on an effective interest rate basis except for financial assets that are recognised at fair value through profit or loss.

Financial Assets at Fair Value Through Profit or Loss Financial assets are classified as financial assets at

fair value through profit or loss (FVTPL) where the financial assets:

a) have been acquired principally for the purpose of selling in the near future;

b) are derivatives (except for derivative instruments that are designated and effective hedging instruments); or

c) are parts of an identified portfolio of financial instruments that the Corporation manages together and have a recent actual pattern of short-term profit-taking.

Forward exchange contracts (FECs) in this category are classified as current assets.

Financial assets at FVTPL are stated at fair value, with any resultant gain or loss recognised in profit or loss. The net gain or loss recognised in profit or loss incorporates any interest earned on the financial asset. The Corporation’s financial assets in this category are FECs which are derivative financial

instruments. Gains and losses on these items are recognised through profit or loss except if they are classified as a cash flow hedge where they are recognised in the hedging reserve within equity.

Derivatives FECs are initially recognised at fair value on the date on which the contract is entered into and are subsequently revalued to reflect changes in fair value. FECs are carried as assets when their net fair value is positive and as liabilities when their net fair value is negative.

For the purpose of hedge accounting, the Corporation’s hedges are classified as cash flow hedges when they hedge exposure to variability in cash flows that is attributable either to a particular risk associated with a recognised asset, liability or to a highly probable forecast transaction.

At the inception of a hedge relationship, the Corporation formally designates and documents the hedge relationship to which the Corporation wishes to apply hedge accounting and the risk management objective and strategy for undertaking the hedge. The documentation includes identification of the hedging instrument, the hedged item or transaction, the nature of the risk being hedged and how the Corporation will assess the hedging instrument’s effectiveness in offsetting the exposure to changes in the hedged item’s fair value or cash flow attributable to the hedged risk.

Such hedges are expected to be highly effective in achieving offsetting changes in fair value or cash flows and are assessed on an ongoing basis to determine that they actually have been highly effective throughout the financial reporting periods for which they were designated.

The effective portion of the gain or loss on the cash flow hedge is recognised directly in equity, while the ineffective portion is recognised in profit or loss.

14. Financial Instruments continued

Financial Performance 209

Notes to and Forming Part of the Financial Statements for the year ended 30 June 2016

Financial statements

Derivatives continued Amounts taken to equity are transferred to profit or loss when the hedged transaction affects profit or loss, such as when hedged income or expenses are recognised or when a forecast sale or purchase occurs. When the hedged item is the cost of a non-financial asset or liability, the amounts taken to equity are transferred to the initial carrying amount of the non-financial asset or liability. If the forecast transaction is no longer expected to occur, amounts previously recognised in equity are transferred to

profit or loss. If the hedging instrument expires or is sold, terminated or exercised without replacement or rollover, or if its designation as a hedge is revoked, amounts previously recognised in equity remain until the forecast transaction occurs. If the related transaction is not expected to occur, the amount is taken to profit or loss.

Accounting Policy - Financial Liabilities Financial liabilities are classified as ‘other financial liabilities’ in accordance with AASB 139 Financial Instruments: Recognition and Measurement.

Notes

2016 $’000

2015 $’000

14.2B Net gains or losses from financial assets Held-to-maturity Interest revenue 5B 6 600 6 945

Net foreign exchange (loss)/gain 4H (290) 1 787

Net gain on held-to-maturity financial assets 6 310 8 732

Loans, receivables and cash Interest revenue 5B 1 645 1 030

Net gain from loans and receivables 1 645 1 030

Items subject to subsequent reclassification to profit or loss Gains on cash flow hedging instruments 270 10

Total items subject to subsequent reclassification to profit or loss 270 10

Net gain at fair value through other comprehensive income 270 10

Net gains from financial assets recognised in Statement of Comprehensive Income 8 225 9 772

14.2C Net losses from financial liabilities Financial liabilities - at amortised cost Interest and finance expenses 4E (1 596) (810)

Net loss from financial liabilities - at amortised cost (1 596) (810)

Net loss from financial liabilities recognised in Statement of Comprehensive Income (1 596) (810)

14.3 Financial Risk Management

The Corporation’s financial risk management policies and procedures are established to identify and analyse the risks faced by the Corporation, to set appropriate risk limits and controls to monitor risks and adherence to limits. The Corporation’s policies are reviewed regularly to reflect changes in the Corporation’s activities. There has been no change in the policies from the previous year. Compliance with policies and exposure limits are reviewed by the Corporation’s internal auditors on a continuous basis.

To meet the Corporation’s financial risk management objectives, surplus cash is invested into short term, highly liquid investments with maturities at acquisition date of greater than three months. These investments are included as ‘other receivables’.

14. Financial Instruments continued

210 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2016

Notes to and Forming Part of the Financial Statements for the year ended 30 June 2016

Financial statements

The Corporation’s Treasury function provides advice and services to the business, coordinates access to foreign currency contracts and monitors and assesses the financial risks relating to the operations of the Corporation through internal risk reports. Where appropriate, the Corporation seeks to minimise the effects of its financial risks by using derivative financial instruments to hedge its risk exposures. The use of financial derivatives is governed by the Corporation’s policies as approved by the Board of Directors, which provide written principles on foreign exchange risk, credit risk, the use of financial derivatives and investment of funds. The Corporation does not enter into trade financial instruments for speculative purposes.

14.4 Fair Values of Financial Instruments

Forward exchange contracts (FECs) The fair values of FECs are taken to be the unrealised gain or loss at balance date calculated by reference

to current forward exchange rates for contracts with similar maturity profiles. At 30 June 2016 this was a net asset of $47 796 (2015 net asset of $212 990).

The fair values of financial instruments that are not traded in an active market (such as over-the-counter derivatives) are determined using a Level 2 technique based on the forward exchange rates at the end of the reporting period using assumptions that are based on market conditions at the end of each reporting period.

Loans from Government The fair values of long-term borrowings are estimated using discounted cash flow analysis, based on current interest rates for liabilities with similar risk profiles. At 30 June 2016, the Corporation had drawn down $90 000 000 (2015 $70 000 000) of a $90 000 000 loan facility from the Department of Finance, maturing from 8 April 2017 to 8 April 2021. This is to cash-flow the construction of a purpose-built facility in Southbank, Victoria.

The aforementioned methods and assumptions were used to estimate the fair values as summarised in the table below:

Fair value of financial instruments

Carrying amount 2016 $’000

Fair value 2016 $’000

Carrying amount 2015 $’000

Fair value 2015 $’000

Financial assets Finance lease receivable 200 200 - -

Forward exchange contracts 172 172 242 242

Total financial assets 372 372 242 242

Financial liabilities Loans from Department of Finance 90 000 91 076 70 000 69 919

Forward exchange contracts 124 124 29 29

Total financial liabilities 90 124 91 200 70 029 69 948

14. Financial Instruments continued

Financial Performance 211

Notes to and Forming Part of the Financial Statements for the year ended 30 June 2016

Financial statements

14.5 Credit Risk

Credit risk is the risk that a counterparty will default on its contractual obligations resulting in financial loss to the Corporation. Credit risk arises from the financial assets of the Corporation, which comprise cash and cash equivalents, trade and other receivables, short term investments and derivative instruments.

The Corporation has a policy of only dealing with creditworthy counterparties and obtaining collateral where appropriate, as a means of mitigating the risk of financial loss from defaults. The Corporation assesses credit ratings through independent ratings agencies and if not available, uses publicly available financial information and its own trading record to rate customers.

The Corporation manages its credit risk by undertaking credit checks on customers who wish to take on credit terms. The Corporation has policies that set limits for each individual customer. Ongoing credit evaluations are performed on the financial condition of accounts receivable. The Corporation has no material concentration of credit risk with

any single customer as the Corporation has a large number of customers spread across a range of industries and geographical areas.

The credit risk arising from dealings in financial instruments is controlled by a strict policy of credit approvals, limits and monitoring procedures. Credit exposure is controlled by counterparty limits that are reviewed and approved by the Board of Directors. The Corporation does not have any significant credit risk exposure to any single counterparty. The credit risk on liquid funds and derivative financial instruments is limited because the counterparties are banks with credit ratings of at least A- as assigned by Standard & Poor’s.

The Corporation’s maximum exposure to credit risk at reporting date in relation to each class of recognised financial assets is the carrying amount, net of allowance for doubtful debts, of those assets as indicated in the Statement of Financial Position.

Credit exposure of foreign currency and interest rate bearing investments is represented by the net fair value of the contracts, as disclosed below:

Categories of financial instruments

Not past due nor impaired 2016 $’000

Not past due nor impaired 2015 $’000

Past due or impaired 2016 $’000

Past due or impaired 2015 $’000

Financial assets Cash and cash equivalents 6 811 8 790 - -

Goods and services receivables 2 266 6 376 937 1 555

Held-to-maturity financial assets 266 650 246 300 - -

Finance lease receivable 200 - - -

Other receivables 5 432 7 665 - -

Forward exchange contracts 172 242 - -

Accrued revenue 10 211 8 151 - -

Carrying amount of financial assets 291 742 277 524 937 1 555

Ageing of financial assets that are past due but not impaired

0 to 30

days $’000

31 to 60 days $’000

61 to 90 days $’000

90 plus days $’000

Total $’000

2016 Financial assets Goods and services receivables 31 255 43 116 445

2015 Financial assets Goods and services receivables 117 214 216 288 835

14. Financial Instruments continued

212 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2016

Notes to and Forming Part of the Financial Statements for the year ended 30 June 2016

Financial statements

14.6 Liquidity Risk

Liquidity risk is the risk that the Corporation will encounter difficulty in meeting obligations associated with financial liabilities. The Corporation is dependent upon revenue from Government.

At 30 June 2016, 90% (2015 87%) of normal activities were funded in this manner and without this revenue, the Corporation would be unable to meet its obligations. The Corporation has no on-demand financial liabilities.

Maturities for financial liabilities at 30 June 2016

1 year or less

$’000

1 to 2

years

$’000

2 to 5

years

$’000

More than 5 years

$’000

Total

$’000

2016 Financial liabilities Loans from Government 20 000 20 000 50 000 - 90 000

Trade creditors 75 980 26 65 131 76 202

Interest payable 436 - - - 436

Salaries and wages 15 510 - - - 15 510

Superannuation 646 - - - 646

Other payables (including forward exchange contracts) 2 593 - - - 2 593

Total financial liabilities 115 165 20 026 50 065 131 185 387

2015 Financial liabilities Loans from Government - 20 000 50 000 - 70 000

Trade creditors 77 836 - - 127 77 963

Interest payable 345 - - - 345

Salaries and wages 24 973 - - - 24 973

Superannuation 439 - - - 439

Other payables 3 574 334 265 - 4 173

Total financial liabilities 107 167 20 334 50 265 127 177 893

14. Financial Instruments continued

Financial Performance 213

Notes to and Forming Part of the Financial Statements for the year ended 30 June 2016

Financial statements

14.7 Market Risk

Market risk includes foreign currency risk, which is detailed in Note 14.8 Foreign Currency Risk, and interest rate risk, which is detailed in Note 14.9 Interest Rate Risk. The Corporation is not exposed to any other price risk on financial instruments.

Market risk sensitivity analysis of exposure at 30 June 2016

Risk variable

Change in risk variable %

Effect on

profit and loss $’000

Effect on equity $’000

Currency risk USD 10.5% (336) (1 795)

Currency risk USD (10.5%) 336 1 795

Currency risk GBP 10.5% (208) -

Currency risk GBP (10.5%) 208 -

Currency risk EUR 10.5% (51) -

Currency risk EUR (10.5%) 51 -

Interest rate risk Interest revenue 0.3% 905 -

Interest rate risk Interest revenue (0.3%) (905) -

Market risk sensitivity analysis of exposure at 30 June 2015

Risk variable

Change in risk variable %

Effect on

profit and loss $’000

Effect on equity $’000

Currency risk USD 10.9% (731) (191)

Currency risk USD (10.9%) 731 191

Currency risk GBP 10.9% (225) -

Currency risk GBP (10.9%) 225 -

Currency risk EUR 10.9% (34) (167)

Currency risk EUR (10.9%) 34 167

Interest rate risk Interest revenue 0.4% 1 000 -

Interest rate risk Interest revenue (0.4%) (1 000) -

The impact on the Corporation’s surplus is not material.

14.8 Foreign Currency Risk

Foreign currency risk is the risk that the fair value or future cash flows of a financial instrument will fluctuate due to the changes in foreign exchange rates.

The Corporation’s activities expose it primarily to the financial risk of changes in foreign currency exchange rates arising from transactions and assets and liabilities that are denominated in a currency that is not Australian dollars. The Corporation enters into FECs to hedge the foreign exchange rate risk arising from some of these transactions. These FECs are not designated as cash flow hedges.

The Corporation is exposed to foreign currency denominated in United States dollars (USD), Great British pounds (GBP) and Euros (EUR).

The table at Note 14.7 Market Risk details the effect on the profit and equity as at 30 June 2016 from a 10.5% (2015 10.9%) favourable/unfavourable change in the rate of the Australian dollar (AUD) against the currencies to which the Corporation is exposed, with all other variables held constant.

14. Financial Instruments continued

214 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2016

Notes to and Forming Part of the Financial Statements for the year ended 30 June 2016

Financial statements

14.9 Interest Rate Risk

Interest rate risk is the risk that the fair value or future cash flows of a financial instrument will fluctuate because of changes in market interest rates.

The Corporation is typically not exposed to interest rate risk on borrowings, as all borrowings are at fixed interest rates. The Corporation derives interest revenue from funds invested, which is impacted by interest rate fluctuations. Although the Corporation is not dependent on interest revenue to continue operations, the table Note 14.7 Market Risk illustrates the impact of a 0.30% (2015 0.40%) movement in the interest rate, on interest revenues. The change in interest revenue is proportional to the change in interest rates.

14.10 Hedging Instruments

The following table sets out the gross value to be received under FECs, the weighted average contracted exchange rates and the settlement periods of outstanding contracts for the Corporation.

Sell Australian Dollars

Average Exchange Rate

2016 $’000

2015 $’000

2016 $’000

2015 $’000

Buy USD Less than 1 year 19 198 3 592 0.7424 0.7841

Buy GBP Less than 1 year 152 1 724 0.4922 0.5219

Buy EUR Less than 1 year 362 1 619 0.6632 0.6817

Specific hedges

The Corporation enters into FECs to cover specific foreign currency payments when exposures of $50 000 or greater are entered into under a firm contract for goods or services involving a specific foreign currency amount and payment date. Exposures are covered if they fall within a set period, which can generally be a minimum of 3 months or maximum of 6 months subject to market conditions. A net gain of $279 739 (2015 net gain of $10 875) on specific hedges of foreign currency purchases, outstanding as at 30 June 2016, was recorded. The Corporation’s cash flow hedges were all effective during the period.

General hedges

The Corporation also enters into FECs to cover foreign currency payments when exposures less than $50 000, of a recurrent nature and with varying foreign currency amounts and payment dates are incurred. General cover is typically held between 40% and 60% of estimated exposures for USD, GBP and EUR subject to market conditions. At balance date, the Corporation held forward exchange contracts to buy USD, GBP and EUR. Gains/losses arising from general hedges outstanding at year end have been taken to profit or loss. The net gain is $45 791 (2015 net gain of $266 619) on general hedges of anticipated foreign currency purchases.

14. Financial Instruments continued

Financial Performance 215

Notes to and Forming Part of the Financial Statements for the year ended 30 June 2016

Financial statements

Contingent Items

15. Contingent Assets and Liabilities

2016 $’000

2015 $’000

Contingent liabilities - guarantees Balance at beginning of year 626 621

Net change during the year 15 5

Total contingent liabilities - guarantees 641 626

The Corporation has provided guarantees and an indemnity to the Reserve Bank of Australia in support of bank guarantees required in the day to day operations of the Corporation.

Quantifiable and Significant Remote Contingencies

The Corporation has neither material contingent assets nor remote contingencies at 30 June 2016 (2015 nil).

Unquantifiable Contingencies

In the normal course of activities, claims for damages and other recoveries have been lodged at the date of this report against the Corporation and its staff. The Corporation has disclaimed liability and is actively defending these actions. It is not possible to estimate the amounts of any eventual payments which may be required or amounts that may be received in relation to any of these claims.

Accounting Policy - Contingent assets and liabilities Contingent assets and contingent liabilities are not recognised in the Statement of Financial Position. They may arise from uncertainty as to the existence of an asset or liability, or represent an asset or liability in respect of which the amount cannot be reliably measured.

Contingent assets are disclosed when settlement is probable but not virtually certain and contingent liabilities are disclosed when settlement is greater than remote. Commitments and contingencies are disclosed on a net basis. Net GST commitments recoverable from or payable to the ATO are disclosed.

216 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2016

APPENDICES CHAPTER EIGHT

Shaun Micallef’s Mad As Hell

Appendices 217

Appendices

1 ABC Charter and Duties of the Board 218

2 ABC Board and Board Committees 219

3 ABC Organisation as at 30 June 2016 222

4 ABC Advisory Council 224

5 ABC Code of Practice 226

6 ABC Television Content Analysis 235 7 Promotion and Market Research 238 8 Performance Pay 238

9 Consultants 238

10 Overseas Travel Costs 239

11 Reports Required by Legislation 240 12 Staff Profile 241

13 ABC Awards 241

14 Television Transmission Channels 249

15 Radio Transmission Frequencies 251 16 Radio Australia and Australia Plus Transmission and Distribution 257

17 ABC Offices 258

Glossary 263

Index 264

Appendices for the year ended 30 June 2016

218 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2016

Appendices

Appendix 1—ABC Charter and duties of the Board From the Australian Broadcasting Corporation Act 1983

6 Charter of the Corporation (1) The functions of the Corporation are:

(a) to provide within Australia innovative and comprehensive broadcasting services of a high standard as part of the Australian broadcasting system consisting of national, commercial and community sectors and, without limiting the generality of the foregoing, to provide:

(i) broadcasting programs that contribute to a sense of national identity and inform and entertain, and reflect the cultural diversity of, the Australian community; and

(ii) broadcasting programs of an educational nature;

(b) to transmit to countries outside Australia broadcasting programs of news, current affairs, entertainment and cultural enrichment that will:

(i) encourage awareness of Australia and an international understanding of Australian attitudes on world affairs; and

(ii) enable Australian citizens living or travelling outside Australia to obtain information about Australian affairs and Australian attitudes on world affairs; and

(ba)to provide digital media services; and

(c) to encourage and promote the musical, dramatic and other performing arts in Australia.

Note: See also section 31AA (Corporation or prescribed companies to be the only providers of Commonwealth-funded international broadcasting services).

(2) In the provision by the Corporation of its broadcasting services within Australia:

(a) the Corporation shall take account of:

(i) the broadcasting services provided by the commercial and community sectors of the Australian broadcasting system;

(ii) the standards from time to time

determined by the ACMA in respect of broadcasting services;

(iii) the responsibility of the Corporation as the provider of an independent national broadcasting service to provide a balance between broadcasting programs of wide appeal and specialized broadcasting programs;

(iv) the multicultural character of the Australian community; and

(v) in connection with the provision of broadcasting programs of an educational nature—the responsibilities of the States in relation to education; and

(b) the Corporation shall take all such measures, being measures consistent with the obligations of the Corporation under paragraph (a), as, in the opinion of the Board, will be conducive to the full development by the Corporation of suitable broadcasting programs.

(3) The functions of the Corporation under subsection (1) and the duties imposed on the Corporation under subsection (2) constitute the Charter of the Corporation.

(4) Nothing in this Section shall be taken to impose on the Corporation a duty that is enforceable by proceedings in a court.

8 Duties of the Board (1) It is the duty of the Board:

(a) to ensure that the functions of the Corporation are performed efficiently and with the maximum benefit to the people of Australia;

(b) to maintain the independence and integrity of the Corporation;

(c) to ensure that the gathering and presentation by the Corporation of news and information is accurate and impartial according to the recognized standards of objective journalism; and

(d) to ensure that the Corporation does not contravene, or fail to comply with:

(i) any of the provisions of this Act or

any other Act that are applicable to the Corporation; or

(ii) any directions given to, or requirements made in relation to, the Corporation under any of those provisions; and

Appendices 219

Appendices

Appendix 2—ABC Board and Board Committees

ABC Board

Members and attendance at meetings The ABC Board held six meetings during 2015-16.

Member

Meetings eligible to attend Meetings

attended

James Spigelman AC QC, Chairman 6 6

Mark Scott AO, Managing Director 5 5

Michelle Guthrie, Managing Director 2 2

Jane Bennett (Term ended 29 June 2016) 6 6

Kirstin Ferguson (Appointed 12 November 2015) 4 3

Peter Lewis 6 6

Simon Mordant AM 6 4

Matt Peacock 6 6

Steven Skala AO (Term ended 23 November 2015)

2 2

Fiona Stanley AC (Term ended 29 June 2016) 6 6

Donny Walford (Appointed 24 November 2015) 4 4

Requests made to the Board by the Minister under section 8(2) In 2015-16, neither the Minister for Communications and the Arts nor the former Minister for Communications made any requests to the Board under section 8(2) of the Australian Broadcasting Corporation Act 1983.

Board Committees

Finance Committee The role of the Finance Committee is to assist the Board and management of the ABC to optimise the financial performance and efficiency of the Corporation, consistent with stated objectives, and to establish and maintain best practice financial management services including performance measurement.

The Finance Committee held two meetings in 2015-16:

Meeting No. 1/2016 11 February 2016

Meeting No. 2/2016 8 June 2016

Meetings during 2015-16 were attended by Simon Mordant (Chair of the Finance Committee), and Committee member Donny Walford.

(e) to develop codes of practice relating to:

(i) programming matters; and

(ii) if the Corporation has the function of providing a datacasting service under section 6A—that service;

and to notify those codes to the ACMA.

(2) If the Minister at any time furnishes to the Board a statement of the policy of the Commonwealth Government on any matter relating to broadcasting or digital media services, or any

matter of administration, that is relevant to the performance of the functions of the Corporation and requests the Board to consider that policy in the performance of its functions, the Board shall ensure that consideration is given to that policy.

(3) Nothing in subsection (1) or (2) is to be taken to impose on the Board a duty that is enforceable by proceedings in a court.

Appendix 1—ABC Charter and duties of the Board continued

220 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2016

Appendices

Appendix 2—ABC Board and Board Committees continued

Member Position on Committee

Meetings eligible to attend Meetings

attended

Simon Mordant AM

Committee Chairman 2 2

Donny Walford Director 2 2

All meetings were attended by the Managing Director and the Chairman of the Board. In 2015-16, Board members were invited to attend all ABC Finance Committee meetings. Committee meetings are also attended by the Chief Operating Officer and the General Manager Finance and Operations.

During the year the Finance Committee monitored the ABC’s financial plans, budgets and budget performance. It considered and endorsed the ABC’s annual budget allocations for approval by the Board, including the annual Capital Budget and Strategy. In 2015-16, the Committee oversaw the closure of the ABC Retail shop network.

Audit and Risk Committee The Board is required to ensure that the functions of the Corporation are performed with integrity, efficiency and maximum benefit to the people of Australia (see section 8(1)(a) and (b) of the Australian Broadcasting Corporation Act 1983). In connection with the discharge of these duties, the Audit and Risk Committee provides the Board with assistance and advice on the ABC’s risk, control and compliance framework and its external accountability responsibilities. The Committee’s responsibilities are detailed in its Charter and were amended in October 2015 to include responsibilities relating to performance reporting as required under the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 (the PGPA Act). The Committee’s responsibilities include:

• assisting the Board to discharge its oversight and governance responsibilities by reviewing the appropriateness of the Corporation’s:

- financial reporting

- performance reporting

- system of risk oversight and management

- system of internal control

- internal audit external audit

- ethical culture

• providing a forum for communication between the Board, senior management and both the internal and external auditors

• monitoring and reviewing the independence, integrity and objectivity of the Corporation’s internal and external auditors

• monitoring and reviewing compliance with standards of ethical behaviour expected within the Corporation.

The Audit and Risk Committee held five meetings in 2015-16:

Meeting No. 3 2015 6 August 2015

Meeting No. 4 2015 14 October 2015

Meeting No. 5 2015 3 December 2015

Meeting No. 1 2016 8 April 2016

Meeting No. 2 2016 8 June 2016

Meetings during 2015-16 were attended by Steven Skala AO (Chair of the Audit and Risk Committee), Peter Lewis (Director/Chair of the Audit and Risk Committee), Jane Bennett, Dr Kirstin Ferguson and Richard Rassi.

The appointment of Steven Skala AO to the Audit and Risk Committee ended in November 2015 to coincide with the end of his term on the ABC Board. Peter Lewis was appointed to the role of Chair of the Audit and Risk Committee in November 2015. Jane Bennett and Dr Kirstin Ferguson were appointed to the Audit and Risk Committee in August 2015 and December 2015 respectively. Richard Rassi continued his appointment as an External Member on the Audit and Risk Committee during 2015-16. He is not a member of the ABC Board.

Appendices 221

Appendices

Appendix 2—ABC Board and Board Committees continued

Member

Position on Committee

Meetings eligible to attend Meetings

attended

Steven Skala AO Committee Chairman

(term ended 23 November 2015) 2 2

Peter Lewis Director/ Committee Chairman 5 5

Jane Bennett

Director

4 4

Dr Kirstin Ferguson

Director

2 1

Richard Rassi

External member 5 4

In 2015-16, Board members were invited to attend all ABC Audit and Risk Committee meetings. Committee meetings were also attended by the Chief Operating Officer, Head Group Audit and representatives of the Australian National Audit Office (ANAO) and its nominated representative KPMG. The Chairman of the Board, the Managing Director and other members of the Board also attended Committee meetings.

During 2015-16, the Audit and Risk Committee received information papers relating to ABC strategic risks, risk management, internal and external audit performance, business continuity, legislative requirements, fraud controls, the coordination of internal and external audit, key ABC projects, compliance matters and matters related to the preparation and finalisation of the Annual Financial Statements. In 2015-16, the Audit and Risk Committee reconsidered its arrangements and processes against the requirements of the PGPA Act and the Resource Management Guide No. 202—Audit Committees for Commonwealth Entities and Commonwealth Companies issued by the Department of Finance, and the ANAO Better Practice Guide on Public Sector Audit Committees.

At its meetings, the Audit and Risk Committee endorsed the 2014-15 Annual Financial Statements and monitored progress against the 2015-16 Audit Plan. During 2015-16, the Committee considered the findings of audit reports and noted the implementation of audit recommendations by management, fraud awareness initiatives and fraud investigations undertaken.

The Audit and Risk Committee also reviewed information relating to the selection of key performance indicators and other performance measures, and systems, processes and procedures for assessing and reporting the achievement of the ABC’s performance in accordance with applicable legislation and guidance.

The Committee also dealt with matters related to, and reports from, external audit and the Corporation’s requirement to formally report on financial and non-financial performance under the PGPA Act. During the year, the Committee met separately with the ANAO and KPMG without management present.

During its meetings in 2015-16, the Committee endorsed the revised Audit and Risk Committee Charter and the 2016-17 Audit Plan for approval by the Board.

Group Audit Group Audit provides an independent and objective audit and advisory service which is designed to add value and improve the Corporation’s operations. Group Audit helps the ABC to achieve its objectives by bringing a systematic and disciplined approach to evaluate and improve the effectiveness of risk management, control and governance processes.

Group Audit is responsible to the Audit and Risk Committee for contributing to the achievement of the Corporation’s goals and objectives by:

• assisting management in evaluating processes for identifying, assessing and managing the key operational, financial and compliance risks of the ABC

• evaluating the effectiveness of internal control systems, including compliance with legislative requirements and internal policies, and recommending improvements to management

• playing an active role in developing and maintaining a culture of accountability and integrity, including undertaking investigations in relation to fraud or whistleblower allegations

• being responsive to the Corporation’s changing needs and striving for continuous improvement in the performance of its activities

• facilitating and supporting the integration of risk management into day-to-day business activities and processes

• promoting a culture of self-assessment and adherence to high ethical standards.

222 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2016

Appendices

Appendix 2—ABC Board and Board Committees continued Group Audit is responsible for preparing and implementing the ABC’s Audit Plan, which seeks to ensure that audits focus on key areas of risk to the Corporation. The Audit Plan is endorsed by the Audit and Risk Committee and approved by the Board annually.

In 2015-16, Group Audit performed unscheduled reviews at the specific request of management and the Audit and Risk Committee and continued to utilise technology to undertake continuous auditing and monitoring of transactional data. Group Audit also provided advice and guidance on good governance, policies and controls, fraud risks and provided advice and input on a number of key projects and initiatives being undertaken by the Corporation.

external providers. This provided access to expertise in specialist areas and supplemented internal resources and experience.

During 2015-16 Group Audit continued to operate with a combination of in-house staff and outsourced

Coordination with external auditors Group Audit continued to liaise with the ABC’s external auditors, the ANAO and its nominated representative, KPMG. This included seeking advice on proposed areas of focus, the identification of areas of potential external audit reliance on audits undertaken by Group Audit, and ensuring that there was minimal duplication of audit coverage. The ANAO, KPMG and Group Audit developed a Coordinated Audit Plan for 2015-16 highlighting areas of audit coverage and reliance, as well as audit coverage of ABC strategic risk and financial reporting risk areas.

Appendix 3—ABC Organisation as at 30 June 2016

Managing Director Michelle Guthrie (a) Chief of Staff Samantha Liston (a)

Audience and Marketing Director Audience and Marketing Leisa Bacon

Head Audience Insights Alicia Olson-Keating Head Creative Services Diana Costantini Head Integrated Media Emma Wilson Head News Marketing Carolyn MacDonald Head Radio Marketing Jocelin Abbey Head Television Marketing Jo Mullaley Manager Business

and Operations Tara Hester

Marketing Manager Digital Network Natasha Nolland

Commercial Director ABC Commercial Robert Patterson Chief Financial Officer Cheryl Scroope Head ABC Retail Regina Hoekstra

Head Sales and Business Development Sharon Ramsay-Luck

Head ABC Publishing and Licensing Sharon Ramsay-Luck (a)

Head ABC Studios and Media Production Patrick Austin

Head Video Entertainment and Distribution Jessica Ellis

Head ABC Music and Events Natalie Waller Manager Digital Business Development Klaude Thomas

Manager Acquisitions Kate McDermott Manager Business Affairs David Carr Manager Sales and Merchandise Mark Carpenter

Policy Manager Claire Gorman

Corporate Affairs Director Corporate Affairs Michael Millett Head Corporate Affairs Sophie Mitchell Head Corporate Governance Judith Maude

Corporate Strategy and Planning Director Corporate Strategy and Planning David Anderson

Head Corporate Strategy and Planning Mark Tapley

Head Strategic Policy Group David Sutton

Digital Network Director Digital Network Angela Clark Head Digital Architecture and Development Ciaran Forde

Head Service Design; Head Research and Development Alvaro Marquez

Appendices 223

Appendices

Appendix 3—ABC Organisation as at 30 June 2016 continued Head Strategy Louise O’Donnell

Head Product and Operations Nathan Moyes Head Digital Education Annabel Astbury

Editorial Policies Editorial Director Alan Sunderland

Head Audience and Consumer Affairs Kirstin McLiesh

Manager Editorial Policies (News) Mark Maley

Senior Policy Advisor (Radio) Mary Masey

Editorial Policy Advisor (Television) Simon Melkman

International CEO ABC International Lynley Marshall COO ABC International Anne Milne Business Partnership

Manager Rebecca Bignell

Head Digital Operations David Hua Head Multiplatform Content Clement Paligaru Head International Development Domenic Friguglietti

Legal and Business Affairs Director Legal and Business Affairs Rob Simpson

Deputy General Counsel Michael Martin Deputy General Counsel Jennifer Wright Head Business Affairs Georgina Waite

News Director News Gaven Morris

Deputy Director / Head Newsrooms Craig McMurtrie Head Current Affairs Bruce Belsham Head Operations Rebecca Matthews

Head Strategy and Staff Development Michele Fonseca Head Business Roland Clifton-Bligh

Operations Chief Operating Officer David Pendleton Head Group Audit Alison Hamill

GM Finance and Operations Aziz Dindar GM Property Stephen Johnston

GM Operations Planning Michael Ward GM Capital Works Mark Woodley

GM Broadcast Operations Doug Whip Director Communications Networks Adrian Potter

Director Technology Ken Gallacher

People Director ABC People Rebekah Donaldson (a) Head Human Resources Vanessa MacBean Head Human Resources Carmen McMurtrie Head Learning Stephen Gray

Head Workplace Relations and Wellbeing Rebekah Donaldson

Head Organisation Development Kate Marshall

Head Indigenous Employment and Diversity Phillipa McDermott

Radio Director Radio Michael Mason

Head Content and Platforms Linda Bracken Head Partnerships, Business and Operations Merryn Vincent Head Editorial Quality

and Governance Jane Connors

Head Strategy and Transformation Jeremy Millar

Head Spoken vacant

Head Music Chris Scaddan

Regional Director Regional Fiona Reynolds

Head Regional Content Catherine Hurley Head Rural and National Programs Leigh Radford

Head Audience Strategy Martin Southgate Head Engagement and Policy Amy Hills Head Business Lachlan Foster

Television Director Television Richard Finlayson

Head Audience and Digital Rebecca Heap Head Non-Scripted Production Brendan Dahill

Head Scripted Production Sally Riley Head Business Gabrielle Cambridge

Head Operations vacant

Head Partnerships and Policy vacant

224 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2016

Appendices

Appendix 4—ABC Advisory Council In 2015-16, the ABC Advisory Council met three times. It made five recommendations.

During the year, the Council undertook a review of activities and processes, including revising its Terms of Reference, to ensure that it is operating effectively and maximising the value it contributes to the ABC. The Council considered that its time and efforts were best spent developing Recommendations that were well informed, specific and focused.

At the 4-5 August 2015 meeting, the Council determined that it would no longer make formal commendations regarding particular ABC content.

Advisory Council members Professor Andrea Hull AO, Council Chairman (Albert Park Vic)

Mr Sam Almaliki (South Melbourne Vic)

Ms Sarah Burr (Braddon ACT)

Mr James Curtis (Inglewood WA)

Mr Wade Dabinett (Parilla SA)

Ms Fiona Duggan (Youngstown TAS)

Ms Kate Duncan (Coburg North VIC)

Ms Kez Hall (Nhulunbuy NT)

Ms Heron Loban (Sherwood Qld)

Mr Robert Macaulay (Westbrook via Singleton NSW)

Adjunct Professor Peter Norden AO (Bentleigh Vic)

Mrs Nina Trad Azam (Figtree NSW)

Summary of recommendations and responses 2015-16

Recommendations Recommendation R1/2/15 - Q&A - Director of Television, A/Director of News and Director Radio

The ABC Advisory Council recommends that the ABC strengthens its role in providing a platform for strong public/community engagement and debate on public policy through programs such as Q&A.

Response from Director of Television

The Television division notes and appreciates this recommendation. Public and community engagement will continue to be at the core of programming across all our platforms. Outside the always high profile of Q&A as a public forum, the ABC is particularly proud of the Australians On Drugs forum, hosted by triple j’s Tom Tilley, that appeared on ABC2 on 28 July. The program targeted younger viewers with a provocative, honest and revealing discussion about the issues around drug use. Further forums are in planning for later in 2015 and in 2016.

Response from A/Director of News

News also appreciates the recommendation. The Division is committed to ensuring that Q&A continues to be Australia’s leading live broadcast public forum in 2016, and hopes it will broaden its audience engagement next year by hosting more debates outside of Ultimo, New South Wales.

Response from Director of Radio

Radio notes and appreciates this recommendation from the Council and wishes to reaffirm our deep engagement with communities through local and national radio networks.

Recommendation R2/2/15 - 7pm News - A/Director of News

The ABC Advisory Council recommends that in order to strengthen the role of the ABC as a respected independent news presenter the 7pm News should give increased emphasis to the contribution of expert commentators input in political, social and economic policy, and community interest fields.

Response from A/Director of News

ABC News is currently into the second year of a strategy that has a primary focus of devoting more time to explaining the major stories of the day— whether they be local, national or international.

We prioritise giving airtime to news-makers as part of our mission to break more stories, and also use experts to add context. A fast-moving news cycle makes implementing the 7pm Strategy a daily challenge and we are constantly improving.

Appendices 225

Appendices

Appendix 4—ABC Advisory Council continued Recommendation R1/3/15 - Children’s Television: Australian Content - Director of Television

The ABC Advisory Council commends Children’s Television for its long and rich heritage of providing quality television to generations of Australians, enriching the lives of Australian families by providing content that entertains and educates their children, reflecting our culture, ideas and stories across all their screens. The Council recommends that the current levels of Australian content are increased, with a renewed focus on diversity of characters (people with disabilities, positive female and male leads, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, culturally and linguistically diverse people), as well as investigating methods of making content more accessible to narrower age ranges.

Response from Director of Television

The Television division and the ABC Children’s team appreciate the Advisory Council’s ongoing support and invaluable community insight, highlighting the information shared through the recent Children’s project led by council member Melissa Cadzow. Although it is not possible to significantly increase our current levels of Australian children’s content due to resource challenges, we are exploring ways to maximise local children’s production through the introduction of new workflows and technologies. We can assure the Council that the ABC Children’s area will maintain its ongoing focus on diversity and the broad representation of Australian culture and society. The growth of young audiences on iview will also allow for more targeted demographics to be specifically served through a video-on-demand content offer.

Recommendation R2/3/15 - Children’s Television: Promotion - Director of Television

The ABC Advisory Council recommends that the promotion of children’s content be enhanced to inform audiences of this innovative and valuable service. There is a considerable ABC audience which has access to and interest in ABC Children’s content but may be unaware of the range on offer, leading the service to be possibly being under-utilised, particularly by children in the primary school and secondary school age groups.

Response from Director of Television

The Television division thanks the Council for this recommendation and will definitely consider broader promotional strategies around our ABC Children’s services including ABC KIDS, ABC3, ABC Education and iview. Tailored messaging and increased social engagement may enable us to communicate more effectively with parents and teachers about television content and platforms targeting younger Australians (2-17 years).

Recommendation R3/3/15 - iview - Director of Television

The ABC Advisory Council recommends that the iview platform should be expanded to a diversity of compatible streaming platforms and continue to cater to an audience that is moving away from appointment viewing.

Response from Director of Television

The Television division thanks the Council for the valuable opportunity to discuss the ABC’s video-on-demand service, iview, and for the recommendation

that iview be expanded to a diverse range of streaming platforms to cater for audiences as they move away from appointment viewing. Development is underway to deploy iview on Apple TV and across an expanded range of connected TVs in the first half of 2016, which should greatly enhance the availability of iview to audiences seeking to engage with the ABC’s video content on demand. The iview team constantly monitors the market for devices with sufficient scale which may be appropriate new platforms for iview, carefully balancing our reach with the additional development and maintenance costs to ensure our footprint is sustainable.

226 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2016

Appendices

Appendix 5—ABC Code of Practice Current as at 30 June 2016; last updated 1 March 2016.

I. Regulatory Framework The ABC Board is required, under section 8(1)(e) of the ABC Act, to develop a code of practice relating to its television and radio programming, and to notify this code to the Australian Communications and Media Authority (“the ACMA”).

A complaint alleging the ABC has acted contrary to its Code of Practice in its television or radio programming may be made to the ABC. A complainant is entitled under section 150 of the Broadcasting Services Act 1992 (Cth) (“the BSA”) to take their complaint to the ACMA if, after 60 days, the ABC fails to respond to the complainant or the complainant considers the ABC’s response is inadequate.

Section 150 of the BSA empowers the ACMA to investigate a complaint alleging the ABC has, in providing a national broadcasting service, breached its Code of Practice. The ACMA can decline to investigate the complaint under section 151 of the BSA if it is satisfied that the complaint does not relate to the ABC Code of Practice, or that the complaint is frivolous or vexatious or was not made in good faith.

The ACMA’s jurisdiction under sections 150-151 does not encompass the ABC’s print content or content disseminated by the ABC over the internet or through mobile devices. However, the ACMA has separate jurisdiction under Schedule 7 of the BSA in relation to content hosted on websites or transmitted through mobile services where that content is either “prohibited content”1 or “age-restricted content”.2 The ACMA is empowered under Schedule 7 to require content service providers and content hosts to remove or prevent access to these types of content.

The ABC voluntarily complies with the Content Services Code developed by the Internet Industry Association and registered as an industry code with the ACMA under clause 85 of Schedule 7 of the BSA. The Content Services Code does not apply to content delivered through online or mobile services where that content has been previously transmitted on radio or television.

Except as expressly provided by the BSA, the regulatory regime established by the BSA does not apply to the ABC: section 13(5) of the BSA, and section 79 of the ABC Act.

II. Scope of the Code The requirements of this Code are set out in the sections dealing with Interpretation and Standards in Part IV and the Associated Standard in Part V. The Standards in Part IV apply to radio and television programs broadcast by the ABC on its free-to-air television or radio broadcasting services. The Associated Standard in Part V applies only to television programs broadcast by the ABC on its domestic free-to-air television services.

This Code does not apply to any complaint which the ABC had decided not to investigate or, having accepted it for investigation, decided not to investigate further, where the ABC was satisfied that:

• the complaint concerns content which is or becomes the subject of legal proceedings;

• the complaint was frivolous or vexatious or not made in good faith;

• the complaint was lodged with the ABC more than six weeks after the date when the program was last broadcast by the ABC on its free-to-air radio or television services, unless the ABC accepted the complaint for investigation after being satisfied that it was appropriate to do so, having regard to:

- the interests of the complainant in the subject matter of the complaint;

- the seriousness of the alleged breach;

- the reason(s) for the delay;

- the availability of the program content which is the subject of the complaint; and

- any prejudice the delay may otherwise have on the ABC’s ability to investigate and determine the matter fairly; or

• the complainant does not have a sufficient interest in the subject matter of the complaint, where the complaint alleges a breach of Fair and honest dealing (Standards 5.1-5.8) or Privacy (Standard 6.1).

1 Prohibited content essentially involves content that is classified either as RC (Refused Classification) or X18+. This includes real depictions of actual sexual activity, child pornography, detailed instruction in crime, violence or drug use; and age-restricted content.

2 Age-restricted content involves content classified as R18+ or MA15+ that is delivered through a mobile device or through a service that provides audio or video content for a fee. This type of content must be subject to a restricted access system, i.e. measures put in place to protect children under the age of 15 from exposure to unsuitable material. This category of content includes material containing strong depictions of nudity, implied sexual activity, drug use or violence, very frequent or very strong coarse language, and other material that is strong in impact.

Appendices 227

Appendices

Appendix 5—ABC Code of Practice continued To avoid any doubt, the ABC intends that any complaint falling within the terms of any one of the above categories is not relevant to the ABC Code of Practice, for the purposes of section 151(2)(b) of the BSA. In effect, this means that only complaints which the ABC has accepted for investigation in accordance with the above criteria are eligible under this Code to be reviewed and investigated by the ACMA.

III. Resolved Complaints The ABC seeks to comply fully with the Code and to resolve complaints as soon as practicable.

A failure to comply will not be a breach of the Code if the ABC has, prior to the complaint being made to the ACMA, taken steps which were adequate and appropriate in all the circumstances to redress the cause of the complaint.

To illustrate, a failure to comply with Standards 2.1 or 2.2 (Accuracy) will not be taken to be a breach of the Code if a correction or clarification, which is adequate and appropriate in all the circumstances, is made prior to or within 30 days of the ABC receiving the complaint.

IV. Principles and Standards

1. Interpretation In this Code, the Standards must be interpreted and applied in accordance with the Principles applying in each Section. From time to time, the ABC publishes Guidance Notes which do not in themselves impose obligations on the ABC, but which may be relevant in interpreting and applying the Code.

The Standards in Parts IV and V are to be interpreted and applied with due regard for the nature of the content under consideration in particular cases. The ABC is conscious that its dual obligations—for accountability and for high quality—can in practice interact in complex ways. It can be a sign of strength not weakness that journalism enrages or art shocks. The Standards are to be applied in ways that maintain independence and integrity, preserve trust and do not unduly constrain journalistic enquiry or artistic expression.

2. Accuracy Principles:

The ABC has a statutory duty to ensure that the gathering and presentation of news and information is accurate according to the recognised standards of objective journalism. Credibility depends heavily on factual accuracy.

Types of fact-based content include news and analysis of current events, documentaries, factual dramas and lifestyle programs. The ABC requires that reasonable efforts must be made to ensure accuracy in all fact-based content. The ABC gauges those efforts by reference to:

• the type, subject and nature of the content;

• the likely audience expectations of the content;

• the likely impact of reliance by the audience on the accuracy of the content; and

• the circumstances in which the content was made and presented.

The ABC accuracy standard applies to assertions of fact, not to expressions of opinion. An opinion, being a value judgement or conclusion, cannot be found to be accurate or inaccurate in the way facts can. The accuracy standard requires that opinions be conveyed accurately, in the sense that quotes should be accurate and any editing should not distort the meaning of the opinion expressed.

The efforts reasonably required to ensure accuracy will depend on the circumstances. Sources with relevant expertise may be relied on more heavily than those without. Eyewitness testimony usually carries more weight than second-hand accounts. The passage of time or the inaccessibility of locations or sources can affect the standard of verification reasonably required.

The ABC should make reasonable efforts, appropriate in the context, to signal to audiences gradations in accuracy, for example by querying interviewees, qualifying bald assertions, supplementing the partly right and correcting the plainly wrong.

Standards:

2.1 Make reasonable efforts to ensure that material facts are accurate and presented in context.

2.2 Do not present factual content in a way that will materially mislead the audience. In some cases, this may require appropriate labels or other explanatory information.

228 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2016

Appendices

Appendix 5—ABC Code of Practice continued 3. Corrections and clarifications Principles:

A commitment to accuracy includes a willingness to correct errors and clarify ambiguous or otherwise misleading information. Swift correction can reduce harmful reliance on inaccurate information, especially given content can be quickly, widely and permanently disseminated. Corrections and clarifications can contribute to achieving fairness and impartiality.

Standards:

3.1 Acknowledge and correct or clarify, in an appropriate manner as soon as reasonably practicable:

a. significant material errors that are readily apparent or have been demonstrated; or

b. information that is likely to significantly and materially mislead.

4. Impartiality and diversity of perspectives Principles:

The ABC has a statutory duty to ensure that the gathering and presentation of news and information is impartial according to the recognised standards of objective journalism.

Aiming to equip audiences to make up their own minds is consistent with the public service character of the ABC. A democratic society depends on diverse sources of reliable information and contending opinions. A broadcaster operating under statute with public funds is legitimately expected to contribute in ways that may differ from commercial media, which are free to be partial to private interests.

Judgements about whether impartiality was achieved in any given circumstances can vary among individuals according to their personal and subjective view of any given matter of contention. Acknowledging this fact of life does not change the ABC’s obligation to apply its impartiality standard as objectively as possible. In doing so, the ABC is guided by these hallmarks of impartiality:

• a balance that follows the weight of evidence;

• fair treatment;

• open-mindedness; and

• opportunities over time for principal relevant perspectives on matters of contention to be expressed.

The ABC aims to present, over time, content that addresses a broad range of subjects from a diversity of perspectives reflecting a diversity of experiences, presented in a diversity of ways from a diversity of sources, including content created by ABC staff, generated by audiences and commissioned or acquired from external content-makers.

Impartiality does not require that every perspective receives equal time, nor that every facet of every argument is presented.

Assessing the impartiality due in given circumstances requires consideration in context of all relevant factors including:

• the type, subject and nature of the content;

• the circumstances in which the content is made and presented;

• the likely audience expectations of the content;

• the degree to which the matter to which the content relates is contentious;

• the range of principal relevant perspectives on the matter of contention; and

• the timeframe within which it would be appropriate for the ABC to provide opportunities for the principal relevant perspectives to be expressed, having regard to the public importance of the matter of contention and the extent to which it is the subject of current debate.

Standards:

4.1 G ather and present news and information with due impartiality.

4.2 P resent a diversity of perspectives so that, over time, no significant strand of thought or belief within the community is knowingly excluded or disproportionately represented.

4.3 Do not state or imply that any perspective is the editorial opinion of the ABC. The ABC takes no editorial stance other than its commitment to fundamental democratic principles including the rule of law, freedom of speech and religion, parliamentary democracy and equality of opportunity.

4.4 Do not misrepresent any perspective.

4.5 D o not unduly favour one perspective over another.

Appendices 229

Appendices

Appendix 5—ABC Code of Practice continued 5. Fair and honest dealing Principles:

Fair and honest dealing is essential to maintaining trust with audiences and with those who participate in or are otherwise directly affected by ABC content. In rare circumstances, deception or a breach of an undertaking may be justified. Because of the potential damage to trust, deception or breach of an undertaking must be explained openly afterwards unless there are compelling reasons not to do so.

Standards:

Dealing with participants

5.1 Participants in ABC content should normally be informed of the general nature of their participation.

5.2 A r efusal to participate will not be overridden without good cause.

Opportunity to respond

5.3 Where allegations are made about a person or organisation, make reasonable efforts in the circumstances to provide a fair opportunity to respond.

Attribution and sources

5.4 Aim to attribute information to its source.

5.5 W here a source seeks anonymity, do not agree without first considering the source’s motive and any alternative attributable sources.

5.6 Do not misrepresent another’s work as your own.

Undertakings

5.7 Assurances given in relation to conditions of participation, use of content, confidentiality or anonymity must be honoured except in rare cases where justified in the public interest.

Secret recording and other types of deception

5.8 Secret recording devices, misrepresentation or other types of deception must not be used to obtain or seek information, audio, pictures or an agreement to participate except where:

a. j ustified in the public interest and the material cannot reasonably be obtained by any other means; or

b. c onsent is obtained from the subject or identities are effectively obscured; or

c. t he deception is integral to an artistic work and the potential for harm is taken into consideration.

6. Privacy Principles:

Privacy is necessary to human dignity and every person reasonably expects that their privacy will be respected. But privacy is not absolute. The ABC seeks to balance the public interest in respect for privacy with the public interest in disclosure of information and freedom of expression.

Standards:

6.1 I ntrusion into a person’s private life without consent must be justified in the public interest and the extent of the intrusion must be limited to what is proportionate in the circumstances.

7. Harm and offence Principles:

The ABC broadcasts comprehensive and innovative content that aims to inform, entertain and educate diverse audiences. This involves a willingness to take risks, invent and experiment with new ideas. It can result in challenging content which may offend some of the audience some of the time. But it also contributes to diversity of content in the media and to fulfilling the ABC’s function to encourage and promote the musical, dramatic and other performing arts. The ABC acknowledges that a public broadcaster should never gratuitously harm or offend and accordingly any content which is likely to harm or offend must have a clear editorial purpose.

The ABC potentially reaches the whole community, so it must take into account community standards. However, the community recognises that what is and is not acceptable in ABC content largely depends upon the particular context, including the nature of the content, its target audience, and any signposting that equips audiences to make informed choices about what they see, hear or read. Applying the harm and offence standard, therefore, requires careful judgement. What may be inappropriate and unacceptable in one context may be appropriate and acceptable in another. Coarse language, disturbing images or unconventional situations may form a legitimate part of reportage, debate, documentaries or a humorous, satirical, dramatic or other artistic work.

230 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2016

Appendices

Appendix 5—ABC Code of Practice continued Standards:

7.1 C ontent that is likely to cause harm or offence must be justified by the editorial context.

7.2 W here content is likely to cause harm or offence, having regard to the context, make reasonable efforts to provide information about the nature of the content through the use of classification labels or other warnings or advice.

7.3 Ensure all domestic television programs— with the exception of news, current affairs and sporting events—are classified and scheduled for broadcast in accordance with the ABC’s Associated Standard on Television Program Classification.

7.4 If inadvertent or unexpected actions, audio or images in live content are likely to cause harm or offence, take appropriate steps to mitigate.

7.5 T he reporting or depiction of violence, tragedy or trauma must be handled with extreme sensitivity. Avoid causing undue distress to victims, witnesses or bereaved relatives. Be sensitive to significant cultural practices when depicting or reporting on recently deceased persons.

7.6 W here there is editorial justification for content which may lead to dangerous imitation or exacerbate serious threats to individual or public health, safety or welfare, take appropriate steps to mitigate those risks, particularly by taking care with how content is expressed or presented.

7.7 A void the unjustified use of stereotypes or discriminatory content that could reasonably be interpreted as condoning or encouraging prejudice.

8. Children and young people Principles:

The ABC aims to provide children and young people (under the age of 18) with enjoyable and enriching content, as well as opportunities for them to express themselves. Children and young people participate and interact with the ABC in various ways—as actors, presenters, interviewees, subjects, content makers and audience members.

The ABC has a responsibility to protect children and young people from potential harm that might arise during their engagement with the ABC and its content. The ABC shares this responsibility with parents/guardians and with the child or young person him/herself. In particular, the ABC recommends that parents/guardians supervise children and young

people’s access to content, their participation in interactive services, and their exposure to news and current affairs. It is not always possible to avoid presenting content that may be distressing to some audience members.

Standards:

8.1 T ake due care over the dignity and physical and emotional welfare of children and young people who are involved in making, participating in and presenting content produced or commissioned by the ABC.

8.2 B efore significant participation of a child or young person in content produced or commissioned by the ABC, or in interactive services offered by the ABC, consider whether it is appropriate to obtain the consent of both the child/young person and the parent/guardian.

8.3 Adopt appropriate measures wherever practicable to enable children and young people, or those who supervise them, to manage risks associated with the child/young person’s participation with, use of and exposure to ABC content and services designed for them.

8.4 Take particular care to minimise risks of exposure to unsuitable content or inappropriate contact by peers or strangers.

V. Associated Standard: Television Program Classification

Status of Associated Standard This Associated Standard is approved by the ABC Board and is binding. It is for consideration by relevant editorial decision-makers when providing advice on compliance and by complaints bodies when dealing with complaints. The Associated Standard is provided to assist interpretation of or otherwise supplement the standard in the Editorial Policies to which the Associated Standard relates.

This Associated Standard forms part of the Code of Practice notified to the Australian Communications and Media Authority under section 8(1)(e) of the Australian Broadcasting Corporation Act 1983.

Appendices 231

Appendices

Appendix 5—ABC Code of Practice continued Key Editorial Standard 7.3 Ensure all domestic television programs— with the exception of news, current affairs

and sporting events—are classified and scheduled for broadcast in accordance with the ABC’s Associated Standard on Television Program Classification.

Principles:

The ABC applies the classifications listed below to the broadcast of all its domestic television programs with the exception of news, current affairs and sporting events. The ABC classifications are adapted from the Guidelines for the Classification of Films and Computer Games issued by the Classification Board made under the Classification (Publications, Films and Computer Games) Act 1995.

The guiding principle in the application of the following classifications is context. What is inappropriate and unacceptable in one context may be appropriate and acceptable in another. Factors to be taken into account include: the artistic or educational merit of the production, the purpose of a sequence, the tone, the camera work, the intensity and relevance of the material, the treatment, and the intended audience.

Standards:

7.3.1 Television Classifications

G - GENERAL

G programs may be shown at any time. G programs, which include programs designed for pre-school and school-aged children, are suitable for children to watch on their own. Some G programs may be more appropriate for older children.

The G classification does not necessarily indicate that the program is one that children will enjoy. Some G programs contain themes or storylines that are not of interest to children.

Whether or not the program is intended for children, the treatment of themes and other classifiable elements will be careful and discreet.

Themes: The treatment of themes should be discreet, justified by context, and very mild in impact. The presentation of dangerous, imitable behaviour is not permitted except in those circumstances where it is justified by context. Any depiction of such behaviour must not encourage dangerous imitation.

Violence: Violence may be very discreetly implied, but should:

• have a light tone, or

• have a very low sense of threat or menace, and

• be infrequent, and

• not be gratuitous.

Sex: Sexual activity should:

• only be suggested in very discreet visual or verbal references, and

• be infrequent, and

• not be gratuitous.

Artistic or cultural depictions of nudity in a sexual context may be permitted if the treatment is discreet, justified by context, and very mild in impact.

Language: Coarse language should:

• be very mild and infrequent, and

• not be gratuitous.

Drug Use: The depiction of the use of legal drugs should be handled with care. Illegal drug use should be implied only very discreetly and be justified by context.

Nudity: Nudity outside of a sexual context should be:

• infrequent, and

• not detailed, and

• not gratuitous.

PG - PARENTAL GUIDANCE

(Parental Guidance recommended for people under 15 years)

Subject to the Implementation Guidelines at 7.3.2, PG programs may be shown in accordance with Time Zone Charts at 7.3.5.

PG programs may contain themes and concepts which, when viewed by those under 15 years, may require the guidance of an adult. The PG classification signals to parents that material in this category contains depictions or references which could be confusing or upsetting to children without adult guidance. Material classified PG will not be harmful or disturbing to children.

232 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2016

Appendices

Appendix 5—ABC Code of Practice continued Parents may choose to preview the material for their children. Some may choose to watch the material with their children. Others might find it sufficient to be accessible during or after the viewing to discuss the content.

Themes: The treatment of themes should be discreet and mild in impact. More disturbing themes are not generally dealt with at PG level. Supernatural or mild horror themes may be included.

Violence: Violence may be discreetly implied or stylised and should also be:

• mild in impact, and

• not shown in detail.

Sex: Sexual activity and nudity in a sexual context may be suggested, but should:

• be discreet, and

• be infrequent, and

• not be gratuitous.

Verbal references to sexual activity should be discreet.

Language: Coarse language should be mild and infrequent.

Drug Use: Discreet verbal references and mild, incidental visuals of drug use may be included, but these should not promote or encourage drug use.

Nudity: Nudity outside of a sexual context should not be detailed or gratuitous.

M - MATURE

(Recommended for people aged 15 years and over)

Subject to the Implementation Guidelines at 7.3.2, M programs may be shown in accordance with the Time Zone Charts at 7.3.5.

The M category is recommended for people aged over 15 years. Programs classified M contain material that is considered to be potentially harmful or disturbing to those under 15 years. Depictions and references to classifiable elements may contain detail. While most themes may be dealt with, the degree of explicitness and intensity of treatment will determine what can be accommodated in the M category—the less explicit or less intense material will be included in the M classification and the more explicit or more intense material, especially violent material, will be included in the MA15+ classification.

Themes: Most themes can be dealt with, but the treatment should be discreet and the impact should not be strong.

Violence: Generally, depictions of violence should:

• not contain a lot of detail, and

• not be prolonged.

In realistic treatments, depictions of violence that contain detail should:

• be infrequent, and

• not have a strong impact, and

• not be gratuitous.

In stylised treatments, depictions of violence may contain more detail and be more frequent if this does not increase the impact.

Verbal and visual references to sexual violence may only be included if they are:

• discreet and infrequent, and

• strongly justified by the narrative or documentary context.

Sex: Sexual activity may be discreetly implied.

Nudity in a sexual context should not contain a lot of detail, or be prolonged.

Verbal references to sexual activity may be more detailed than depictions if this does not increase the impact.

Language: Coarse language may be used.

Generally, coarse language that is stronger, detailed or very aggressive should:

• be infrequent, and

• not be gratuitous.

Drug Use: Drug use may be discreetly shown.

Drug use should not be promoted or encouraged.

Nudity: Nudity outside of a sexual context may be shown but depictions that contain any detail should not be gratuitous.

Appendices 233

Appendices

Appendix 5—ABC Code of Practice continued MA15+ - MATURE AUDIENCE

(Not suitable for people under 15 years)

Subject to the Implementation Guidelines at 7.3.2, MA15+ programs may be shown in accordance with the Time Zone Charts at 7.3.5.

MA15+ programs, because of the matter they contain or because of the way it is treated, are not suitable for people aged under 15 years.

Material classified MA15+ deals with issues or contains depictions which require a more mature perspective. This is because the impact of individual elements or a combination of elements is considered likely to be harmful or disturbing to viewers under 15 years of age. While most themes may be dealt with, the degree of explicitness and intensity of treatment will determine what can be accommodated in the MA15+ category—the more explicit or more intense material, especially violent material, will be included in the MA15+ classification and the less explicit or less intense material will be included in the M classification.

Themes: The treatment of themes with a high degree of intensity should not be gratuitous.

Violence: Generally, depictions of violence should not have a high impact.

In realistic treatments, detailed depictions of violence with a strong impact should:

• be infrequent, and

• not be prolonged, and

• not be gratuitous.

Depictions of violence in stylised treatments may be more detailed and more frequent if this does not increase the impact.

Depictions of sexual violence are permitted only if they are not frequent, prolonged, gratuitous or exploitative.

Sex: Sexual activity may be implied.

Depictions of nudity in a sexual context which contain detail should not be exploitative.

Verbal references may be more detailed than depictions, if this does not increase the impact.

Language: Coarse language may be used.

Coarse language that is very strong, aggressive or detailed should not be gratuitous.

Drug Use: Drug use may be shown, but should not be promoted or encouraged.

More detailed depictions should not have a high degree of impact.

Nudity: Nudity should be justified by context.

7.3.2 Implementation Guidelines

The time zones for each program classification are guides to the most likely placement of programs within that classification. They are not hard and fast rules and there will be occasions on which programs or segments of programs appear in other time zones.

There must be sound reasons for any departure from the time zone for a program classification. Possible reasons might include, for example, the need to schedule programs which are serious presentations of moral, social or cultural issues in timeslots most suitable for their target audiences.

Programs, including those having a particular classification under the Classification Board’s Guidelines for the Classification of Films and Computer Games, may be modified so that they are suitable for broadcast or suitable for broadcast at particular times.

Broken Hill in New South Wales shares a time zone with South Australia but ordinarily receives the ABC’s New South Wales TV services. Given the time zone difference, some programs are broadcast outside their classification time zone.

7.3.3 Television Classification Symbols

The classification symbol of the PG, M or MA15+ program (except for news, current affairs or sporting events) being shown will be displayed at the beginning of the program.

The classification symbol of the PG, M or MA15+ program (except for news, current affairs or sporting events) being promoted will be displayed during the promotion.

7.3.4 Consumer Advice

Audio and visual consumer advice on the reasons for an M or MA15+ classification will be given prior to the beginning of an M or MA15+ program.

234 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2016

Appendices

Appendix 5—ABC Code of Practice continued 7.3.5 Time Zone Charts

ABC and ABCNews24

5am 12pm 3pm 7pm 7.30pm 8.30pm 9pm 5am

G

PG

M

MA

ABC2

5am 12pm 3pm 7pm 7.30pm 8.30pm 9pm 5am

G

(ABC2 is not on air at this time)

PG

M

MA

ABC KIDS

5am 12pm 3pm 7pm 7.30pm 8.30pm 9pm 5am

G

(ABC KIDS is not on air at this time)

PG

M

MA

ABC3

5am 12pm 3pm 7pm 7.30pm 8.30pm 9pm 5am

G

PG

M

MA

Appendix 6—ABC Television Content Analysis ABC main channel linear program hours transmitted - 24 hours

Australian Overseas Total

First

Release Repeat Total Australian First

Release Repeat Total Overseas 2015-16 2014-15

Arts and Culture 32 114 146 9 68 77 223 260

Children’s 0 0 0 0 0 00 5

Current Affairs 634 480 1 114 0 0 0 1 114 988

Documentary 33 213 245 22 146 168 413 427

Drama 59 230 289 88 1 111 1 199 1 488 1 425

Entertainment 1 314 222 1 536 46 402 448 1 985 1 662

Factual 88 269 356 3 635 638 995 978

Indigenous 3 41 44 0 0 0 44 13

Movies 0 0 0 0 206 206206 418

News 1 702 109 1 812 0 0 0 1 812 1 859

Religion and Ethics 18 51 69 2 24 26 95 82

Sport 76 39 114 0 0 0 114 365

Total Program Hours 3 958 1 768 5 726 170 2 592 2 762 8 488 8 483

% of Total Program Hours 46.6% 20.8% 67.5% 2.0% 30.5% 32.5% 100.0% 100.0%

*Other 296 296 277

Total Hours 6 022 2 762 8 784 8 760

% of Total Hours 69% 31%

*Other: Includes interstitial material, program announcements and community service announcements.

Notes: This Table reflects linear hours broadcast from the Sydney transmitter, comprising national and New South Wales transmission. Figures may differ slightly in other states and territories as a result of varying levels of local content. Hours have been rounded to nearest whole number.

Appendices 235

Appendices

Appendix 6—ABC Television Content Analysis continued ABC main channel linear program hours transmitted - 6am-midnight

Australian Overseas Total

First

Release Repeat Total Australian First

Release Repeat Total Overseas 2015-16 2014-15

Arts and Culture 24 79 103 8 33 41 144 170

Children’s 0 0 0 0 0 00 5

Current Affairs 567 403 969 0 0 0 969 863

Documentary 33 162 194 22 102 124 319 313

Drama 58 175 233 88 778 866 1 099 1 142

Entertainment 442 155 597 46 258 304 900 886

Factual 86 242 327 3 602 605 933 798

Indigenous 3 16 19 0 0 0 19 12

Movies 0 0 0 0 4 44 56

News 1 699 108 1 807 0 0 0 1 807 1 839

Religion and Ethics 18 31 49 2 24 26 74 81

Sport 71 8 79 0 0 0 79 174

Total Program Hours 3 001 1 376 4 377 169 1 801 1 970 6 347 6 339

% of Total Program Hours 47.3% 21.69% 69.0% 2.7% 28.4% 31.0% 100.0% 100.0%

*Other 241 241 231

Total Hours 4 618 1 970 6 588 6 570

% of Total Hours 70% 30%

*Other: Includes interstitial material, program announcements and community service announcements.

Notes: This Table reflects linear hours broadcast from the Sydney transmitter, comprising national and New South Wales transmission. Figures may differ slightly in other states and territories as a result of varying levels of local content. Hours have been rounded to nearest whole number.

ABC main channel linear program hours transmitted - 6pm-midnight

Australian Overseas Total

First

Release Repeat Total Australian First

Release Repeat Total Overseas 2015-16 2014-15

Arts and Culture 24 9 32 8 9 18 50 73

Children’s 0 0 0 0 0 00 2

Current Affairs 231 95 326 0 0 0 326 288

Documentary 33 43 75 21 23 44 119 179

Drama 58 114 172 88 337 425 597 561

Entertainment 110 62 172 46 84 130 302 365

Factual 78 4 82 3 261 264 346 247

Indigenous 3 7 10 0 0 0 10 9

Movies 0 0 0 0 2 22 9

News 218 105 323 0 0 0 323 328

Religion and Ethics 18 0 19 0 0 0 19 18

Sport 5 8 13 0 0 0 13 24

Total Program Hours 777 447 1 224 167 716 883 2 107 2 104

% of Total Program Hours 36.9% 21.2% 58.1% 7.9% 34.0% 41.9% 100.0% 100.0%

*Other 89 89 86

Total Hours 1 313 883 2 196 2 190

% of Total Hours 60% 40%

*Other: Includes interstitial material, program announcements and community service announcements.

Notes: This Table reflects linear hours broadcast from the Sydney transmitter, comprising national and New South Wales transmission. Figures may differ slightly in other states and territories as a result of varying levels of local content. Hours have been rounded to nearest whole number.

236 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2016

Appendices

ABC KIDS (ABC2) linear program hours transmitted - 5am-7pm

Australian Overseas Total

First

Release Repeat Total Australian First

Release Repeat Total Overseas 2015-16 2014-15

Arts and Culture 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Children’s 126 1 267 1 392 101 3 317 3 419 4 811 4 788

Current Affairs 0 0 0 0 0 00 0

Documentary 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Drama 0 0 0 0 0 00 0

Entertainment 0 0 0 0 0 00 0

Factual 0 0 0 0 0 00 0

Indigenous 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Movies 0 0 0 0 0 00 0

News 0 0 0 0 0 00 0

Religion and Ethics 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Sport 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4

Total Program Hours 126 1 267 1 392 101 3 317 3 419 4 811 4 791

% of Total Program Hours 2.6% 26.3% 28.9% 2.1% 68.9% 71.1% 100.0% 100.0%

*Other 313 313 319

Total Program Hours, including interstitials 1 705 3 419 5 124 5 110

% of Total Hours 33% 67%

*Other: Includes interstitial material, program announcements and community service announcements.

Notes: This Table reflects linear hours broadcast from the Sydney transmitter, comprising national and New South Wales transmission. Figures may differ slightly in other states and territories as a result of varying levels of local content. Hours have been rounded to nearest whole number.

The ABC2 transmission hours, schedule and content varied in this reporting period and should not be used as a direct comparison to previous years. In 2014-15, transmission commenced at 6am. The end transmission time for ABC2 of 2am may vary, on average transmission closes at 2am. These statistics are calculated until transmission closes.

ABC3 linear program hours transmitted - 6am-varied close

Australian Overseas Total

First

Release Repeat Total Australian First

Release Repeat Total Overseas 2015-16 2014-15

Arts/Culture 0 5 5 0 0 0 5 8

Children’s 133 1 413 1 546 278 3 591 3 870 5 416 5 232

Documentary 0 11 11 0 0 0 11 37

Entertainment 1 448 449 0 9 9 458 441

Factual 3 21 24 0 51 51 74 109

Indigenous 0 3 3 0 0 0 3 4

News 54 4 57 0 0 057 57

Total Program Hours 191 1 904 2 094 278 3 651 3 930 6 024 5 888

% of Total Program Hours 3.2% 31.6% 34.8% 4.6% 60.6% 65.2% 100.0% 100%

*Other 145 145 265

Total Hours 2 239 3 930 6 169 6 153

% of Total Hours 36% 64%

*Other: Includes interstitial material, program announcements and community service announcements.

Notes: This Table reflects linear hours broadcast from the Sydney transmitter, comprising national and New South Wales transmission.

Figures may differ slightly in other states and territories as a result of varying levels of local content.

Channel close times vary in 2015-16. Hours have been rounded to nearest whole number.

Appendix 6—ABC Television Content Analysis continued

Appendices 237

Appendices

Appendix 6—ABC Television Content Analysis continued ABC2 linear program hours transmitted - 7pm-2am

Australian Overseas Total

First

Release Repeat Total Australian First

Release Repeat Total Overseas 2015-16 2014-15

Arts and Culture 0 2 2 0 23 23 25 50

Children’s 0 0 0 0 0 00 0

Current Affairs 0 1 1 0 2 23 3

Documentary 11 34 45 71 598 669 714 653

Drama 2 6 8 17 526 543 551 548

Entertainment 33 279 313 33 598 631 944 848

Factual 1 5 6 11 241 252 258 278

Indigenous 0 3 3 0 0 0 3 1

Movies 0 0 0 0 19 1919 46

News 0 9 9 0 0 09 11

Religion and Ethics 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Sport 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 52

Total Program Hours 47 341 388 132 2 007 2 139 2 527 2 490

% of Total Program Hours 1.9% 13.5% 15.4% 5.2% 79.4% 84.6% 100.0% 98.5%

*Other 35 35 65

Total Hours 423 2 139 2 562 2 555

% of Total Hours 17% 83%

*Other: Includes interstitial material, program announcements and community service announcements.

Notes: This Table reflects linear hours broadcast from the Sydney transmitter, comprising national and New South Wales transmission. Figures may differ slightly in other states and territories as a result of varying levels of local content. Hours have been rounded to nearest whole number.

The ABC2 transmission hours, schedule and content varied in this reporting period and should not be used as a direct comparison to previous years. In 2014-15 transmission commenced at 6am. The end transmission time for ABC2 of 2am may vary, on average transmission closes at 2am. These statistics are calculated until transmission closes.

iview program hours - 24 hours

Australian Overseas Total

First

Release Repeat Total Australian First

Release Repeat Total Overseas 2015-16 2014-15

Arts and Culture 39 108 148 0 119 119 267

Children's 0 1 638 1 639 0 5 252 5 252 6 891

Current Affairs 2 1 007 1 009 0 1 1 1 010

Documentary 4 148 152 0 481 481 633

Drama 7 263 269 0 1 028 1 028 1 298

Entertainment 109 197 306 0 451 451 757

Factual 4 178 182 0 525 525 706

Indigenous 0 18 19 0 0 0 19

Movies 0 0 0 0 2 22

News 0 2 391 2 391 0 0 0 2 391

Religion and Ethics 0 21 21 0 2 2 23

Sport 0 105 105 0 0 0 105

Total Program Hours 165 6 076 6 241 0 7 861 7 861 14 102

% of Total Program Hours 1.2% 43.1% 44.3% 0.0% 55.7% 55.7% 100.0%

*Other 1 1

Total Hours 6,242 7 861 14 103

% of Total Hours 44% 56%

*Other: Includes interstitial material, program announcements and community service announcements.

Notes: This table reflects hours of content detailed in the ABC’s OnAir schedule that were uploaded to iview.

238 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2016

Appendices

Appendix 7—Promotion and Market Research Expenditure on market research and promotion for 2015-16 was $10 696 127, compared with $11 334 536 in 2014-15.

2015-16 $

2014-15 $

Advertising 3 104 308 2 464 690

Market Research 5 765 604 5 782 143

Promotion 1 826 215 3 067 703

Total 10 696 127 11 334 536

The Corporation uses advertising agencies and market research organisations predominantly for activities related to ABC Commercial, Radio, Television and Australia Plus.

Appendix 8—Performance Pay The ABC paid bonuses to 176 executives totalling $1 615 539, an average of $9 179 per executive.

It paid bonuses to 91 non-executive employees totalling $201 770, an average of $2 217 per employee.

Appendix 9—Consultants During 2015-16, the ABC spent $4 213 696 on consultancies, broken down as follows (payments to consultants includes amounts paid and payable as at 30 June 2016):

Consultant Purpose of Consultancy Total $

Below $10 000 Various Various 148 956

$10 000- $50 000 Atlus Group Cost Management Pty Ltd Property advisory services 10 500

Oakton Services Pty Ltd Technical advice 13 240

Leadership Advisory Pty Ltd Strategic advice 14 502

O'Connor Marsden & Associates Pty Ltd Technical advice 15 708

Urbis Valuations Pty Ltd Property valuation and advisory services 16 000

Bindi Newman Consultancy Strategic advice 16 700

Heriot Media & Governance Pty Ltd International development projects 19 000

P.T. Ragam Obor Hikmah Risk assessment and analysis 19 651

Capture Pty Ltd Strategic advice 20 000

Inventium Pty Ltd Strategic advice 21 299

M Skulley Editorial review 21 600

IBM Australia Ltd Technical advice 25 000

J McCarthy Strategic advice 25 000

P Cavanagh Editorial review 25 000

Stancombe Research & Planning Pty Ltd International development projects 29 570

Ray Martin Media Pty Ltd Editorial review 30 000

S Harris Editorial review 30 000

M Roberts International development projects 30 806

Appendices 239

Appendices

Appendix 9—Consultants continued

Appendix 10—Overseas Travel Costs The total cost of overseas travel for 2015-16 was $4.6 million, compared with $4.5 million in 2014-15. ABC overseas travel costs

2015-16 ($m)

2014-15 ($m)

Travel allowances and accommodation 2.2 2.0

Airfares 1.6 1.6

Other* 0.8 0.9

Total 4.6 4.5

* Other includes car hire, taxis, excess baggage, hire of personnel and equipment.

Consultant Purpose of Consultancy Total $

McGees Property (NSW) Pty Ltd Property valuation and advisory services 33 570

Essential Utilities Corporation Pty Ltd Technical advice 34 000

T. C. Corporate Pty Ltd Strategic advice 36 956

KPMG Finance, tax and other advisory services 43 531

Sub-total 531 633

Above $50 000 Australian Rescue Management Pty Ltd Risk assessment and analysis 53 665

Ernst & Young Finance, tax and other advisory services 57 088

K Blackburn Editorial review 60 470

S Brown Editorial review 68 400

P Graham Strategic advice 72 500

Vera Facienda Pty Ltd Strategic advice 95 185

PricewaterhouseCoopers Finance, tax and other advisory services 97 089

Askew Associates Pty Ltd Risk assessment and analysis 136 417

Neoteny Service Design Strategic advice 148 250

Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu Strategic advice 150 000

Accenture Australia Pty Ltd Strategic advice 151 341

Trevor-Roberts Associates Career advice 156 400

Cast Professional Services Pty Ltd Strategic advice 281 267

333 Management Pty Ltd Strategic advice 735 884

L.E.K. Consulting Strategic advice 1 269 151

Sub-total 3 533 107

Total 4 213 696

240 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2016

Appendices

Appendix 11—Reports Required by Legislation Reports required under s80 of the Australian Broadcasting Corporation Act 1983 Section 80 of the Australian Broadcasting Corporation Act 1983 requires the Corporation to report on the following particular matters:

s.80(a) - s.80(daa) Directions from the Minister relating to a broadcast or provision of content on a digital media service

No such directions were received during the year

s.80(da) Codes of practice developed under subsection 8(1) See Appendix 5 (page 226) s.80(e) Particulars of any request made to the Board by the Minister during that year under subsection 8(2) and the action (if any) taken by the Board in respect of the request

See Appendix 2 (page 219)

s.80(f) Particulars of any gift, devise or bequest accepted by the Corporation during that year The Corporation received no gifts or donations within the meaning

of Section 80 of the Australian Broadcasting Corporation Act 1983

s.80(g) Particulars of any advice received by the Board during that year from the ABC Advisory Council See Appendix 4 (page 224)

s.80(j) Activities under subsection 25A See Financial Statements (page 204)

s.80(k) Particulars of any activities during the year of any authorised business with which the Corporation is associated under that subsection

See Section 3, Infrastructure and Operations (page 84)

s.80(l) Particulars of significant changes of transmission coverage and quality See page 155

Reports required under the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Rule 2014 Judicial Decisions and Reviews by Outside Bodies (section 17BE(q))

Matters referred to the Australian Communications and Media Authority for review are noted in the Corporate Governance section (page 125). No other judicial decisions or decisions of administrative tribunals were made in 2015-16 which had, or may have, a significant effect on the ABC’s operations.

Indemnities and Insurance Premiums for Officers (section 17BE(t))

The ABC has indemnified its officers and acquired appropriate insurances from Comcover including Directors and Officers liability insurance on terms and conditions which are consistent with the provisions of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Rule 2014 and the standing Board resolutions. The premium for the Directors and Officers liability insurance was $297 616.

Index of Annual Report requirements (section 17BE(u))

An index of Annual Report requirements is provided at page 264.

Appendices 241

Appendices

Appendix 12—Staff Profile

Appendix 13—ABC Awards

International Awards 2015 Apple’s Best Apps

Listed: ABC KIDS Play app

2016 A&R Worldwide International Music Industry Awards

Radio Station of the Year: triple j

52nd Chicago International Television Awards

Silver Plaque - Children’s Series: Bushwhacked! Series 3, Australian Children’s Television Foundation (in association with the ABC)

Certificate of Merit - Children’s Series: Little Lunch, Australian Children’s Television Foundation (in association with the ABC)

2015 Grey Heron Media HearSay International Audio Arts Festival

Gold Prize: Sophie Townsend and Timothy Nicastri, Life Matters, RN, ‘Mr Fix-it’

2016 International Emmy Kids Awards

Best Kids Series: Nowhere Boys Series 2, Matchbox Pictures (in association with the ABC)

Total ABC staff strength, 30 June 2016

ACT NSW NT Overseas Qld SA Tas Vic WA Total

ABC Commercial 0.00 98.25 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 3.60 0.00 101.85

ABC International 0.00 11.00 0.00 3.00 0.00 0.66 0.00 28.36 0.00 43.02

Audience and Marketing 1.00 89.70 2.00 0.00 5.10 3.00 3.00 12.49 2.00 118.29

Broadcast Operations 3.00 33.07 0.00 0.00 5.51 3.03 3.39 12.12 6.87 67.00

Capital Works 0.00 20.86 0.00 0.00 2.00 0.00 0.00 11.53 0.00 34.39

Communications Networks 0.00 18.80 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 18.80

Corporate Management* 1.00 78.91 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.21 0.00 5.00 0.00 85.12

Digital Network 0.00 109.61 0.00 0.00 12.00 0.00 0.00 12.35 0.00 133.96

Finance & Operations 0.00 47.31 0.00 0.00 3.59 41.11 2.00 3.00 1.00 98.01

News 109.51 581.28 51.40 18.80 162.95 96.74 63.54 204.63 78.56 1 367.41

Operations Planning 5.00 90.35 0.00 0.00 4.00 8.07 3.74 25.78 4.05 144.69

People 0.00 50.91 0.00 0.00 1.59 5.48 0.00 3.30 0.00 61.29

Property 2.71 32.46 2.00 0.00 6.39 5.85 3.75 8.00 5.4 66.56

Radio 23.67 275.97 28.33 0.00 58.74 38.49 25.20 96.66 29.46 576.50

Regional 4.00 110.51 19.37 0.00 111.01 39.51 18.10 65.21 53.42 421.12

Technology 12.00 210.8 8.00 0.00 14.00 13.00 9.28 38.11 16.53 321.71

Television 0.00 382.63 0.00 0.00 0.95 1.00 0.00 138.21 0.00 522.78

Grand Total 161.89 2 242.40 114.81 21.80 387.83 256.14 131.99 668.36 197.28 4 182.50

* Includes Managing Director’s Office, ABC Secretariat, Corporate Affairs, Corporate Strategy and Planning, Editorial Policies, Legal and Business Affairs, and the Office of the Chief Operating Officer.

Notes:

1. Values in Full Time Equivalents (FTE).

2. Statistics current as at the end of the last pay period in 2015-16 (26 June 2016).

3. Number of overseas employees in the above table does not include locally-hired staff.

Gender Breakdown

Head count %

Female 2 510 51.14%

Male 2 398 48.86%

Total 4 908 100.00%

242 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2016

Appendices

2015 International Federation of Agricultural Journalists Awards

Young Leaders Award: Brett Worthington, ABC Rural

Winner, Video Broadcast: Lauren Waldhuter, ABC Rural, ‘Future of virus-affected canola still unknown’

Winner, Audio Broadcast: Charlie McKillop, ABC Rural, ‘“A duty to be kind” in Halal slaughter’

Highly Commended, Online Broadcast: Kerry Straight, Landline, ‘Bitter Harvest’

2016 Kidscreen Awards

Best Non-Animated or Mixed Series - Programming (Tweens/Teens): Nowhere Boys Series 2, Matchbox Pictures (in association with the ABC)

2016 New York Festival Radio Awards

Gold Radio Winner Best Biography/Profiles (Information/Documentary): Earshot, RN, ‘Steve, David and Goliath’

Gold Radio Winner Best Writing (Craft); Gold Radio Winner Best Sound (Craft); Gold Radio Winner Best Director (Craft); and Silver Radio Winner Best Culture & the Arts (Information /Documentary): Kyla Brettle and David Carlin, ABC RN and RMIT non/fictionLab, ‘Making Up: 11 Scenes from a Bangkok Hotel’

Silver Radio Winner Best Biography/Profiles (Information/Documentary): Robyn Ravlich, RN, ‘Encountering Marina Abramović - Artist and Icon’

2016 Prix Jeunesse Awards

International Winner, 7-10 Fiction: Robyn Butler and Wayne Hope, Little Lunch, ‘The Principal’s Office’ Australian Children’s Television Foundation (in association with the ABC)

2015 Prix Marulic Awards

Grand Prize - Documentary: Karen Werner, Earshot, RN, ‘Laws of lost and found objects’

2016 Sarah Lawrence College International Audio Fiction Awards (The Sarahs)

1st Place: Lea Redfern and (freelancer) Rijn Collins, Earshot, RN, ‘Almost Flamboyant’

49th Worldfest Houston Independent Film Festival Remi Awards

Gold Remi - Best TV Series (Family/Children): Bushwhacked!, Mint Pictures (in association with the ABC)

National Awards 21st Digital Industry Association of Australia (AIMIA) Awards (the AMYs)

Best Online Service - Healthcare Category: ABC Active Memory, (ABC Commercial/Florey Institute of Neuroscience and Mental Health/University of Sydney/University of Melbourne)

2015 AFL Coaches Association (AFLCA) Awards

Media Award: Gerard Whateley, ABC Grandstand

2015 Amnesty International Australia Media Awards

Radio: Kirsti Melville, 360documentaries, RN, ‘The Storm’

Indigenous Reporting: Sarah Dingle, Background Briefing, RN, ‘What’s sacred now?’

2016 Andrew Olle Scholarship

Bridget Brennan and Marty McCarthy

48th Annual Australian Writers’ Guild Awards (The AWGIES)

Television Miniseries (Adaptation): Jan Sardi and Mac Gudgeon, The Secret River, Ruby Entertainment (in association with the ABC)

Comedy (Situation or Narrative): Josh Thomas, Please Like Me Series 2, ‘Scroggin’, Guesswork Television (in association with the ABC)

Children’s Television (P Classification): Charlotte Rose Hamlyn, Guess How Much I Love You, ‘Make A Rainbow’, SLR Productions (in association with the ABC)

Animation: Bruce Griffiths, The New Adventures of Figaro Pho, ‘Romerophobia: The Fear of Zombies’, Chocolate Liberation Front and Ambience Entertainment (in association with the ABC)

Radio (Original Broadcast): Aden Rolfe, Radiotonic, RN, ‘Like a Writing Desk’

2016 Annual Equity Ensemble Awards

Outstanding Performance by an Ensemble in a Comedy Series: Utopia Series 2, Working Dog (in association with the ABC)

2016 Australasian Reporting Awards

Annual Report of the Year: ABC Annual Report 2014-15

Gold Award: ABC Annual Report 2014-15

Appendix 13—ABC Awards continued

Appendices 243

Appendices

2015 Australian Academy Cinema Television Arts (AACTA) Awards

Best Children’s Television Series: Ready For This, Werner Film Productions and Blackfella Films (in association with the ABC)

Best Television Comedy Series: Shaun Micallef’s Mad as Hell, Giant Baby Productions and ITV Studios (in association with the ABC)

Best Light Entertainment: The Weekly with Charlie Pickering

Best Television Drama Series: Glitch, Matchbox Pictures (in association with the ABC)

Best Documentary Television Program: The Killing Season

Best Performance in a Television Comedy: Celia Pacquola, Utopia, Working Dog (in association with the ABC)

Best Editing in Television: Nicholas Holmes ASE, Redfern Now: Promise Me, Blackfella Films (in association with the ABC)

Best Original Music Score: Cornel Wilczek, Glitch, Matchbox Pictures (in association with the ABC)

Best Production Design in Television: Herbert Pinter, The Secret River, Ruby Entertainment (in association with the ABC)

Best Cinematography in a Documentary: Nick Robinson, Luke Peterson and Jon Shaw, Life on the Reef

2016 Australian Book Industry Awards

Biography of the Year: Richard Glover, Flesh Wounds (ABC Books/HarperCollins Publishers)

45th Australian Cinematographers Society Awards

Neil Davis International News Gold Tripod: Aaron Hollett, Gaza Airstrike

2015 Australian Council for International Development (ACFID) Media Award

Winner: The Weekly with Charlie Pickering

2016 Australian Directors Guild (ADG) Awards

Best Direction in a Documentary Series: Ivan O’Mahoney, Hitting Home

Best Direction in a Telemovie: Rachel Perkins, Redfern Now: Promise Me, Blackfella Films (in association with the ABC)

Best Direction in a TV Drama Series: Emma Freeman, Glitch, Matchbox Pictures (in association with the ABC)

Esben Storm Award for Best Direction in a Children’s TV Drama: Daina Reid, Ready For This, Werner Film Productions and Blackfella Films (in association with the ABC)

Best Direction in a TV Comedy: Jonathan Brough, Sammy J & Randy in Ricketts Lane, Sticky Pictures (in association with the ABC)

2016 ADG Awards Highly Commended Project (Documentary Stand Alone): Jane Manning, Ka-Ching! Pokie Nation, Looking Glass Pictures (in association with the ABC)

2015 Australian Football Media Association Media Awards

Alf Brown Award for overall contribution to AFL coverage in 2015: Gerard Whateley

Most Outstanding Caller - Radio: Gerard Whateley

2015 Australian Independent Record Label Association (AIR) Music Awards

Best Independent Jazz Album: Barney McAll, Mooroolbark

Best Independent Classical Album: Australian Brandenburg Orchestra, Brandenburg Celebrates

2016 Australian Jazz Awards (The Bells)

Best Australian Vocal Jazz Album: Kristin Berardi, Where or When

Best Australian Instrumental Jazz Album: Barney McAll, Mooroolbark

Best Australian Jazz Song: Barney McAll, ‘Nectar Spur’

2015 Australian Museum Lifetime Achievement Award

Robyn Williams, ABC RN science broadcaster

2015 Australian Recording Industry Association Awards (The ARIAs)

Best Classical Album: Peter Sculthorpe: Complete Works for Solo Piano performed by Tamara-Anna Cislowska, ABC Classics

Best Jazz Album: Barney McAll, Mooroolbark

Best Original Soundtrack/Cast/Show Album: triple j, Beat the Drum - Celebrating 40 Years of triple j

Appendix 13—ABC Awards continued

244 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2016

Appendices

Outstanding Achievement Award: Lee Kernaghan, Spirit of the Anzacs

2015 Australian Screen Editors Guild Awards (The Ellies)

Best Editing in Television Factual: Roger Carter, Australian Story, ‘How I Met Your Father’

Best Editing in a Television Comedy: Julie-Anne DeRuvo, Please Like Me Series 2, Guesswork Television (in association with the ABC)

2015 Australian Sports Commission Media Awards

Best Coverage of Sport by an Individual - Broadcast: Gerard Whateley

Best Reporting of an Issue in Sport: Caro Meldrum-Hanna, Sam Clark and Max Murch, Four Corners, ‘Making a Killing’

Best Coverage of Sport for People with Disability: Amanda Shalala, Grandstand, ‘Grandstand para-sport profiles’

Best Depiction of the Value of Sport to Australians in a Community: Dan Goldberg, Adam Kay and Anthony De Sylva, Foreign Correspondent, ‘Pitch Battle’, Mint Pictures (in association with the ABC)

2015 Australian Teachers of Media Awards (The ATOMs)

Best Documentary - Social and Political Issues: Darlene Johnson, The Redfern Story, Samson Productions (in association with the ABC)

2015 Central Coast Community Builder Award

Scott Levi, 92.5 ABC Central Coast

2016 Citi Journalism Awards for Excellence

Broadcast Media: Norman Hermant, reporting on the transition to Consumer Directed Care

44th Country Music Awards of Australia (Golden Guitars)

Vocal Collaboration of the Year: Lee Kernaghan and special guests, Spirit of the Anzacs

Video Clip of the Year: Lee Kernaghan, Spirit of the Anzacs

Top Selling Album of the Year: Lee Kernaghan, Spirit of the Anzacs

2016 Country Music Channel (CMC) Awards

ARIA Highest Selling Album of the Year: Lee Kernaghan, Spirit of the Anzacs

Oz Artist of the Year: Adam Brand

Oz Male Artist of the Year: Lee Kernaghan

Group of Duo of the Year: The Wolfe Brothers

Oz Video of the Year: Lee Kernaghan, Spirit of the Anzacs

New Oz Artist of the Year: Caitlyn Shadbolt

2015 Davitt Awards

Best Children’s Crime Novel: Judith Rossell, Withering by Sea J (ABC Books/Harper Collins Publishers)

2016 Horticultural Media Association Australia (HMAA) Laurel Awards

Gold Laurel and induction into the Hall of Fame for services to horticulture: Jane Edmanson OAM

Article Laurel: AB Bishop, Gardening Australia Magazine, ‘Sister Act’

Video Laurel: Angus Stewart, Gardening Australia, ‘A Drop of the Good Stuff’

Audio Laurel: Tim Entwisle and Jim Fogarty, Talking Plants, RN

2016 LearnX Impact Awards

Platinum Award for Best Learning Project - Wellbeing: Happy Body at Work

2016 Logie Awards

Most Outstanding Public Affairs Report: Sarah Ferguson, Deborah Masters, Sue Spencer, Louie Eroglu, Four Corners, ‘The Killing Season’

Most Outstanding Children’s Program: Ready For This, Werner Film Productions and Blackfella Films (in association with the ABC)

Most Outstanding Entertainment Program: Gruen, CJZ (in association with the ABC)

Most Outstanding Drama Series: Glitch, Matchbox Pictures (in association with the ABC)

Most Outstanding Miniseries or Telemovie: The Secret River, Ruby Entertainment (in association with the ABC)

Appendix 13—ABC Awards continued

Appendices 245

Appendices

Most Outstanding Comedy Program: Shaun Micallef’s Mad as Hell, Giant Baby Productions and ITV Studios (in association with the ABC)

Most Outstanding Actress: Deborah Mailman, Redfern Now: Promise Me, Blackfella Films (in association with the ABC)

Most Outstanding Supporting Actor: Tim Minchin, The Secret River, Ruby Entertainment (in association with the ABC)

2016 Mastercard IT Journalism Awards (The Lizzies)

Best Audio Program: Marc Fennell, Download This Show, RN

2014 Excellence in Health Award (National Press Club)1

Health Journalist of the Year: Ann Arnold, Background Briefing, RN, ‘Big Food Fight’

Health Policy: Ann Arnold, Background Briefing, RN, ‘Big Food Fight’

2015 Our Watch Awards

Gold Award: Jess Hill for reportage on domestic violence, Background Briefing, RN (as well as articles in The Monthly and The Guardian)

Best Series or Special: Jess Hill, series on domestic violence

All Media - Best news coverage: Jayne Margetts and ABC News Team, ABC TV and ABC Online, ‘Domestic Violence Education’

Rotary Foundation Paul Harris Fellow

Simon Marnie, 702 ABC Sydney

2015 Screen Producers Australia Awards

Drama Television Production of the Year: The Code, Playmaker Media (in association with the ABC)

Comedy Television Production of the Year: Please Like Me Series 2, Guesswork Television (in association with the ABC)

Children’s Television Production of the Year: Nowhere Boys Series 2, Matchbox Pictures (in association with the ABC)

Light Entertainment Television Production of the Year: Agony, High Wire Films (in association with the ABC)

Telemovie or Miniseries Production of the Year: The Secret River, Ruby Entertainment (in association with the ABC)

2015 Sydney College of the Arts Fauvette Loureiro Memorial Artists Travel Scholarship

Julian Day, ABC Classic FM

2015 United Nations Association of Australia Media Awards

TV News and Current Affairs: Norman Hermant, ‘Consumer Directed Care’

Radio Documentary: Kirsti Melville and David Le May, 360documentaries, RN, ‘The Storm’

2015 Walkley Awards

Gold Walkley: Caro Meldrum-Hanna, Sam Clark and Max Murch, Four Corners, ‘Making a Killing’

Multimedia Storytelling: Huw Parkinson, Insiders, ‘Bronwyn Bishop’s Arrested Development’, ‘Star Wars: Fixed’, ‘The Breakfast Clubbing Season’

Radio/Audio News and Current Affairs Reporting: Mark Willacy and Mark Solomons, PM, ‘Hopeland’

Business Journalism: Adele Ferguson, Sarah Danckert and Klaus Toft, Four Corners, ‘7-Eleven: The Price of Convenience’

Camerawork: Louie Eroglu, Four Corners, ‘The Killing Season’ and ‘The Great Cricket Coup’

TV/AV Daily Current Affairs: Matt Brown, Suzanne Dredge and Mar Marsic, 7.30, ‘Enslaved by Aussie Jihadis’

Investigative Journalism: Caro Meldrum-Hanna, Sam Clark and Max Murch, Four Corners, ‘Making a Killing’

2015 Walkley Young Australian Journalist of the Year Awards

Radio/Audio Journalism: Alice Matthews, AM, ‘Sexual harassment rife in medical profession, warns surgeon’ and PM, ‘Universities consider sexual harassment education in health courses’

Television/Video Journalism: Elise Worthington, 7.30, ‘Facing hereditary cancer and its agonising choices’

2015/16 Wattle Valley Women’s National Basketball League(WNBL) Media Awards

Best Feature (Radio/TV): Grandstand, ‘Meet the Lynx’

Appendix 13—ABC Awards continued

1 Awarded on 28 October 2015, from the previous reporting period.

246 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2016

Appendices

State and Territory Awards New South Wales

2015 Australian Cinematographers Society Awards (NSW/ACT)

Gold - Experimental and Specialised: Jonathan Shaw, Life on the Reef, Episode 1, Northern Pictures (in association with the ABC)

Bronze - Current Affairs: Quentin Davis, Australian Story, ‘The Battle for Tarwyn Park’

Gold - Documentaries: Justin Hanrahan ACS, Why Anzac with Sam Neill, Essential Media and Entertainment and Frame Up Films (in association with the ABC)

Silver - Documentaries: Peter Coleman ACS, Bespoke, Episode 1 ‘Rise of the Makers’

Bronze - Documentaries: Toby Ralph, Redesign My Brain 2, Mindful Media (in association with the ABC)

Gold - Drama or Comedy and Telefeatures: Bruce Young, The Code, Episode 4, Playmaker Media (in association with the ABC)

Silver - Drama or Comedy and Telefeatures: Simon Chapman, Glitch, Episode 3, Matchbox Pictures (in association with the ABC)

2015 Kennedy Awards for Excellence in NSW Journalism

2015 NSW Journalist of the Year: Caro Meldrum-Hanna, Four Corners

Paul Lockyer Award for Outstanding Regional Broadcast Journalism: Adam Harvey, 7.30

Peter Frilingos Award for Outstanding Sport Reporting: Caro Meldrum-Hanna, Four Corners

Outstanding Television Current Affairs: Caro Meldrum-Hanna, Sam Clark and Max Murch, Four Corners, ‘Making a Killing’

Outstanding Consumer Affairs Reporting: Caro Meldrum-Hanna, Ali Russell and Mario Christodoulou, Four Corners, ‘Slaving Away’

Outstanding Investigative Reporting: Caro Meldrum-Hanna, Sam Clark and Max Murch, Four Corners, ‘Making a Killing’

Radio Current Affairs: Sharon Davis and Steven Tilley, Earshot, RN, ‘Inside the Drug Court’ series

2015 Mental Health Matters Awards

Mental Health Promotion and Wellbeing Award: Anna-Louise Bouvier, Happy Body at Work

Media Award—National/Statewide: Karina Holden, Jenni Wilks and Cian O’Clery, Changing Minds: the Inside Story, Northern Pictures (in association with the ABC)

2015 New South Wales Premier’s History Awards

Multimedia History Prize: Dan Goldberg and Margie Bryant, Brilliant Creatures, Mint Pictures and Serendipity Productions (in association with the ABC)

2015 New South Wales Regional Media Awards

All Media Broadcast Camerawork: Kim Honan, ABC Rural, (Body of Work)

All Media Feature/Documentary: William Verity, RN, ‘Voice of the Voiceless’

Radio/Audio News and Current Affairs: Aaron Kearney and Ashleigh McIntyre, Inside Out, 1233 ABC Newcastle

Television/Audio-Visual News and Current Affairs: Emily Laurence, ‘GP skin cancer patients demand compensation, changes to industry regulation’

Northern Territory

2015 Northern Territory Media Awards

Gold Award - Marchbanks Young Journalist of the Year: Ruby Jones

Television/Radio Best News Coverage: Kate Wild

All Media Best Environment/Innovation Reporting: Jane Bardon

Television/Radio Best Current Affairs or Feature: Jane Bardon and Franco Pastillo

All Media Best Scoop/Newsbreaker: James Oaten

2015 Northern Territory Recreational Fishing Awards

The Mike Reed / Overall Award for Contribution to Recreational Fishing: Mario Faggion, Tim Moore and Rob Smith, 105.7 ABC Darwin, ‘Tales from the Tinny’

Appendix 13—ABC Awards continued

Appendices 247

Appendices

Queensland

2015 Australian Cinematographers Society (ACS) Queensland Awards

Gold Award - Current Affairs: Cameron Bauer, Foreign Correspondent, ‘Odyssey’

Gold Award - Drama or Comedy Series & Telefeatures: Mark Wareham ACS, Redfern Now: Promise Me, Blackfella Films (in association with the ABC)

Gold Award - Documentaries - Cinema & TV: Lucas Tomoana, Lest We Forget What?, Pony Films (in association with the ABC)

2015 Gold Coast Media Awards (The MACCAs)

Big Macca: Nicole Dyer

Best TV feature: Ashleigh Stevenson

Best Radio Presenter: Matt Webber

Best Radio Feature: Rachel Fountain

2015 Queensland Clarion Awards for Journalism

2015 Queensland Journalist of the Year: Kathy McLeish

2015 New Journalist of the Year: Alyse Edwards

Investigative Journalism: Kathy McLeish, Michael McKinnon and Heidi Rexa, ‘The Barrett closure inquiry’

Broadcast Interview: Matt Wordsworth, ‘Bruce Flegg Interview’

Social Issues Reporting: Matt Wordsworth, Domestic Violence Series

Radio Current Affairs: Stephanie Smail, ‘Exposing a hidden threat’

2015 Queensland Rural Press Club Excellence in Rural Journalism Awards

Radio Journalism: Craig Zonca, Queensland Country Hour, ABC Rural, ‘Queensland Agriculture Minister says supporting sugar legislation would be ‘delusional’

Television: Dominique Schwartz, ABC Television, ‘Unsoiling the Reef’

Online: Marty McCarthy, ABC Rural, ‘Drought Before and After’

South Australia

2015 Archbishop of Adelaide Media Awards

St Mary Mackillop Citation: Lincoln Tyner, ABC Adelaide (Body of Work)

Television - Best News Coverage - Citation: Mike Sexton, Indigenous Education

Radio - Commendation: Annette Marner, ABC North and West SA, ‘Altered States: how the drug ice is changing country South Australia and Broken Hill’

Radio - Citation: Natalie Whiting, Coverage of Indigenous issues

2015 Australian Cinematographers’ Society Awards (SA/WA)

Bronze - Neil Davis International News: Brant Cumming

Bronze - Current Affairs: Brant Cumming, Vivid

Silver - Current Affairs: Brant Cumming, Vanuatu Appeal

Gold - John Bowring ACS TV Entertainment, TV Magazine, Breaks and Promos: Greg Ashman, Restoration Australia, Episode 1 ‘Keith Hall’

Silver - Documentaries: Brant Cumming, Foreign Correspondent, ‘The Emerald Isle’

2015 Rural Media South Australia Awards

Rural Journalist of the Year: Prue Adams

Best Rural Journalist - Radio: Danielle Grindlay

Best Rural Journalist - Television: Prue Adams

Best Rural Journalist - Online: Danielle Grindlay

2016 South Australian Media Awards

Best Community Journalist: Kate Hill

Best Coverage of Social Equity Affairs: Natalie Whiting

Best Radio News or Current Affairs or Feature Report: Carl Smith, ‘Energy Futures’

Best TV Current Affairs of Feature: Alex Mann, 7.30, ‘On The Run’

Best Radio Broadcaster: Natalie Whiting

Best Rural/Regional Journalist: Elise Fantin, ‘Palliative care saved’

Appendix 13—ABC Awards continued

248 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2016

Appendices

2015 South Australian Press Club Awards

Young Journalist of the Year: Carl Smith

Best Radio Report: Matt Doran, PM, ‘Mining company Arrium closes SA iron ore mine, axes jobs because of falling iron ore price’

Best Community Report Any Medium: Kate Hill, 891 ABC Adelaide online, ‘Inside the sex offenders rehabilitation program at Mount Gambier Prison’

Tasmania

2016 Tasmanian Media Awards

2016 Journalist of the Year: Michael Atkin (Body of Work)

Best New Journalist: Richard Baines (Body of Work)

Best Feature, Documentary or Current Affairs: Michael Atkin, ‘Easy Prey: Careers Australia and its dubious sales tactics’

Science, Environment and Health: Michael Atkin (Body of Work)

Mental Health Reporting: Jane Ryan, Earshot, RN, ‘Coming out: living with bipolar’

Victoria

2015 Australian Cinematographers Society Awards (Vic/Tas)

Gold - Neil Davis International News: Aaron Hollett, Gaza Airstrike

Gold - Neil Davis International News: Aaron Hollett, Gaza Children

Silver - Current Affairs: Aaron Hollett, Syrian Migrants

2015 Rural Press Club of Victoria Journalism and Photography Annual Awards

Best Feature Series - Broadcast: Danielle Grindlay, The Country Hour, ‘Drought policy apartheid’

Best Feature Story - Broadcast: Nikolai Beilharz, The Country Hour, ‘Why won’t Australian consumers buy more Australian grown food?’

Best Multimedia: Emily Bissland, ABC Open South West Victoria, ‘Peter Bakker: Remembering forgotten Aboriginal soldiers’

2015 Melbourne Press Club Quill Awards for Excellence in Victorian Journalism

Best Business Story in any Medium: Sarah Danckert (Fairfax Media) Adele Ferguson and Klaus Toft, Four Corners, ‘7-Eleven: The Price of Convenience’

Best TV or Video Current Affairs (Feature over 10 minutes): Richard Baker (Fairfax Media), Nick McKenzie and Klaus Toft, Four Corners, ‘True Detectives’

Grant Hattam Quill for Investigative Journalism: Caro Meldrum-Hanna and Sam Clark, Four Corners, ‘Making a Killing’

Best Radio Current Affairs Report: Jon Faine, Daniel Ziffer and Tess Armstrong, 774 ABC Melbourne, VicRoads Registration Issue

2015 The Age Music Victoria Awards

Best Jazz Album: Barney McAll, Mooroolbark

Western Australia

2014 Australian Cinematographers’ Society Awards (SA/WA)

Bronze - Documentaries: David Le May, Who’s Been Sleeping in My House?, Series 3 Episode 2 ‘Selsdon’

2015 West -Australian Media Awards

Radio/Audio Journalism - Best News Story or Feature: Caitlyn Gribbin, ‘Demanding death in custody answers’

Appendix 13—ABC Awards continued

Appendices 249

Appendices

Appendix 14—Television Transmission Channels Digital television

Australian Capital Territory Canberra 8

Tuggeranong 41

Weston Creek/Woden 41

New South Wales Adelong 39

Albury North 31

Armidale 36

Armidale North 7

Ashford 41

Balranald 40

Batemans Bay/ Moruya 41

Bathurst 7

Batlow 41

Bega 31

Bombala 47

Bonalbo 41

Bouddi 41

Bourke 6

Bowral/Mittagong 47 Braidwood 47

Broken Hill 10

Captains Flat 41

Cassilis 30

Central Tablelands 36 Central Western Slopes 12

Cobar 6

Coffs Harbour 45

Condobolin 41

Coolah 47

Cooma Town 41

Cooma/Monaro 29 Cowra 42

Crookwell 32

Deniliquin 41

Dubbo 41

Dungog 41

Eden 47

Glen Innes 41

Gloucester 29

Goodooga 7

Gosford 41

Goulburn 41

Grafton/Kempsey 36 Hay 41

Illawarra 35

Inverell 41

Ivanhoe 8

Jerilderie 41

Jindabyne 41

Kandos 47

Khancoban 46

Kings Cross 30

Kotara 37

Kyogle 41

Laurieton 41

Lightning Ridge 11

Lithgow 31

Lithgow East 47

Manly/Mosman 30

Manning River 7

Menindee 41

Merewether 37

Merriwa 43

Mudgee 41

Murrumbidgee Irrigation Area 28

Murrurundi 37

Murwillumbah 29

Narooma 47

Newcastle 37

Nowra North 47

Nyngan 41

Oberon 42

Port Stephens 30

Portland/Wallerawang 41 Richmond/Tweed 29 Stanwell Park 47

SW Slopes/E Riverina 46 Sydney 12

Talbingo 41

Tamworth 41

Tenterfield 47

Thredbo 33

Tottenham 47

Tumbarumba 41

Tumut 41

Ulladulla 28

Upper Hunter 47

Upper Namoi 29

Vacy 32

Wagga Wagga 41

Walcha 45

Walgett 40

Wilcannia 9

Wollongong 41

Wyong 41

Young 41

Northern Territory Alice Springs 8

Batchelor 41

Bathurst Island 11

Borroloola 10

Daly River 7

Darwin 30

Darwin City 41

Galiwinku 10

Groote Eylandt 7

Jabiru 7

Katherine 8

Mataranka 8

Nhulunbuy 7

Pine Creek 10

Tennant Creek 9A

Queensland Airlie Beach 39

Alpha 7

Aramac 8

Atherton 47

Augathella 7

Ayr 45

Babinda 48

Barcaldine 7

Bedourie 6

Bell 41

Birdsville 7

Blackall 7

Blackwater 47

Boonah 42

Bowen Town 39

Boyne Island 41

Brisbane 12

Cairns 8

Cairns East 42

Cairns North 35

Camooweal 7

Capella 31

Cardwell 48

Charleville 11

Charters Towers 45 Clermont 35

Cloncurry 6

Collinsville 35

Cooktown 40

Cunnamulla 11

Currumbin 50

Darling Downs 29

Dimbulah 42

Dirranbandi 7

Dysart 41

Eidsvold 47

Emerald 11

Esk 39

Georgetown 7

Gladstone East 33

Gladstone West 47

Gold Coast 41

Gold Coast Southern Hinterland 50

Goondiwindi 41

Gordonvale 48

Gympie 41

Gympie Town 49

Herberton 35

Hervey Bay 41

Hughenden 8

Injune 6

Jericho 6

Julia Creek 11

Karumba 7

Longreach 10

Mackay 28

Mareeba 42

Meandarra 47

Middlemount 35

Miles 41

Miriam Vale/Bororen 41 Mission Beach 48

Mitchell 12

Monto 41

Moranbah 48

Moranbah Town 35 Morven 8

Mossman 33

Mount Garnet 35

Mount Isa 7

Mount Molloy 42

Moura 47

Murgon 41

Muttaburra 11

Nambour 41

Nebo 35

Noosa/Tewantin 41 Normanton 8

Port Douglas 47

Proserpine 45

Quilpie 9

250 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2016

Appendices

Appendix 14—Television Transmission Channels continued Ravenshoe 42

Redlynch 47

Richmond 7

Rockhampton 34

Rockhampton East 41 Roma 8

Shute Harbour 47

Southern Downs 35 Springsure 41

St George 12

Stuart 46

Sunshine Coast North 49 Sunshine Coast South 39 Surat 10

Tambo 7

Tara 41

Taroom 10

Texas 41

Theodore 41

Thursday Island 9

Tieri 35

Toowoomba 47

Townsville 34

Townsville North 46 Tully 41

Wandoan 47

Wangetti 42

Warwick 41

Weipa 6

Wide Bay 11

Winton 7

Yeppoon 41

South Australia Adelaide 12

Adelaide Foothills 39 Andamooka 7

Bordertown 42

Burra 35

Caralue Bluff 47

Ceduna/Smoky Bay 39 Clare 47

Coffin Bay 44

Coober Pedy 7

Cowell 36

Craigmore/Hillbank 39 Hawker 47

Keith 38

Kingston SE/Robe 38 Lameroo 42

Leigh Creek South 8 Naracoorte 42

Pinnaroo 38

Port Lincoln 49

Quorn 47

Renmark/Loxton 31 Roxby Downs 40

South East (Mt Gambier) 31

Spencer Gulf North 43 Streaky Bay 11

Tumby Bay 30

Victor Harbor 39

Waikerie 47

Wirrulla 9A

Woomera 37

Wudinna 36

Tasmania Acton Road 36

Barrington Valley 48 Bicheno 36

Binalong bay 37

Burnie 47

Cygnet 44

Derby (Tas) 47

Dover 47

Dover South 43

East Devonport 35

Geeveston 35

Gladstone 47

Goshen/ Goulds Country 35 Hillwood 47

Hobart 8

Hobart City* 33

Hobart NE Suburbs 47 King Island 47

Launceston 35

Lileah 8

Lilydale 47

Maydena 42

Meander 48

Montumana IBL 47

NE Tasmania 41

New Norfolk 35

Orford 41

Penguin 35

Port Sorell 28

Queenstown/Zeehan 47

Ringarooma 29

Rosebery 32

Savage River 47

Smithton 35

St Helens 29

St Marys 47

Strahan 41

Swansea 47

Taroona 45

Ulverstone 35

Waratah 35

Wynyard 28

Victoria Alexandra 47

Alexandra Environs 41 Apollo Bay 47

Bairnsdale 35

Ballarat 35

Bendigo 29

Bonnie Doon 32

Bright 31

Bruthen 47

Cann River 47

Casterton 41

Churchill 49

Cobden 41

Colac 47

Coleraine 47

Corryong 36

Eildon 34

Eildon Town 41

Ferntree Gully 43

Foster 41

Genoa 36

Goulburn Valley 37

Halls Gap 47

Hopetoun-Beulah 33 Horsham 41

Kiewa 41

Lakes Entrance 47

Latrobe Valley 29

Lorne 35

Mallacoota 47

Mansfield 47

Marysville 35

Melbourne 12

Mildura/Sunraysia 11 Murray Valley 47

Myrtleford 47

Nhill 47

Nowa Nowa 29

Orbost 41

Portland 41

Rosebud 43

Safety Beach 43

Selby 35

Seymour 41

South Yarra 43

Tawonga South 31

Upper Murray 11

Upwey 35

Warburton 35

Warrnambool 50

Warrnambool City 29 Western Victoria 6

Yea 34

Western Australia Albany 43

Augusta 46

Bridgetown 45

Broome 9

Bruce Rock 50

Bunbury 36

Carnamah 46

Carnarvon 6

Central Agricultural 45 Cervantes 47

Cue 10

Dalwallinu 49

Dampier 28

Denham 7

Derby (WA) 9

Esperance 9A

Exmouth 7

Fitzroy Crossing 41

Geraldton 41

Halls Creek 9

Hopetoun (WA) 40

Jurien 37

Kalbarri 8

Kalgoorlie 9A

Kambalda 40

Karratha 42

Katanning 45

Ko onup 50j Kununurra 8

Kununurra East 40

Lake Grace 34

* Hobart City Temporary Infill Service

Appendices 251

Appendices

Appendix 15—Radio Transmission Frequencies Digital radio Sydney 206.352MHz Brisbane 206.352MHz Adelaide 206.352MHz Melbourne 206.352MHz Perth 206.352MHz

Analog radio ABC Local Radio

Australian Capital Territory Canberra 666

New South Wales Armidale 101.9

Ashford 107.9

Batemans Bay/ Moruya 103.5

Bega 810

Bombala 94.1

Bonalbo 91.3

Broken Hill 999

Byrock 657

Central Western Slopes 107.1

Cobar 106.1

Cooma 1602

Corowa 675

Crookwell 106.9

Cumnock Central NSW 549

Dubbo 95.9

Eden 106.3

Glen Innes 819

Gloucester 100.9

Goodooga 99.3

Gosford 92.5

Goulburn (Town) 90.3 Grafton 738

Grafton/Kempsey 92.3 Hay 88.1

Illawarra 97.3

Ivanhoe 106.1

Jindabyne 95.5

Kandos 96.3

Kempsey 684

Lightning Ridge 92.1 Lithgow 1395

Manning River 95.5

Menindee 97.3

Merriwa 101.9

Mudgee 99.5

Murrumbidgee Irrigation Area 100.5 Murrurundi 96.9

Murwillumbah 720

Muswellbrook 1044 Newcastle 1233

Nyngan 95.1

Port Stephens 95.9 Portland/ Wallerawang 94.1 Richmond/ Tweed 94.5 SW Slopes/

E Riverina 89.9

Sydney 702

Tamworth 648

Taree 756

Tenterfield 88.9

Thredbo 88.9

Tottenham 99.3

Tumut 97.9

Upper Hunter 105.7 Upper Namoi 99.1

Wagga Wagga 102.7 Walcha 88.5

Walgett 105.9

Wilcannia 1584

Young 96.3

Northern Territory Adelaide River 98.9

Alice Springs 783

Bathurst Island 91.3

Borroloola 106.1

Daly River 106.1

Darwin 105.7

Galiwinku 105.9

Groote Eylandt 106.1 Jabiru 747

Katherine 106.1

Mataranka 106.1

Newcastle Waters 106.1 Nhulunbuy 990

Pine Creek 106.1

Tennant Creek 106.1

Queensland Airlie Beach 89.9

Alpha 105.7

Atherton 720

Babinda 95.7

Bedourie 106.1

Biloela 94.9

Birdsville 106.1

Boulia 106.1

Brisbane 612

Cairns (AM) 801

Cairns 106.7

Cairns North 95.5

Camooweal 106.1

Charleville 603

Coen 105.9

Appendix 14—Television Transmission Channels continued Laverton 11

Leeman 6

Leinster 11

Leonora 10

Mandurah/Waroona 41 Manjimup 46

Marble Bar 7

Margaret River 45

Meekathurra 9

Menzies 10

Merredin 50

Mingenew 46

Moora 38

Morawa 7

Mount Magnet 9

Mullewa 46

Nannup 31

Narrembeen 50

Narrogin 50

Newman 6

Norseman 6

Northam 50

Northampton 46

Onslow 7

Pannawonica 9

Paraburdoo 9A

Pemberton 32

Perth 12

Port Hedland 8

Ravensthorpe 10

Roebourne 9A

Roleystone 41

Southern Agricultural 11 Southern Cross 7

Tom Price 12

Toodyay 47

Wagin 29

Wongan Hills 47

Wyndham 12

Yalgoo 10

Notes: This appendix lists only terrestrial transmission services for which an apparatus licence is held by the ABC.

Television transmitter statistics

ACT NSW NT Qld SA Tas Vic WA Total

3 92 15 113 32 42* 53 71421

* Includes Hobart City Temporary Infill Service

252 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2016

Appendices

Appendix 15—Radio Transmission Frequencies continued Collinsville 106.1

Cooktown 105.7

Croydon 105.9

Cunnamulla 106.1

Dimbulah 91.7

Dysart 91.7

Eidsvold 855

Emerald 1548

Georgetown 106.1 Gladstone 99.1

Glenden 92.5

Gold Coast 91.7

Goondiwindi 92.7

Greenvale 105.9

Gympie 95.3

Gympie 1566

Hughenden 1485

Injune 105.9

Julia Creek 567

Karumba 106.1

Lakeland 106.1

Laura 106.1

Longreach 540

Mackay 101.1

Middlemount 106.1 Miriam Vale 88.3

Mission Beach 89.3 Mitchell 106.1

Moranbah 104.9

Mossman 639

Mount Garnet 95.7

Mount Isa 106.5

Mount Molloy 95.7

Moura 96.1

Nambour 90.3

Normanton 105.7

Pentland 106.1

Pialba-Dundowran (Wide Bay) 855

Quilpie 106.1

Rockhampton 837

Roma 105.7

Roma/St George 711 Southern Downs 104.9 Tambo 105.9

Taroom 106.1

Theodore 105.9

Thursday Island (Torres Strait) 1062 Toowoomba 747

Townsville 630

Tully 95.5

Wandoan 98.1

Weipa 1044

Wide Bay 100.1

South Australia Adelaide 891

Andamooka 105.9

Coober Pedy 106.1 Leigh Creek South 1602 Marree 105.7

Mount Gambier 1476 Naracoorte 1161

Port Lincoln 1485

Port Pirie 639

Renmark/Loxton 1062 Roxby Downs 102.7 Streaky Bay 693

smania Ta

sebery 106.3

Western Australia Albany 630

Argyle 105.9

Augusta 98.3

Bridgetown 1044

Broome 675

Bunbury (Busselton) 684

Batemans Bay/ Moruya 105.1

Bathurst (City) 96.7

Bega/Cooma 100.9 Bonalbo 92.1

Bourke 101.1

Carnarvon 846

Cue 106.1

Dalwallinu 531

Derby 873

Esperance 837

Exmouth 1188

Fitzroy Crossing 106.1 Geraldton 828

Halls Creek 106.1

Hopetoun 105.3

Kalbarri 106.1

Kalgoorlie 648

Karratha 702

Kununurra 819

Laverton 106.1

Leonora 105.7

Manjimup 738

Woomera 1584

Bicheno 89.7

Burnie 102.5

East Devonport 100.5 Fingal 1161

Hobart 936

King Island 88.5

Launceston City 102.7 Lileah 91.3

NE Tasmania 91.7

Orford 90.5

Queenstown/ Zeehan 90.5

Ro Savage River/ Waratah 104.1

St Helens 1584

St Marys 102.7

Strahan 107.5

Swansea 106.1

Waratah 103.3

Weldborough 97.3

Victoria Alexandra 102.9

Apollo Bay 89.5

Ballarat 107.9

Bendigo 91.1

Bright 89.7

Cann River 106.1

Corryong 99.7

Eildon 98.1

Goulburn Valley 97.7 Horsham 594

Latrobe Valley 100.7 Mallacoota 104.9

Mansfield 103.7

Melbourne 774

Mildura/ Sunraysia 104.3 Murray Valley 102.1 Myrtleford 91.7

Omeo 720

Orbost 97.1

Portland 96.9

Sale 828

Upper Murray, Albury/Wodonga 106.5 Warrnambool 1602 Western Victoria 94.1

Marble Bar 105.9

Meekatharra 106.3 Menzies 106.1

Mount Magnet 105.7 Nannup 98.1

Newman 567

Norseman 105.7

Northam 1215

Pannawonica 567

Paraburdoo 567

Perth 720

Port Hedland 603

Ravensthorpe 105.9 Southern Cross 106.3 Tom Price 567

Wagin 558

Wyndham 1017

Yalgoo 106.1

ABC RN

Australian Capital Territory Canberra 846

New South Wales Armidale 720

Balranald 93.1

Broken Hill 102.9

Central Tablelands 104.3 Central Western Slopes 107.9

Cobar 107.7

Condobolin 88.9

Cooma (Town) 95.3 Crookwell 107.7

Deniliquin 99.3

Eden 107.9

Emmaville 93.1

Glen Innes 105.1

Gloucester 102.5

Goodooga 100.9

Goulburn 1098

Grafton/Kempsey 99.5 Hay 88.9

Ivanhoe 107.7

Jerilderie 94.1

Jindabyne 97.1

Kandos 100.3

Lightning Ridge 93.7 Lithgow 92.1

Manning River 97.1

Menindee 95.7

Merriwa 103.5

Appendices 253

Appendices

Appendix 15—Radio Transmission Frequencies continued Murrumbidgee Irrigation Area 98.9 Murrurundi 104.1

Newcastle 1512

Nowra 603

Port Stephens 98.3 Portland/ Wallerawang 92.5 Richmond/Tweed 96.9 SW Slopes/

E Riverina 89.1

Sydney 576

Tamworth 93.9

Tenterfield 90.5

Thredbo 90.5

Tumut 99.5

Upper Namoi 100.7 Wagga Wagga 104.3 Walcha 90.1

Walgett 107.5

Wilcannia 1485

Wollongong 1431

Young 97.1

Northern Territory Adelaide River 100.5 Alice Springs 99.7

Bathurst Island 92.9 Borroloola 107.7

Daly River 107.7

Darwin 657

Galiwinku 107.5

Groote Eylandt 107.7 Jabiru 107.7

Katherine 639

Mataranka 107.7

Newcastle Waters 107.7 Nhulunbuy 107.7

Pine Creek 107.7

Tennant Creek 684

Queensland Airlie Beach 93.1

Alpha 107.3

Aramac 107.9

Augathella 107.7

Babinda 94.1

Barcaldine 107.3

Bedourie 107.7

Birdsville 107.7

Blackall 107.9

Blackwater 94.3

Boulia 107.7

Bowen 92.7

Brisbane 792

Cairns 105.1

Cairns North 93.9

Camooweal 107.7

Capella 107.3

Charleville 107.3

Charters Towers 97.5 Clermont 107.7

Cloncurry 107.7

Coen 107.5

Collinsville 107.7

Cooktown 107.3

Corfield 107.3

Croydon 107.5

Cunnamulla 107.7

Darling Downs 105.7 Dimbulah 93.3

Dirranbandi 107.3

Dysart 93.3

Eidsvold 102.7

Emerald 93.9

Georgetown 107.7 Gladstone 95.9

Glenden 93.3

Gold Coast 90.1

Goondiwindi 94.3

Greenvale 101.9

Gympie 96.9

Herberton 93.1

Hughenden 107.5

Injune 107.5

Isisford 107.7

Jericho 107.7

Julia Creek 107.5

Karumba 107.7

Lakeland 107.7

Laura 107.7

Longreach 99.1

Mackay 102.7

Meandarra 104.3

Middlemount 107.7 Miles 92.1

Miriam Vale 89.9

Mission Beach 90.9 Mitchell 107.7

Monto 101.9

Moranbah 106.5

Morven 107.5

Mossman 90.1

Mount Garnet 97.3

Mount Isa 107.3

Mount Molloy 97.3

Moura 96.9

Muttaburra 107.7

Normanton 107.3

Pentland 107.7

Quilpie 107.7

Richmond 107.7

Rockhampton 103.1 Roma 107.3

Southern Downs 106.5 Springsure 100.9

St George 107.7

Surat 107.5

Tambo 107.5

Taroom 107.7

Theodore 107.5

Thursday Island 107.7 Townsville 104.7

Townsville North 96.7 Tully 96.3

Wandoan 98.9

Weipa 107.3

Wide Bay 100.9

Winton 107.9

South Australia Adelaide 729

Andamooka 107.5

Ceduna/ Smoky Bay 107.7

Coober Pedy 107.7 Hawker 107.5

Keith 96.9

Leigh Creek South 106.1 Marree 107.3

Mount Gambier 103.3 Quorn 107.9

Renmark/Loxton 1305 Roxby Downs 101.9 Spencer Gulf North 106.7

Streaky Bay 100.9

Tumby Bay 101.9

Wirrulla 107.3

Woomera 105.7

Wudinna 107.7

Tasmania Bicheno 91.3

Hobart 585

Lileah 89.7

NE Tasmania 94.1

Orford 88.9

Queenstown 630

Rosebery 107.9

St Helens 96.1

St Marys 101.1

Strahan 105.9

Swansea 107.7

Waratah 104.9

Weldborough 98.9

Victoria Albury/Wodonga 990 Alexandra 104.5

Bairnsdale 106.3

Bright 88.9

Cann River 107.7

Corryong 98.1

Eildon 97.3

Hopetoun (Vic) 88.3 Horsham 99.7

Mallacoota 103.3

Mansfield 105.3

Melbourne 621

Mildura/Sunraysia 105.9 Nhill 95.7

Omeo 99.7

Orbost 98.7

Portland 98.5

Swifts Creek 103.5

Wangaratta 756

Warrnambool 101.7 Western Victoria 92.5

Western Australia Argyle 107.5

Augusta 99.1

Broome 107.7

Bunbury(Busselton) 1269 Carnarvon 107.7

Cue 107.7

Dalwallinu 612

Dampier 107.9

Denham 107.5

Derby 107.5

Eneabba 107.7

Esperance 106.3

254 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2016

Appendices

Appendix 15—Radio Transmission Frequencies continued Exmouth 107.7

Fitzroy Crossing 107.7 Geraldton 99.7

Halls Creek 107.7

Hopetoun (WA) 106.9 Jurien 107.9

Kalbarri 107.7

Kalgoorlie 97.1

Kambalda 93.9

Karratha 100.9

Kununurra 107.3

Laverton 107.7

Leeman 107.3

Leonora 107.3

Marble Bar 107.5

Meekatharra 107.9 Menzies 107.7

Merredin 107.3

Mount Magnet 107.3 Mullewa 107.5

Nannup 98.9

Narembeen 107.7

Newman 93.7

Norseman 107.3

Onslow 107.5

Pannawonica 107.7 Paraburdoo 107.7

Perth 810

Port Hedland 95.7

Ravensthorpe 107.5 Roebourne 107.5

Salmon Gums 100.7 Southern Agricultural 96.9

Southern Cross 107.9 Tom Price 107.3

Wagin 1296

Wyndham 107.7

Yalgoo 107.7

ABC Classic FM

Australian Capital Territory Canberra 102.3

Tuggeranong 99.1

New South Wales Armidale 103.5

Batemans Bay/ Moruya 101.9

Bathurst (City) 97.5

Bega/Cooma 99.3

Broken Hill 103.7

Central Tablelands 102.7 Central Western Slopes 105.5

Goulburn (Town) 89.5 Grafton/Kempsey 97.9 Illawarra 95.7

Manning River 98.7

Murrumbidgee Irrigation Area 97.3

Newcastle 106.1

Richmond/Tweed 95.3 SW Slopes/ E Riverina 88.3

Sydney 92.9

Tamworth 103.1

Upper Namoi 96.7

Wagga Wagga 105.9

Northern Territory Alice Springs 97.9

Darwin 107.3

Queensland Airlie Beach 95.5

Brisbane 106.1

Cairns 105.9

Cairns North 94.7

Clermont 104.5

Darling Downs 107.3 Emerald 90.7

Gold Coast 88.5

Gympie 93.7

Mackay 97.9

Mount Isa 101.7

Nambour 88.7

Rockhampton 106.3 Roma 97.7

Southern Downs 101.7 Townsville 101.5

Townsville North 95.9 Wide Bay 98.5

South Australia Adelaide 103.9

Adelaide Foothills 97.5 Mount Gambier 104.1 Renmark/ Loxton 105.1 Roxby Downs 103.5

Spencer Gulf North 104.3

Tasmania Hobart 93.9

NE Tasmania 93.3

Victoria Ballarat (Lookout Hill) 105.5 Bendigo 92.7

Bright 88.1

Goulburn Valley 96.1 Latrobe Valley 101.5 Melbourne 105.9

Mildura/Sunraysia 102.7 Murray Valley 103.7 Upper Murray 104.1 Warrnambool 92.1

Western Victoria 93.3

Western Australia Bunbury 93.3

Central Agricultural 98.9 Esperance 104.7

Geraldton 94.9

Kalgoorlie 95.5

Narrogin 92.5

Perth 97.7

Southern Agricultural 94.5

triple j

Australian Capital Territory Canberra 101.5

Tuggeranong 95.9

New South Wales Armidale 101.1

Bathurst (City) 95.9

Bega/Cooma 100.1 Broken Hill 102.1

Central Tablelands 101.9 Central Western Slopes 102.3

Goulburn (Town) 88.7 Grafton/Kempsey 91.5 Illawarra 98.9

Manning River 96.3

Murrumbidgee Irrigation Area 96.5

Newcastle 102.1

Richmond/Tweed 96.1 SW Slopes/ E Riverina 90.7

Sydney 105.7

Tamworth 94.7

Upper Namoi 99.9

Wagga Wagga 101.1

Northern Territory Alice Springs 94.9

Darwin 103.3

Queensland Brisbane 107.7

Cairns 107.5

Cairns North 97.1

Darling Downs 104.1 Gold Coast 97.7

Mackay 99.5

Mount Isa 104.1

Nambour 89.5

Rockhampton 104.7 Southern Downs 103.3 Townsville 105.5

Townsville North 97.5 Wide Bay 99.3

South Australia Adelaide 105.5

Adelaide Foothills 95.9 Mount Gambier 102.5 Renmark/Loxton 101.9 Spencer Gulf

North 103.5

Tasmania Hobart 92.9

NE Tasmania 90.9

Victoria Ballarat (Lookout Hill) 107.1 Bendigo 90.3

Goulburn Valley 94.5 Latrobe Valley 96.7

Melbourne 107.5

Mildura/Sunraysia 101.1 Murray Valley 105.3 Upper Murray 103.3 Warrnambool 89.7

Western Victoria 94.9

Appendices 255

Appendices

Appendix 15—Radio Transmission Frequencies continued Western Australia Bunbury 94.1

Central Agricultural 98.1 Geraldton 98.9

Kalgoorlie 98.7

Perth 99.3

Southern Agricultural 92.9

NewsRadio

Australian Capital Territory Canberra 103.9

Tuggeranong 99.9

New South Wales Armidale 102.7

Batemans Bay/ Moruya 100.5

Bathurst 98.3

Bega/Cooma 89.7

Broken Hill 104.5

Central Tablelands 91.9 Central Western Slopes 106.3

Deniliquin 100.9

Gosford 98.1

Goulburn 99.9

Grafton/Kempsey 90.7 Illawarra 90.9

Inverell 93.5

Lithgow 91.3

Manning River 94.7

Mudgee 101.1

Murrumbidgee Irrigation Area 98.1 Newcastle 1458

Port Stephens 95.1 Richmond/ Tweed 98.5 SW Slopes/ E Riverina 91.5

Sydney 630

Tamworth 91.7

Upper Hunter 104.9 Upper Namoi 101.5 Wagga Wagga 105.1

Northern Territory Alice Springs 104.1

Darwin 102.5

Katherine 105.3

Queensland Airlie Beach 93.9

Bowen 96.7

Brisbane 936

Cairns 101.1

Cairns North 96.3

Emerald 89.1

Gladstone 96.7

Gold Coast 95.7

Gympie 94.5

Mackay 104.3

Mount Isa 104.9

Rockhampton 105.5 Sunshine Coast 94.5 Toowoomba 96.7

Townsville 94.3

Townsville North 93.5 Warwick 96.3

Wide Bay 97.7

South Australia Adelaide 972

Mount Gambier 105.7 Renmark/Loxton 93.9 Spencer Gulf North 102.7

Tumby Bay 91.5

Tasmania Burnie 90.5

East Devonport 102.1 Hobart 747

NE Tasmania 92.5

Victoria Bairnsdale 107.9

Ballarat 94.3

Bendigo 89.5

Colac 104.7

Goulburn Valley 107.7 Horsham 89.3

Latrobe Valley 95.1

Melbourne 1026

Mildura/Sunraysia 100.3 Murray Valley 95.9

Portland 97.7

Upper Murray 100.9 Warrnambool 91.3

Western Victoria 91.7

Western Australia Broome 106.9

Bunbury (Busselton) 1152

Carnarvon 106.1

Central Agricultural 99.7 Esperance 103.1

Geraldton 101.3

Kalgoorlie 100.3

Karratha 104.1

Perth 585

Port Hedland 94.9

Southern Agricultural 92.1

Wagin 96.3

Domestic Shortwave The frequencies used by shortwave stations to transmit are varied to obtain optimum results.

Northern Territory Alice Springs 4835kHz Katherine 5025kHz Tennant Creek 4910kHz

Notes: This appendix has listed only terrestrial transmission services with apparatus licences held by the ABC. The ABC has no control over ABC television and radio services retransmitted under Sections 212 or 212A of the Broadcasting Services Act 1992 (Cth) (the BSA).

Radio Transmitter Statistics

ACT NSW NT Qld SA Tas Vic WA Total

Digital Radio 0 1 0 1 1 0 1 15

ABC Local Radio 1 59 15 68 13 19 24 41 240

ABC Radio National 1 52 15 87 18 13 21 50 257

ABC Classic FM 2 19 2 18 6 2 11 8 68

triple j 2 18 2 13 5 2 10 658

NewsRadio 2 26 3 18 5 4 14 12 84

Domestic Shortwave 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 03

Total 8 175 40 205 48 40 81 118 715

256 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2016

Appendices

Appendix 16—Radio Australia and Australia Plus Transmission and Distribution

Radio Australia Frequencies Radio English - 24 hours

Tonga Nuku’alofa 103 FM

Fiji Nadi 106.6 FM

Suva 106.6 FM

Vanuatu Port Vila 103 FM

Santo 103 FM

Solomon Islands Honiara 107 FM

Papua New Guinea

Port Moresby 101.9 FM

Lae 102.1 FM

Timor-Leste Dili 106.4 FM

Cambodia Phnom Penh 101.5 FM

Laos Vientiane 96 FM

Samoa Apia 102 FM

Radio English - Part rebroadcast

Nauru Nauru 88.8 FM

Vanuatu Port Vila VBTC 98 FM

Paradise FM

Cook Islands 88FM 88 FM

Radio Cook Islands

630 AM

Papua New Guinea

NBC network 1 national

station and 19 provincial

Papua New Guinea

FM100 network:

Lae 100.3 FM

Kimbe 100.8 FM

Kavieng 100.3 FM

Goroka 100.2 FM

Buka 100.8 FM

Boregoro 107.7 FM

Dimodimo 107.1 FM

Samoa Samoa Quality

Broadcasting

89.9 FM

Solomon Islands Honiara 97.7/101.7

FM Paoa FM

Tuvalu Funafuti 100.1 FM

Tonga Tonga

Broadcasting

1017 AM

Languages other than English - rebroadcast partner stations

New Caledonia New Caledonia 1st FM Network 8 frequencies across New

Caledonia

French Polynesia Polynesia 1st FM Network (national broadcaster)

16

frequencies across Polynesia

Polynesia 1st AM service

738 AM

Wallis and Futuna Hinifo 101.0 FM

Mua/Hahake 100.0 FM

Sigave 89.0 FM

Sigave 90.0 FM

Alo 91.0 FM

Pidgin (Tok Pisin)

Papua New Guinea

FM100 Network:

Madang 100.8 FM

Lae 100.3 FM

Kimbe 100.8 FM

Kavieng 100.3 FM

Goroka 100.2 FM

Buka 100.8 FM

Boregoro 107.7 FM

Dimodimo 107.1 FM

NBC Provincial Stations:

Bougainville Central East New Britain East Sepik Eastern Highlands Enga Gulf Madang Manus

Appendices 257

Appendices

Appendix 16—Radio Australia and Australia Plus Transmission and Distribution continued

Pidgin (Tok Pisin)

Milne Bay Marobe New Island Northern Simbu Southern Highlands West New Britain West Sepik Western Western Highlands

Vanuatu Horeatoa 107.5 FM

Port Vila 1125 AM

Santo 1179 AM

Solomon Islands Honiara 1035 AM

Radio Khmer

Cambodia Phnom Penh 102 FM

Kva Village 102 FM

Sangkat Dankor 102 FM

Khan Dangkor 102 FM

Siem Reap 107.9 FM

Battambang 92.7 FM

Kampot 99.7 FM

Kampong Cham 92.5 FM

Radio Mandarin

China Beijing 774 AM

Shanghai Media Group: Radio Classical FM

94.7 FM

Radio Australia shortwave transmitters

Shepparton (Victoria)

3

Satellite distribution - Australia Plus and Radio Australia Australia Plus television and Radio Australia are distributed together across the Pacific, south-east Asia, north Asia and south Asia on the Intelsat 18, and Intelsat 20 satellites. This makes the two networks available to rebroadcasters and direct-to-home (DTH) across the region.

Australia Plus - rebroadcasts and free-to-air transmitters Australia Plus has more than 200 rebroadcast partners, mainly cable operators, across the Asia-Pacific region. Information on rebroadcast partners can be found at Australia Plus television’s website: http://tv.australiaplus.com/tuning

In addition, Australia Plus television is available via 24-hour free-to-air transmitter in Solomon Islands (UHF Channel 28 and VHF Channel 9a) operated under agreement with the local telecom.

258 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2016

Appendices

ABC Head Office Australian Broadcasting Corporation ABC Ultimo Centre 700 Harris Street Ultimo NSW 2007 (GPO Box 9994 Sydney NSW 2001) Phone (02) 8333 1500 Fax (02) 8333 5344 Managing Director: Michelle Guthrie

Corporate Audience and Marketing ABC Ultimo Centre 700 Harris Street Ultimo NSW 2007 (GPO Box 9994 Sydney NSW 2001) Phone (02) 8333 1500 Fax (02) 8333 5305 Director: Leisa Bacon

Corporate Affairs ABC Ultimo Centre 700 Harris Street Ultimo NSW 2007 (GPO Box 9994 Sydney NSW 2001) Phone (02) 8333 1500 Fax (02) 8333 5305 Director: Michael Millett

Corporate Strategy and Planning ABC Ultimo Centre 700 Harris Street Ultimo NSW 2007 (GPO Box 9994 Sydney NSW 2001) Phone (02) 8333 1500 Fax (02) 8333 5305 Director: David Anderson

ABC Commercial ABC Ultimo Centre 700 Harris Street Ultimo NSW 2007 (GPO Box 9994 Sydney NSW 2001) Phone (02) 8333 1500 Fax (02) 8333 3989 Director: Robert Patterson

Digital Network ABC Ultimo Centre 700 Harris Street Ultimo NSW 2007 (GPO Box 9994 Sydney NSW 2001) Phone (02) 8333 1500 Fax (02) 8333 1558 Director: Angela Clark

Editorial Policies ABC Ultimo Centre 700 Harris Street Ultimon NSW 20047 (GPO Box 9994 Sydney NSW 2001) Phone (02) 8333 1500 Fax (02) 8333 1558 Editorial Director: Alan Sunderland

ABC International ABC Southbank Centre 120 Southbank Boulevard Southbank VIC 3006 (GPO Box 9994 Melbourne VIC 3001) Phone (03) 9626 1500 Fax (03) 9626 1552 CEO: Lynley Marshall

Legal and Business Affairs ABC Ultimo Centre 700 Harris Street Ultimo NSW 2007 (GPO Box 9994 Sydney NSW 2001) Phone (02) 8333 1500 Fax (02) 8333 5860 Director: Rob Simpson

News ABC Ultimo Centre 700 Harris Street Ultimo NSW 2007 (GPO Box 9994 Sydney NSW 2001) Phone (02) 8333 1500 Fax (02) 8333 4551 Director: Gaven Morris

Operations ABC Ultimo Centre 700 Harris Street Ultimo NSW 2007 (GPO Box 9994 Sydney NSW 2001) Phone (02) 8333 1500 Fax (02) 8333 1777 Chief Operating Officer: David Pendleton

People ABC Ultimo Centre 700 Harris Street Ultimo NSW 2007 (GPO Box 9994 Sydney NSW 2001) Phone (02) 8333 1500 Fax (02) 8333 5108 Director: Samantha Liston

Radio ABC Ultimo Centre 700 Harris Street Ultimo NSW 2007 (GPO Box 9994 Sydney NSW 2001) Phone (02) 8333 1500 Fax (02) 8333 2603 Director: Michael Mason

Regional 45 Ann Street (PO Box 201) Launceston TAS 7250 (GPO Box 9994 Hobart TAS 7001) Phone (03) 6323 1011 Fax (03) 6323 1099 Director: Fiona Reynolds

Television ABC Ultimo Centre 700 Harris Street Ultimo NSW 2007 (GPO Box 9994 Sydney NSW 2001) Phone (02) 8333 1500 Fax (02) 8333 3055 Director: Richard Finlayson

Appendix 17—ABC Offices

Appendices 259

Appendices

State Offices Australian Capital Territory

Canberra Cnr Northbourne and Wakefield Avenues Dickson ACT 2602 (GPO Box 9994 Canberra ACT 2601) Phone (02) 6275 4555 Fax (02) 6275 4601 (Local Radio station: 666 ABC Canberra) Local Manager: Andrea Ho

New South Wales

Sydney ABC Ultimo Centre 700 Harris Street Ultimo NSW 2007 (GPO Box 9994 Sydney NSW 2001) Phone (02) 8333 1234 Fax (02) 8333 1203 (Local Radio station: 702 ABC Sydney) Local Manager: Cath Dwyer

Bega Unit 1, First Floor The Roy Howard Building Ayers Walkway 184 Carp Street (PO Box 336) Bega NSW 2550 Phone (02) 6491 6011 Fax (02) 6491 6099 (Local Radio station: ABC South East) Chief of Staff: Lisa Markham

Coffs Harbour 24 Gordon Street Coffs Harbour NSW 2450 Phone (02) 6650 3611 Fax (02) 6650 3699 (Local Radio station: ABC Coffs Coast) Chief of Staff: Cameron Marshall

Dubbo 45 Wingewarra Street (PO Box 985) Dubbo NSW 2830 Phone (02) 6881 1811 Fax (02) 6881 1899 (Local Radio station: ABC Western Plains) Chief of Staff: Nick Lowther

Lismore 61 High Street (PO Box 908) Lismore Heights NSW 2480 Phone (02) 6627 2011 Fax (02) 6627 2099 (Local Radio station: ABC North Coast) Chief of Staff: Justine Frazier

Muswellbrook 36A Brook Street Muswellbrook NSW 2333 Phone (02) 6542 2811 Fax (02) 6542 2899 (Local Radio station: ABC Upper Hunter) Chief of Staff: Theresa Rockley-Hogan

Newcastle 24 Wood Street (Cnr Wood and Parry Streets) Newcastle West NSW 2302 PO Box 2205 Dangar NSW 2309 Phone (02) 4922 1200 Fax (02) 4922 1222 (Local Radio station: 1233 ABC Newcastle) Chief of Staff: Theresa Rockley-Hogan

Orange 46 Bathurst Road (PO Box 8549) East Orange NSW 2800 Phone (02) 6393 2511 Fax (02) 6393 2599 (Local Radio station: ABC Central West) Chief of Staff: Brooke Daniels

Port Macquarie 51 Lord St (PO Box 42) Port Macquarie NSW 2444 Phone (02) 6588 1211 Fax (02) 6588 1299 (Local Radio station: ABC Mid North Coast) Chief of Staff: Cameron Marshall

Tamworth 470 Peel Street Level 1, Parry Shire Building (PO Box 558) Tamworth NSW 2340 Phone (02) 6760 2411 Fax (02) 6760 2499 (Local Radio station: ABC New England North West) Chief of Staff: Anna Moulder

Wagga Wagga 100 Fitzmaurice Street Wagga Wagga NSW 2650 Phone (02) 6923 4811 Fax (02) 6923 4899 (Local Radio station: ABC Riverina) Chief of Staff: Benjamin Shuhyta

Wollongong 13 Victoria St Wollongong NSW 2500 (PO Box 973 Wollongong NSW 2520) Phone (02) 4224 5011 Fax (02) 4224 5099 (Local Radio station: 97.3 ABC Illawarra) Chief of Staff: Jen Lacey

Northern Territory

Darwin 1 Cavenagh Street Darwin NT 0800 (GPO Box 9994 Darwin NT 0801) Phone (08) 8943 3222 Fax (08) 8943 3235 (Local Radio station: 105.7 ABC Darwin) Local Manager: Simon Scoble

Appendix 17—ABC Offices continued

260 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2016

Appendices

Alice Springs Cnr Gap Road and Speed Street Alice Springs NT 0870 (PO Box 1144 Alice Springs NT 0871) Phone (08) 8950 4711 Fax (08) 8950 4799 (Local Radio station: 783 ABC Alice Springs) Chief of Staff: Rick Hind

Katherine Stuart Highway Katherine NT 0850 (PO Box 1240 Katherine NT 0851) Phone (08) 8972 5711 Fax (08) 8972 5799 (Local Radio station: 106.1 ABC Katherine) Chief of Staff: Rick Hind

Queensland

Brisbane 114 Grey Street South Brisbane QLD 4101 (GPO Box 9994 Brisbane QLD 4001) Phone (07) 3377 5222 Fax (07) 3377 5612 (Local Radio station: 612 ABC Brisbane) Local Manager: Jen Brennen

Bundaberg Shop 6 58 Woongarra Street (PO Box 1152) Bundaberg QLD 4670 Phone (07) 4155 4911 Fax (07) 4155 4999 (Local Radio station: ABC Wide Bay) Chief of Staff: Scott Lamond

Cairns Cnr Sheridan and Upward Streets (PO Box 932) Cairns QLD 4870 Phone (07) 4044 2011 Fax (07) 4044 2099 (Local Radio station: ABC Far North Queensland) Chief of Staff: Kirsty Nancarrow

Gold Coast Cnr Gold Coast Highway and Francis Street (PO Box 217) Mermaid Beach QLD 4218 Phone (07) 5595 2917 Fax (07) 5595 2999 (Local Radio station: 91.7 Coast FM) Chief of Staff: Andrew Arthur

Longreach Duck Street (PO Box 318) Longreach QLD 4730; Phone (07) 4658 4011 Fax (07) 4658 4099 (Local Radio station: ABC Western Queensland) Chief of Staff: Lindsay Wright (a)

Mackay 2 Wellington Street (PO Box 127) Mackay QLD 4740 Phone (07) 4957 1111 Fax (07) 4957 1199 (Local Radio station: ABC Tropical North) Chief of Staff: Fidelis Rego

Mt Isa 114 Camooweal Street Mt Isa QLD 4825 Phone (07) 4744 1311 Fax (07) 4744 1399 (Local Radio station: ABC North West Queensland) Chief of Staff: Andrew Saunders

Rockhampton 236 Quay Street (PO Box 911) Rockhampton QLD 4700 Phone (07) 4924 5111 Fax (07) 4924 5199 (Local Radio station: ABC Capricornia) Chief of Staff: Chrissy Arthur

Sunshine Coast Level 1 15 Carnaby Street (PO Box 1212) Maroochydore QLD 4558 Phone (07) 5475 5000 Fax (07) 5475 5099 (Local Radio station: 90.3 Coast FM) Chief of Staff: Bianca Clare

Toowoomba 297 Margaret Street (PO Box 358) Toowoomba QLD 4350 Phone (07) 4631 3811 Fax (07) 4631 3899 (Local Radio station: ABC Southern Queensland) Chief of Staff: Vicki Thompson

Townsville 8-10 Wickham Street (PO Box 694) Townsville QLD 4810 Phone (07) 4722 3011 Fax (07) 4722 3099 (Local Radio station: 630 ABC North Queensland) Chief of Staff: Eleanor Gregory

South Australia

Adelaide 85 North East Road Collinswood SA 5081 (GPO Box 9994 Adelaide SA 5001) Phone (08) 8343 4881 Fax (08) 8343 4402 (Local Radio station: 891 Adelaide) Local Manager: Graeme Bennett

Broken Hill (administered by ABC South Australia) 454 Argent Street (PO Box 315) Broken Hill NSW 2880 Phone (08) 8082 4011 Fax (08) 8082 4099 (Local Radio station: 999 ABC Broken Hill) Chief of Staff: Andrew Schmidt

Appendix 17—ABC Offices continued

Appendices 261

Appendices

Mount Gambier 31 Penola Road (PO Box 1448) Mt Gambier SA 5290 Phone (08) 8724 1011 Fax (08) 8724 1099 (Local Radio station: ABC South East) Chief of Staff: Stuart Stansfield

Port Lincoln First Floor, Civic Centre 60 Tasman Terrace (PO Box 679) Port Lincoln SA 5606 Phone (08) 8683 2611 Fax (08) 8683 2699 (Local Radio station: 1485 Eyre Peninsula and West Coast) Chief of Staff: Petria Ladgrove

Port Pirie 85 Grey Terrace (PO Box 289) Port Pirie SA 5540 Phone (08) 8638 4811 Fax (08) 8638 4899 (Local Radio station: 639 ABC North and West SA) Chief of Staff: Petria Ladgrove

Renmark Ral Ral Avenue (PO Box 20) Renmark SA 5341 Phone (08) 8586 1311 Fax (08) 8586 1399 (Local Radio station: 1062 ABC Riverland) Chief of Staff: Bruce Mellett

Tasmania

Hobart ABC Centre 1-7 Liverpool Street (GPO Box 9994) Hobart TAS 7001 Phone (03) 6235 3217 Fax (03) 6235 3220 (Local Radio Station: 936 ABC Hobart) Local Manager: Jocelyn Nettlefold

Burnie 81 Mount Street (PO Box 533) Burnie TAS 7320 Phone (03) 6430 1211 Fax (03) 6430 1299 (Local Radio station: ABC Northern Tasmania) Chief of Staff: Deniker Gerrity

Launceston 45 Ann Street (PO Box 201) Launceston TAS 7250 Phone (03) 6323 1011 Fax (03) 6323 1099 (Local Radio station: ABC Northern Tasmania) Chief of Staff: Deniker Gerrity

Victoria

Melbourne ABC Southbank Centre 120 Southbank Boulevard Southbank VIC 3006 (GPO Box 9994 Melbourne VIC 3001) Phone (03) 9626 1500 Fax (03) 9626 1774 (Local Radio station: 774 ABC Melbourne) Local Manager: Warwick Tiernan

Ballarat 5 Dawson Street South Ballarat VIC 3350 (PO Box 7 Ballarat VIC 3353) Phone (03) 5320 1011 Fax (03) 5320 1099 (Local Radio station: 107.9 ABC Ballarat) Chief of Staff: Tony Allan (a)

Bendigo 278 Napier Street (PO Box 637) Bendigo VIC 3550 Phone (03) 5440 1711 Fax (03) 5440 1799 (Local Radio station: ABC Central Victoria) Chief Of Staff: Sian Gard

Horsham Shop 3 148 Baillie Street Horsham VIC 3400 (PO Box 506 Horsham VIC 3402) Phone (03) 5381 5311 Fax (03) 5381 5399 (Local Radio station: ABC Western Victoria) Chief of Staff: Tony Allan (a)

Mildura 73 Pine Ave (PO Box 10083) Mildura VIC 3502 Phone (03) 5022 4511 Fax (03) 5022 4599 (Local Radio station: ABC Mildura-Swan Hill) Chief of Staff: Lauren Henry

Sale 340 York Street (PO Box 330) Sale VIC 3850 Phone (03) 5143 5511 Fax (03) 5143 5599 (Local Radio station: ABC Gippsland) Chief of Staff: Laura Poole

Shepparton 50A Wyndham Street (PO Box 1922) Shepparton VIC 3630 Phone (03) 5820 4011 Fax (03) 5820 4099 (Local Radio Station: ABC Goulburn Murray) Chief of Staff: Gaye Pattison

Warrnambool 166B Koroit Street (PO Box 310) Warrnambool VIC 3280 Phone (03) 5560 3111 Fax (03) 5560 3199 (Local Radio station: ABC South Western Victoria) Chief of Staff: Tony Allan (a)

Appendix 17—ABC Offices continued

262 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2016

Appendices

Wodonga 1 High Street (PO Box 1063) Wodonga VIC 3690 Phone (02) 6049 2011 Fax (02) 6049 2099 (Local Radio station: ABC Goulburn Murray) Chief of Staff: Gaye Pattison

Western Australia

Perth 30 Fielder Street East Perth WA 6000 (GPO Box 9994 Perth WA 6848) Phone (08) 9220 2700 Fax (08) 9220 2727 (Local Radio station: 720 ABC Perth) Local Manager: Sarah Knight

Albany 2 St Emilie Way Albany WA 6330 Phone (08) 9842 4011 Fax (08) 9842 4099 (Local Radio Station: ABC Great Southern) Chief of Staff: Andrew Collins

Broome 23 Hamersley Street (PO Box 217) Broome WA 6725 Phone (08) 9191 3011 Fax (08) 9191 3099 (Local Radio station: ABC Kimberley) Chief of Staff: Cushla Travers

Bunbury 72 Wittenoom Street (PO Box 242) Bunbury WA 6231 Phone (08) 9792 2711 Fax (08) 9792 2799 (Local Radio station: ABC South West) Chief of Staff: Clare Negus

Esperance 80b Windich Street (PO Box 230) Esperance WA 6450 Phone (08) 9083 2011 Fax (08) 9083 2099 (Local Radio station: ABC Goldfields-Esperance) Chief of Staff: John Wibberley

Geraldton 245 Marine Terrace (PO Box 211) Geraldton WA 6531 Phone (08) 9923 4111 Fax (08) 9923 4199 (Local Radio station: ABC Midwest and Wheatbelt) Chief of Staff: Arthur Muhl

Kalgoorlie Unit 3, Quartz Centre 353 Hannan Street (PO Box 125) Kalgoorlie WA 6430 Phone (08) 9093 7011 Fax (08) 9093 7099 (Local Radio station: ABC Goldfields-Esperance) Chief of Staff: John Wibberley

Karratha DeGrey Place (PO Box 994) Karratha WA 6714 Phone (08) 9183 5011 Fax (08) 9183 5099 (Local Radio station: ABC North West) Chief of Staff: Shanelle Miller

Kununurra 114b Collibah Drive (PO Box 984) Kununurra WA 6743 Phone (08) 9168 4311 Fax (08) 9168 4399 (Local Radio station: ABC Kimberley) Chief of Staff: Cushla Travers

In addition: ABC Regional has home-based reporters in Port Augusta and Nowra

Overseas Offices

Beijing 8-121 Qi Jia Yuan Diplomatic Compound Chaoyang District Beijing 100600 China Phone +86 10 6532 6819 Fax +86 10 6532 2514

Jakarta Level 16 Deutsche Bank Jl. Imam Bonjol 80 Jakarta 10310 Indonesia Phone +62 21 390 8123 Fax +62 21 390 8124

Nairobi Nivina Towers Westlands Road Museum Hill Westlands Nairobi Kenya

London 2nd floor 4 Millbank Westminster SW1P 3JA London United Kingdom Phone +44 20 7808 1360 Fax +44 20 7799 5482

Port Moresby Airvos Avenue GPO Box 779 Port Moresby Papua New Guinea

In addition: ABC has home-based reporters in Bangkok, Beirut, Jerusalem and New Delhi

Appendix 17—ABC Offices continued

Appendices 263

Glossary

Glossary app—short for ‘application’ or ‘application software’, particularly in the context of mobile devices. An app is a computer program designed to perform a particular task or function, and may be custom-built to meet a specific need.

audio-on-demand (AOD)—the provision of audio content over the Internet so that it begins playing shortly after the user requests it. Generally, the content does not remain on the user’s computer or mobile device after it has been played.

catch-up—media content which is made available on an on-demand basis (for example, through podcasts or online streaming) following the scheduled broadcast of the content on traditional platforms.

Charter—the fundamental operating responsibilities of the ABC, as set out in section 6 of the Australian Broadcasting Corporation Act 1983.

co-production—a program produced through an agreement between the ABC and an outside producer, and potentially others, to jointly contribute money, facilities and/or staff.

cross-media/cross-platform/ multiplatform—content produced for and delivered on more than one media platform.

digital radio—the transmission of a broadcast radio signal in digital form, allowing more channels and additional data to be carried in the same spectrum as analog radio.

download—the transfer of data, including audio and video files, across the internet to the user’s computer or mobile device for later use. Unlike streamed files, downloaded files remain on the computer or device.

Electronic Program Guide (EPG)—A guide which provides users of television, radio, and other media applications with continuously updated menus displaying broadcast programming or scheduling information for current and upcoming programming.

first-release—the first time a program has been broadcast in Australia.

five-city metropolitan reach— the combined audience reach of a television service in the five cities of Adelaide, Brisbane, Melbourne, Perth and Sydney.

hashtag—a word or phrase preceded by a hash symbol (#), used on social media sites such as Twitter and Facebook to identify messages on a specific topic.

interstitial—content that is not a television program and is put to air between programs. Interstitials include station identification, program promotions, cross-promotions for radio or new media programming, ABC Commercial merchandising and community service announcements.

platform—a medium or technology for content distribution. The ABC’s primary platforms are radio, television and online/mobile.

podcasting—the provision of downloadable audio files so that the user is able to ‘subscribe’ to a program and have their computer or mobile device automatically retrieve new files as they become available. Podcasts can also be downloaded singularly, or streamed.

portal—an online or mobile website which aggregates content into a single destination.

reach—the total number of people who have viewed, listened or visited a service over a given time frame.

share—the percentage of the listening/viewing audience tuned to a particular service on a platform over a given time frame.

simulcast—simultaneous broadcast of the same content in multiple formats, such as radio and television, as required by the Broadcasting Services Act 1992.

social media—the generic term for a diverse collection of online technologies that allow users to create, publish and share content with one another, including blogs, wikis (e.g. Wikipedia), ‘micro-blogs’ (e.g. Twitter), social networking (e.g. Facebook) and photo and video sharing (sites e.g. YouTube).

streaming—’real time’ audio- or video-on-demand that is synchronised with a radio or television broadcast.

user-generated content (UGC)—media content created by audience members and published online or broadcast on radio or television.

video-on-demand (VOD)—the provision of video content over the Internet so that it begins playing shortly after the user requests it. Generally, the content does not remain on the user’s computer or mobile device after it has been played.

Acronyms/ Abbreviations ANAO Australian National Audit Office

AOD audio-on-demand

DRM Digital Ratings (Monthly)

ECRC Election Coverage Review Committee

EPG Electronic Program Guide

PGPA Act Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013

RN formerly Radio National

SVOD subscription video-on-demand

UGC user-generated content

VOD video-on-demand

WHS work health and safety

264 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2016

Index

Compliance index — statutory reporting requirements The index below shows compliance with information requirements contained in the Australian Broadcasting Corporation Act 1983 (ABC Act), the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 (PGPA Act), and the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Rule 2014 (PGPA Rule).

Statutory Reporting Requirements Page

Reports required under section 80 of the ABC Act - refer to Appendix 11 240 Requirements of section 43 the PGPA Act Financial statements 172

Auditor General’s report 170

Requirements of section 17BE of the PGPA Rule Legislation establishing the ABC 120

Summary of the ABC’s objects and functions 218

The ABC’s purpose as included in the ABC Corporate Plan 2015-16 126

Responsible Minister 120

Ministerial directions Nil

Government policy orders N/A

Annual Performance Statements 126

Statements regarding significant non-compliance 122

Information about members of the accountable authority 9

Outline of organisational structure 17

Outline of location of major activities or facilities 6; 258

Information in relation to the main corporate governance practices 120

Related entity transactions Nil

Significant activities and changes affecting the agency All sections Judicial decisions and decisions

of administrative tribunals 240

Particulars of reports on the ABC Nil

Obtaining information from subsidiaries N/A Indemnities and insurance premiums for officers 240

Index The index is arranged alphabetically word by word. References in bold indicate the primary reference/s. References in italics indicate the reference appears in a table, graphs or chart. A bold m following a page reference indicates that the reference appears in a map.

ABC Advisory Council—17, 136-8

ABC Appreciation Survey—23, 29, 30, 142-3, 151

ABC Board—

Committees—219-22

Members—9-13

Role and duties—8, 17, 80-1, 120, 226

ABC Charter—8, 24, 120, 126, 133, 218-9

ABC Classic FM—4, 32, 51, 55, 56, 131, 150-1, 154-5, 245, 254-5

ABC Code of Practice—80-1, 123-5, 129, 226-34

ABC Commercial—17, 21, 41, 73-7, 98-9, 104, 106, 114, 153, 156-8, 164, 222, 238, 241, 242, 258

ABC Executive—8, 17, 18-22, 86-7, 88, 91, 94, 120-1, 156-7, 163, 238

ABC International—5, 6m, 17, 20, 32, 36, 67m, 67-72, 93, 99, 102, 156-8, 223, 241, 258

ABC Local Radio—4, 6-7m, 38, 41, 51, 53, 59, 64, 85, 108, 111-3, 131, 150-1, 154-5, 251, 255, 259-62

ABC News 24—5, 13, 14, 34, 43-5, 53, 59, 61, 64, 66, 93, 104, 127-8, 146, 152

ABC NewsRadio—5, 64, 151, 154-5, 255

ABC Online and mobile—4-5, 23, 30, 32-9, 40-1, 42, 48, 54, 56-7, 60, 62-4, 66-9, 71, 72, 74-5, 76, 77, 83, 85, 87, 88, 90-1, 92-3, 94, 97, 98, 99, 106, 109, 111, 113, 116, 124, 129-30, 138, 142-5, 152, 226, 242, 245, 247-8

ABC Regional—4, 15, 17, 29, 40, 51, 56, 58-60, 77, 85, 90-1, 93, 99, 106-7, 111-3, 115, 156-8, 223, 241, 258-62

ABC Retail—5, 15, 29, 73-6, 104, 114, 153, 156-7, 163, 220, 222

ABC RN—4, 36, 38, 54-5, 131, 150

ABC Shops—5, 73-5, 114

Appendices 265

Index

ABC Strategy—8, 15, 17, 58, 67, 68, 84, 86-7, 90, 97, 98, 99, 103, 110, 120, 121, 135, 157, 222-3, 224, 258

ABC Values—25, 86, 88, 103, 115

apps—4, 23, 32-5, 37, 38, 63, 64, 66, 68, 70, 92, 109, 145, 146, 241

Appropriation—97, 122, 164-5

see also funding

arts—16, 34, 41, 51, 55, 68, 70, 75, 77, 93, 97, 138, 142, 149, 150, 234-7, 241, 242, 243, 245

Audience and Consumer Affairs—80, 123, 123-4, 129

Audit and Risk Committee—120-1, 220-2

audit, internal—17, 120-1, 221-2

Australian content—40-1, 44-5, 48, 56-7, 67, 73, 77, 99, 130, 133, 148-50, 225,

Australian National Audit Office (ANAO)—221-2

awards—50, 52, 57, 88, 241-8

balance—81, 82, 104, 123, 142, 151, 228

bias—83, 123, 123, 124

Board—see ABC Board

Bonner Committee—134-5

business continuity—84, 121, 221

Charter—see ABC Charter

Capital City Radio—4, 38, 51, 151

Classic FM—see ABC Classic FM

Code of Practice—see ABC Code of Practice

community—23, 29, 30, 51, 64, 70-72, 85, 92-3, 98, 102-5, 111-3, 129, 135, 136-8, 142-3, 218, 224-5, 228-9, 244, 247, 248

complaints—16, 80, 82-3, 99, 114, 123-4, 123-5, 129, 227, 231

consultants—115, 238-9

Corporate Plan—8, 121-2, 126-33

digital radio—4, 38, 53, 132, 154-5, 251, 255

Editorial Policies—15, 16, 80-1, 91, 104, 106, 113, 123-4, 130, 157, 241, 258

education—40, 47, 72, 77, 105, 131, 142, 218, 225, 245, 247

Editorial Reviews—16, 80-1, 130

efficiency—14-5, 74, 84, 108, 219, 220

Election Coverage Review Committee (ECRC)—82

emergency broadcasting—61, 72, 111-3, 115

Federal Budget—14-5, 61, 62, 66

fraud—221-2

Freedom of Information (FOI)—122-3

Funding—14-15, 23, 59, 99, 131, 164-5

—see also Appropriation

Governance—8, 97, 99, 102, 103, 120-38, 220, 221, 222, 222, 240

Group Audit—17, 120-1, 221-2

hours broadcast—130, 148-50, 234-7

independence—8, 80, 81, 120, 218, 220, 227

Indigenous—41, 45, 50, 53, 55, 57, 81, 89, 134-5, 138, 149, 150, 156, 223, 234-7, 242, 247

international bureaux—6m, 262

iview—4, 14, 29, 33-6, 41, 42, 44-5, 47, 50, 57, 59, 66, 92-3, 99, 104-5, 106, 107, 123, 138, 145, 225, 237

Local Radio—see ABC Local Radio

mobile—4, 23, 32-8, 63, 64, 67, 68, 71, 77, 91, 106, 109, 129, 226

national identity—13, 142, 218

NewsRadio—see ABC NewsRadio

Occupational Health and safety (OHS)—see work health and safety (WHS)

overseas travel costs—239

podcasts—38, 40, 52, 55, 64, 77, 91, 131

Radio Australia—4, 67m, 67-9, 70-1, 72, 153, 255, 256-7

Regional Local Radio—see ABC Regional

reception—123, 133

reviews—see Editorial Reviews

RN (Radio National)—see ABC RN

social responsibility—102, 111-6

work health and safety (WHS)—90, 94-5, 102, 120, 158-9

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GPO Box 9994

in your state/territory capital

Phone 13 9994

Fax 02 8333 5344

TTY 1800 627 854

abc.net.au