Note: Where available, the PDF/Word icon below is provided to view the complete and fully formatted document
Auditor-General Audit reports for 2012-13 No. 52 Performance audit Management of debt relief arrangements: Australian Taxation Office


Download PDF Download PDF

T h e A u d i t o r - G e n e r a l

Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Performance Audit

Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

Australian Taxation Office

A u s t r a l i a n N a t i o n a l A u d i t O f f i c e

 

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

2

   

© Commonwealth of Australia 2013 

ISSN 1036-7632 ISBN 0 642  81376 0 (Print)  ISBN 0 642  81377 9 (On‐line) 

Except for the content in this document supplied by third parties, the Australian National Audit Office logo, the Commonwealth Coat of Arms, and any material protected by a trade mark, this document is licensed by the

Australian National Audit Office for use under the terms of a

Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 3.0 Australia licence. To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/au/

You are free to copy and communicate the document in its current form for non-commercial purposes, as long as you attribute the document to the Australian National Audit Office and abide by the other licence terms. You may not alter or adapt the work in any way.

Permission to use material for which the copyright is owned by a third party must be sought from the relevant copyright owner. As far as practicable, such material will be clearly labelled.

For terms of use of the Commonwealth Coat of Arms, visit It’s an Honour at http://www.itsanhonour.gov.au/coat-arms/index.cfm.

Requests and inquiries concerning reproduction and rights should be addressed to:

Executive Director Corporate Management Branch Australian National Audit Office 19 National Circuit BARTON ACT 2600

Or via email: webmaster@anao.gov.au

 

         

 

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

2

   

© Commonwealth of Australia 2013 

ISSN 1036-7632 ISBN 0 642  81376 0 (Print)  ISBN 0 642  81377 9 (On‐line) 

Except for the content in this document supplied by third parties, the Australian National Audit Office logo, the Commonwealth Coat of Arms, and any material protected by a trade mark, this document is licensed by the

Australian National Audit Office for use under the terms of a

Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 3.0 Australia licence. To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/au/

You are free to copy and communicate the document in its current form for non-commercial purposes, as long as you attribute the document to the Australian National Audit Office and abide by the other licence terms. You may not alter or adapt the work in any way.

Permission to use material for which the copyright is owned by a third party must be sought from the relevant copyright owner. As far as practicable, such material will be clearly labelled.

For terms of use of the Commonwealth Coat of Arms, visit It’s an Honour at http://www.itsanhonour.gov.au/coat-arms/index.cfm.

Requests and inquiries concerning reproduction and rights should be addressed to:

Executive Director Corporate Management Branch Australian National Audit Office 19 National Circuit BARTON ACT 2600

Or via email: webmaster@anao.gov.au

 

         

 

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

3

Canberra ACT 25 June 2013

Dear Mr President Dear Madam Speaker

The Australian National Audit Office has undertaken an independent performance audit in the Australian Taxation Office with the authority contained in the Auditor-General Act 1997. I present the report of this audit to the Parliament. The report is titled Management of Debt Relief Arrangements.

Following its presentation and receipt, the report will be placed on the Australian National Audit Office’s Homepage—http://www.anao.gov.au.

Yours sincerely

Ian McPhee Auditor-General

The Honourable the President of the Senate The Honourable the Speaker of the House of Representatives Parliament House Canberra ACT    

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

4

AUDITING FOR AUSTRALIA

The Auditor-General is head of the Australian National Audit Office (ANAO). The ANAO assists the Auditor-General to carry out his duties under the Auditor-General Act 1997 to undertake performance audits, financial statement audits and assurance reviews of Commonwealth public sector bodies and to provide independent reports and advice for the Parliament, the Australian Government and the community. The aim is to improve Commonwealth public sector administration and accountability.

For further information contact: The Publications Manager Australian National Audit Office GPO Box 707 Canberra ACT 2601

Telephone: (02) 6203 7505 Fax: (02) 6203 7519

Email: webmaster@anao.gov.au

ANAO audit reports and information about the ANAO are available at our internet address:

http://www.anao.gov.au

Audit Team Jane Whyte Therese McCormick Nathan Callaway

Andrew Morris

 

 

   

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

5

Contents Abbreviations .................................................................................................................. 7 

Summary and Recommendations .............................................................................. 9 

Summary ...................................................................................................................... 10 

Introduction ............................................................................................................. 10 

Audit objective and criteria ...................................................................................... 13 

Overall conclusion ................................................................................................... 14 

Key findings by chapter ........................................................................................... 15 

Summary of agency response ................................................................................ 20 

Recommendations ....................................................................................................... 22 

Audit Findings ............................................................................................................ 23 

1.  Background and Context ........................................................................................ 24 

Introduction ............................................................................................................. 24 

Debt relief options ................................................................................................... 27 

The ATO’s arrangements for managing debt relief ................................................. 32 

Published reports relating to the ATO’s management of debt ................................ 34  Audit objective, criteria and methodology ............................................................... 35 

2.  Engaging with Tax Debtors and Supporting Debt Staff .......................................... 37 

Introduction ............................................................................................................. 37 

Information and community engagement activities ................................................. 38 

Supporting ATO staff in the management of debt relief cases ............................... 41  Conclusion .............................................................................................................. 46 

3.  Assessing Debt Relief Applications ........................................................................ 48 

Background ............................................................................................................. 48 

Assessment and decision making processes ......................................................... 48 

Quality assurance processes .................................................................................. 63 

Conclusion .............................................................................................................. 72 

4.  Automated Debt Relief Processes .......................................................................... 75 

Bulk non-pursuit process ........................................................................................ 78 

Re-raising non-pursued debts ................................................................................. 82 

Standalone systems supporting the Debt Hardship Capability team ...................... 83  GIC remission ......................................................................................................... 85 

Conclusion .............................................................................................................. 86 

5.  Reporting of Debt Relief Arrangements .................................................................. 88 

Background ............................................................................................................. 88 

Management reporting of debt relief ....................................................................... 89 

External reporting of debt relief ............................................................................... 96 

Conclusion .............................................................................................................. 97 

 

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

4

AUDITING FOR AUSTRALIA

The Auditor-General is head of the Australian National Audit Office (ANAO). The ANAO assists the Auditor-General to carry out his duties under the Auditor-General Act 1997 to undertake performance audits, financial statement audits and assurance reviews of Commonwealth public sector bodies and to provide independent reports and advice for the Parliament, the Australian Government and the community. The aim is to improve Commonwealth public sector administration and accountability.

For further information contact: The Publications Manager Australian National Audit Office GPO Box 707 Canberra ACT 2601

Telephone: (02) 6203 7505 Fax: (02) 6203 7519

Email: webmaster@anao.gov.au

ANAO audit reports and information about the ANAO are available at our internet address:

http://www.anao.gov.au

Audit Team Jane Whyte Therese McCormick Nathan Callaway

Andrew Morris

 

 

   

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

6

Appendices ................................................................................................................. 99 

Appendix 1:  Agency response .............................................................................. 100 

Index ........................................................................................................................... 101 

Series Titles ................................................................................................................ 102 

Current Better Practice Guides .................................................................................. 108 

Tables

Table S.1 Waiver, release, and compromise applications received, finalised and granted in 2011-12 ....................................................... 12 

Table 1.1 Debt relief applications finalised and granted in 2011-12 .................. 31  Table 1.2 Report structure .................................................................................. 36 

Table 2.1 Number of courses completed relevant to debt relief, for the period March 2010 to March 2013 ..................................................... 45 

Table 3.1 Factors considered when assessing release applications ................. 52  Table 3.2 Release applications processed from 1 July 2011 to 31 December 2012 ............................................................................. 53 

Table 3.3 Debt values and delegations—release ............................................... 56 

Table 3.4 Value of compromised debts, 1 July 2009 to 31 December 2012 ..... 58  Table 3.5 Enterprise quality assurance re-design project, processes and outcomes ............................................................................................ 66 

Table 3.6 Objections to debt release decisions for the period 2010-11 to 22 February 2013 ............................................................................... 70 

Table 3.7 Debt release appeals to the Administrative Appeals Tribunal ............ 72  Table 5.1 Reasons for non-pursuit of debt in 2011-12 ...................................... 92 

Table 5.2 GIC reported in annual reports and ATO Finance reports, 2011-12 .............................................................................................. 97 

 

Figures

Figure 1.1 Age profile of collectable debt, 30 June 2012 .................................... 26 

Figure 1.2 Structure of the Debt business line as at 1 July 2012 ........................ 33 

Figure 4.1 Debt management process flow ......................................................... 78 

Figure 4.2 Bulk non-pursuit process workflow in the legacy systems ................. 80 

 

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

6

Appendices ................................................................................................................. 99 

Appendix 1:  Agency response .............................................................................. 100 

Index ........................................................................................................................... 101 

Series Titles ................................................................................................................ 102 

Current Better Practice Guides .................................................................................. 108 

Tables

Table S.1 Waiver, release, and compromise applications received, finalised and granted in 2011-12 ....................................................... 12 

Table 1.1 Debt relief applications finalised and granted in 2011-12 .................. 31  Table 1.2 Report structure .................................................................................. 36 

Table 2.1 Number of courses completed relevant to debt relief, for the period March 2010 to March 2013 ..................................................... 45 

Table 3.1 Factors considered when assessing release applications ................. 52  Table 3.2 Release applications processed from 1 July 2011 to 31 December 2012 ............................................................................. 53 

Table 3.3 Debt values and delegations—release ............................................... 56 

Table 3.4 Value of compromised debts, 1 July 2009 to 31 December 2012 ..... 58  Table 3.5 Enterprise quality assurance re-design project, processes and outcomes ............................................................................................ 66 

Table 3.6 Objections to debt release decisions for the period 2010-11 to 22 February 2013 ............................................................................... 70 

Table 3.7 Debt release appeals to the Administrative Appeals Tribunal ............ 72  Table 5.1 Reasons for non-pursuit of debt in 2011-12 ...................................... 92 

Table 5.2 GIC reported in annual reports and ATO Finance reports, 2011-12 .............................................................................................. 97 

 

Figures

Figure 1.1 Age profile of collectable debt, 30 June 2012 .................................... 26 

Figure 1.2 Structure of the Debt business line as at 1 July 2012 ........................ 33 

Figure 4.1 Debt management process flow ......................................................... 78 

Figure 4.2 Bulk non-pursuit process workflow in the legacy systems ................. 80 

 

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

7

Abbreviations

AAT  Administrative Appeals Tribunal 

ANAO  Australian National Audit Office 

ATO  Australian Taxation Office 

BNP  Bulk non‐pursuit 

CAS  Client Account Services 

Debt QMS  Debt Quality Management System 

DBL  Debt business line 

DBP  Debt Best Practice team 

DHC  Debt Hardship Capability team 

Finance  Department of Finance and Deregulation 

FMA Act  Financial Management and Accountability Act 1997 

GIC  General interest charge 

ICP  Integrated Core Processing system 

ICT  Information and Communication Technology 

INP  Individually non‐pursued 

IQF  Integrated Quality Framework 

L&D  Learning and development 

ME&I  Micro Enterprises and Individuals business line 

PAYG  Pay‐as‐you‐go tax withholding 

POCA  Proceeds of Crime Act 2002 

PS LA  Practice Statement Law Administration  

TAA  Taxation Administration Act 1953 

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

9

Summary and Recommendations  

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

9

Summary and Recommendations  

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

10

Summary

Introduction 1. The Australian Taxation Office (ATO) is responsible for administering  Australia’s tax and superannuation legislation, and seeks to build confidence  in its administration through helping people to understand their rights and  obligations, improve ease of compliance and access to benefits, and manage  non‐compliance with the law. The effective management of debt is also a key  factor  in  maintaining  community  confidence  in  the  fairness  and  equity  of  Australia’s tax and superannuation systems. 

2. A  debt  arises  when  a  tax,  duty  or  charge  becomes  legally  due  and  payable.1 The ATO expects tax debtors to pay their debts as and when they fall  due for payment. However, if the debt is not paid by the due date, the ATO  can  take  appropriate  action  to  recover  it.  The  ATO’s  policy  is  to  adopt  a  ‘community first’ approach when deciding the recovery options it will take,  and differentiates between taxpayers who are trying to do the right thing and  meet their obligations, and those who are not.2 Accordingly, the ATO takes  into account the compliance history of taxpayers and their capacity to pay a tax  debt. 

3. The ATO encourages people to contact them as soon as practicable if  they  are  experiencing  difficulties  in  meeting  their  tax  or  superannuation  obligations, and will assist them to manage their obligations and prevent their  debt from escalating. Information relating to financial hardship is available on  the  ATO’s  website,  and  the  ATO  also  conducts  a  range  of  community  engagement  activities  to  communicate  its  messages  to  taxpayers.  While  the  ATO has measures in place to identify and support taxpayers who may be  experiencing  financial  difficulties,  the  onus  is  on  taxpayers  or  their  representatives to contact the ATO and discuss their financial circumstances  and debt payment arrangements. 

4. Debt  recovery  options  available  to  the  ATO  include  negotiating  a  payment  arrangement  to  allow  taxpayers  to  pay  their  debt  over  an  agreed  period  of  time,  using  garnishee  powers  to  collect  the  debt  directly  from  a 

                                                       1 This report refers to these debts broadly as taxation debt. 2

Commissioner of Taxation, Annual Report 2011-12, p. 44.

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

10

Summary

Introduction 1. The Australian Taxation Office (ATO) is responsible for administering  Australia’s tax and superannuation legislation, and seeks to build confidence  in its administration through helping people to understand their rights and  obligations, improve ease of compliance and access to benefits, and manage  non‐compliance with the law. The effective management of debt is also a key  factor  in  maintaining  community  confidence  in  the  fairness  and  equity  of  Australia’s tax and superannuation systems. 

2. A  debt  arises  when  a  tax,  duty  or  charge  becomes  legally  due  and  payable.1 The ATO expects tax debtors to pay their debts as and when they fall  due for payment. However, if the debt is not paid by the due date, the ATO  can  take  appropriate  action  to  recover  it.  The  ATO’s  policy  is  to  adopt  a  ‘community first’ approach when deciding the recovery options it will take,  and differentiates between taxpayers who are trying to do the right thing and  meet their obligations, and those who are not.2 Accordingly, the ATO takes  into account the compliance history of taxpayers and their capacity to pay a tax  debt. 

3. The ATO encourages people to contact them as soon as practicable if  they  are  experiencing  difficulties  in  meeting  their  tax  or  superannuation  obligations, and will assist them to manage their obligations and prevent their  debt from escalating. Information relating to financial hardship is available on  the  ATO’s  website,  and  the  ATO  also  conducts  a  range  of  community  engagement  activities  to  communicate  its  messages  to  taxpayers.  While  the  ATO has measures in place to identify and support taxpayers who may be  experiencing  financial  difficulties,  the  onus  is  on  taxpayers  or  their  representatives to contact the ATO and discuss their financial circumstances  and debt payment arrangements. 

4. Debt  recovery  options  available  to  the  ATO  include  negotiating  a  payment  arrangement  to  allow  taxpayers  to  pay  their  debt  over  an  agreed  period  of  time,  using  garnishee  powers  to  collect  the  debt  directly  from  a 

                                                       1 This report refers to these debts broadly as taxation debt. 2

Commissioner of Taxation, Annual Report 2011-12, p. 44.

Summary

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

11

taxpayer’s bank account or salary, or as a last resort seeking payment of the  debt through court action. The ATO may also decide not to pursue the liability,  or to reduce or cancel the amount of debt the taxpayer owes. These options are  referred to collectively in this report as ‘debt relief’ arrangements.  

5. Debt  relief  options  include:  the  waiver3  of  debt;  full  or  partial  release  from tax liabilities where payment may cause serious hardship to taxpayers4;  and acceptance of a compromised amount of revenue against the full value of  the debt where it has assessed that the entire balance is unlikely to be paid. The  ATO may also decide not to pursue a debt where it is uneconomical to do so or  irrecoverable at law, including through automated bulk processes for lower  value and aged debts that have been in the system for some time.5  

6. In addition to their primary debt, taxpayers may be liable for general  interest and penalty charges.6 In certain circumstances, the ATO may agree to a  remission of the general interest and penalty charges, meaning that all or part of  the general interest charge that has accrued, including for the late payment of a  debt, is cancelled.7 Each debt relief option is governed by specific legislation,  delegations and criteria, subject to the type of tax for which the debt arises. 

7. Debt relief options can only be applied to collectable debt—that is, debt  that  is  not  subject  to  objection  or  appeal  or  any  form  of  insolvency  administration. The ATO was managing $31.7 billion in total debt holdings as  at 30 June 20128, of which $16.6 billion was collectable debt and $15.1 billion  was  impeded  debt.9  The  age  of  the  collectable  debt  varies,  with  around  $7.0 billion  being  outstanding  for  more  than  two  years,  including  over  $1.5 billion for more than five years; aged debt being generally more difficult  to  recover.  Activity  statement  debt  (particularly  relating  to  the  goods  and  services tax) and income tax debt accounted for the bulk of the collectable debt: 

                                                       3 A debt due to the Commonwealth can only be waived—that is, expunged and not subsequently recovered or re-raised—by the Finance Minister or appointed delegate. 4

Serious hardship is where an individual is ‘deprived of necessities according to normal community standards’: ATO, Practice Statement Law Administration, PS LA 2011/17: Debt relief. 5 Debts that the ATO decides not to pursue may be re-raised at a later date if changes to a taxpayer’s circumstances

would support collection of the debt. 6 The ATO applies a range of interest charges where taxpayers have not paid the full amount of the tax debt, or not paid by the due date, in order to compensate the Government for the time value of money. Penalties are imposed where

taxpayers have failed to meet their tax obligations, such as to lodge a tax return. 7 ATO policy states that it is inappropriate to remit the general interest charge as an inducement to finalise a debt. ATO, Practice Statement Law Administration, PS LA 2011/12. 8

Commissioner of Taxation, Annual Report 2011-12, p. 58. 9 Impeded debt is subject to legal requirements, such as the taxpayer undergoing insolvency proceedings or disputing the debt owed to the ATO. There are no available debt relief options for impeded debt.

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

12

$9.1 billion in activity statement debt, and $7.1 billion in income tax debt.10 All  collectable  debt  is  subject  to  the  ATO’s  debt  management  and  recovery  processes, including where taxpayers are eligible for some form of debt relief. 

8. The value of debts subject to some form of debt relief in 2011-12 was  $4.6 billion. Of this amount: $2.4 billion was not pursued11 either because the  debts were uneconomic to pursue or irrecoverable at law12; $1.6 billion was for  remission of general interest charges; $391 million was for remission of penalty  charges;  $184.2 million  was  compromised;  $60.6 million  was  released;  and  around $200 000 was waived. The number and value of applications received  and granted waiver, release, and compromise from debt in 2011-12 are set out  in Table S1. The table indicates that 62 per cent of the applications finalised  were granted full or partial relief of their debt.  

Table S.1

Waiver, release, and compromise applications received, finalised and granted in 2011-12

Debt relief Number of applications received

Number of applications finalised1

Value of applications finalised ($ million)

Number and per cent of finalised applications

granted release

Value of debt not collected ($ million)

Release 6165 3863 198.9 2439 (63%) 60.6

Compromise 27 23 Not Available 16 (70%) 184.2

Waiver 59 51 7.1 4 (8%) 0.2

Total 6251 3937 Not Available 2459 (62%) 245.0

Source: ATO. Note 1: Applications may not be finalised in the year that they are received. The difference between the number of release applications received and finalised in 2011-12 was mainly due to a high number of applications being received late in the financial year, and 1573 applications ‘finalised without

decision’, where taxpayers failed to bring all lodgements up to date or did not provide the required information.

                                                       10 The remaining $0.3 billion mainly related to superannuation guarantee charge debt. 11

The ATO’s financial statements allow for the non-collection of revenue amounts (including debt subject to relief arrangements) by providing for the impairment of taxation receivables. In 2011-12, the ATO’s financial statements disclose in Note 19 total taxation receivable (gross) of $31.7 billion and an allowance for impairment of $11.5 billion. While debts that are not pursued because they are uneconomical to do so are impaired in the financial statements, they can be re-raised (as outlined in footnote 5). 12

This figure includes around $462 million not pursued in 2011-12 as a result of automated bulk non-pursuit processes in the legacy systems that identified large volumes of lower value and aged debts and some that were irrecoverable at law. The ICP system has identified almost $50 million of lower value and aged debts for non-pursuit since its inception in September 2010.

Summary

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

13

9. Of  those  cases  granted  full  or  partial  relief  of  their  debts  through  release, compromise or waiver in 2011-12, most (69 per cent) involved relief of  between $2500 and $50 000, while 81 per cent of the total value of relief was  granted to cases where the relief exceeded $100 000.13 

Administration of taxation debt

10. The  ATO’s  Debt  business  line  has  primary  responsibility  for  the  management and reporting of debt, including debt relief. Guidance material,  staff training and appropriate delegations support the assessment of debt relief  applications. The ATO also applies a quality assurance regime to its debt relief  processes and practices, and taxpayers have various rights of review of the  decisions the ATO has made about their application for debt relief. 

11. In  managing  debt  cases,  the  ATO  relies  on  two  information  and  communications technology (ICT) systems—a new integrated core processing  system established in 2010 that operates in parallel with a number of legacy  systems.14  Taxpayers  may  have  several  accounts  in  these  two  systems,  and  while  this  situation  has  little  impact  on  individual  taxpayers  it  creates  additional work for ATO staff to assess and manage debt relief cases as they  must use information from both systems. 

Audit objective and criteria 12. The objective of the audit was to assess the effectiveness of the ATO’s  administration of debt relief arrangements. The audit assessed whether: 

 information was readily available on debt relief options to people in  serious hardship; 

 those cases being considered for debt relief were effectively assessed; 

 debt cases that were not pursued and re‐raised or cancelled at a later  date were being appropriately managed; and 

 debt relief outcomes were accurately reported. 

The  ATO’s  communication  with  taxpayers  and  key  stakeholders  was  also  examined. 

                                                       13 The ATO did not maintain statistics on the age of debt relief cases. 14

The ICP system processes, among other things, income tax and fringe benefits tax. The legacy systems process taxes that include goods and services tax, pay-as-you-go (PAYG) tax installments, excise, and superannuation guarantee.

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

12

$9.1 billion in activity statement debt, and $7.1 billion in income tax debt.10 All  collectable  debt  is  subject  to  the  ATO’s  debt  management  and  recovery  processes, including where taxpayers are eligible for some form of debt relief. 

8. The value of debts subject to some form of debt relief in 2011-12 was  $4.6 billion. Of this amount: $2.4 billion was not pursued11 either because the  debts were uneconomic to pursue or irrecoverable at law12; $1.6 billion was for  remission of general interest charges; $391 million was for remission of penalty  charges;  $184.2 million  was  compromised;  $60.6 million  was  released;  and  around $200 000 was waived. The number and value of applications received  and granted waiver, release, and compromise from debt in 2011-12 are set out  in Table S1. The table indicates that 62 per cent of the applications finalised  were granted full or partial relief of their debt.  

Table S.1

Waiver, release, and compromise applications received, finalised and granted in 2011-12

Debt relief Number of applications received

Number of applications finalised 1

Value of applications finalised ($ million)

Number and per cent of finalised applications

granted release

Value of debt not collected ($ million)

Release 6165 3863 198.9 2439 (63%) 60.6

Compromise 27 23 Not Available 16 (70%) 184.2

Waiver 59 51 7.1 4 (8%) 0.2

Total 6251 3937 Not Available 2459 (62%) 245.0

Source: ATO. Note 1: Applications may not be finalised in the year that they are received. The difference between the number of release applications received and finalised in 2011-12 was mainly due to a high number of applications being received late in the financial year, and 1573 applications ‘finalised without

decision’, where taxpayers failed to bring all lodgements up to date or did not provide the required information.

                                                       10 The remaining $0.3 billion mainly related to superannuation guarantee charge debt. 11

The ATO’s financial statements allow for the non-collection of revenue amounts (including debt subject to relief arrangements) by providing for the impairment of taxation receivables. In 2011-12, the ATO’s financial statements disclose in Note 19 total taxation receivable (gross) of $31.7 billion and an allowance for impairment of $11.5 billion. While debts that are not pursued because they are uneconomical to do so are impaired in the financial statements, they can be re-raised (as outlined in footnote 5). 12

This figure includes around $462 million not pursued in 2011-12 as a result of automated bulk non-pursuit processes in the legacy systems that identified large volumes of lower value and aged debts and some that were irrecoverable at law. The ICP system has identified almost $50 million of lower value and aged debts for non-pursuit since its inception in September 2010.

Summary

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

13

9. Of  those  cases  granted  full  or  partial  relief  of  their  debts  through  release, compromise or waiver in 2011-12, most (69 per cent) involved relief of  between $2500 and $50 000, while 81 per cent of the total value of relief was  granted to cases where the relief exceeded $100 000.13 

Administration of taxation debt

10. The  ATO’s  Debt  business  line  has  primary  responsibility  for  the  management and reporting of debt, including debt relief. Guidance material,  staff training and appropriate delegations support the assessment of debt relief  applications. The ATO also applies a quality assurance regime to its debt relief  processes and practices, and taxpayers have various rights of review of the  decisions the ATO has made about their application for debt relief. 

11. In  managing  debt  cases,  the  ATO  relies  on  two  information  and  communications technology (ICT) systems—a new integrated core processing  system established in 2010 that operates in parallel with a number of legacy  systems.14  Taxpayers  may  have  several  accounts  in  these  two  systems,  and  while  this  situation  has  little  impact  on  individual  taxpayers  it  creates  additional work for ATO staff to assess and manage debt relief cases as they  must use information from both systems. 

Audit objective and criteria 12. The objective of the audit was to assess the effectiveness of the ATO’s  administration of debt relief arrangements. The audit assessed whether: 

 information was readily available on debt relief options to people in  serious hardship; 

 those cases being considered for debt relief were effectively assessed; 

 debt cases that were not pursued and re‐raised or cancelled at a later  date were being appropriately managed; and 

 debt relief outcomes were accurately reported. 

The  ATO’s  communication  with  taxpayers  and  key  stakeholders  was  also  examined. 

                                                       13 The ATO did not maintain statistics on the age of debt relief cases. 14

The ICP system processes, among other things, income tax and fringe benefits tax. The legacy systems process taxes that include goods and services tax, pay-as-you-go (PAYG) tax installments, excise, and superannuation guarantee.

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

14

Overall conclusion 13. In  managing  taxation  debt,  the  ATO  must  balance  support  for  taxpayers  experiencing  financial  hardship  with  its  responsibilities  to  collect  revenue. The decision to reduce or cancel a debt represents a loss of revenue  for the Commonwealth, and may also advantage one taxpayer over another if  debt relief decisions are not consistently applied. In 2011‐12, the ATO collected  $301 billion in taxation revenue, had collectable debt holdings of $16.6 billion  and granted $4.6 billion in debt relief.15 

14. The  ATO’s  management  of  debt  relief  arrangements  is  generally  effective, given the volume of transactions and the extent of the need to have  regard  to  taxpayers’  personal  circumstances.  The  ATO  promotes  early  engagement by taxpayers if they are unable to meet their tax obligations and  provides considerable information about debt management and relief. It also  has  effective  arrangements  for  identifying,  assessing  and  managing  applications  from  taxpayers  experiencing  financial  hardship,  and  recently  improved  its  debt  reporting  arrangements.  There  is  scope,  however,  to  improve the quality assurance processes for general interest charge remission  to help ensure these decisions are consistently applied. Assessing the extent to  which debt release decisions have supported taxpayers in meeting their tax  obligations in the longer term, would also inform debt relief strategies and  improve the quality of decision making. 

15. Debt relief applications are mainly assessed and managed by the Debt  Hardship  Capability  team  within  the  Debt  business  line.  The  team  has  specialist debt knowledge and the capability to consider taxpayers’ financial  circumstances. Formal guidance material supports the assessment of debt relief  cases,  and  staff  training,  supervision  and  delegations  aim  to  provide  consistency  across  assessments,  recognising  that  debt  relief  decisions  are  complex and require judgements about taxpayers’ financial hardship and their  capacity to pay. The ANAO analysed a sample of 629 cases across all major  categories of debt relief (waiver, release, compromise, individual non‐pursuit  and remission of general interest charges), and did not identify any notable  non‐compliance with ATO processes and record keeping obligations. 

                                                       15 Total taxation revenue was reported in the Commissioner of Taxation, Annual Report 2011-12, p. 58. Collectable debt holdings relate to multiple previous years and was valued at $16.6 as at 30 June 2012. In addition, there was $15.1

billion in impeded debt that was not subject to debt relief arrangements, over the same period.

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

14

Overall conclusion 13. In  managing  taxation  debt,  the  ATO  must  balance  support  for  taxpayers  experiencing  financial  hardship  with  its  responsibilities  to  collect  revenue. The decision to reduce or cancel a debt represents a loss of revenue  for the Commonwealth, and may also advantage one taxpayer over another if  debt relief decisions are not consistently applied. In 2011‐12, the ATO collected  $301 billion in taxation revenue, had collectable debt holdings of $16.6 billion  and granted $4.6 billion in debt relief.15 

14. The  ATO’s  management  of  debt  relief  arrangements  is  generally  effective, given the volume of transactions and the extent of the need to have  regard  to  taxpayers’  personal  circumstances.  The  ATO  promotes  early  engagement by taxpayers if they are unable to meet their tax obligations and  provides considerable information about debt management and relief. It also  has  effective  arrangements  for  identifying,  assessing  and  managing  applications  from  taxpayers  experiencing  financial  hardship,  and  recently  improved  its  debt  reporting  arrangements.  There  is  scope,  however,  to  improve the quality assurance processes for general interest charge remission  to help ensure these decisions are consistently applied. Assessing the extent to  which debt release decisions have supported taxpayers in meeting their tax  obligations in the longer term, would also inform debt relief strategies and  improve the quality of decision making. 

15. Debt relief applications are mainly assessed and managed by the Debt  Hardship  Capability  team  within  the  Debt  business  line.  The  team  has  specialist debt knowledge and the capability to consider taxpayers’ financial  circumstances. Formal guidance material supports the assessment of debt relief  cases,  and  staff  training,  supervision  and  delegations  aim  to  provide  consistency  across  assessments,  recognising  that  debt  relief  decisions  are  complex and require judgements about taxpayers’ financial hardship and their  capacity to pay. The ANAO analysed a sample of 629 cases across all major  categories of debt relief (waiver, release, compromise, individual non‐pursuit 

and remission of general interest charges), and did not identify any notable  non‐compliance with ATO processes and record keeping obligations. 

                                                       15 Total taxation revenue was reported in the Commissioner of Taxation, Annual Report 2011-12, p. 58. Collectable debt holdings relate to multiple previous years and was valued at $16.6 as at 30 June 2012. In addition, there was $15.1

billion in impeded debt that was not subject to debt relief arrangements, over the same period.

Summary

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

15

16. To support compliance with its debt relief processes and procedures,  the  Debt  business  line  has  specific  quality  assurance  mechanisms  in  place,  including  controls  over  automated  processes.  These  mechanisms  do  not,  however, adequately cover the decisions to remit general interest charges that  can be made by staff in other business lines, who are often at relatively low  classification levels. There would  be benefit in the ATO’s quality assurance  reviews giving particular attention to providing assurance that these decisions  are being made in accordance with relevant policies and procedures. 

17. Reporting  on  debt  relief  arrangements  within  the  ATO  was  limited  prior to early 2013, covering only combined figures for non‐pursued debt and  the remission of general interest and penalty charges. In April 2013, the ATO  implemented  a  new  reporting  framework  that  is  intended  to  provide  more  accurate  and  detailed  information  on  all  aspects  of  debt  management,  including debt reductions by category of debt relief.16 

18. The  ANAO  has  made  two  recommendations  aimed  at:  enhancing  assurance  processes  for  the  remission  of  general  interest  charges;  and  improving the ATO’s ongoing administration of debt relief arrangements by  assessing the extent to which debt release decisions have assisted taxpayers to  meet their tax obligations in the longer term. 

Key findings by chapter

Engaging with tax debtors and supporting debt staff (Chapter 2)

19. To  encourage  and  support  taxpayers’  compliance  with  their  tax  obligations,  the  ATO  provides  a  range  of  information  relating  to  debt  management  on  its  website  to  assist  taxpayers  in  meeting  their  payment  obligations, and also provides advice in writing and by telephone.  

20. While online information about debt relief is available, it does not fully  cover all aspects of debt relief and is difficult to locate. A new website is being  developed to improve accessibility and the clarity of messages as part of the  ATO’s strategy to deliver more services online. As the ATO expands its online  service delivery, consideration will need to be afforded to those taxpayers who  are  less  comfortable  with,  or  whose  personal  circumstances  may  limit  their  access to, these services. 

                                                       16 The new reporting framework will provide a weekly summary report of the value of debt holdings at the start and end of the week, and debt in-flow and out-flow, including debts resolved by collection or reduction (debt relief).

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

16

21. The  ATO  conducts  community  engagement  activities  that  allow  communication of specific messages to taxpayers, including in relation to debt  relief,  and  to  obtain  feedback  on  the  standard  of  services  being  provided.  Results  from  a  survey  of  54 financial  counsellors  completed  for  this  audit  indicated that the ATO performed reasonably well in responding to taxpayers  in  hardship  and  in  engaging  with  counsellors.17  The  results  also  provided  useful  information  for  management  about  opportunities  to  improve  the  negotiation  of  debt  hardship  arrangements.  The  ATO  could  also  consider  including questions relating to taxpayers’ engagement with the ATO about the  management of their debts in its annual surveys, as these do not currently  cover debt management issues.18 

22. The processing of debt cases is supported by guidance material that  sets  out  policies  and  procedures  to  be  followed  by  staff  when  assessing  applications for relief. Training courses are also delivered to ATO staff in order  to  provide  them  with  the  necessary  skills  to  engage  taxpayers  and  work  through  debt  management  options.  Debt  business  line  staff  have  access  to  15 courses  that  most  directly  relate  to  debt  management  and  debt  relief  arrangements,  with  ATO  records  indicating  a  significant  increase  in  staff  attendance since July 2011. The results from the survey of financial counsellors  may  be  useful  to  the  ATO  when  reviewing  its  annual  learning  and  development plan.  

Assessing debt relief applications (Chapter 3)

23. Assessing a taxpayer’s circumstances and eligibility for some form of  debt relief involves an understanding of the relevant legislation and the ATO’s  policies  and  procedures.  ATO  staff  are  required  to  assess  taxpayers’  circumstances  against  factors  that,  by  their  nature,  require  a  degree  of  judgement,  including  that  the  decision  to  grant  debt  release  will  allow  taxpayers  to  gain  control  of  their  finances.  The  ANAO’s  analysis  of  the  administration of a sample of applications for waiver and release of a debt19  indicated  general  compliance  with  ATO  processes  and  record  keeping 

                                                       17 In March 2013, Financial Counselling Australia surveyed 54 financial counsellors from across Australia (excluding New South Wales and Tasmania) about their experiences in dealing with the ATO, specifically the Debt Hardship Capability

team, to negotiate a debt hardship arrangement for their clients. 18 Two annual surveys—the ATO professionalism survey and the Community Perceptions survey—are commissioned by the ATO but neither includes any questions relating to debt management or relief. 19

The ANAO analysed all 77 applications for waiver of a debt finalised during the 18 month period 1 July 2011 to 31 December 2012, and 460 of around the 9499 applications for release of debt actioned between 1 July 2011 and 30 June 2012.

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

16

21. The  ATO  conducts  community  engagement  activities  that  allow  communication of specific messages to taxpayers, including in relation to debt  relief,  and  to  obtain  feedback  on  the  standard  of  services  being  provided.  Results  from  a  survey  of  54 financial  counsellors  completed  for  this  audit  indicated that the ATO performed reasonably well in responding to taxpayers  in  hardship  and  in  engaging  with  counsellors.17  The  results  also  provided  useful  information  for  management  about  opportunities  to  improve  the  negotiation  of  debt  hardship  arrangements.  The  ATO  could  also  consider  including questions relating to taxpayers’ engagement with the ATO about the  management of their debts in its annual surveys, as these do not currently  cover debt management issues.18 

22. The processing of debt cases is supported by guidance material that  sets  out  policies  and  procedures  to  be  followed  by  staff  when  assessing  applications for relief. Training courses are also delivered to ATO staff in order  to  provide  them  with  the  necessary  skills  to  engage  taxpayers  and  work  through  debt  management  options.  Debt  business  line  staff  have  access  to  15 courses  that  most  directly  relate  to  debt  management  and  debt  relief  arrangements,  with  ATO  records  indicating  a  significant  increase  in  staff  attendance since July 2011. The results from the survey of financial counsellors  may  be  useful  to  the  ATO  when  reviewing  its  annual  learning  and  development plan.  

Assessing debt relief applications (Chapter 3)

23. Assessing a taxpayer’s circumstances and eligibility for some form of  debt relief involves an understanding of the relevant legislation and the ATO’s  policies  and  procedures.  ATO  staff  are  required  to  assess  taxpayers’  circumstances  against  factors  that,  by  their  nature,  require  a  degree  of  judgement,  including  that  the  decision  to  grant  debt  release  will  allow  taxpayers  to  gain  control  of  their  finances.  The  ANAO’s  analysis  of  the  administration of a sample of applications for waiver and release of a debt19  indicated  general  compliance  with  ATO  processes  and  record  keeping 

                                                       17 In March 2013, Financial Counselling Australia surveyed 54 financial counsellors from across Australia (excluding New South Wales and Tasmania) about their experiences in dealing with the ATO, specifically the Debt Hardship Capability

team, to negotiate a debt hardship arrangement for their clients. 18 Two annual surveys—the ATO professionalism survey and the Community Perceptions survey—are commissioned by

the ATO but neither includes any questions relating to debt management or relief. 19 The ANAO analysed all 77 applications for waiver of a debt finalised during the 18 month period 1 July 2011 to 31 December 2012, and 460 of around the 9499 applications for release of debt actioned between 1 July 2011 and

30 June 2012.

Summary

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

17

obligations. However, in respect of compromise, the ATO could strengthen its  record keeping for the relatively small number of cases it manages each year.20 

24. In  examining  decision‐making  processes  for  the  non‐pursuit  of  individual debts and the remission of general interest charges, this audit drew  on  the  findings  of  the  ANAO’s  2010-11  and  2011-12  audits  of  the  ATO’s  financial  statements.  These  audits  indicated  that  the  ATO  had  appropriate  approvals and recording of remittal values. The audits also noted that there  was generally less oversight of the decisions to remit general interest charges  than other forms of debt relief. This is despite decisions to remit these charges  being made across the ATO and often by officers at relatively low classification  levels.21 

25. The  ATO  commissions  external  consultants  to  conduct  annual  independent  reviews  of  its  debt  release  decisions.  As  these  reviews  have  a  relatively narrow focus, examining only the assessment of ‘serious hardship’  and if taxpayers were kept informed of the progress of their application, there  would be benefit in the ATO reviewing the ongoing value of these reviews.  The ATO does not assess the outcomes of debt release decisions, including the  extent to which they have supported taxpayers to meet their taxation payment  obligations  in  the  longer  term.  Such  analysis  would  provide  a  better  understanding  of  the  factors  involved  in  assessing  taxpayers’  financial  hardship and the quality of debt release decisions, as well as informing debt  relief strategies. 

26. As  previously  noted,  taxpayers  are  expected  to  meet  their  debt  obligations where they have the capacity to pay. Decisions to reduce or cancel  debts  represent  a  loss  of  revenue  for  the  Commonwealth,  and  if  not  consistently applied may advantage one taxpayer over another. The ATO has  several mechanisms to assess the quality and consistency of its administration  and decision making. In particular, the Integrated Quality Framework22 (IQF)  processes aim to provide assurance that there are no systemic issues in the  administration of the tax and superannuation systems, and the Debt Quality  Management System is used to assess the quality of the work of individual  staff members in the Debt business line. 

                                                       20 The ANAO examined the case management records for 42 of the 98 compromise cases finalised between 1 July 2009 and 31 December 2012. 21

The ATO remitted general interest charges valued at $1.9 billion in 2010-11 and $1.6 billion in 2011-12. 22 The Integrated Quality Framework is the principal means of improving and assuring the quality of work across the ATO. It aims to identify systemic issues concerning processes and procedures at the corporate and team level.

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

18

27. While the Debt Quality Management System assessment processes are  generally sound, the ATO is redesigning the IQF to provide a greater level of  assurance on the work being undertaken. The new IQF processes are to be  implemented  in  2013-14.  There  would  be  benefit  in  increasing  the  quality  assurance  review  for  the  remission  of  general  interest  charges  to  provide  greater assurance that decisions are being applied consistently and staff are  following the appropriate procedures, including not to remit these charges as  an inducement to finalise a debt. 

28. Taxpayers can request the ATO to review a decision not to grant relief  from their debt. However, information provided by the ATO about the main  options  for  review  is  not  clear  in  all  instances.  Notably,  the  ATO  website  advises taxpayers that they cannot dispute or disagree with a general interest  charge decision through the objections process, only advising taxpayers that  they can contact the ATO to discuss the matter. Further, it does not advise that  complaints and objections regarding release decisions are dealt with differently  by the ATO.23 While the ATO’s processes for managing taxpayers’ objections  are sound, it would be helpful if the ATO better communicated the processes  for disputing or disagreeing with their decisions. There have been relatively  few  objections  and  reviews  of  the  ATO’s  debt  release  decisions  upheld  in  recent years. Only four of 209 objections finalised in 2011-12 were upheld (less  than 2 per cent), and similarly one of 12 appeals to the Administrative Appeals  Tribunal was upheld. 

Automated debt relief processes (Chapter 4)

29. The  ATO  initiated  the  Change  Program  in  2002  to  establish  an  up‐to‐date ICT capability and replace the agency’s multiple ICT systems with a  single  business  system.  In  June  2010,  the  ATO  announced  that  the  implementation of the Change Program was formally completed. However, a  range of legislative changes, combined with changes in project scope and a  series of delays and extensions, resulted in the full functionality of the original  program specifications not being achieved. As a result, the ATO continues to  use two ICT systems to administer tax and superannuation (the integrated core  processing (ICP) system and the legacy systems).  

                                                       23 Complaints are initially managed within the Debt team that made the original decision, whereas objections follow a more formal process and are reviewed by another business line to provide an independent assessment.

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

18

27. While the Debt Quality Management System assessment processes are  generally sound, the ATO is redesigning the IQF to provide a greater level of  assurance on the work being undertaken. The new IQF processes are to be  implemented  in  2013-14.  There  would  be  benefit  in  increasing  the  quality  assurance  review  for  the  remission  of  general  interest  charges  to  provide  greater assurance that decisions are being applied consistently and staff are  following the appropriate procedures, including not to remit these charges as  an inducement to finalise a debt. 

28. Taxpayers can request the ATO to review a decision not to grant relief  from their debt. However, information provided by the ATO about the main  options  for  review  is  not  clear  in  all  instances.  Notably,  the  ATO  website  advises taxpayers that they cannot dispute or disagree with a general interest  charge decision through the objections process, only advising taxpayers that  they can contact the ATO to discuss the matter. Further, it does not advise that  complaints and objections regarding release decisions are dealt with differently  by the ATO.23 While the ATO’s processes for managing taxpayers’ objections  are sound, it would be helpful if the ATO better communicated the processes  for disputing or disagreeing with their decisions. There have been relatively  few  objections  and  reviews  of  the  ATO’s  debt  release  decisions  upheld  in  recent years. Only four of 209 objections finalised in 2011-12 were upheld (less  than 2 per cent), and similarly one of 12 appeals to the Administrative Appeals  Tribunal was upheld. 

Automated debt relief processes (Chapter 4)

29. The  ATO  initiated  the  Change  Program  in  2002  to  establish  an  up‐to‐date ICT capability and replace the agency’s multiple ICT systems with a  single  business  system.  In  June  2010,  the  ATO  announced  that  the  implementation of the Change Program was formally completed. However, a  range of legislative changes, combined with changes in project scope and a  series of delays and extensions, resulted in the full functionality of the original  program specifications not being achieved. As a result, the ATO continues to  use two ICT systems to administer tax and superannuation (the integrated core  processing (ICP) system and the legacy systems).  

                                                       23 Complaints are initially managed within the Debt team that made the original decision, whereas objections follow a more formal process and are reviewed by another business line to provide an independent assessment.

Summary

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

19

30. While these ICT arrangements have no direct impact on taxpayers, they  limit  the  ATO’s  capacity  to  administer  certain  business  operations  without  intervention. For debt management, this means using systems separate from  the main ICT systems to support the management of taxpayers’ applications  for release, waiver and compromise, and to report on the movement of debt  cases and the different categories of debt relief. While the ATO recognises the  risks  and  challenges  of  maintaining  two  complex,  parallel  ICT  systems,  it  noted that there are multiple demands for system upgrades and enhancements  that have to be prioritised across the ATO. 

31. The  ATO  applies  processes  in  both  ICT  systems  to  allow  the  bulk  non‐pursuit  of  debts  that  have  been  outstanding  for  some  time  and  are  considered uneconomical to follow up or are irrecoverable at law. In the legacy  systems, just over $462 million of debt was not pursued during 2011-12. This  bulk  process  is  safeguarded  by  two  key  controls—executive  review  and  approval of bulk non‐pursuit parameters and a sampling review of the output  of  the  process—that  provide  reasonable  assurance  of  the  integrity  of  the  process. 

32. There is, however, only a limited, interim bulk non‐pursuit capacity in  the ICP system as full functionality is not yet available. Since September 2010,  debts  in  this  system  totalling  just  under  $50  million  were  not  pursued,  covering debts that are potentially uneconomical to pursue, but none that are  potentially irrecoverable at law. There is a potential backlog of cases that will  not be processed until the full bulk non‐pursuit capability is available in the  ICP system, scheduled for September 2013.  

33. Debts that the ATO has assessed as uneconomical to pursue through  the bulk non‐pursuit and individual non‐pursuit processes can be re‐raised at a  later date, subject to changes in the taxpayer’s circumstances, using either ICT  system. Analysis of the ATO’s systems for re‐raising non‐pursued debt found  that the five relevant business rules are being properly implemented in the  relevant systems. The ATO’s internal procedures to impose general interest  and penalty charges and to run monthly bulk processes to deal with very low  value automatic remissions are also sound, and ANAO testing has found no  material mistakes in the process. 

Reporting debt relief (Chapter 5)

34. The  ATO  developed  a  new  debt  reporting  framework  in  2012-13,  primarily to meet the reporting requirements associated with the additional 

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

20

program funding allocated in the 2012-13 Budget. The framework provides the  Debt business line with improved management information on the value and  ‘flow’ of debts, including for the categories of debt relief. Previously, the focus  of reporting had been on debt collection, with the ATO advising that reporting  of  debt  relief  had  traditionally  been  regarded  as  a  lower  priority  and  undertaken on an ad hoc basis. 

35. The first full report under the new framework, the debt flow weekly  summary report, was produced in April 2013. The ATO now produces four  reports that provide information on debt relief—the other reports being the  non‐pursuit report, the hardship capability report, and a report on the value of  general interest and penalty charges imposed and remitted each month. These  three reports provide high‐level data on some but not all aspects of debt relief,  and  will  complement  the  more  detailed  information  provided  in  the  new  report.  Refinements  to  the  four  debt  reports  depend  on  the  ATO  further  developing its ICT systems. These changes would address issues that currently  constrain the debt reporting capability, including that data must be sourced  from the standalone systems used by the Debt Hardship Capability team. 

36. There  is  limited  public  reporting  of  debt  relief  arrangements  in  the  Commissioner  of  Taxation’s  annual  reports  and  accompanying  financial  statements.24  Reporting  would  be  strengthened  by  the  consolidated  presentation of all debt relief arrangements, broken down by category, and by  the ATO ceasing to use the terms ‘non‐pursuit’ and ‘write‐off’ interchangeably.  These terms do not accurately distinguish between those debts the ATO has  chosen not to pursue but can re‐raise at a later date (non‐pursuit) and those it  had decided not to recover (write‐off). 

Summary of agency response 37. The  ATO  provided  the  following  summary  comment  to  the  audit  report: 

The  ATO  welcomes  this  audit  and  considers  the  report  supportive  of  our  overall  approach  to  managing  the  debt  relief  arrangements.  The  audit  recognises  that  the  ATO’s  management  of  debt  relief  arrangements  are  generally  effective  given  the  volume  of  transactions  and  the  need  to  have  regard to taxpayers’ personal circumstances. The report also acknowledges the 

                                                       24 Debt relief information can also be provided in response to a request for information at Senate Estimate committees or to support ATO funding proposals.

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

20

program funding allocated in the 2012-13 Budget. The framework provides the  Debt business line with improved management information on the value and  ‘flow’ of debts, including for the categories of debt relief. Previously, the focus  of reporting had been on debt collection, with the ATO advising that reporting  of  debt  relief  had  traditionally  been  regarded  as  a  lower  priority  and  undertaken on an ad hoc basis. 

35. The first full report under the new framework, the debt flow weekly  summary report, was produced in April 2013. The ATO now produces four  reports that provide information on debt relief—the other reports being the  non‐pursuit report, the hardship capability report, and a report on the value of  general interest and penalty charges imposed and remitted each month. These  three reports provide high‐level data on some but not all aspects of debt relief,  and  will  complement  the  more  detailed  information  provided  in  the  new  report.  Refinements  to  the  four  debt  reports  depend  on  the  ATO  further  developing its ICT systems. These changes would address issues that currently  constrain the debt reporting capability, including that data must be sourced  from the standalone systems used by the Debt Hardship Capability team. 

36. There  is  limited  public  reporting  of  debt  relief  arrangements  in  the  Commissioner  of  Taxation’s  annual  reports  and  accompanying  financial  statements.24  Reporting  would  be  strengthened  by  the  consolidated  presentation of all debt relief arrangements, broken down by category, and by  the ATO ceasing to use the terms ‘non‐pursuit’ and ‘write‐off’ interchangeably.  These terms do not accurately distinguish between those debts the ATO has  chosen not to pursue but can re‐raise at a later date (non‐pursuit) and those it  had decided not to recover (write‐off). 

Summary of agency response 37. The  ATO  provided  the  following  summary  comment  to  the  audit  report: 

The  ATO  welcomes  this  audit  and  considers  the  report  supportive  of  our  overall  approach  to  managing  the  debt  relief  arrangements.  The  audit  recognises  that  the  ATO’s  management  of  debt  relief  arrangements  are  generally  effective  given  the  volume  of  transactions  and  the  need  to  have  regard to taxpayers’ personal circumstances. The report also acknowledges the 

                                                       24 Debt relief information can also be provided in response to a request for information at Senate Estimate committees or to support ATO funding proposals.

Summary

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

21

ATO  has  effective  arrangements  for  identifying,  assessing  and  managing  applications from taxpayers experiencing financial hardship. 

The ATO recognises the audit highlights several opportunities to strengthen  and further improve the management of debt relief. In particular, ensuring the  objective of debt release strategies, in supporting taxpayers to gain control of  their financial circumstances and meet taxation obligations in the longer term.  We also acknowledge the benefit of an increased focus on the assurance of the  quality  and  consistency  of  general  interest  charge  remission  decisions.  The  ATO agrees with the two recommendations contained in the review. 

38. The ATO’s full response is included at Appendix 1. 

 

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

22

Recommendations

Recommendation No. 1

Para 3.87

To  inform  debt  release  strategies,  the  ANAO  recommends that the Australian Taxation Office assesses  (through a sampling approach) the extent to which it has  achieved  its  objective  of  supporting  taxpayers  to  gain  control of their financial circumstances and meet taxation  payment obligations in the longer term. 

  ATO response: Agreed  

Recommendation No. 2

Para 3.90

To  provide  increased  assurance  of  the  quality  and  consistency of decisions to remit general interest charges,  the  ANAO  recommends  that  the  Australian  Taxation  Office undertakes specific quality assurance assessments  on  general  interest  charge  remission  decisions  and  includes a focus on these decisions in the IQF summary  reports. 

  ATO response: Agreed 

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

22

Recommendations

Recommendation No. 1

Para 3.87

To  inform  debt  release  strategies,  the  ANAO  recommends that the Australian Taxation Office assesses  (through a sampling approach) the extent to which it has  achieved  its  objective  of  supporting  taxpayers  to  gain  control of their financial circumstances and meet taxation  payment obligations in the longer term. 

  ATO response: Agreed  

Recommendation No. 2

Para 3.90

To  provide  increased  assurance  of  the  quality  and  consistency of decisions to remit general interest charges,  the  ANAO  recommends  that  the  Australian  Taxation  Office undertakes specific quality assurance assessments  on  general  interest  charge  remission  decisions  and  includes a focus on these decisions in the IQF summary  reports. 

  ATO response: Agreed 

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

23

Audit Findings

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

24

1. Background and Context

Introduction 1.1 The Australian Taxation Office (ATO) is responsible for administering  Australia’s tax and superannuation legislation, and seeks to build confidence  in its administration through helping people to understand their rights and  obligations, improve ease of compliance and access to benefits, and manage  non‐compliance with the law. The effective management of debt is a key factor  in maintaining community confidence in the fairness and equity of Australia’s  tax and superannuation systems. 

1.2 A debt arises when a tax, duty or charge becomes due and payable— that is, deemed by law to be due to the Commonwealth and payable to the  Commissioner of Taxation (the Commissioner).25 The ATO expects tax debtors  to pay their debts as and when they fall due for payment because the agency: 

is not a lending institution or credit provider; expects tax debtors to organise  their affairs to ensure payment of tax debts on time, and to give their tax debts  equal priority with other debts.26 

If a debt is not paid by the due date (and the taxpayer does not contact the  ATO), the Commissioner can take appropriate action to recover it. 

1.3 The ATO encourages people to contact them if they are experiencing  difficulties in meeting their tax or superannuation obligations, and can assist  them  in  managing  their  obligations  and  further  escalation  of  their  debt.  Information relating to assistance with financial hardship is available on the  ATO’s website, and the ATO also conducts a range of community engagement  activities to communicate specific messages to taxpayers. While the ATO has  measures in place to identify and support taxpayers who may be experiencing  financial difficulties, the onus is on taxpayers or their representatives to contact  the ATO and discuss their financial circumstances. 

1.4 The  ATO  must  balance  its  responsibility  to  collect  revenue  with  support  for  taxpayers  experiencing  serious  financial  hardship.  The  ATO’s  policy  is  to  adopt  a  ‘community  first’  approach  when  deciding  the  most  appropriate debt recovery action, and differentiates between taxpayers who 

                                                       25 This report refers to these debts broadly as taxation debts. 26

ATO, Practice Statement Law Administration PS LA 2011/14: General debt collection powers and principles.

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

24

1. Background and Context

Introduction 1.1 The Australian Taxation Office (ATO) is responsible for administering  Australia’s tax and superannuation legislation, and seeks to build confidence  in its administration through helping people to understand their rights and  obligations, improve ease of compliance and access to benefits, and manage  non‐compliance with the law. The effective management of debt is a key factor  in maintaining community confidence in the fairness and equity of Australia’s  tax and superannuation systems. 

1.2 A debt arises when a tax, duty or charge becomes due and payable— that is, deemed by law to be due to the Commonwealth and payable to the  Commissioner of Taxation (the Commissioner).25 The ATO expects tax debtors  to pay their debts as and when they fall due for payment because the agency: 

is not a lending institution or credit provider; expects tax debtors to organise  their affairs to ensure payment of tax debts on time, and to give their tax debts  equal priority with other debts.26 

If a debt is not paid by the due date (and the taxpayer does not contact the  ATO), the Commissioner can take appropriate action to recover it. 

1.3 The ATO encourages people to contact them if they are experiencing  difficulties in meeting their tax or superannuation obligations, and can assist  them  in  managing  their  obligations  and  further  escalation  of  their  debt.  Information relating to assistance with financial hardship is available on the  ATO’s website, and the ATO also conducts a range of community engagement  activities to communicate specific messages to taxpayers. While the ATO has  measures in place to identify and support taxpayers who may be experiencing  financial difficulties, the onus is on taxpayers or their representatives to contact  the ATO and discuss their financial circumstances. 

1.4 The  ATO  must  balance  its  responsibility  to  collect  revenue  with  support  for  taxpayers  experiencing  serious  financial  hardship.  The  ATO’s  policy  is  to  adopt  a  ‘community  first’  approach  when  deciding  the  most  appropriate debt recovery action, and differentiates between taxpayers who 

                                                       25 This report refers to these debts broadly as taxation debts. 26

ATO, Practice Statement Law Administration PS LA 2011/14: General debt collection powers and principles.

Background and Context

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

25

are trying to do the right thing and meet their obligations, and those who are  not. When the ATO engages with taxpayers about the payment of their debt,  the taxpayers’ individual circumstances and the merits of each case are taken  into  account.  Accordingly,  the  agency  takes  into  account  the  compliance  history of taxpayers, including both payment and lodgment records, and their  capacity to pay a tax debt. 

1.5 The  ATO’s  total  debt  holdings  cover  both  impeded  and  collectable  debt: 

 impeded  debt  may  be  subject  to  particular  legal  requirements—the  taxpayer may be undergoing insolvency proceedings or disputing the  debt owed to the ATO. These types of debts require specialist attention  by ATO staff and there is a high risk that they may not be collected; and 

 collectable  debt  is  not  subject  to  objection  or  appeal  or  any  form  of  insolvency administration, and provides the highest possible return on  ATO resources taking action to recover the debt.27  

1.6 As at 30 June 2012, the ATO was managing $31.7 billion in total debt  holdings,  comprising  $15.1  billion  in  impeded  debt  and  $16.6  billion  in  collectable debt.28 Activity statement debt (particularly relating to the goods  and services tax) and income tax debt accounted for the bulk of the collectable  debt: $9.1 billion in activity statement debt, and $7.1 billion in income tax debt.  The remaining $0.3 billion mainly related to superannuation guarantee charge  debt.29  Overall,  around  two‐thirds  of  total  collectable  debt  relates  to  the  micro‐enterprise market segment.30 The ratio of collectable debt to total cash  collections is an indicator of the ATO’s performance in managing debt.31  

1.7 While a portion of the value of collectable debt accrued in 2011-12, the  age of the debt varied. As indicated in Figure 1.1, as at 30 June 2012 around  $7.0  billion  of  the  debt  had  been  outstanding  for  more  than  two  years, 

                                                       27 ATO, Collectable v Impeded Debt, 16 August 2011. 28

Commissioner of Taxation, Annual Report 2011-12, p. 58. 29 ibid.

30 The micro enterprise market segment consists of businesses with an annual turnover of less than $2 million. 31 The key performance indicator for collectable debt included in the ATO’s Annual Plan 2010-11 was ‘maintaining the

ratio of collectable debt to receipts at under 5 per cent’; in 2011-12 was to ‘reduce the stock of aged debt and maintain the ratio of collectable debt to receipts at approximately 5 per cent’; and in 2012-13 was ‘the trend in the ratio of total collectable debt to total cash collection’. In this regard, the ATO Annual Report, 2011-12 reported a ‘ratio’ of 5.2 per cent in 2010-11 and 5.5 per cent in 2011-12.

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

26

including over $1.5 billion for more than five years; aged debt being generally  more difficult to recover. 

Figure 1.1

Age profile of collectable debt, 30 June 2012

 

Source: Data provided by the ATO.

1.8 Debt  recovery  options  available  to  the  ATO  include  negotiating  a  payment  arrangement  to  allow  taxpayers  to  pay  the  debt  over  an  agreed  period of time, using the Commissioner’s garnishee powers to collect the debt  directly  from  a  taxpayer’s  bank  account  or  salary  and,  in  the  case  of  a  company, applying a director penalty notice.32 As a last resort, the ATO may  also seek payment through court action. In managing debts, the ATO can also  decide not to pursue the liability, or to reduce or cancel the amount of debt the  taxpayer owes—referred to collectively in this report as ‘debt relief’. Provisions 

                                                       32 A financial penalty can be applied to the director of a company, under the director penalty regime, if the company does not meet certain tax obligations.

0

100 000

200 000

300 000

400 000

500 000

600 000

0

1

2

3

4

5

6

up to 6 months 6-12 months 1-2 years 2-5 years 5-10 years 10+ years

Number of cases

$ billion

Primary tax balance General interest charge No. of cases

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

26

including over $1.5 billion for more than five years; aged debt being generally  more difficult to recover. 

Figure 1.1

Age profile of collectable debt, 30 June 2012

 

Source: Data provided by the ATO.

1.8 Debt  recovery  options  available  to  the  ATO  include  negotiating  a  payment  arrangement  to  allow  taxpayers  to  pay  the  debt  over  an  agreed  period of time, using the Commissioner’s garnishee powers to collect the debt  directly  from  a  taxpayer’s  bank  account  or  salary  and,  in  the  case  of  a  company, applying a director penalty notice.32 As a last resort, the ATO may  also seek payment through court action. In managing debts, the ATO can also  decide not to pursue the liability, or to reduce or cancel the amount of debt the  taxpayer owes—referred to collectively in this report as ‘debt relief’. Provisions 

                                                       32 A financial penalty can be applied to the director of a company, under the director penalty regime, if the company does not meet certain tax obligations.

0

100 000

200 000

300 000

400 000

500 000

600 000

0

1

2

3

4

5

6

up to 6 months 6-12 months 1-2 years 2-5 years 5-10 years 10+ years

Number of cases

$ billion

Primary tax balance General interest charge No. of cases

Background and Context

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

27

for debt relief only apply to collectable debt, not impeded debt.33 The ATO  cannot  reduce  or  cancel  a  debt  that  is  in  dispute,  but  may  negotiate  a  settlement with the taxpayer that is less than the full value of the liability.34 

Debt relief options 1.9 The term ‘debt relief’ encompasses the options available to the ATO for  the  treatment  of  collectable  debt,  with  each  being  governed  by  specific  legislation, delegations and criteria, subject to the type of tax for which the  debt arises. The main options are: the waiver of debt; full or partial release from  tax  liabilities;  or  the  ATO  may  decide  not  to  pursue  a  debt.  In  some  circumstances the ATO may accept a compromised amount of revenue against  the full value of the debt, where an assessment indicates that the entire balance  is unlikely to be paid.35 In addition to their primary debt, taxpayers may be  liable for general interest charges (GICs) and penalty charges that have been  imposed on the primary debt.36 In certain circumstances, the Commissioner  may agree to a remission of the GIC, meaning that all or part of the GIC that has  accrued is cancelled. Taxpayers may also be granted remission of a penalty.37 

Waiver of tax debts

1.10 A debt due to the Commonwealth can only be waived—that is, the debt  is  expunged  and  cannot  be  recovered  or  re‐raised  at  a  later  date—by  the  Finance Minister or the appointed delegate in the Department of Finance and  Deregulation (Finance). The Finance Minister’s legal ability to waive a debt is  provided by the Financial Management and Accountability Act 1997 (FMA Act).38  The debt may be waived because of a moral, rather than a legal obligation on  the Commonwealth to extinguish the debt due to equity or ongoing financial  hardship considerations, where normal ATO provisions for debt relief would  not apply. 

                                                       33 Particular provisions apply to the calculation of the general interest charge in disputed debt, where a taxpayer has paid 50 per cent of the disputed amount. PS LA 2011/12. 34

ATO, Code of Settlement Practice. 35 Waiver and release provisions are explained in the ATO’s Practice Statement Law Administration PS LA 2011/17 pertaining to debt relief. The compromise provisions are set out in PS LA 2011/3: Compromise of taxation debts. 36

The ATO applies a range of interest charges and penalties, where taxpayers have failed to meet their tax obligations, for example, a penalty for failure to lodge a tax return; and an interest charge for failure to pay the full amount of the tax debt, or not paying by the due date. 37

ATO, Practice Statement Law Administration, PS LA 2011/12: Administration of general interest charge (GIC) imposed for late payment or underestimation of liability. 38 FMA Act, Section 34(1)(a),states that ‘the Finance Minister may, on behalf of the Commonwealth waive the

Commonwealth’s rights to payment of an amount owing to the Commonwealth’.

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

28

1.11 The Commissioner also has powers to waive a debt where the liability  is subject to provisions of the Proceeds of Crime Act 2002 (POCA).39 In some  instances, where the liability arises from criminal offences, the ATO’s standard  debt  recovery  arrangements  may  not  be  as  effective  as  action  taken  by  the  Commonwealth  Director  of  Public  Prosecutions  under  the  POCA.  Where  appropriate, provision in the Taxation Administration Act 1953 (TAA) allows the  Commissioner  to  waive  the  right  to  payment  of  a  tax‐related  liability  to  facilitate POCA proceedings. In making a decision about a waiver under this  provision the Commissioner considers the net amount likely to be received by  the  Commonwealth,  if  the  tax  debt  is  waived  and  POCA  proceedings  are  undertaken.40 The waiver of tax debt by the ATO in favour of POCA action is  infrequently pursued, and for the period 1 July 2010 to 31 December 2012 only  occurred on three occasions.41 

Release from payment of tax debts

1.12 Individual  taxpayers  (and  trustees  of  the  estate  of  deceased  individuals) may be granted release from certain tax liabilities on the grounds  that payment of the liability will be likely to cause serious financial hardship.42  Several  tests  are  applied  to  determine  if  a  taxpayer’s  circumstances  reflect  ‘serious hardship’, and the Commissioner (or his delegate) may allow a full or  partial  release  from  the  debt.  The  legal  basis  for  this  type  of  debt  relief  is  provided under the TAA.43  

Accepting a compromised amount of debt

1.13 Under  certain  circumstances  the  ATO  may  assess  that  the  entire  balance of an undisputed, or collectable, debt is unlikely to be paid and accept  a  lesser  amount  in  full  satisfaction  of  the  liability.  This  is  referred  to  as  accepting a compromised amount of the full value of the debt, and aims to  secure the highest net return to the Commonwealth, given the circumstances of  the case.44 There is no specific legislation which allows the Commissioner to 

                                                       39 ATO, Practice Statement Law Administration, PS LA 2011/10: Waiver of taxation debts in proceeds of crime matters. 40

Taxation Administration Act 1953, schedule 1, division 342. 41 Debts waived under POCA provisions are not within the scope of this audit. 42

Serious hardship is defined by the ATO as a situation where an individual is ‘deprived of necessities according to normal community standards’. Necessities include reasonable amounts of food, clothing, medical supplies, accommodation, education for children and other basic requirements. 43

Taxation Administration Act 1953, division 340-5, p.402. 44 ATO, Practice Statement Law Administration, PS LA 2011/3: Compromise of taxation debts, p. 4.

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

28

1.11 The Commissioner also has powers to waive a debt where the liability  is subject to provisions of the Proceeds of Crime Act 2002 (POCA).39 In some  instances, where the liability arises from criminal offences, the ATO’s standard  debt  recovery  arrangements  may  not  be  as  effective  as  action  taken  by  the  Commonwealth  Director  of  Public  Prosecutions  under  the  POCA.  Where  appropriate, provision in the Taxation Administration Act 1953 (TAA) allows the  Commissioner  to  waive  the  right  to  payment  of  a  tax‐related  liability  to  facilitate POCA proceedings. In making a decision about a waiver under this  provision the Commissioner considers the net amount likely to be received by  the  Commonwealth,  if  the  tax  debt  is  waived  and  POCA  proceedings  are  undertaken.40 The waiver of tax debt by the ATO in favour of POCA action is  infrequently pursued, and for the period 1 July 2010 to 31 December 2012 only  occurred on three occasions.41 

Release from payment of tax debts

1.12 Individual  taxpayers  (and  trustees  of  the  estate  of  deceased  individuals) may be granted release from certain tax liabilities on the grounds  that payment of the liability will be likely to cause serious financial hardship.42  Several  tests  are  applied  to  determine  if  a  taxpayer’s  circumstances  reflect  ‘serious hardship’, and the Commissioner (or his delegate) may allow a full or  partial  release  from  the  debt.  The  legal  basis  for  this  type  of  debt  relief  is  provided under the TAA.43  

Accepting a compromised amount of debt

1.13 Under  certain  circumstances  the  ATO  may  assess  that  the  entire  balance of an undisputed, or collectable, debt is unlikely to be paid and accept  a  lesser  amount  in  full  satisfaction  of  the  liability.  This  is  referred  to  as  accepting a compromised amount of the full value of the debt, and aims to  secure the highest net return to the Commonwealth, given the circumstances of  the case.44 There is no specific legislation which allows the Commissioner to 

                                                       39 ATO, Practice Statement Law Administration, PS LA 2011/10: Waiver of taxation debts in proceeds of crime matters. 40

Taxation Administration Act 1953, schedule 1, division 342. 41 Debts waived under POCA provisions are not within the scope of this audit. 42

Serious hardship is defined by the ATO as a situation where an individual is ‘deprived of necessities according to normal community standards’. Necessities include reasonable amounts of food, clothing, medical supplies, accommodation, education for children and other basic requirements. 43

Taxation Administration Act 1953, division 340-5, p.402. 44 ATO, Practice Statement Law Administration, PS LA 2011/3: Compromise of taxation debts, p. 4.

Background and Context

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

29

accept  a  compromised  amount,  but  it  is  regarded  as  prudent  financial  management  under  the  relevant  sections  of  the  FMA  Act45  where  no  other  collection  options  are  available.  Where  a  compromised  amount  of  debt  is  agreed and paid, the Commissioner provides a covenant to the taxpayer that  no further action will be taken to enforce additional payment. 

Non-pursuit of tax debts

1.14 The  Commissioner  or  his  delegate  may  also  decide  not  to  pursue  recovery of tax debts where the:  

 amount of the debt is assessed as irrecoverable at law—that is, the debt  cannot be recovered by the judgment of the court46; and/or 

 debt is uneconomical to pursue, where the total cost of recovery action  would exceed the amount of debt that may be collected.47  

1.15 Specific  categories  of  debt  cases  are  subject  to  a  bulk  non‐pursuit  process.  These  cases  are  selected  by  the  ATO’s  business  systems  based  on  several criteria, including that the debt is aged and of low value. Individual  debt cases that are not pursued are usually more complex, higher value debts  that  are  under  management  by  an  ATO  case  officer.  Debts  that  the  ATO  decides not to pursue under these provisions are different from debts that have  been subject to release or waiver, in that they can be re‐raised, although the  re‐raising of debts that are irrecoverable at law, by their nature, seldom occurs: 

...a decision not to pursue a debt does not absolve the debtor from ever having  to  pay  the  liability  except  if  the  amount  was  not  pursued  because  it  was  irrecoverable  at  law.  A  debt  that  was  not  pursued  due  to  it  being  uneconomical to pursue may be re‐raised and action to collect the debt can  recommence, if the circumstances which led to the decision not to pursue the  debt change, for example, the financial position of the debtor, improves.48 

General interest charge remission

1.16 GIC  is  a  uniform  interest  charge  imposed  in  a  wide  range  of  circumstances,  including  where  an  amount  of  tax,  charge,  levy  or  penalty 

                                                       45 FMA Act, sections 44 and 47. 46

The definitions of irrecoverable at law includes: when it cannot be recovered by action and by judgment of the court, that is, the debt cannot be ‘proved’; and in various specified circumstances relating to bankruptcy and liquidation proceedings. ATO, Practice Statement Law Administration, PS LA 2011/17: Debt relief, paragraph 62. 47

FMA Act, section 47 (1) (c). 48 ATO, Practice Statement Law Administration, PS LA 2011/17: Debt relief, paragraph 7.

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

30

remains unpaid.49 The GIC liability is calculated for each day beyond the due  date of the debt, and denies late payers an advantage over taxpayers who pay  their tax on time. The provision for penalties applies to most tax laws—that is,  if  a  taxpayer  fails  to  meet  a  tax  obligation  under  any  tax  law,  for  example  failure to lodge a tax return or activity statement on time, then the taxpayer  will be liable to pay a penalty. 

1.17 Taxpayers  may  be  granted  full  or  partial  remission  of  the  GIC  component of a debt, although they may still be liable for the primary debt.  The ATO also applies a systems‐based automatic remission of low values of  GIC imposed on taxpayers’ accounts that is independent of any engagement  with  taxpayers.  The  Commissioner  (or  his  delegate)  has  the  discretion  to  determine when it is fair and reasonable to remit the GIC under the relevant  section of the TAA.50 

1.18 The  ATO  also  applies  a  range  of  other  penalties,  for  example  in  circumstances where taxpayers fail to lodge documents on time; or to withhold  amounts  as  required  under  the  pay‐as‐you‐go  (PAYG)  withholding  system.  However,  GIC  accounts  for  the  largest  amount  of  charges  imposed  on  taxpayers. 

1.19 Table 1.1 outlines the value of debt reduced or not collected by debt  relief category in 2011-12. Of the $4.6 billion of debt relief provided, the largest  categories were non‐pursuit ($2.4 billion51) and remission of GIC ($1.6 billion).  Debt release and waiver together represented around one per cent of the total  value  of  debt  relief  provided  in  the  same  period,  and  62  per  cent  of  the  applications  for  waiver,  release,  and  compromise  finalised  in  2011-12  were  granted full or partial release of their debt. 

   

                                                       49 The GIC was implemented on 1 July 1999, following the passing of the Taxation Laws Amendment Act (No.3) 1999. The GIC marked a major shift by the ATO towards a more commercial approach whereby taxpayers are required to

compensate the government for the time value of money. The GIC replaced the Late Payment Penalty regime and is used to calculate a range of other penalties. 50 Tax Administration Act 1953, section 8AAG(5). 51

The ATO’s financial statements allow for the non-collection of revenue amounts (including debt subject to relief arrangements) by providing for the impairment of taxation receivables. In 2011-12, the ATO’s financial statements disclose in Note 19 total taxation receivable (gross) of $31.7 billion and an allowance for impairment of $11.5 billion. While debts that are not pursued because they are uneconomical to do so are impaired in the financial statements, they can be re-raised (as outlined in paragraph 1.15).

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

30

remains unpaid.49 The GIC liability is calculated for each day beyond the due  date of the debt, and denies late payers an advantage over taxpayers who pay  their tax on time. The provision for penalties applies to most tax laws—that is,  if  a  taxpayer  fails  to  meet  a  tax  obligation  under  any  tax  law,  for  example  failure to lodge a tax return or activity statement on time, then the taxpayer  will be liable to pay a penalty. 

1.17 Taxpayers  may  be  granted  full  or  partial  remission  of  the  GIC  component of a debt, although they may still be liable for the primary debt.  The ATO also applies a systems‐based automatic remission of low values of  GIC imposed on taxpayers’ accounts that is independent of any engagement  with  taxpayers.  The  Commissioner  (or  his  delegate)  has  the  discretion  to  determine when it is fair and reasonable to remit the GIC under the relevant  section of the TAA.50 

1.18 The  ATO  also  applies  a  range  of  other  penalties,  for  example  in  circumstances where taxpayers fail to lodge documents on time; or to withhold  amounts  as  required  under  the  pay‐as‐you‐go  (PAYG)  withholding  system.  However,  GIC  accounts  for  the  largest  amount  of  charges  imposed  on  taxpayers. 

1.19 Table 1.1 outlines the value of debt reduced or not collected by debt  relief category in 2011-12. Of the $4.6 billion of debt relief provided, the largest  categories were non‐pursuit ($2.4 billion51) and remission of GIC ($1.6 billion).  Debt release and waiver together represented around one per cent of the total  value  of  debt  relief  provided  in  the  same  period,  and  62  per  cent  of  the  applications  for  waiver,  release,  and  compromise  finalised  in  2011-12  were  granted full or partial release of their debt. 

   

                                                       49 The GIC was implemented on 1 July 1999, following the passing of the Taxation Laws Amendment Act (No.3) 1999. The GIC marked a major shift by the ATO towards a more commercial approach whereby taxpayers are required to

compensate the government for the time value of money. The GIC replaced the Late Payment Penalty regime and is used to calculate a range of other penalties. 50 Tax Administration Act 1953, section 8AAG(5). 51 The ATO’s financial statements allow for the non-collection of revenue amounts (including debt subject to relief

arrangements) by providing for the impairment of taxation receivables. In 2011-12, the ATO’s financial statements disclose in Note 19 total taxation receivable (gross) of $31.7 billion and an allowance for impairment of $11.5 billion. While debts that are not pursued because they are uneconomical to do so are impaired in the financial statements, they can be re-raised (as outlined in paragraph 1.15).

Background and Context

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

31

Table 1.1

Debt relief applications finalised and granted in 2011-12

Debt relief Number of applications received

Number of applications finalised1

Value of applications ($ million)

Number and per cent of finalised applications granted relief2

Value of debt not collected ($ million)

Waiver 59 51 13 4 (7%) 0

Release 6165 3863 239 2439 (40%) 61

Compromise 27 23 203 16 (59%) 184

Bulk non-pursuit

NA NA NA NA 462

Individual non-pursuit NA NA NA NA 1906

GIC remission NA NA NA NA 1643

Penalty remission

NA NA NA NA 391

Total 3937 455 4647

Source: ATO.

Note 1: Applications may not be finalised in the year that they are received. The large difference between the number of release applications received and finalised in 2011-12 was mainly due to a high number of applications being received late in the financial year, and 1573 applications ‘finalised without decision’, where taxpayers failed to bring all lodgements up to date or did not provide the required information.

Note 2: While the data shows that a large proportion of the applications in each category were not granted, this does not reflect that taxpayers’ applications were rejected outright. A taxpayer’s application for a waiver, release or compromise of their debt may result in an alternative solution. For example, a taxpayer’s application for waiver of a debt may be refused, but the taxpayer’s circumstances and the debt case may be eligible for full or partial release.

NA: Not applicable or data not available.

1.20 Of  those  cases  granted  full  or  partial  relief  of  their  debts  through  release, compromise or waiver in 2011-12, most (69 per cent) involved relief of  between $2500 and $50 000, while 81 per cent of the total value of relief was  granted to cases where the relief exceeded $100 000.52 

                                                       52 The ATO did not maintain statistics on the age of relief cases.

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

32

The ATO’s arrangements for managing debt relief 1.21 The ATO’s Debt business line (DBL) is one of four business lines within  the ATO’s Operations sub‐plan53, with responsibility for managing all aspects  of tax and superannuation debt, including debt relief.54 The DBL develops and  implements strategies for managing debt that support the ATO’s focus areas  and  deliverables,  as  set  out  in  the  ATO’s  annual  plan  and  accompanying  corporate  overview.55  As  at  1  July  2012,  the  DBL  had  1924  staff  and  an  operational budget of $186 million for 2012-13.56 

1.22 The operational structure of the DBL (outlined in Figure 1.2) reflects the  ATO’s  debt  management  framework  of  early  collection,  firmer  action,  and  strategic recovery. By focusing on early collection, the ATO aims to assist both  personal and business taxpayers to manage their obligations and prevent their  debt from escalating. Firmer action is taken against those taxpayers who make  no effort to manage their debt; and the ATO may take more targeted strategic  recovery action, particularly where a business is considered not to be viable in  the longer term and there would be little likelihood of the tax debt ever being  paid. Two additional areas in the DBL provide risk, intelligence and reporting  and project delivery and production management services across the business line. 

1.23 The  DBL  has  two  specialist  teams  that  deal  exclusively  with  the  administration of debt relief: 

 the Debt Hardship Capability (DHC) team, established in October 2008,  assesses taxpayers’ applications for release or waiver, and less complex  cases where part of the debt may be compromised. The team is also a  reference  point  for  ATO  staff  and  community  welfare  groups,  if  a  taxpayer is claiming difficulty in meeting their debts; and 

 the Debt Reduction team manages the bulk non‐pursuit process. 

1.24 Debt cases that the ATO may not pursue are generally managed by  ATO case officers within the firmer action or strategic recovery sections of the  DBL. Complex compromise issues are managed within the strategic recovery  section of the business line. 

                                                       53 The ATO Plan is managed through four sub-plans: Compliance; Corporate Service and Law; Enterprise Solutions and Technology; and Operations. Business and Service Lines provide the operational delivery vehicles for the relevant sub-

plan.

54 The exception is that the remission of GIC and penalties is managed across the ATO, as outlined in paragraph 1.25. 55 ATO, Debt Line Plan 2012-13. 56

ibid., p. 14.

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

32

The ATO’s arrangements for managing debt relief 1.21 The ATO’s Debt business line (DBL) is one of four business lines within  the ATO’s Operations sub‐plan53, with responsibility for managing all aspects  of tax and superannuation debt, including debt relief.54 The DBL develops and  implements strategies for managing debt that support the ATO’s focus areas  and  deliverables,  as  set  out  in  the  ATO’s  annual  plan  and  accompanying  corporate  overview.55  As  at  1  July  2012,  the  DBL  had  1924  staff  and  an  operational budget of $186 million for 2012-13.56 

1.22 The operational structure of the DBL (outlined in Figure 1.2) reflects the  ATO’s  debt  management  framework  of  early  collection,  firmer  action,  and  strategic recovery. By focusing on early collection, the ATO aims to assist both  personal and business taxpayers to manage their obligations and prevent their  debt from escalating. Firmer action is taken against those taxpayers who make  no effort to manage their debt; and the ATO may take more targeted strategic  recovery action, particularly where a business is considered not to be viable in  the longer term and there would be little likelihood of the tax debt ever being  paid. Two additional areas in the DBL provide risk, intelligence and reporting  and project delivery and production management services across the business line. 

1.23 The  DBL  has  two  specialist  teams  that  deal  exclusively  with  the  administration of debt relief: 

 the Debt Hardship Capability (DHC) team, established in October 2008,  assesses taxpayers’ applications for release or waiver, and less complex  cases where part of the debt may be compromised. The team is also a  reference  point  for  ATO  staff  and  community  welfare  groups,  if  a  taxpayer is claiming difficulty in meeting their debts; and 

 the Debt Reduction team manages the bulk non‐pursuit process. 

1.24 Debt cases that the ATO may not pursue are generally managed by  ATO case officers within the firmer action or strategic recovery sections of the  DBL. Complex compromise issues are managed within the strategic recovery  section of the business line. 

                                                       53 The ATO Plan is managed through four sub-plans: Compliance; Corporate Service and Law; Enterprise Solutions and Technology; and Operations. Business and Service Lines provide the operational delivery vehicles for the relevant sub-

plan.

54 The exception is that the remission of GIC and penalties is managed across the ATO, as outlined in paragraph 1.25. 55 ATO, Debt Line Plan 2012-13. 56

ibid., p. 14.

Background and Context

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

33

Figure 1.2

Structure of the Debt business line as at 1 July 2012

Deputy Commissioner

Early Collections

Firmer Action

Strategic Recovery and Superannuation

Risk, Intelligence and Reporting

Project Delivery and Production Management

Responsible for: outbound correspondence and telephone calls; referral of debt to external collection agencies; and debt hardship capability and bulk non-pursuit teams.

Undertakes a range of options to recover outstanding debt that includes: garnishee notices; statutory demands; and

director penalty notices.

Manages debt of taxpayers with significant liabilities as a result of previous ATO compliance activities, large enterprise debt and aged debt holdings.

Provides research and analysis, debt reporting and the management of cross-jurisdictional and inter-agency relationships.

Provides operational analytics and production management.

Debt Business Line

 

Source: ANAO analysis of ATO documents.

1.25 Administrative arrangements for GIC and penalties extend beyond the  DBL.  Staff  in  all  business  lines  dealing  with  taxpayer  assessments  have  authorisation  to  grant  GIC  and  penalty  remission,  subject  to  delegations  approved by the Commissioner of Taxation. The delegation to approve GIC  remission up to $10 000 is also extended to staff employed by external debt  collection agencies, contracted to deliver services on behalf of the ATO. The  Deputy Commissioner, Debt business line, is accountable for the quality and  consistency of GIC remissions across the ATO. 

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

34

Business systems

1.26 In  managing  debt  cases,  the  ATO  relies  on  two  information  and  communications technology (ICT) systems—a new integrated core processing  (ICP) system established in 2010 and the legacy systems.57 Taxpayers may have  several accounts in these two systems and, while this situation has little impact  on individual taxpayers, it creates additional work for ATO staff to assess and  manage debt relief cases as they must use information from both systems. 

Published reports relating to the ATO’s management of debt 1.27 The  ANAO  has  published  four  performance  audits  on  the  ATO’s  management of debt: 

 Audit  Report  No.54  2011-12,  Engagement  of  External  Debt  Collection  Agencies; 

 Audit Report No.42 2006-07, ATO’s Administration of Debt Collection— Micro‐businesses; 

 Audit Report No 31, 1999-2000, Administration of Tax Penalties; and 

 Audit Report No.23 1999-2000, Management of Tax Debt Collection. 

1.28 While  these  reports  covered  a  range  of  topics  relating  to  debt  management, none had extensive coverage of debt relief arrangements. 

Commonwealth Ombudsman report

1.29 The  Commonwealth  Ombudsman  issued  a  report  in  March  2009  concerning the re‐raising of ‘written‐off’ income tax debts by the ATO. The  report found that the term was confusing for taxpayers, as it: 

only reflects a decision not to pursue the debt for a period of time and can be  reversed if and when the ATO considers that the person’s circumstances have  changed.58 

The Ombudsman’s investigation found that there was scope to improve the  ATO’s  administration  of  decisions  to  re‐raise  debt.  The  report  made 

                                                       57 The ICP system processes, among other things, income tax and fringe benefits tax. The legacy systems process taxes that include goods and services tax, pay-as-you-go (PAYG) tax installments, excise, and superannuation guarantee. 58

Commonwealth Ombudsman, Australian Taxation Office: re-raising written-off tax debts, March 2009.

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

34

Business systems

1.26 In  managing  debt  cases,  the  ATO  relies  on  two  information  and  communications technology (ICT) systems—a new integrated core processing  (ICP) system established in 2010 and the legacy systems.57 Taxpayers may have  several accounts in these two systems and, while this situation has little impact  on individual taxpayers, it creates additional work for ATO staff to assess and  manage debt relief cases as they must use information from both systems. 

Published reports relating to the ATO’s management of debt 1.27 The  ANAO  has  published  four  performance  audits  on  the  ATO’s  management of debt: 

 Audit  Report  No.54  2011-12,  Engagement  of  External  Debt  Collection  Agencies; 

 Audit Report No.42 2006-07, ATO’s Administration of Debt Collection— Micro‐businesses; 

 Audit Report No 31, 1999-2000, Administration of Tax Penalties; and 

 Audit Report No.23 1999-2000, Management of Tax Debt Collection. 

1.28 While  these  reports  covered  a  range  of  topics  relating  to  debt  management, none had extensive coverage of debt relief arrangements. 

Commonwealth Ombudsman report

1.29 The  Commonwealth  Ombudsman  issued  a  report  in  March  2009  concerning the re‐raising of ‘written‐off’ income tax debts by the ATO. The  report found that the term was confusing for taxpayers, as it: 

only reflects a decision not to pursue the debt for a period of time and can be  reversed if and when the ATO considers that the person’s circumstances have  changed.58 

The Ombudsman’s investigation found that there was scope to improve the  ATO’s  administration  of  decisions  to  re‐raise  debt.  The  report  made 

                                                       57 The ICP system processes, among other things, income tax and fringe benefits tax. The legacy systems process taxes that include goods and services tax, pay-as-you-go (PAYG) tax installments, excise, and superannuation guarantee. 58

Commonwealth Ombudsman, Australian Taxation Office: re-raising written-off tax debts, March 2009.

Background and Context

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

35

six recommendations that included improving communication with taxpayers  when their debt is written‐off, and again when it is re‐raised. 

1.30 This issue was considered in a Senate Committee in June 2009, with the  ATO being asked how the confusion caused by its use of the term ‘write‐off’  would be minimised. In response, the ATO stated that: 

all information available to taxpayers and Tax Office staff will be updated to  use the term non‐pursuit rather than write‐off, where necessary.59 

1.31 The  ATO’s  internal  audit  unit  conducted  an  audit  of  the  bulk  non‐pursuit  process  in  July  2011  to  ensure  compliance  with  the  relevant  processes.  Overall,  the  audit  found  that  the  cases  selected  were  within  the  parameters approved by the Debt Executive, although procedures were not  up‐to‐date  or  lacked  detail,  and  were  not  always  adhered  to.  The  report  included  seven  recommendations,  aimed  at:  improving  and  updating  the  documentation  for  the  bulk  non‐pursuit  procedures;  improving  quality  assurance; and ensuring that staff receive thorough training. 

Audit objective, criteria and methodology 1.32 The objective of the audit was to assess the effectiveness of the ATO’s  administration of debt relief arrangements. The audit assessed whether: 

 information  is  readily  available  on  debt  relief  options  to  people  in  serious hardship; 

 those cases being considered for debt relief were effectively assessed; 

 debt cases that were not pursued and re‐raised or cancelled at a later  date were being appropriately managed; and 

 debt relief outcomes are accurately reported. 

The  ATO’s  communication  with  taxpayers  and  key  stakeholders  was  also  examined. 

   

                                                       59 Senate Standing Committee on Economics, Treasury portfolio, BudgetEestimates 2-4 June 2009. Answer to question on notice.

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

36

Audit methodology

1.33 The audit examined electronic records, documentation and reports held  by the ATO, and interviewed relevant ATO staff. The audit included analysing  a sample of 629 cases across all major categories of debt relief, drawing on the  ANAO’s 2010-11 and 2011-12 audits of the ATO’s financial statements for the  analysis of individual non‐pursuit cases and remission of the general interest  charge. The audit team also interviewed selected tax professionals and welfare  organisations providing assistance to people experiencing financial difficulties. 

1.34 The  audit  was  conducted  in  accordance  with  ANAO  Auditing  Standards at a cost of approximately $338 200. 

Structure of the report

1.35 Table 1.2 outlines the structure of the report. 

Table 1.2 Report structure Chapter Chapter overview

2. Engaging with tax debtors and supporting debt staff

Examines the ATO’s engagement with the community and the information provided about debt management arrangements. The guidance and training given to assist staff to identify, assess and manage debt relief cases is also examined.

3. Assessing debt relief applications

Examines the policies and processes supporting the ATO’s assessment of debt relief applications to determine their eligibility for debt relief arrangements.

4. Automated debt relief processes Examines the ATO’s automated processes supporting the administration of debt relief.

5. Reporting of debt relief arrangements Examines the reporting of debt relief arrangements by the ATO.

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

36

Audit methodology

1.33 The audit examined electronic records, documentation and reports held  by the ATO, and interviewed relevant ATO staff. The audit included analysing  a sample of 629 cases across all major categories of debt relief, drawing on the  ANAO’s 2010-11 and 2011-12 audits of the ATO’s financial statements for the  analysis of individual non‐pursuit cases and remission of the general interest  charge. The audit team also interviewed selected tax professionals and welfare  organisations providing assistance to people experiencing financial difficulties. 

1.34 The  audit  was  conducted  in  accordance  with  ANAO  Auditing  Standards at a cost of approximately $338 200. 

Structure of the report

1.35 Table 1.2 outlines the structure of the report. 

Table 1.2 Report structure Chapter Chapter overview

2. Engaging with tax debtors and supporting debt staff

Examines the ATO’s engagement with the community and the information provided about debt management arrangements. The guidance and training given to assist staff to identify, assess and manage debt relief cases is also examined.

3. Assessing debt relief applications

Examines the policies and processes supporting the ATO’s assessment of debt relief applications to determine their eligibility for debt relief arrangements.

4. Automated debt relief processes Examines the ATO’s automated processes supporting the administration of debt relief.

5. Reporting of debt relief arrangements Examines the reporting of debt relief arrangements by the ATO.

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

37

2. Engaging with Tax Debtors and Supporting Debt Staff

This  chapter  examines  the  ATO’s  engagement  with  the  community  and  the  information  provided  about  debt  management  arrangements.  The  guidance  and  training given to staff to identify, assess and manage debt relief cases is also examined. 

Introduction 2.1 The ATO encourages taxpayers to contact them as soon as practicable if  they  are  experiencing  difficulty  in  meeting  their  tax  and  superannuation  obligations. The Commissioner of Taxation’s Annual Report, 2011-12 states that  the ATO: 

...provides support and assistance to viable small businesses and individuals  who are experiencing short‐term financial difficulties and who are willing to  work with us to address their tax and superannuation debts. This targeted  support  includes  tailored  payment  arrangements,  remission  of  interest  and  penalties, and full or partial release of certain debts.60 

2.2 To  encourage  and  support  taxpayers’  compliance  with  their  tax  obligations,  the  ATO  provides  a  range  of  information  relating  to  debt  management  on  its  website  to  assist  taxpayers  in  meeting  their  payment  obligations,  including  specific  information  on  categories  of  debt  relief.  The  ATO  also  conducts  community  engagement  activities  that  allow  communication of specific messages to taxpayers in relation to managing their  debt. These messages typically highlight the expectation that tax debtors will  meet their debt obligations if they have the financial capacity to do so, however  options  are  available  to  assist  taxpayers  experiencing  serious  financial  hardship. 

2.3 While the ATO has measures in place to identify and support taxpayers  who may be experiencing serious financial difficulties, the onus is on taxpayers  or  their  representatives  to  contact  the  ATO  and  discuss  their  financial  circumstances. 

2.4 Internally,  the  identification  and  processing  of  debt  relief  cases  is  supported by ATO guidance material that sets out policies and procedures that 

                                                       60 Commissioner of Taxation, Annual Report 2011-12, p. 44.

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

38

must  be  followed  by  staff  when  identifying  financial  hardship,  assessing  applications for relief and managing debt relief cases. Training courses are also  delivered to ATO staff in order to provide them with the necessary skills to  engage taxpayers and work through debt management options. 

2.5 The ANAO examined the information and advice provided by the ATO  in relation to debt management, including debt relief arrangements and the  guidance and training given to ATO staff managing debt cases. 

Information and community engagement activities 2.6 The ATO’s community information and engagement activities promote  taxpayers’ early intervention with their tax debt, to avoid further escalation of  their debt. As the onus is generally on taxpayers to apply for waiver, release,  compromise of a debt, or GIC remission, it is important that they understand  the debt relief options available to them. 

Information

2.7 Taxpayers experiencing financial difficulty, and who interact with the  ATO through a tax professional can reasonably expect to be properly advised  on  the  debt  management  and  relief  options  that  may  be  available  to  them.  Those managing their own taxation affairs may access relevant information on  the ATO’s website61; or check the ATO’s social media presence, in the form of  the ATO’s facebook, Twitter and YouTube accounts. As at 31 December 2012,  key documents available on the ATO’s website included:  

 Release from your tax debt; 

 Guide to managing your tax debt;

 Difficulty  in  paying  your  tax  debt:  business  clients  (available  in  18 languages);

 Difficulty in paying your tax debt, (individual clients);

 Financial Difficulties—frequently asked questions; and

 General Interest Charge—can I ask for a remission of GIC?

                                                       61 Taxpayers with hearing or speech difficulties are provided with a direct link from the ATO website to the National Relay Service. The website also provides information in several languages for non-English speaking taxpayers, including how

to access the Translating and Interpreting Service. Customised services are provided through the ATO’s Indigenous Helpline.

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

38

must  be  followed  by  staff  when  identifying  financial  hardship,  assessing  applications for relief and managing debt relief cases. Training courses are also  delivered to ATO staff in order to provide them with the necessary skills to  engage taxpayers and work through debt management options. 

2.5 The ANAO examined the information and advice provided by the ATO  in relation to debt management, including debt relief arrangements and the  guidance and training given to ATO staff managing debt cases. 

Information and community engagement activities 2.6 The ATO’s community information and engagement activities promote  taxpayers’ early intervention with their tax debt, to avoid further escalation of  their debt. As the onus is generally on taxpayers to apply for waiver, release,  compromise of a debt, or GIC remission, it is important that they understand  the debt relief options available to them. 

Information

2.7 Taxpayers experiencing financial difficulty, and who interact with the  ATO through a tax professional can reasonably expect to be properly advised  on  the  debt  management  and  relief  options  that  may  be  available  to  them.  Those managing their own taxation affairs may access relevant information on  the ATO’s website61; or check the ATO’s social media presence, in the form of  the ATO’s facebook, Twitter and YouTube accounts. As at 31 December 2012,  key documents available on the ATO’s website included:  

 Release from your tax debt; 

 Guide to managing your tax debt;

 Difficulty  in  paying  your  tax  debt:  business  clients  (available  in  18 languages);

 Difficulty in paying your tax debt, (individual clients);

 Financial Difficulties—frequently asked questions; and

 General Interest Charge—can I ask for a remission of GIC?

                                                       61 Taxpayers with hearing or speech difficulties are provided with a direct link from the ATO website to the National Relay Service. The website also provides information in several languages for non-English speaking taxpayers, including how

to access the Translating and Interpreting Service. Customised services are provided through the ATO’s Indigenous Helpline.

Engaging with Tax Debtors and Supporting Debt Staff

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

39

2.8 These  publications  assist  taxpayers  to  understand  the  options  for  repaying debt when they are facing financial hardship, including processes for  applying for debt relief. However, the ANAO found that the information did  not  fully  cover  all  aspects  of  debt  relief  and  was  difficult  to  locate  on  the  website. Two key publications, Difficulty in paying your tax debts for individual  and  business  clients  were  last  updated  in  July  2011,  while  the  more  comprehensive document, Guide to managing your tax debt, had most recently  been updated in January 2013. 

2.9 The website also provides information on actions available to taxpayers  when  they  are  dissatisfied  with  aspects  of  the  ATO’s  service  or  an  ATO  decision. However, this information is not clear in all instances. Notably, the  website advises taxpayers that they cannot dispute or disagree with a general  interest  charge  remission  decision  through  the  objections  process,  only  advising taxpayers they can contact the ATO to discuss the matter.62 Further, it  does not advise that complaints and objections for release decisions are dealt  with differently by the ATO.63 It would be helpful to taxpayers if the ATO  clarified the processes for disputing or disagreeing with these decisions. 

2.10 The scope and breadth of the information and services available online  are set to increase, with the roll out of the ATO’s Online 2015 information and  communication  technology  forward  work  program.  The  Commissioner’s  online update of September 2012 stated:  

With advances in technology, we know many of you prefer to interact with us  online.  So,  it’s  only  natural  that  we  want  to  expand  these  services  and  encourage you to use them, as online service is a more efficient way for us to  interact with you and to reduce our costs - which benefits us all. 

2.11 Taxpayers less comfortable with, or whose personal circumstances may  limit their access to, online services, can write to the ATO for information and  advice64, make phone contact through a free‐call number (including self‐help  lines for personal and business taxpayers), or access services in one of 19 ATO  shopfronts and shared services arrangements nationally.  

                                                       62 Advice to taxpayers on the ATO website includes that the ATO, if asked, will, in most cases, review the decision consistent with good administrative practice. The letter to taxpayers informing them that their request for GIC remission

has been declined advises that they may seek a review of the decision by the Federal Court, or they should contact the ATO if they believe there are further circumstances that should have been considered. 63 Complaints are initially managed within the Debt team that made the original decision, whereas objections follow a more

formal process and are reviewed by another business line to provide an independent assessment. 64 The ATO scans letters from taxpayers to identify specific words that may indicate the taxpayer is experiencing financial hardship. These cases would be referred to the Debt Hardship Capability team for follow-up.

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

40

2.12 Other taxpayers may be assisted by community‐based organisations,  including the Financial Counsellors Network (where the ATO provides a direct  phone number to the ATO’s Debt Hardship Capability team); and the ATO’s  Tax  Time  volunteers65  can  provide  information  to  taxpayers  experiencing  financial difficulty on how to contact the ATO for information and assistance. 

Community engagement

2.13 The ATO conducts a range of community engagement and consultation  activities  through  various  workshops  and  forums  with  community‐based  welfare organisations and professional tax bodies. These activities provide the  ATO  with  feedback  on  its  administration  of  debt  management  and  relief.  Particular  consultation  activities  with  community  welfare  organisations  relating  to  debt  hardship  and  relief  include  presentations  to  the  Financial  Counsellors  National  Conferences  in  2011  and  2012.  The  perceptions  of  financial counsellors about debt relief have been captured in a recent survey. 

Survey of financial counsellors

2.14 As part of this audit, the ANAO consulted the Financial Counsellors  Australia  (FCA)  network66  for  its  views  about  engaging  with  the  ATO  on  behalf  of  clients  experiencing  financial  difficulties.  In  response,  the  FCA  surveyed,  in  March  2013,  54  financial  counsellors  from  across  Australia  (excluding New South Wales and Tasmania) about their experiences in dealing  with the ATO, specifically the Debt Hardship Capability team, to negotiate a  debt  hardship  arrangement  for  their  clients.  The  survey  covered  the  ATO’s  provision of information and community support activities for debt hardship  as well as the decision making processes and practices for debt relief and the  outcomes achieved for their clients.67  

2.15 The survey results indicated that the ATO performed reasonably well  in  managing  taxpayers  in  hardship  and  engaging  with  counsellors.  When  asked  about  the  information  on  the  ATO’s  website,  while  the  counsellors  themselves  were  mostly  able  to  find  and  understand  information  on  debt 

                                                       65 Tax Help volunteers are trained in preparing basic tax returns, such as for taxpayers with less than $50 000 taxable income with no business or rental income. If volunteers are asked about anything regarding the debt relief categories

they are to ring the hotline or refer the taxpayer to contact the ATO. 66 Financial Counselling Australia (FCA) is the peak body for financial counsellors in Australia. Financial counsellors provide information, support and advocacy to assist people in financial difficulty. 67

Survey participants were asked 16 questions relating to the: information available about hardship; their experience when contacting the ATO; outcomes for their clients; and ATO’s overall debt collection practices.

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

40

2.12 Other taxpayers may be assisted by community‐based organisations,  including the Financial Counsellors Network (where the ATO provides a direct  phone number to the ATO’s Debt Hardship Capability team); and the ATO’s  Tax  Time  volunteers65  can  provide  information  to  taxpayers  experiencing  financial difficulty on how to contact the ATO for information and assistance. 

Community engagement

2.13 The ATO conducts a range of community engagement and consultation  activities  through  various  workshops  and  forums  with  community‐based  welfare organisations and professional tax bodies. These activities provide the  ATO  with  feedback  on  its  administration  of  debt  management  and  relief.  Particular  consultation  activities  with  community  welfare  organisations  relating  to  debt  hardship  and  relief  include  presentations  to  the  Financial  Counsellors  National  Conferences  in  2011  and  2012.  The  perceptions  of  financial counsellors about debt relief have been captured in a recent survey. 

Survey of financial counsellors

2.14 As part of this audit, the ANAO consulted the Financial Counsellors  Australia  (FCA)  network66  for  its  views  about  engaging  with  the  ATO  on  behalf  of  clients  experiencing  financial  difficulties.  In  response,  the  FCA  surveyed,  in  March  2013,  54  financial  counsellors  from  across  Australia  (excluding New South Wales and Tasmania) about their experiences in dealing  with the ATO, specifically the Debt Hardship Capability team, to negotiate a  debt  hardship  arrangement  for  their  clients.  The  survey  covered  the  ATO’s  provision of information and community support activities for debt hardship  as well as the decision making processes and practices for debt relief and the  outcomes achieved for their clients.67  

2.15 The survey results indicated that the ATO performed reasonably well  in  managing  taxpayers  in  hardship  and  engaging  with  counsellors.  When  asked  about  the  information  on  the  ATO’s  website,  while  the  counsellors  themselves  were  mostly  able  to  find  and  understand  information  on  debt 

                                                       65 Tax Help volunteers are trained in preparing basic tax returns, such as for taxpayers with less than $50 000 taxable income with no business or rental income. If volunteers are asked about anything regarding the debt relief categories

they are to ring the hotline or refer the taxpayer to contact the ATO. 66 Financial Counselling Australia (FCA) is the peak body for financial counsellors in Australia. Financial counsellors provide information, support and advocacy to assist people in financial difficulty. 67

Survey participants were asked 16 questions relating to the: information available about hardship; their experience when contacting the ATO; outcomes for their clients; and ATO’s overall debt collection practices.

Engaging with Tax Debtors and Supporting Debt Staff

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

41

hardship,  their  clients  had  more  difficulty.68  The  counsellors’  views  on  the  release application form were mixed, with 68 per cent commenting that it was  not easy for their clients to complete.  

2.16 While the survey was conducted solely for the purposes of this audit,  the results provided useful information for management about opportunities  to improve  the negotiation of debt hardship arrangements. The ATO could  consider including questions relating to taxpayers’ engagement with the ATO  about the management of their debts in its annual surveys, as these do not  currently cover debt management or relief issues.69 

Arrangements supporting external communication

2.17 The ATO’s Corporate Relations area has primary responsibility for the  agency’s  external  communications,  including  the  content  on  the  ATO’s  website, and works at the corporate level, across the agency’s business and  services lines. Commencing in February 2013, communication functions in the  Operations  sub‐plan  (that  includes  the  Debt,  Client  Account  Services,  Customer  Service  and  Solutions,  and  Operations  Support  and  Capability  business lines) have been combined to form a Shared Services unit providing  communication and finance services for the Operations sub‐plan. 

2.18 This restructure is expected to present opportunities for streamlining  business  processes,  identifying  improvement  and  removing  duplication  of  effort across the Operations sub‐plan, as well as ensuring consistency in service  delivery across the sub‐plan’s business lines. 

Supporting ATO staff in the management of debt relief cases 2.19 The  ATO  produces  a  wide  range  of  guidance  material  for  staff  that  aims  to:  establish  the  ATO  Executive’s  expectations  on  key  aspects  of  administration; align work processes and practices across the ATO; and assist  officers undertake their work more efficiently and effectively. The ATO also  provides  learning  and  development  opportunities,  primarily  a  range  of 

                                                       68 To the question: ‘my clients would find the information easy to understand’, 81 per cent of participants answered either hardly ever or sometimes, whereas 56 per cent of counsellors were mostly or always able to find information easily and

63 per cent were mostly or always able to understand the information. 69 Two annual surveys—the ATO Professionalism survey and the Community Perceptions survey—are commissioned by the ATO but neither includes any questions relating to debt management or relief.

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

42

training courses, for ATO officers and staff providing debt collection services  and call‐centre services under contract to the ATO. 

Guidance material

2.20 The range of guidance material produced by the ATO includes policies  with agency‐wide application, such as the Taxpayer’s Charter, and procedures  and technical reference documents that set out detailed processes for specific  day‐to‐day operational and administrative tasks. The Debt Best Practice (DBP)  team,  established  in  2006-07,  has  responsibility  for  the  development  and  maintenance of guidance material relevant to the management of debt. 

Debt Best Practice team

2.21 The DBP team is specific to the DBL and reports to the business line’s  Executive. The team also works with other business lines and functions across  the  ATO  to  support  the  end‐to‐end  process  of  debt  management  and  collection. The services provided by the DBP team are referred to by the ATO  as  ’non‐discretionary’  functions—that  is,  functions  that  are  essential  for  maintaining the operations of the business, and best practice activities. As at  December 2012, the non‐discretionary functions undertaken by the DBP team  include the development and maintenance of: 

 a set of 328 procedural documents that are referred to by DBL staff  undertaking  debt  collection  activities and  support  consistency  in  the  processes  and  procedures  they  apply.  The  team  manages  around  2000 procedural changes each year, including many that are the result  of feedback from staff; 

 an inventory of 399 debt letters and notices that are sent to taxpayers or  their  representatives  in  relation  to  their  debt.  The  team  has  responsibility for the content, design and accuracy of these letters, and  manages around 250 changes to the content of the letters each year; and 

 support  tools  that  use  software  solutions.  These  solutions  include  macros70  that  reduce  or  eliminate  the  manual  aspects  of  operational  tasks, such as the number of key strokes or steps required by ATO staff  to complete an activity on a client record; and the Script Manager and  Reference Tool (SMART), a computer‐based program that converts ICT 

                                                       70 A macro is a way to automate a task that is performed repeatedly or on a regular basis. It is a series of commands and actions that can be stored and run whenever the task needs to be performed.

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

42

training courses, for ATO officers and staff providing debt collection services  and call‐centre services under contract to the ATO. 

Guidance material

2.20 The range of guidance material produced by the ATO includes policies  with agency‐wide application, such as the Taxpayer’s Charter, and procedures  and technical reference documents that set out detailed processes for specific  day‐to‐day operational and administrative tasks. The Debt Best Practice (DBP)  team,  established  in  2006-07,  has  responsibility  for  the  development  and  maintenance of guidance material relevant to the management of debt. 

Debt Best Practice team

2.21 The DBP team is specific to the DBL and reports to the business line’s  Executive. The team also works with other business lines and functions across  the  ATO  to  support  the  end‐to‐end  process  of  debt  management  and  collection. The services provided by the DBP team are referred to by the ATO  as  ’non‐discretionary’  functions—that  is,  functions  that  are  essential  for  maintaining the operations of the business, and best practice activities. As at  December 2012, the non‐discretionary functions undertaken by the DBP team  include the development and maintenance of: 

 a set of 328 procedural documents that are referred to by DBL staff  undertaking  debt  collection activities and  support  consistency  in  the  processes  and  procedures  they  apply.  The  team  manages  around  2000 procedural changes each year, including many that are the result  of feedback from staff; 

 an inventory of 399 debt letters and notices that are sent to taxpayers or  their  representatives  in  relation  to  their  debt.  The  team  has  responsibility for the content, design and accuracy of these letters, and  manages around 250 changes to the content of the letters each year; and 

 support  tools  that  use  software  solutions.  These  solutions  include  macros70  that  reduce  or  eliminate  the  manual  aspects  of  operational  tasks, such as the number of key strokes or steps required by ATO staff  to complete an activity on a client record; and the Script Manager and  Reference Tool (SMART), a computer‐based program that converts ICT 

                                                       70 A macro is a way to automate a task that is performed repeatedly or on a regular basis. It is a series of commands and actions that can be stored and run whenever the task needs to be performed.

Engaging with Tax Debtors and Supporting Debt Staff

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

43

processes to a more user‐friendly format, and allows reference material  to be accessed more easily.71 

2.22 The  ATO  does  not  routinely  disaggregate  these  figures  to  identify  specific  guidance  material  that  relates  to  different  tax  types  or  specific  activities,  but  advised  the  ANAO  that,  as  at  31  March  2013,  61  procedural  documents  related  to  the  various  categories  of  debt  relief.  The  ATO  also  advised  that  the  full  complement  of  SMART  scripts  relevant  to  the  work  undertaken  by  the  DHC  team  (for  processing  applications  for  hardship,  release, waiver and compromise) were fully implemented in February 2013. 

2.23 To  maintain  the  relevance  and  accuracy  of  the  (non‐discretionary)  material, the DBP team consults with the relevant business sections on critical  changes,  and  actively  seeks  feedback  and  comments  from  the  Debt  officers  who use the material. 

2.24 In the two‐year period January 2011 to January 2013, limited resources  and  other  priorities  resulted  in  the  DBP  team  focussing  solely  on  the  non‐discretionary  functions.  Additional  resources—four  full‐time  equivalent  staff—were  allocated  to  the  team  in  January  2013,  allowing  the  team  to  re‐commence best practice reviews and develop a review program for 2013.  While  the  DBP  team  has  processes  in  place  to  develop  and  maintain  non‐discretionary  items,  undertaking  better  practice  reviews  will  support  continuous improvement in the ATO’s operations. 

Accessing guidance material

2.25 All  ATO  staff  have  access  to  the  guidance  material  through  the  agency’s  intranet  site,  and  are  instructed  to  refer  to  the  electronic  version  (rather than download and use a hardcopy) to ensure that they are referring to  the most up‐to‐date version of a policy or procedures document. ATO staff  often  work  with  dual  monitors  to  facilitate  working  concurrently  with  the  information on the intranet, and different views of the taxpayer’s accounts on  the ATO’s business systems.72 While the use of macros may be available for  some transactions, it can still be a cumbersome, complex and time consuming  process. There is also the increased potential for human error. 

                                                       71 SMART makes it easier for staff to undertake their work because the procedures follow a script and debt officers do not have to switch between multiple procedures. Rather, they can follow the procedures by choosing options from the

script, accessing only information relevant to them. 72 Most transactions, for example a decision to remit a taxpayer’s GIC liability, involves several ‘steps’ requiring the ATO officer to switch between different ICT systems and the ATO’s intranet, further discussed in Chapter 5.

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

44

2.26 In  July  2012,  the  DBP  team  commenced  transitioning  debt  guidance  material to the SMART format, with migration scheduled to be completed in  March  2014.  The  implementation  of  the  SMART  format  should  reduce  the  processing time and the number of ‘steps’ involved in many of the transactions  undertaken by DBL staff.  

Learning and development

2.27 The current administrative arrangements supporting ATO learning and  development  (L&D)  functions  were  established  in  2009-10,  following  an  external review of the ATO’s corporate services undertaken in 2008-09.73 Prior  to the review, L&D functions were managed in individual business lines, with  little  or  no  co‐ordination  between  them.  This  arrangement  resulted  in  variations in the standards and extent of training opportunities provided to  staff, and duplication of the courses available to them. For example, in 2009  there  were  over  3000  training  courses  being  delivered  across  the  ATO,  including 16 dealing with negotiation skills.  

2.28 The training courses have been reviewed and consolidated and, as at  January 2013, the ATO now delivers less than 1300 courses that meet uniform  standards, either through e‐learning modules or in a classroom situation. A  proposed  evaluation  framework,  when  implemented,  should  provide  information on the value and effectiveness of the ATO’s investment in staff  training.  As  at  April  2013,  there  were  nine  L&D  staff  at  the  Operations  sub‐plan level, including two attached to the DBL.  

Debt Business line learning and development

2.29 Staff of the DBL have access to a range of general and specialist debt  training courses and materials, and manage their training record through an  electronic  system.  The  system  allows  their  managers  to  monitor  their  participation and progress in training courses and also provides information  on the number of times any particular course has been completed. 

2.30 Available  data  indicates  that  15  courses  were  directly  related  to  the  administration of debt cases and debt relief. These courses were completed on  3478 occasions by DBL staff: 691 completed on‐line, and 2787 in a classroom  environment with a trainer. Courses available to staff include those aiming to 

                                                       73 The ATO’s corporate services had not been reviewed in over a decade, and findings in the review identified opportunities to reduce duplication, improve efficiency and achieve cost savings in several of the ATO’s corporate

services functions, including L&D. ATO, Tier two project, closure report, 12 July 2010.

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

44

2.26 In  July  2012,  the  DBP  team  commenced  transitioning  debt  guidance  material to the SMART format, with migration scheduled to be completed in  March  2014.  The  implementation  of  the  SMART  format  should  reduce  the  processing time and the number of ‘steps’ involved in many of the transactions  undertaken by DBL staff.  

Learning and development

2.27 The current administrative arrangements supporting ATO learning and  development  (L&D)  functions  were  established  in  2009-10,  following  an  external review of the ATO’s corporate services undertaken in 2008-09.73 Prior  to the review, L&D functions were managed in individual business lines, with  little  or  no  co‐ordination  between  them.  This  arrangement  resulted  in  variations in the standards and extent of training opportunities provided to  staff, and duplication of the courses available to them. For example, in 2009  there  were  over  3000  training  courses  being  delivered  across  the  ATO,  including 16 dealing with negotiation skills.  

2.28 The training courses have been reviewed and consolidated and, as at  January 2013, the ATO now delivers less than 1300 courses that meet uniform  standards, either through e‐learning modules or in a classroom situation. A  proposed  evaluation  framework,  when  implemented,  should  provide  information on the value and effectiveness of the ATO’s investment in staff  training.  As  at  April  2013,  there  were  nine  L&D  staff  at  the  Operations  sub‐plan level, including two attached to the DBL.  

Debt Business line learning and development

2.29 Staff of the DBL have access to a range of general and specialist debt  training courses and materials, and manage their training record through an  electronic  system.  The  system  allows  their  managers  to  monitor  their  participation and progress in training courses and also provides information  on the number of times any particular course has been completed. 

2.30 Available  data  indicates  that  15  courses  were  directly  related  to  the  administration of debt cases and debt relief. These courses were completed on  3478 occasions by DBL staff: 691 completed on‐line, and 2787 in a classroom  environment with a trainer. Courses available to staff include those aiming to 

                                                       73 The ATO’s corporate services had not been reviewed in over a decade, and findings in the review identified opportunities to reduce duplication, improve efficiency and achieve cost savings in several of the ATO’s corporate

services functions, including L&D. ATO, Tier two project, closure report, 12 July 2010.

Engaging with Tax Debtors and Supporting Debt Staff

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

45

assist them to: identify taxpayers who are experiencing difficulty in paying  their debt; and assess taxpayers’ applications for debt relief. The courses and  the number of times they were completed by DBL staff, is set out in Table 2.1.74 

Table 2.1

Number of courses completed relevant to debt relief, for the period March 2010 to March 2013

Course type name Number of times course completed

Training course 21 March 2010 to

30 June 2011

1 July 2011 to 31 March 2013

Client service—an introduction 160 257

Coping with distressed callers 834

Decision making—introduction 200 278

Decision making—operations 27 n/a

Delegations and authorisations 26 273

Internal review of ATO decisions 8 13

Non-pursuit of debt 12 129

Quality notes 104 277

Debt—Compromise overview 1

Debt hardship cases 127

Debt hardship team 33

Debt issues and special circumstances 131

GIC—remission overview 254

GIC, SIC, & FTL overview 203

Penalties and interest—remission 131

Total 1371 2107

Source: ATO.

Note 1: Data is available from 21 March 2011, when the ATO implemented a new learning management system.

Note 2: Where there are no numbers in the table, the course was available, including electronically, but not completed by staff within the reporting period.

   

                                                       74 Courses are delivered in a classroom setting or online, and the dates and number of times courses are completed is recorded.

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

46

2.31 Individual staff and their managers are responsible for ensuring staff  complete training courses required for their particular work. While data at this  aggregated level does not indicate if the incidence of training is appropriate to  the numbers of staff in the DBL, it shows a clear variance in the type of course  and  attendance  over  the  two  periods.  For  example,  no  staff  completed  the  course on Dealing with distressed callers in the second (20 month) period75; and  there was no participation in the course dealing with GIC remission in the first  (15 month) period. 

2.32 The DBL Learning and Development Plan 2012-13 identifies ongoing, new  and emerging capability requirements (or training needs) for consideration in  the ATO’s forward L&D work plan for the year. The plan was developed by  DBL L&D staff and endorsed by the Debt Executive.  

2.33 While  training  courses  contribute  to  overall  staff  skills,  none  of  the  training  needs  in  the  DBL’s  L&D  plan  2012-13  directly  identify  issues  concerning  the  administration  of  debt  relief.  The  results  of  the  survey  undertaken by Financial Counsellors Australia may be useful to the ATO when  reviewing its annual learning and development plan. 

Conclusion 2.34 To  encourage  and  support  taxpayers’  compliance  with  their  tax  obligations,  the  ATO  provides  a  range  of  information  relating  to  debt  management  on  its  website  to  assist  taxpayers  in  meeting  their  payment  obligations, and also provides advice in writing and by telephone.  

2.35 While online information about debt relief is available, it does not fully  cover all aspects of debt relief and is difficult to locate. A new website is being  developed to improve accessibility and the clarity of messages as part of the  ATO’s  strategy  to  deliver  more  services  online.  As  the  ATO’s  expands  its  online  service  delivery,  consideration  will  need  to  be  afforded  to  those  taxpayers  who  are  less  comfortable  with,  or  whose  personal  circumstances  may limit their access to, these services. 

2.36 The  ATO  conducts  community  engagement  activities  that  allow  communication of specific messages to taxpayers, including in relation to debt  relief,  and  to  obtain  feedback  on  the  standard  of  services  being  provided. 

                                                       75 The ATO advised that delivery of this course was specifically organised in early 2011 to support DBL staff dealing with taxpayers directly affected by the floods and cyclones that occurred at the time.

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

46

2.31 Individual staff and their managers are responsible for ensuring staff  complete training courses required for their particular work. While data at this  aggregated level does not indicate if the incidence of training is appropriate to  the numbers of staff in the DBL, it shows a clear variance in the type of course  and  attendance  over  the  two  periods.  For  example,  no  staff  completed  the  course on Dealing with distressed callers in the second (20 month) period75; and  there was no participation in the course dealing with GIC remission in the first  (15 month) period. 

2.32 The DBL Learning and Development Plan 2012-13 identifies ongoing, new  and emerging capability requirements (or training needs) for consideration in  the ATO’s forward L&D work plan for the year. The plan was developed by  DBL L&D staff and endorsed by the Debt Executive.  

2.33 While  training  courses  contribute  to  overall  staff  skills,  none  of  the  training  needs  in  the  DBL’s  L&D  plan  2012-13  directly  identify  issues  concerning  the  administration  of  debt  relief.  The  results  of  the  survey  undertaken by Financial Counsellors Australia may be useful to the ATO when  reviewing its annual learning and development plan. 

Conclusion 2.34 To  encourage  and  support  taxpayers’  compliance  with  their  tax  obligations,  the  ATO  provides  a  range  of  information  relating  to  debt  management  on  its  website  to  assist  taxpayers  in  meeting  their  payment  obligations, and also provides advice in writing and by telephone.  

2.35 While online information about debt relief is available, it does not fully  cover all aspects of debt relief and is difficult to locate. A new website is being  developed to improve accessibility and the clarity of messages as part of the  ATO’s  strategy  to  deliver  more  services  online.  As  the  ATO’s  expands  its  online  service  delivery,  consideration  will  need  to  be  afforded  to  those  taxpayers  who  are  less  comfortable  with,  or  whose  personal  circumstances  may limit their access to, these services. 

2.36 The  ATO  conducts  community  engagement  activities  that  allow  communication of specific messages to taxpayers, including in relation to debt  relief,  and  to  obtain  feedback  on  the  standard  of  services  being  provided. 

                                                       75 The ATO advised that delivery of this course was specifically organised in early 2011 to support DBL staff dealing with taxpayers directly affected by the floods and cyclones that occurred at the time.

Engaging with Tax Debtors and Supporting Debt Staff

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

47

Results  from  a  survey  of  54 financial  counsellors  completed  for  this  audit  indicated that the ATO performed reasonably well in responding to taxpayers  in hardship and in engaging with counsellors. The results also provided useful  information for management about opportunities to improve the negotiation of  debt hardship arrangements. The ATO could also consider including questions  relating  to  taxpayers’  engagement  with  the  ATO  about  the  management  of  their  debts  in  its  annual  surveys,  as  these  do  not  currently  cover  debt  management issues. 

2.37 The processing of debt cases is supported by guidance material that  sets  out  policies  and  procedures  to  be  followed  by  staff  when  assessing  applications for relief. Training courses are also delivered to ATO staff in order  to  provide  them  with  the  necessary  skills  to  engage  taxpayers  and  work  through  debt  management  options.  Debt  business  line  staff  have  access  to  15 courses  that  most  directly  relate  to  debt  management  and  debt  relief  arrangements,  with  ATO  records  indicating  a  significant  increase  in  staff  attendance since July 2011. The results from the survey of financial counsellors  may  be  useful  to  the  ATO  when  reviewing  its  annual  learning  and  development plan. 

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

48

3. Assessing Debt Relief Applications

This chapter examines the policies and processes supporting the ATO’s assessment of  debt relief applications to determine their eligibility for debt relief arrangements. 

Background 3.1 Community  confidence  in  the  ATO’s  administration  relies  on  maintaining a ‘level playing field’, so that one taxpayer is not advantaged over  another in the treatment of debt. Effective communication, and transparency  and  consistency  in  decision  making  support  the  fairness  and  equity  of  the  administration of the tax and superannuation systems. 

3.2 Where a taxpayer has applied for some form of debt relief, or the ATO  has initiated further examination of a taxpayer’s circumstances and capacity to  pay their debt, each case is individually assessed. The ATO’s quality assurance  processes and reviews provide information on the appropriateness and quality  of these assessments, and taxpayers also have various rights of review of the  ATO’s decisions. 

3.3 To  assess  the  effectiveness  of  the  ATO’s  policies  and  processes  supporting the assessment of applications where taxpayers are granted some  form of debt relief, the ANAO examined: 

 key aspects of the assessment and decision making processes across the  categories of debt relief; 

 quality assurance processes that provide review of debt relief decisions  and  whether  they  were  in  accordance  with  relevant  policies  and  procedures; and 

 internal and external processes for taxpayers to object to, or appeal, a  decision made by the ATO. 

Assessment and decision making processes 3.4 Assessing a taxpayer’s financial circumstances and eligibility for some  form  of  debt  relief  involves  an  understanding  of  the  relevant  legislation,  policies and procedures, and is supported by ATO guidance material that staff  are  expected  to  follow  when  assessing  debt  cases.  Guidance  material  in  relation  to  assessing  taxpayers’  circumstances  extends  to  advice  to  staff  on  dealing with taxpayers who may be experiencing difficulties in their personal  life and includes contact details for welfare and financial counselling services.  

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

48

3. Assessing Debt Relief Applications

This chapter examines the policies and processes supporting the ATO’s assessment of  debt relief applications to determine their eligibility for debt relief arrangements. 

Background 3.1 Community  confidence  in  the  ATO’s  administration  relies  on  maintaining a ‘level playing field’, so that one taxpayer is not advantaged over  another in the treatment of debt. Effective communication, and transparency  and  consistency  in  decision  making  support  the  fairness  and  equity  of  the  administration of the tax and superannuation systems. 

3.2 Where a taxpayer has applied for some form of debt relief, or the ATO  has initiated further examination of a taxpayer’s circumstances and capacity to  pay their debt, each case is individually assessed. The ATO’s quality assurance  processes and reviews provide information on the appropriateness and quality  of these assessments, and taxpayers also have various rights of review of the  ATO’s decisions. 

3.3 To  assess  the  effectiveness  of  the  ATO’s  policies  and  processes  supporting the assessment of applications where taxpayers are granted some  form of debt relief, the ANAO examined: 

 key aspects of the assessment and decision making processes across the  categories of debt relief; 

 quality assurance processes that provide review of debt relief decisions  and  whether  they  were  in  accordance  with  relevant  policies  and  procedures; and 

 internal and external processes for taxpayers to object to, or appeal, a  decision made by the ATO. 

Assessment and decision making processes 3.4 Assessing a taxpayer’s financial circumstances and eligibility for some  form  of  debt  relief  involves  an  understanding  of  the  relevant  legislation,  policies and procedures, and is supported by ATO guidance material that staff  are  expected  to  follow  when  assessing  debt  cases.  Guidance  material  in  relation  to  assessing  taxpayers’  circumstances  extends  to  advice  to  staff  on  dealing with taxpayers who may be experiencing difficulties in their personal  life and includes contact details for welfare and financial counselling services.  

Assessing Debt Relief Applications

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

49

3.5 The ANAO examined a sample of cases to analyse the ATO’s decision  making processes in relation to taxpayers’ applications for waiver, release and  compromise of a debt. This analysis focused on whether key procedures in the  assessment processes were followed, but did not test the validity of debt relief  decisions. The approval and recording of decisions relating to non‐pursuit of a  taxpayer’s debt and GIC are routinely examined in the ANAO’s annual audits  of the ATO’s financial statements. 

Applications for waiver of a debt

3.6 As  previously  noted,  applications  for  the  waiver  of  a  debt  may  be  directly received by the ATO, but are generally submitted to the Department of  Finance and Deregulation (Finance) and then forwarded to the Debt Hardship  Capability (DHC) team in the ATO for review and recommendation. The final  decision to grant the waiver of a debt rests with the Finance Minister (or her  delegate). 

3.7 Where the ATO’s assessment of a taxpayer’s circumstances supports  full or partial relief from the liability, the debt will only be recommended for  waiver if there is no alternative solution. For example, the ATO may assess that  the  case  is  most  appropriately  dealt  with  through  release  provisions.  The  waiving of a debt is, effectively, debt relief of last resort. 

3.8 The  DHC  team  received  59  applications  for  waiver  in  2011-12  (increased  from  43 applications  in  2010-11).  Another  40  applications  were  received between July and December 2012. During the 18 month period (1 July  2011 to 31 December 2012) the ATO finalised 77 applications for waiver of a  debt. Of these finalised applications76: 

 six were granted a full waiver, valued at $418 033; 

 eight were not granted a waiver but the taxpayers were released from  their debts, valued at $182 326;  

 26  were  not  granted  a  waiver  but  the  ATO  assessed  the  debts  as  uneconomical to pursue, valued at $1 932 639; 

 six were not granted a waiver but had GIC and / or penalties remitted,  valued at $121 422;  

                                                       76 The number of results exceeds the number of finalised applications, as a single waiver application may be resolved through multiple solutions, for example, by releasing some of the debt and not pursuing the balance.

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

50

 two  were  not  granted  a  waiver  but  payment  arrangements  were  entered into for the $160 080 debt; 

 28 were not granted a waiver and the taxpayers were still liable to pay  their debts, valued at $8 284 392; and 

 eight applications were discontinued77, valued at $1 096 828. 

3.9 The  DHC  team  maintains  spreadsheets  to  monitor  workflow,  and  information  relevant  to  the  application  is  accessed  and  recorded  in  the  taxpayers’  accounts  in  the  ATO’s  business  systems.  The  ANAO  examined  three key stages of the ATO’s procedures for assessing taxpayers’ applications  for the waiver of their debts. These included that the ATO had: 

 considered an alternative solution, where the taxpayer’s circumstances  supported some form of relief from debt; 

 appropriately recorded the results of the assessment (prepared by the  ATO and sent to Finance) on the taxpayers’ accounts in the relevant  ATO  business system,  including  instances  where  the  ATO  found  an  alternative solution, such as full or partial release of the debt; and 

 evidence on the taxpayers’ accounts that they had been informed (by  the ATO), of the result of the assessment, and that it was consistent  with the information sent to Finance. 

3.10 The results of the ANAO’s testing indicated that the ATO had followed  these procedures in the majority of cases. Of the 77 applications examined:  

 one case did not have evidence that an alternative solution had been  considered; 

 65 taxpayers’ accounts included the ATO submission to Finance; and 

 65  taxpayers’  accounts  recorded  ATO  contact  with  the  taxpayer  to  either provide them with the information sent to Finance, or to discuss  an alternative solution to the waiver of their debt.78 

                                                       77 An application may be discontinued for a variety of reasons, including instances where the taxpayer: did not provide further information; declared bankruptcy during the assessment process; or died during the application process. 78

Although both criteria had been met in 65 cases, the ANAO assessed the ‘provided information to taxpayer’ criterion as not applicable to three records. In two cases the ATO found that the taxpayer had no tax debt and advised Finance which subsequently advised the taxpayer, and in the other case the taxpayer had already entered into a payment arrangement with the ATO.

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

50

 two  were  not  granted  a  waiver  but  payment  arrangements  were  entered into for the $160 080 debt; 

 28 were not granted a waiver and the taxpayers were still liable to pay  their debts, valued at $8 284 392; and 

 eight applications were discontinued77, valued at $1 096 828. 

3.9 The  DHC  team  maintains  spreadsheets  to  monitor  workflow,  and  information  relevant  to  the  application  is  accessed  and  recorded  in  the  taxpayers’  accounts  in  the  ATO’s  business  systems.  The  ANAO  examined  three key stages of the ATO’s procedures for assessing taxpayers’ applications  for the waiver of their debts. These included that the ATO had: 

 considered an alternative solution, where the taxpayer’s circumstances  supported some form of relief from debt; 

 appropriately recorded the results of the assessment (prepared by the  ATO and sent to Finance) on the taxpayers’ accounts in the relevant  ATO  business system,  including  instances  where  the  ATO  found  an  alternative solution, such as full or partial release of the debt; and 

 evidence on the taxpayers’ accounts that they had been informed (by  the ATO), of the result of the assessment, and that it was consistent  with the information sent to Finance. 

3.10 The results of the ANAO’s testing indicated that the ATO had followed  these procedures in the majority of cases. Of the 77 applications examined:  

 one case did not have evidence that an alternative solution had been  considered; 

 65 taxpayers’ accounts included the ATO submission to Finance; and 

 65  taxpayers’  accounts  recorded  ATO  contact  with  the  taxpayer  to  either provide them with the information sent to Finance, or to discuss  an alternative solution to the waiver of their debt.78 

                                                       77 An application may be discontinued for a variety of reasons, including instances where the taxpayer: did not provide further information; declared bankruptcy during the assessment process; or died during the application process. 78

Although both criteria had been met in 65 cases, the ANAO assessed the ‘provided information to taxpayer’ criterion as not applicable to three records. In two cases the ATO found that the taxpayer had no tax debt and advised Finance which subsequently advised the taxpayer, and in the other case the taxpayer had already entered into a payment arrangement with the ATO.

Assessing Debt Relief Applications

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

51

3.11 Communication  is  an  important  element  of  the  overall  assessment  process. While some of the remaining 11 taxpayers may have been contacted  by  the  ATO  (either  through  email  or  by  telephone),  this  contact  should  be  noted  in  taxpayers’  electronic  case  records,  as  well  as  any  correspondence  between the ATO and Finance, and particularly the waiver submissions. 

Applications for release of debt

3.12 All applications for release from a primary debt, or where the taxpayer  is claiming financial hardship and may be eligible for some form of debt relief,  are assessed by the DHC team. A taxpayer who is assessed as experiencing  serious  hardship  will  not  have  the  capacity  to  pay  their  primary  tax  debt  immediately,  or  within  a  reasonable  period  of  time  through  a  negotiated  payment arrangement. 

3.13 The  DHC  team  has  a  range  of  formal  ATO  guidance  material  and  locally‐developed  templates  and  procedures  documents  to  support  their  assessment of taxpayers’ financial circumstances and release applications. Staff  may  also  contact  the  applicant  during  the  assessment  process  if  further  information is required. 

3.14 There  are  no  defined  benchmarks  against  which  to  assess  serious  hardship  and  a  taxpayer’s  eligibility  for  full  or  partial  release  from  their  primary  debt.  Rather,  factors  to  be  considered  in  assessing  a  taxpayer’s  financial  circumstances  and  their  capacity  to  pay  their  debt,  deal  with  the  taxpayer’s income and expenditure, including assessment of what constitutes  ‘non‐essential’  expenditure.79  Importantly,  the  ATO’s  policy  is  that  release  from  a  debt  will  only  be  granted  where  the  assessment  indicates  that  such  action  will  enable  the  taxpayer  to  manage  their  finances  in  the  future,  including provision for any future tax obligations. 

3.15 The DBL’s Hardship referral fact sheet provides a general explanation  of the various factors to be considered when assessing applications and these  are set out in Table 3.1.80 The nature and substance of these factors indicate the  complexity in assessing a taxpayer’s financial circumstances and the potential 

                                                       79 The ATO’s PS LA 2011/17 deals with debt relief and sets out the steps by which the ATO evaluates the merits of individual cases. The three steps are assessment of: taxpayers’ income and expenditure; assets and liabilities; and

other factors. 80 The fact sheet provides examples the DHC team members should consider when determining the capacity to pay and helps to indicate the level of hardship being experienced by the taxpayer. It is included in the Hardship toolkit: Debt—

Debt hardship toolkit V.1.14, 4 May 2012.

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

52

risk of subjectivity and inconsistency in decision making. This underlines the  importance of appropriate delegation, training, review, and quality assurance  processes. The DHC team advised the ANAO that the work is challenging and  staff  require  about  12  months  in  the  role  before  they  feel  confident  and  competent in undertaking these assessments. 

Table 3.1

Factors considered when assessing release applications

Factor Description

Income and employment What is the status of the taxpayer’s employment, are there others sources of income, and what provision is being made for ongoing tax liabilities? The age and health of the applicant is also relevant in assessing the likelihood of future employment and of the financial situation improving.

Assets Is it reasonable to expect some assets to be sold to pay the

debt, including land, shares or a second home? The family home is generally not included, although substantial equity in the home may indicate an ability to obtain finance.

Necessary expenses Establishing financial hardship requires that a taxpayer has reduced or cancelled all non-essential expenditure, subject to their circumstances. This factor must take into account that certain expenses, for example fuel, are higher in some regions than others, or the costs of medication for different medical conditions will vary.

Compliance history and current level of engagement

The taxpayer’s attitude to the liability and preparedness to plan for future obligations must be considered, including that a change in behaviour is observed where past compliance has been poor.

Family situation The assessment must allow that a marriage or relationship breakdown may result in tax matters not getting the proper attention, including as a result of depression. The number of dependents in the household will also impact on the amount of income the taxpayer can apply to the tax debt.

Other debts The taxpayer’s capacity to pay other debts and / or priority given to payment of those debts can impact on a serious hardship decision.

Source: ATO Hardship referral fact sheet.

Applications for release

3.16 The  DHC  team  received  6165 applications  for  release  in  2011-12  (an  increase of 10 per cent from the previous year), and 3705 applications between  July  and  December  2012.  During  the  18 month  period  (1  July  2011  to  31 December 2012) the team actioned 9499 applications, representing almost  $352 million in collectable debt. Of the applications actioned: 

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

52

risk of subjectivity and inconsistency in decision making. This underlines the  importance of appropriate delegation, training, review, and quality assurance  processes. The DHC team advised the ANAO that the work is challenging and  staff  require  about  12  months  in  the  role  before  they  feel  confident  and  competent in undertaking these assessments. 

Table 3.1

Factors considered when assessing release applications

Factor Description

Income and employment What is the status of the taxpayer’s employment, are there others sources of income, and what provision is being made for ongoing tax liabilities? The age and health of the applicant is also relevant in assessing the likelihood of future employment and of the financial situation improving.

Assets Is it reasonable to expect some assets to be sold to pay the

debt, including land, shares or a second home? The family home is generally not included, although substantial equity in the home may indicate an ability to obtain finance.

Necessary expenses Establishing financial hardship requires that a taxpayer has reduced or cancelled all non-essential expenditure, subject to their circumstances. This factor must take into account that certain expenses, for example fuel, are higher in some regions than others, or the costs of medication for different medical conditions will vary.

Compliance history and current level of engagement

The taxpayer’s attitude to the liability and preparedness to plan for future obligations must be considered, including that a change in behaviour is observed where past compliance has been poor.

Family situation The assessment must allow that a marriage or relationship breakdown may result in tax matters not getting the proper attention, including as a result of depression. The number of dependents in the household will also impact on the amount of income the taxpayer can apply to the tax debt.

Other debts The taxpayer’s capacity to pay other debts and / or priority given to payment of those debts can impact on a serious hardship decision.

Source: ATO Hardship referral fact sheet.

Applications for release

3.16 The  DHC  team  received  6165 applications  for  release  in  2011-12  (an  increase of 10 per cent from the previous year), and 3705 applications between  July  and  December  2012.  During  the  18 month  period  (1  July  2011  to  31 December 2012) the team actioned 9499 applications, representing almost  $352 million in collectable debt. Of the applications actioned: 

Assessing Debt Relief Applications

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

53

 3826  taxpayers  were  granted  full  or  partial  release  from  their  debt,  valued  at  over  $110  million,  (31  per  cent  of  the  total  value  of  the  applications for debt release); 

 2584 taxpayers were refused release (but may have been granted other  solutions, such as negotiating a payment arrangement); and 

 3089 applications were ‘finalised without decision’.81 

The results, grouped by the ATO’s debt levels (DL), are set out in Table 3.2. 

Table 3.2

Release applications processed from 1 July 2011 to 31 December 2012

Result

DL 1 <$2 500

DL2 $2 500 - <$7 500

DL3 $7 500 - <$25 000

DL4

$25 000 - <$50 000

DL5

$50 000 - <$100 000

DL6

$100 000+

Release granted 1

643 843 1249 627 332 132

Release refused

252 449 796 501 338 248

Finalised without decision 472 429 924 599 418 247

Total (9499) 1367 1721 2969 1727 1088 627

Source: ANAO analysis of ATO data.

Note 1: 3751 cases were granted full release, and 75 cases were granted partial release.

3.17 All applications for release must be submitted in writing to the ATO as  there  is  no  online  facility  that  taxpayers  can  use.  Within  seven  days  of  receiving an application, DHC staff are required to check the application, enter  the  case  details  in  the  team’s  standalone  systems,  and  issue  a  letter  to  the  taxpayer acknowledging receipt of the application. The letter also reminds the  taxpayer to ensure their lodgements are up‐to‐date or a  decision cannot be  made about their application. 

3.18 Very  rarely  is  an  application  for  release  refused  at  this  initial  stage,  irrespective  of  whether  or  not  the  application  meets  key criteria  for  release  from a debt. For example, the application may be for a category of debt that is 

                                                       81 ‘Finalised without decision’ means that release was neither granted nor refused. Reasons for a ‘finalised without decision’ result include that: the taxpayer had outstanding lodgements; the taxpayer had an unresolved compensation

claim; the debt was in dispute; and the debt type was not eligible for release.

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

54

not covered by release provisions, but the taxpayer could still be assessed as  experiencing financial hardship and another option may be considered, or the  taxpayer  has  outstanding  lodgements  when  the  application  is  received  but  these are subsequently brought up‐to‐date. 

3.19 The  DHC  team  takes  a  risk  management  approach  to  processing  these applications that seeks to balance the risk to revenue with the resources  available,  while  meeting  service  times82  and  achieving  consistency  in  the  decisions made. ATO documentation notes that the DBL’s firmer action area  takes limited action on debt cases valued at less than $50 000, however the  DHC team often spends around four hours processing each release application  in the same value debt range.  

3.20 The risk management approach to processing release applications is set  out in a training aid for staff that advises them to consider, amongst other  aspects of the case: the value of the debt; whether the taxpayer is in receipt of  welfare  benefits;  and  the  status  of  the  taxpayer’s  lodgements.83The  final  assessment  and  recommendation,  including  calculation  of  the  respective  amounts of the taxpayer’s income and expenditure, is prepared for approval  by the relevant delegate. 

3.21 A macro84 introduced in February 2013 has streamlined the number of  ‘steps’ previously required to process a release application (switching between  the taxpayer’s accounts in the ATO’s business systems and the DHC team’s  standalone  databases),  reducing  the  research  and  processing  time  for  each  application. The ATO advised that the new macro has also standardised the  information included in the release recommendation, improving the quality of  the recommendations for delegate approval. 

ANAO testing of finalised release applications

3.22 The ANAO selected a random sample of 410 applications for release  that were finalised between 1 July 2011 and 31 December 2012. The sample  consisted of:  

 183 cases (45 per cent) where release was granted;  

                                                       82 The applicable service standard is to finalise the case within 56 days of receipt, including those cases where further information is required. 83

The ATO advised the ANAO in May 2013, that the training aid is under review. 84 A macro is a way to automate a task that is performed repeatedly or on a regular basis. It is a series of commands and actions that can be stored and run whenever the task needs to be performed.

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

54

not covered by release provisions, but the taxpayer could still be assessed as  experiencing financial hardship and another option may be considered, or the  taxpayer  has  outstanding  lodgements  when  the  application  is  received  but  these are subsequently brought up‐to‐date. 

3.19 The  DHC  team  takes  a  risk  management  approach  to  processing  these applications that seeks to balance the risk to revenue with the resources  available,  while  meeting  service  times82  and  achieving  consistency  in  the  decisions made. ATO documentation notes that the DBL’s firmer action area  takes limited action on debt cases valued at less than $50 000, however the  DHC team often spends around four hours processing each release application  in the same value debt range.  

3.20 The risk management approach to processing release applications is set  out in a training aid for staff that advises them to consider, amongst other  aspects of the case: the value of the debt; whether the taxpayer is in receipt of  welfare  benefits;  and  the  status  of  the  taxpayer’s  lodgements.83The  final  assessment  and  recommendation,  including  calculation  of  the  respective  amounts of the taxpayer’s income and expenditure, is prepared for approval  by the relevant delegate. 

3.21 A macro84 introduced in February 2013 has streamlined the number of  ‘steps’ previously required to process a release application (switching between  the taxpayer’s accounts in the ATO’s business systems and the DHC team’s  standalone  databases),  reducing  the  research  and  processing  time  for  each  application. The ATO advised that the new macro has also standardised the  information included in the release recommendation, improving the quality of  the recommendations for delegate approval. 

ANAO testing of finalised release applications

3.22 The ANAO selected a random sample of 410 applications for release  that were finalised between 1 July 2011 and 31 December 2012. The sample  consisted of:  

 183 cases (45 per cent) where release was granted;  

                                                       82 The applicable service standard is to finalise the case within 56 days of receipt, including those cases where further information is required. 83

The ATO advised the ANAO in May 2013, that the training aid is under review. 84 A macro is a way to automate a task that is performed repeatedly or on a regular basis. It is a series of commands and actions that can be stored and run whenever the task needs to be performed.

Assessing Debt Relief Applications

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

55

 98 cases (24 per cent) where release was refused; and  

 129  cases  (31  per  cent)  where  the  outcome  was  ‘finalised  without  decision’.85  

The  total  value  of  debt  relating  to  these  cases  was  $12.6  million  of  which   $4.4 million (35 per cent) was released.  

3.23 For each case, the ANAO examined whether:  

 supporting documentation had been entered into the ATO’s business  systems;  

 recommendations  for  applications  for  release  were  approved  by  the  appropriate delegate; and  

 the ATO had met timeliness standards for finalising applications. 

Supporting documentation

3.24 Key documents supporting release decisions are the: application; letter  informing  the  taxpayer  that  the  ATO  has  received  the  application;  report  outlining the assessment of the case; and letter informing the taxpayer of the  final decision. Not all cases include each of these documents, for example, an  application  that  had  been  finalised  without  decision  may  only  have  the  application and a letter to the taxpayer. 

3.25 For the 410 cases examined, a small number of documents were not  available. These included the : 

 release application for two cases; 

 letter  to  taxpayers  informing  them  that  their  applications  had  been  received for nine cases; 

 report outlining the assessment of the case for four cases; and 

 record of the taxpayer having been informed of the final decision, for  10 cases. 

Appropriate delegations

3.26 The delegation to approve an assessment of a taxpayer’s application for  release is determined by the value of the debt. For example, release of debts 

                                                       85 An assessment maybe ‘finalised without decision’ where the ATO has, for example, requested further information from the taxpayer and this has not been provided.

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

56

valued  at  less  than  $20  000  can  be  approved  by  an  ATO  officer  at  the  Australian Public Service (APS) 4 level, while executive level (EL) staff and  senior executive level (SES) staff have much higher delegations. The delegate  would generally review a submission prepared by a more junior staff member.  Table 3.3 sets out the maximum debt value for each APS staff classification  level. 

Table 3.3

Debt values and delegations—release

Debt value ($)

APS delegate level

0 APS1-3

<20 000 APS4

<50 000 APS5

<100 000 APS6

<250 000 EL1

No Limit EL 2 and SES

Source: ATO.

3.27 As previously discussed, appropriate review and delegation supports  consistency  in  decision  making,  particularly  where  complex  factors  are  involved.  Of  the  410  cases  examined,  the  129  that  were  finalised  without  decision did not require delegate approval. Of the remaining 281 cases tested,  in one case, valued at $4234, there was no record that the report had been  reviewed by the delegate; in all other cases, there was evidence of the report  being  reviewed  by  the  appropriate  delegate.  Additionally,  in  observing  the  work of the DHC team, the ANAO noted the commitment by team members to  achieve  appropriate  and  consistent  outcomes  through  discussion  and  mentoring, over and above the required delegations. 

Timeliness standards

3.28 The  ATO  has  three  timeliness  standards  in  place  relating  to  release  decisions. The ATO aims to: 

 acknowledge receipt of an application within seven days of receiving it.  Of  the  410  cases  tested,  the  ATO  acknowledged  receipt  of  an  application  within  an  average  four  days,  with  90  per  cent  of  applications acknowledged within seven days; 

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

56

valued  at  less  than  $20  000  can  be  approved  by  an  ATO  officer  at  the  Australian Public Service (APS) 4 level, while executive level (EL) staff and  senior executive level (SES) staff have much higher delegations. The delegate  would generally review a submission prepared by a more junior staff member.  Table 3.3 sets out the maximum debt value for each APS staff classification  level. 

Table 3.3

Debt values and delegations—release

Debt value ($)

APS delegate level

0 APS1-3

<20 000 APS4

<50 000 APS5

<100 000 APS6

<250 000 EL1

No Limit EL 2 and SES

Source: ATO.

3.27 As previously discussed, appropriate review and delegation supports  consistency  in  decision  making,  particularly  where  complex  factors  are  involved.  Of  the  410  cases  examined,  the  129  that  were  finalised  without  decision did not require delegate approval. Of the remaining 281 cases tested,  in one case, valued at $4234, there was no record that the report had been  reviewed by the delegate; in all other cases, there was evidence of the report  being  reviewed  by  the  appropriate  delegate.  Additionally,  in  observing  the  work of the DHC team, the ANAO noted the commitment by team members to  achieve  appropriate  and  consistent  outcomes  through  discussion  and  mentoring, over and above the required delegations. 

Timeliness standards

3.28 The  ATO  has  three  timeliness  standards  in  place  relating  to  release  decisions. The ATO aims to: 

 acknowledge receipt of an application within seven days of receiving it.  Of  the  410  cases  tested,  the  ATO  acknowledged  receipt  of  an  application  within  an  average  four  days,  with  90  per  cent  of  applications acknowledged within seven days; 

Assessing Debt Relief Applications

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

57

 complete  the  assessment  of  the  application  within  56  days.  Of  the   410 cases analysed, the ATO completed the assessment within 61 days,  on average, with 42 per cent completed within the 56 day standard; and  

 notify taxpayers within 28 days of making the decision.86 Of the 410  cases, the ATO notified the taxpayer of the decision within one day,  with no cases failing to meet the 28 day standard. 

This analysis indicates that, while release applications are generally processed  in accordance with the three relevant timeliness standards, there is scope to  improve the time taken to complete the assessment. 

Compromised debt applications

3.29 The ATO does not promote accepting a compromised amount of the  full  value  of  the  debt  as  a  preferred  solution  to  debt  management.  The  application form is extensive (in excess of 40 pages), and very few applications  are received. Applications are processed by the DHC team, with the exception  of particularly complex cases which are generally managed by case officers in  the strategic recovery area of the DBL. 

3.30 While the number of compromise applications is relatively small, the  value of revenue foregone when a compromise is granted can be significant. In  the period 1 July 2009 to 31 December 2012, the ATO received 95 applications,  and  finalised  98  applications  (including  applications  on  hand  that  were  received prior to 1 July 2009). Of the 98 finalised applications, 78 were refused  and 20 were granted a compromised amount of debt. Of the 20 cases granted  (valued at $12.06 billion) a total of $9.3 billion in debt was compromised, with  the ATO collecting $2.75 billion, or 23 per cent of the total value of the debts.  For one of the cases granted in 2010-11, valued in excess of $10 billion, the  ATO  accepted  a  significantly  lesser  amount  than  the  original  value  of  the  debt.87 

3.31 The  number  and  value  of  debts  where  the  ATO  has  accepted  a  compromised amount of the full value of the debt, for the period 1 July 2009 to  31 December 2012, are set out in Table 3.4. 

                                                       86 Taxation Administration Act 1953, Schedule 1, Chapter 4, Part 4-50, Section 340-5(5). 87

In November 2010, a large amount was written-off taxation receivables in relation to a number of related companies that had been subject to lengthy legal proceedings. The majority of the receivables balance related to accumulated GIC. The GIC revenue had been recorded and then written-off as an expense in the ATO’s administered financial statements over a number of years.

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

58

 

Table 3.4

Value of compromised debts, 1 July 2009 to 31 December 2012

Year

Number of cases granted

Debt value ($ million)

Compromised value collected ($ million)

Value of debt not collected ($ million)

2009-10 1 6.1 1.0 5.1

2010-11 2 11 830.8 2734.4 9096.3

2011-12 16 203.1 19.0 184.2

July to Dec 2012 1 20.3 2.0 18.3

Total 20 12 060.3 2756.4 9303.9

Source: ATO data.

3.32 Under ATO policies88, taxpayers must meet stringent requirements to  be  granted  a  compromise  of  the  full  value  of  the  debt,  and  entering  a  compromise arrangement must present benefits for the ATO. These benefits  include: a saving in the cost of collection; collection at an earlier date than  would  otherwise  be  the  case;  or  collection  of  a  greater  sum  than  could  otherwise be recovered. Offers of compromise will not be accepted where the: 

 proposal offers less than the tax debtor’s total net assets; 

 benefit of accepting the proposal is greater than taking action either  under the Bankruptcy Act 1966 or Corporations Act 2001; and  

 only  reason  to  support  a  proposal  is  the  tax  debtor’s  claim  of  hardship.89 

3.33 The delegation to approve a compromised tax debt is at the EL2 level  and  above90,  and  the  assessment  of  each  application  is  submitted  to  the  relevant  delegate.  The  ANAO  examined  the  electronic  case  management  records91  for  42  of  the  98  compromise  cases  that  were  finalised  between 

                                                       88 The onus is on the tax debtor to establish that the debt should be compromised. To this end, tax debtors should be made aware of the stringent requirements that must be satisfied in order to obtain a compromise agreement, and of the

actions the ATO may take if a compromise proposal is not accepted. ATO, Practice Statement Law Administration, PS LA 2011/3: Compromise of taxation debts, para 20. 89 Ibid, Guiding principles. paras 50 - 72. 90

ATO, Instruments of Delegations, July 2010 and August 2012, respectively. 91 The ATO’s Siebel case management system is the primary case management system for recording information about compromise cases. Records on the Receivables Management System were not reviewed.

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

58

 

Table 3.4

Value of compromised debts, 1 July 2009 to 31 December 2012

Year

Number of cases granted

Debt value ($ million)

Compromised value collected ($ million)

Value of debt not collected ($ million)

2009-10 1 6.1 1.0 5.1

2010-11 2 11 830.8 2734.4 9096.3

2011-12 16 203.1 19.0 184.2

July to Dec 2012 1 20.3 2.0 18.3

Total 20 12 060.3 2756.4 9303.9

Source: ATO data.

3.32 Under ATO policies88, taxpayers must meet stringent requirements to  be  granted  a  compromise  of  the  full  value  of  the  debt,  and  entering  a  compromise arrangement must present benefits for the ATO. These benefits  include: a saving in the cost of collection; collection at an earlier date than  would  otherwise  be  the  case;  or  collection  of  a  greater  sum  than  could  otherwise be recovered. Offers of compromise will not be accepted where the: 

 proposal offers less than the tax debtor’s total net assets; 

 benefit of accepting the proposal is greater than taking action either  under the Bankruptcy Act 1966 or Corporations Act 2001; and  

 only  reason  to  support  a  proposal  is  the  tax  debtor’s  claim  of  hardship.89 

3.33 The delegation to approve a compromised tax debt is at the EL2 level  and  above90,  and  the  assessment  of  each  application  is  submitted  to  the  relevant  delegate.  The  ANAO  examined  the  electronic  case  management  records91  for  42  of  the  98  compromise  cases  that  were  finalised  between 

                                                       88 The onus is on the tax debtor to establish that the debt should be compromised. To this end, tax debtors should be made aware of the stringent requirements that must be satisfied in order to obtain a compromise agreement, and of the

actions the ATO may take if a compromise proposal is not accepted. ATO, Practice Statement Law Administration, PS LA 2011/3: Compromise of taxation debts, para 20. 89 Ibid, Guiding principles. paras 50 - 72. 90

ATO, Instruments of Delegations, July 2010 and August 2012, respectively. 91 The ATO’s Siebel case management system is the primary case management system for recording information about compromise cases. Records on the Receivables Management System were not reviewed.

Assessing Debt Relief Applications

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

59

1 July 2009 and 31 December 2012. Of the 42 cases assessed, 26 were managed  by the DHC team; 12 were managed by the team dealing with complex debt  cases in the strategic recovery area of the DBL, and four were managed by the  Project Wickenby team, also in the strategic recovery area.  

3.34 The ANAO tested three aspects of the ATO’s procedures for actioning a  compromise  application,  based  on  the  ATO’s  compromise  procedures  document and considered whether: 

 supporting documentation was recorded on the taxpayers’ accounts— the compromise application form, a letter or note of a phone call to the  taxpayer acknowledging receipt of the application, and the assessment; 

 the activity in the ATO’s business systems was appropriately classified  as a ‘compromise’ application; and 

 the outcome had been approved by the appropriate delegate. 

3.35 Compromise  procedures  require  that  the  activities  for  processing  an  application are to be recorded on the ATO’s case management system, with a  cross‐referencing  note  to  the  ATO’s  Receivables  Management  System.  The  ATO  advised  that  particularly  sensitive  or  high‐profile  cases  may  be  maintained as paper‐based records, but the records would be referenced in the  relevant taxpayer’s account. 

Supporting documentation

3.36 Of  the  42  finalised  cases,  two  cases  were  marked  as  maintained  on  paper‐based  records,  with  reference  numbers  attached.92  Seven  of  the  remaining 40 cases did not have a record on the taxpayer’s accounts to indicate  any  activity  in  relation  to  a  compromise  of  a  debt.  Of  the  33  cases  where  documentation was available, two cases were granted a compromise of the  debt by the ATO. The ANAO found that: 

 26 cases had the compromise application on file; 

 four  of  the  cases  included  a  record  indicating  that  the  ATO  had  informed the taxpayer that the ATO had received the application; 

                                                       92 The ANAO did not examine these cases as they were held in the Melbourne office, but tested that the records were appropriately referenced in the taxpayers’ accounts.

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

60

 four  cases  were  finalised  without  decision93,  and  of  the  remaining  29 cases, 17 included the assessment for delegate approval; and 

 25 cases had a letter advising the taxpayer of the outcome attached to  the electronic record. 

3.37 In relation to the 33 cases where the ANAO was able to locate records  relating to the compromise application, in 15 cases the records were wrongly  classified, most commonly recorded as release cases (12 cases). In the 17 cases  where the ANAO was able to locate an assessment on the taxpayer’s file, four  did not have a record of delegate approval. These applications were rejected,  and related to debt valued at approximately $1.85 million. 

Individual non-pursuit of debts

3.38 As previously noted, the ATO may decide not to pursue debts that are  considered to be irrecoverable at law or uneconomical to pursue. These debts  may be subject to a bulk non‐pursuit process (further discussed in Chapter 4)  or are dealt with by ATO staff. Taxpayers do not make an application to the  ATO not to pursue their debt, and may not be aware that the ATO has taken  this  action,  particularly  where  the  debt  has  been  subject  to  the  bulk  non‐pursuit process, unless the case is subsequently re‐raised for collection. 

3.39 Debt cases that are considered for non‐pursuit are processed across the  DBL—they are not the exclusive responsibility of the DHC team. Larger value  debts that not pursued are predominantly dealt with by ATO case officers in  the firmer action and strategic recovery areas of the DBL.  

3.40 The ANAO conducts testing of individual cases that have been selected  for non‐pursuit by ATO staff, as part of the annual audit of the ATO’s financial  statements. In 2010-11 and 2011-12, the ANAO examined a sample of activity  statement debts and income tax debts94 that the ATO had not pursued between  1  July  and  30  November  2010,  and  1  July  and  31  December  2011  and  considered whether the:  

 non‐pursuit decision had been approved by an appropriate delegate;  

                                                       93 Some cases do not require an assessment to be completed by the decision-maker. For example, if the taxpayer does not provide additional information or enters into a payment arrangement during the application process the compromise

case is finalised, not requiring an assessment. 94 In 2010-11, the sample resulted in the selection of debt cases that had not been pursued because they were irrecoverable at law or uneconomical to pursue, and did not include cases that were granted debt relief under other

provisions.

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

60

 four  cases  were  finalised  without  decision93,  and  of  the  remaining  29 cases, 17 included the assessment for delegate approval; and 

 25 cases had a letter advising the taxpayer of the outcome attached to  the electronic record. 

3.37 In relation to the 33 cases where the ANAO was able to locate records  relating to the compromise application, in 15 cases the records were wrongly  classified, most commonly recorded as release cases (12 cases). In the 17 cases  where the ANAO was able to locate an assessment on the taxpayer’s file, four  did not have a record of delegate approval. These applications were rejected,  and related to debt valued at approximately $1.85 million. 

Individual non-pursuit of debts

3.38 As previously noted, the ATO may decide not to pursue debts that are  considered to be irrecoverable at law or uneconomical to pursue. These debts  may be subject to a bulk non‐pursuit process (further discussed in Chapter 4)  or are dealt with by ATO staff. Taxpayers do not make an application to the  ATO not to pursue their debt, and may not be aware that the ATO has taken  this  action,  particularly  where  the  debt  has  been  subject  to  the  bulk  non‐pursuit process, unless the case is subsequently re‐raised for collection. 

3.39 Debt cases that are considered for non‐pursuit are processed across the  DBL—they are not the exclusive responsibility of the DHC team. Larger value  debts that not pursued are predominantly dealt with by ATO case officers in  the firmer action and strategic recovery areas of the DBL.  

3.40 The ANAO conducts testing of individual cases that have been selected  for non‐pursuit by ATO staff, as part of the annual audit of the ATO’s financial  statements. In 2010-11 and 2011-12, the ANAO examined a sample of activity  statement debts and income tax debts94 that the ATO had not pursued between  1  July  and  30  November  2010,  and  1  July  and  31  December  2011  and  considered whether the:  

 non‐pursuit decision had been approved by an appropriate delegate;  

                                                       93 Some cases do not require an assessment to be completed by the decision-maker. For example, if the taxpayer does not provide additional information or enters into a payment arrangement during the application process the compromise

case is finalised, not requiring an assessment. 94 In 2010-11, the sample resulted in the selection of debt cases that had not been pursued because they were irrecoverable at law or uneconomical to pursue, and did not include cases that were granted debt relief under other

provisions.

Assessing Debt Relief Applications

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

61

 non‐pursuit had been correctly recorded in the client account; and 

 non‐pursuit had been correctly calculated in view of the client balance  and expected recoverable amount. 

3.41 In both years, there were no issues arising from the ANAO’s testing of  individual non‐pursuit cases as part of the ATO financial statement audits; the  testing also providing assurance for the valuation and allocations relating to  account balances. 

GIC remission

3.42 A decision to grant GIC remission is made by the Commissioner or his  delegate in circumstances where it is considered fair and reasonable to do so.  In  some  circumstances  the  ATO  remits  GIC  without  a  request  from  the  taxpayer, and telephone requests may also be granted. The ATO also applies a  bulk  process  to  remit  low  value  charges  that  have  accrued  on  taxpayers’  records, which is further discussed in Chapter 4.  

3.43 Delegations to approve GIC remission are generally set at lower levels  than  for  other  categories  of  debt  relief.  An  APS  officer at  the  lowest  grade  (APS 1) may grant GIC remission to a maximum of $5000; at the APS 6 level to  a maximum of $250 000; and there is no upper level limit to the value of GIC  remission that can be approved by an executive level officer. The delegation to  approve GIC remission up to $10 000 is also extended to staff employed by  external debt collection agencies, contracted to deliver services on behalf of the  ATO. In 2011-12, the ATO remitted a total of $1643 million GIC as a result of  manual and bulk remissions.95  

3.44 As part of this audit the ANAO reviewed the policy and procedures  associated with GIC remissions.96 The audit drew on testing undertaken as part  of the annual audit of the ATO’s financial statements, and did not conduct  further substantive testing on manual GIC remissions. 

                                                       95 Of the total value of remissions, $1039 million was manually remitted from 245 061 transactions: $428.6 million associated with 113 517 Activity Statement debts and $610.3 million associated with 131 544 income tax debts. 96

Previous audits and reviews examining the ATO’s administration of GIC and penalty charges and remission include: ANAO Report No 31, 1999-2000, Administration of Tax Penalties; further referred to in the Inspector-General of Taxation’s review, September 2005, Review into the Tax Office’s Administration of Penalties and Interest arising from Active Compliance Activities.

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

62

GIC policy and procedures

3.45 Guidance material for GIC remission reflects a much simpler process  than for other forms of debt relief. The taxpayer does not have to submit an  application for GIC remission, with only a notation on the taxpayer’s record  being required to support the decision to remit all or part of the GIC. There is  also less oversight of the decision, including for officers at relatively low levels  of authority and by external debt collections officers working under contract to  the ATO. Importantly, the relevant practice statement providing guidance on  the remission of GIC includes that it would be inappropriate to exercise the  discretion to remit GIC for the following reasons: 

 as an inducement to finalise a disputed debt although, depending on  the circumstances, remission may form a component of a settlement of  litigation, or  

 to finalise a case where the ATO has not attempted to collect GIC.97 

3.46 Guidance  procedures  dealing  with  GIC  remission,  including  GIC  remission  requests  negotiated  by  telephone,  were  reviewed  by  the  ATO  in  January 2013. The ATO found the procedure was appropriate, but advised the  ANAO that the advice to staff in the relevant procedures document that stated  ‘this category of work is high volume, resource intensive and generally a lower risk to  the business, therefore requiring less stringent security’ would be removed, as the  ATO considers it adds no value in substance to the procedure itself. 

Financial statements audits

3.47 In 2010-11 the ANAO examined a sample of GIC remissions associated  with activity statement debts recorded between 1 July and 30 November 2010.  The cases included those valued at over $1 million, and the ANAO examined  whether the: 

 remissions had been processed in accordance with the ATOʹs policies  and procedures; 

 reason for the remission was supported with reference to the relevant  policy; and  

                                                       97 ATO, Practice Statement Law Administration, PS LA 2011/12: Administration of general interest charge (GIC) imposed for late payment or underestimation of liability, paragraph 21.

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

62

GIC policy and procedures

3.45 Guidance material for GIC remission reflects a much simpler process  than for other forms of debt relief. The taxpayer does not have to submit an  application for GIC remission, with only a notation on the taxpayer’s record  being required to support the decision to remit all or part of the GIC. There is  also less oversight of the decision, including for officers at relatively low levels  of authority and by external debt collections officers working under contract to  the ATO. Importantly, the relevant practice statement providing guidance on  the remission of GIC includes that it would be inappropriate to exercise the  discretion to remit GIC for the following reasons: 

 as an inducement to finalise a disputed debt although, depending on  the circumstances, remission may form a component of a settlement of  litigation, or  

 to finalise a case where the ATO has not attempted to collect GIC.97 

3.46 Guidance  procedures  dealing  with  GIC  remission,  including  GIC  remission  requests  negotiated  by  telephone,  were  reviewed  by  the  ATO  in  January 2013. The ATO found the procedure was appropriate, but advised the  ANAO that the advice to staff in the relevant procedures document that stated  ‘this category of work is high volume, resource intensive and generally a lower risk to  the business, therefore requiring less stringent security’ would be removed, as the  ATO considers it adds no value in substance to the procedure itself. 

Financial statements audits

3.47 In 2010-11 the ANAO examined a sample of GIC remissions associated  with activity statement debts recorded between 1 July and 30 November 2010.  The cases included those valued at over $1 million, and the ANAO examined  whether the: 

 remissions had been processed in accordance with the ATOʹs policies  and procedures; 

 reason for the remission was supported with reference to the relevant  policy; and  

                                                       97 ATO, Practice Statement Law Administration, PS LA 2011/12: Administration of general interest charge (GIC) imposed for late payment or underestimation of liability, paragraph 21.

Assessing Debt Relief Applications

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

63

 approval  for  the  remission  had  been  granted  by  an  appropriate  delegate. 

3.48 In  2011-12,  the  ANAO  also  examined  a  sample  of  GIC  remissions  associated  with  activity  statement  and  income  tax  debts.  These  included  remissions valued at more than $10 million, and the ANAO examined whether  the: 

 remissions  had  been  appropriately  applied  and  approved  in  accordance with the ATOʹs policies and procedures; and 

 amounts had been correctly recorded in the client account. 

3.49 In both years, there were no issues arising from the ANAO’s testing of  GIC remissions as part of the ATO financial statement audits. 

Quality assurance processes 3.50 The  ATO  has  several  mechanisms  to  assess  the  quality  of  its  administration and decision making, notably the: 

 Integrated Quality Framework (IQF) that is applied across the ATO;  

 Debt Quality Management System (Debt QMS) that is specific to the  DBL; and 

 independent reviews of release decisions. 

Integrated Quality Framework

3.51 The ATO’s Practice Statement Law Administration (PS LA) 2009/6 sets  out that:  

... each business line is required to act to continuously improve and assure the  quality of its written interpretative decision making and of certain types of  other  actions,  advice,  decisions  and  information  (work  in-scope)  in  this  Practice Statement.98 

The  IQF99  is  the  ATO’s  enterprise‐wide  quality  assurance  process,  and  its  primary means of improving and assuring the quality of its work. The IQF  assesses performance through the examination of ‘action types’. Business lines 

                                                       98 ATO, Practice Statement Law Administration PS LA 2009/6: Quality improvement and assurance; application of and conformance with the Integrated Quality Framework. 99

The Integrated Quality Framework replaced the Technical Quality Review framework on 30 September 2009.

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

64

are also required to participate in a minimum of two community involvement  workshops per year: 

 an  ‘action  type’  is  a  key  stage  in  any  of  the  ATO’s  processes.  For  example,  negotiating  a  payment  arrangement  with  a  taxpayer  is  an  ‘action  type’;  while  processing  a  release  application  includes  several  ‘actions  types’—receipting  the  application,  decision  making,  and  delegation.  Each  action  type  examined  counts  for  one  IQF  assessment100; and 

 community  involvement  workshops  bring  together  a  panel  of  community representatives and ATO staff to review actions taken by  the ATO on a sample of approximately 20 cases. In a few cases, usually  about four, the end‐to‐end process is examined, rather than a specific  action, allowing more comprehensive assessment of the cases. 

3.52 For the IQF assessment applied in the DBL, action types are selected  from  different  types  of  tax  or  activities  within  the  scope  of  work  for  the  reporting  period.  The  actions  are  selected  using  a  sampling  methodology  based on the risk rating of the tax type or activity (low to catastrophic) and an  estimated number of interactions (the population sample) for the forthcoming  IQF reporting period. The IQF process may also be applied to conduct ad hoc  analysis  on  any  aspect  of  the  ATO’s  operations.  To  date,  no  such  specific  assessments and reports have been undertaken. 

3.53 Between  commencement  of  the  IQF  in  September  2009  and  31 December 2012,  the  DBL  had  submitted  30  236  of  the  approximately  151 437101  actions  examined  in  the  IQF  process.  The  debt  community  involvement workshops held in February 2013 focused on debt relief activities,  including hardship assessments and release of debts. The results of the IQF  assessments  and  the  community  involvement  workshops  are  included  in  monthly IQF reports, and aggregated in six monthly reports that are prepared  in  March  and  September  each  year.  The  ANAO  examined  the  seven  aggregated reports produced between September 2009 and September 2012. 

                                                       100 Assessment follows the nine elements of administration contained in the IQF matrix: integrity; correctness; appropriateness to the taxpayer’s requirements and circumstances; effectiveness; administrative soundness;

transparency; consistency; timeliness; and efficiency. These criteria are assessed on a five point scale, ranging from the lowest standard where the action has not been aligned with policy and procedural requirements, to the highest, where the assessors consider that the action has been managed to a very high standard. 101 This is an estimated figure, as the ATO relies on multiple data bases (and archives) for the maintenance of IQF data.

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

64

are also required to participate in a minimum of two community involvement  workshops per year: 

 an  ‘action  type’  is  a  key  stage  in  any  of  the  ATO’s  processes.  For  example,  negotiating  a  payment  arrangement  with  a  taxpayer  is  an  ‘action  type’;  while  processing  a  release  application  includes  several  ‘actions  types’—receipting  the  application,  decision  making,  and  delegation.  Each  action  type  examined  counts  for  one  IQF  assessment100; and 

 community  involvement  workshops  bring  together  a  panel  of  community representatives and ATO staff to review actions taken by  the ATO on a sample of approximately 20 cases. In a few cases, usually  about four, the end‐to‐end process is examined, rather than a specific  action, allowing more comprehensive assessment of the cases. 

3.52 For the IQF assessment applied in the DBL, action types are selected  from  different  types  of  tax  or  activities  within  the  scope  of  work  for  the  reporting  period.  The  actions  are  selected  using  a  sampling  methodology  based on the risk rating of the tax type or activity (low to catastrophic) and an  estimated number of interactions (the population sample) for the forthcoming  IQF reporting period. The IQF process may also be applied to conduct ad hoc  analysis  on  any  aspect  of  the  ATO’s  operations.  To  date,  no  such  specific  assessments and reports have been undertaken. 

3.53 Between  commencement  of  the  IQF  in  September  2009  and  31 December 2012,  the  DBL  had  submitted  30  236  of  the  approximately  151 437101  actions  examined  in  the  IQF  process.  The  debt  community  involvement workshops held in February 2013 focused on debt relief activities,  including hardship assessments and release of debts. The results of the IQF  assessments  and  the  community  involvement  workshops  are  included  in  monthly IQF reports, and aggregated in six monthly reports that are prepared  in  March  and  September  each  year.  The  ANAO  examined  the  seven  aggregated reports produced between September 2009 and September 2012. 

                                                       100 Assessment follows the nine elements of administration contained in the IQF matrix: integrity; correctness; appropriateness to the taxpayer’s requirements and circumstances; effectiveness; administrative soundness;

transparency; consistency; timeliness; and efficiency. These criteria are assessed on a five point scale, ranging from the lowest standard where the action has not been aligned with policy and procedural requirements, to the highest, where the assessors consider that the action has been managed to a very high standard. 101 This is an estimated figure, as the ATO relies on multiple data bases (and archives) for the maintenance of IQF data.

Assessing Debt Relief Applications

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

65

3.54 The format of the reports has changed slightly since the first IQF report  was produced in 2009, and later reports provide additional levels of detail on  the results achieved. In relation to the work undertaken in the DBL, the IQF  reports indicate that, generally, the actions assessed have been rated as ‘meets  standard’. However, each report notes that there is insufficient historical data  to identify any trends in the results, with the September 2012 report noting that  DBL  quality  assessments  cover  a  broad  spectrum  of  debt  actions,  and  not  necessarily the same actions each month. 

3.55 Of the total number of action types examined through the IQF process  for the reporting period, 1917 most directly related to debt relief. These actions  were: 

 GIC remission: 545 granted and 38 refused; 

 recommendation not to pursue a debt: 890 approved by the delegate  and 10 refused; 

 recommendation to release a debt: 170 granted and 66 refused; 

 release  applications:  issuing  14  applications  and  receipting  34 applications;  

 recommendation to accept a compromised amount of the full value of  the debt: four cases approved; and 

 recommendation to waive a debt: one granted and one refused. 

3.56 While  no  specific  problems  were  identified  in  the  IQF  reports,  the  overall number of assessments for each action type, covering a period of just  over three years, is relatively small for some of the action types in comparison  to the number of cases managed. 

3.57 The  ATO’s  Enterprise  Quality  Assurance  Re‐Design  project  is  scheduled  for  implementation  in  July  2013.  The  new  quality  assurance  processes aim to be more targeted and provide improved analysis. Changes in  the process and the outcomes that will be delivered under the new framework  are set out in Table 3.5. 

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

66

Table 3.5

Enterprise quality assurance re-design project, processes and outcomes

Existing Integrated Quality Framework Re-designed processes and outcomes sought from 1 July 2013

Process: Process:

 Bottom-up submission requirements

 Micro-focused compilation of information

 Self-serve based on need

 Varying tiers and lenses for analysing and assuring (including enterprise view)

Outcomes: Outcomes:

 Focus on tactical issues and performance checks  Limited analysis and improvement  No enterprise view of quality and

improvement  Tactical business area improvements

 Quality management identifies tactical, operational and enterprise risks and priorities

 Quality management contributes to tactical, operational and enterprise business improvements

Source: ATO.

Debt Quality Management System

3.58 In April 2011 the DBL commenced a staged implementation of a new  debt‐specific  quality  assurance  process,  the  Debt  QMS,  with  full  implementation achieved in July 2011. The Debt QMS aims to complement the  IQF, and support more detailed analysis of the work being undertaken in the  business  line.  While  the  IQF  is  able  to  identify  systemic  issues  concerning  processes and procedures at the corporate and team level, it was not designed  to  assess  the  quality  of  the  work  undertaken  by  individual  staff.  The  IQF  system  selects  and  assesses  actions  by  debt  category,  while  the  Debt  QMS  selects and assesses actions of individual staff, irrespective of the type of work  they are assigned to. 

3.59 Following  the  introduction  of  the  Debt  QMS,  the  DBL’s  IQF  requirements  were  changed,  requiring  the  business  line  to  undertake  a  minimum  of  120  mandatory  IQF  assessments  each  calendar  year.  The  assessments must include a minimum of 24 from large income tax withholding  cases, and 24 panel assessments. The remaining 72 assessments are comprised  of community involvement workshop assessments and approval assessments. 

Application of the Debt QMS

3.60 Each week, five action types are randomly sampled, (using a similar  methodology to that applied in the IQF assessments) from each DBL officer,  and  loaded  into  the  Debt  QMS  database.  Examples  of  action  types  are:  ‘payment arrangement activated’ or ‘release application received’. From this 

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

66

Table 3.5

Enterprise quality assurance re-design project, processes and outcomes

Existing Integrated Quality Framework Re-designed processes and outcomes sought from 1 July 2013

Process: Process:

 Bottom-up submission requirements

 Micro-focused compilation of information

 Self-serve based on need

 Varying tiers and lenses for analysing and assuring (including enterprise view)

Outcomes: Outcomes:

 Focus on tactical issues and performance checks  Limited analysis and improvement  No enterprise view of quality and

improvement  Tactical business area improvements

 Quality management identifies tactical, operational and enterprise risks and priorities

 Quality management contributes to tactical, operational and enterprise business improvements

Source: ATO.

Debt Quality Management System

3.58 In April 2011 the DBL commenced a staged implementation of a new  debt‐specific  quality  assurance  process,  the  Debt  QMS,  with  full  implementation achieved in July 2011. The Debt QMS aims to complement the  IQF, and support more detailed analysis of the work being undertaken in the  business  line.  While  the  IQF  is  able  to  identify  systemic  issues  concerning  processes and procedures at the corporate and team level, it was not designed  to  assess  the  quality  of  the  work  undertaken  by  individual  staff.  The  IQF  system  selects  and  assesses  actions  by  debt  category,  while  the  Debt  QMS  selects and assesses actions of individual staff, irrespective of the type of work  they are assigned to. 

3.59 Following  the  introduction  of  the  Debt  QMS,  the  DBL’s  IQF  requirements  were  changed,  requiring  the  business  line  to  undertake  a  minimum  of  120  mandatory  IQF  assessments  each  calendar  year.  The  assessments must include a minimum of 24 from large income tax withholding  cases, and 24 panel assessments. The remaining 72 assessments are comprised  of community involvement workshop assessments and approval assessments. 

Application of the Debt QMS

3.60 Each week, five action types are randomly sampled, (using a similar  methodology to that applied in the IQF assessments) from each DBL officer,  and  loaded  into  the  Debt  QMS  database.  Examples  of  action  types  are:  ‘payment arrangement activated’ or ‘release application received’. From this 

Assessing Debt Relief Applications

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

67

sample, on average three actions undertaken by each staff member (from the  total selected over four weeks) are assessed by a trained Debt QMS assessor  each month. The Debt QMS has five assessment criteria.102 

3.61 The Debt Quality team may also conduct ad hoc analysis on any aspect  of the DBL’s operations, when specifically requested to do so. To date, one  such report has been requested, concerning a technical matter in the business  systems, in relation to the recording of non‐pursued debts. 

Debt QMS reports

3.62 The ANAO reviewed the 22 reports produced since the new process  was implemented in May 2011 to February 2013. The content and format of the  report  has  evolved  since  the  system  was  implemented.  For  example,  in  March 2012 the framework expanded from providing information by each area  of  the  DBL—early  collections,  firmer  action  and  strategic  recovery—to  include  further detail on performance by ATO site.  

3.63 As at February 2013, the content and format of the reports provides  detailed performance data, based on the five criteria:  

 summary data at the business line level, and by each area of the DBL— early collections, firmer action and strategic recovery; 

 data for each area of the DBL by the type of debt management tasks  associated with the area103; and  

 the overall quality of work undertaken by each area, by ATO site. 

The reports also include the number of assessments completed in each area  against the target. Review of the available results in the period September 2012  to February 2013 indicate that around 80 per cent of the targeted number of  assessment was completed in each DBL business area.  

3.64 Information on different categories of debt relief cannot be extracted  from  these  reports,  although  there  is  a  ‘Hardship’  profile  that  has  been  included in Debt QMS reports since they commenced. Data extracted by the  ATO from the Debt QMS reports under the Hardship profile, from May 2011 to 

                                                       102 The assessment criteria are: taxpayer interaction; information gathering and evaluation; decision making; process, closure and finalisation; professional representation. 103

For example, work types examined in the early collections area include telephony, correspondence, aged debt, and hardship; in firmer action the work types include formal recovery and insolvency; and in strategic recovery, the administration of superannuation, and large and consolidated debts.

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

68

23 October 2012, show that 1345 records exist for assessments actioned under  this profile. These assessments include104: 

 772  on  aspects  of  release,  including  release  applications  issued,  receiving an application, and making a recommendation; 

 117  on  non‐pursuit  actions,  including  the  creation,  approval  and  submission of not pursuing the debt; 

 17 on processing GIC and penalty remissions; 

 eight on the compromise of debts; and 

 431  miscellaneous  assessments  that  includes  but  is  not  limited  to  specialist advice requested, account balance explanation, phone calls,  information requests and general debt.  

3.65 The results from the 2011-12 Debt QMS reports in relation to Hardship  work  show  a  high  level  of  compliance  with  ATO  policies,  procedures  and  practices, including a: 

 100  per  cent  rating  for  the  ‘present  circumstances  considered’  and  ‘authorisations/delegations applied’ sub‐criteria; and 

 99 percent rating for ‘decisions reasonable, effective and supported by  evidence’ sub‐criteria.  

3.66 The  ‘overall  quality’  rating  for  the  12  sub‐criteria  for  Hardship  was  96 per cent as at February 2013. While the ratings reflect positive performance,  the results provide a higher level of assurance for different products. 

Independent review of release decisions

3.67 The responsibility for assessing taxpayers’ applications for release from  their  tax  debt  changed  from  an  independent  external  board,  the  Tax  Relief  Board, to the Commissioner of Taxation in September 2003. 

3.68 To provide community confidence that the change would not result in  any loss of transparency regarding how these decisions were made, the (then)  Commissioner of Taxation decided that external consultants would be engaged 

                                                       104 The ATO advised that additional actions relating to ‘hardship’ may be assessed but are not necessarily captured under the Hardship profile in the Debt QMS. For example, for the reporting period, an additional 55 QMS records existed for

the action of Relief Application Issued from the QMS focus area of telephony, firmer action, correspondence and aged debt. In addition, analysis of the results recorded in the Debt QMS under the ‘Hardship’ profile identified cases that would not necessarily be assessed on the grounds of ‘Hardship’.

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

68

23 October 2012, show that 1345 records exist for assessments actioned under  this profile. These assessments include104: 

 772  on  aspects  of  release,  including  release  applications  issued,  receiving an application, and making a recommendation; 

 117  on  non‐pursuit  actions,  including  the  creation,  approval  and  submission of not pursuing the debt; 

 17 on processing GIC and penalty remissions; 

 eight on the compromise of debts; and 

 431  miscellaneous  assessments  that  includes  but  is  not  limited  to  specialist advice requested, account balance explanation, phone calls,  information requests and general debt.  

3.65 The results from the 2011-12 Debt QMS reports in relation to Hardship  work  show  a  high  level  of  compliance  with  ATO  policies,  procedures  and  practices, including a: 

 100  per  cent  rating  for  the  ‘present  circumstances  considered’  and  ‘authorisations/delegations applied’ sub‐criteria; and 

 99 percent rating for ‘decisions reasonable, effective and supported by  evidence’ sub‐criteria.  

3.66 The  ‘overall  quality’  rating  for  the  12  sub‐criteria  for  Hardship  was  96 per cent as at February 2013. While the ratings reflect positive performance,  the results provide a higher level of assurance for different products. 

Independent review of release decisions

3.67 The responsibility for assessing taxpayers’ applications for release from  their  tax  debt  changed  from  an  independent  external  board,  the  Tax  Relief  Board, to the Commissioner of Taxation in September 2003. 

3.68 To provide community confidence that the change would not result in  any loss of transparency regarding how these decisions were made, the (then)  Commissioner of Taxation decided that external consultants would be engaged 

                                                       104 The ATO advised that additional actions relating to ‘hardship’ may be assessed but are not necessarily captured under the Hardship profile in the Debt QMS. For example, for the reporting period, an additional 55 QMS records existed for

the action of Relief Application Issued from the QMS focus area of telephony, firmer action, correspondence and aged debt. In addition, analysis of the results recorded in the Debt QMS under the ‘Hardship’ profile identified cases that would not necessarily be assessed on the grounds of ‘Hardship’.

Assessing Debt Relief Applications

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

69

on  an  annual  basis  to  undertake  reviews  of  decisions  regarding  taxpayers  applications for release from debt. Seven reviews have been conducted since  2007—five from 2007-08 to 2009-10 and annually thereafter.  

3.69 For each review, the ATO selects 125 cases from the total population  and the first five reviews included a review of whether the ATO had: 

 considered each case on its merits; 

 understood the taxpayer’s situation; 

 applied the law fairly and equitably; and 

 assisted the taxpayer to move on and do the right thing. 

3.70 The 2010-11 and 2011-12 reviews, however, were reduced in scope as  the  ATO  considered  there  was  some  duplication  in  the  material  being  reviewed. These reviews examined if a decision about release was made in  accordance with the relevant policy, and whether or not the taxpayer was kept  informed of the progress and result of their application.  

3.71 Overall,  the  reports  conclude  that  the  ATO  has  had  a  high  level  of  compliance  with  the  aspects  of  the  debt  release  cases  tested,  however  the  external  provider  does  not  verify  that  the  record  is  comprehensive  and  accurate. The reviews cost approximately $25 000 each and are published on  the ATO’s website. The 2013 review is due to be released in early June 2013.  

Appeals processes

3.72 Subject  to  the  legislative  provisions  applied  to  the  waiver,  release,  compromise of a debt or GIC remission, taxpayers have different avenues of  appeal where they are dissatisfied with the ATO’s decision. Taxpayers may  object to the ATO’s decision not to grant full or partial release from their debt,  but are not able to object to a decision not to remit GIC.105 While the ATO  encourages  taxpayers  to  contact  the  original  decision  maker  in  the  first  instance and attempt to resolve the issue, information on options available to  taxpayers provided in ATO letters and on the ATO website could be clearer, as  discussed in Chapter 2. 

                                                       105 Available from

[Accessed 9/1/2013].

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

70

3.73 A disagreement with a decision made by the ATO is an objection, not a  complaint. Objections and complaints are processed differently by the ATO.  Complaints are initially managed within the Debt team that made the original  decision, whereas objections follow a more formal process and are reviewed by  another  business  line  to  provide  an  independent  assessment.106  Objections  relating to a taxpayer’s application for release from their debt are actioned by  the Micro Enterprises and Individuals interpretative advice team, providing an  independent assessment of the case.  

Objecting to a decision not to release a debt

3.74 Taxpayers can object to a decision to refuse their application for full or  partial release from a debt. Where the ATO has reviewed the case and upheld  the  original  decision,  the  taxpayer  may  lodge  an  appeal  with  the  Administrative Appeals Tribunal (AAT).  

3.75 Objections to decisions not to grant taxpayers’ applications for full or  partial  release  from  their  debt  cases,  for  the  period  1  July  2010  to  22 February 2013, are set out in Table 3.6. No data is available for the outcomes  of  the  objections  for  2010-11,  but  the  outcomes  for  the  period  2011-12 and  1 July 2012 to 22 February 2013 are included. 

Table 3.6

Objections to debt release decisions for the period 2010-11 to 22 February 2013

Year Objections

received

Objections finalised Allowed or partially

allowed

Disallowed Other

2010-11 118 901 n/a n/a n/a

2011-12 224 209 4 113 75

1 July 2012 to 22 February 2013

204 114 0 122 22

Total 546 413 4 235 97

Source: ANAO analysis of ATO data.

Note 1: Estimated by the ATO, as data was incomplete.

                                                       106 The ANAO is currently undertaking an audit examining the ATO’s management of complaints and other feedback.

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

70

3.73 A disagreement with a decision made by the ATO is an objection, not a  complaint. Objections and complaints are processed differently by the ATO.  Complaints are initially managed within the Debt team that made the original  decision, whereas objections follow a more formal process and are reviewed by  another  business  line  to  provide  an  independent  assessment.106  Objections  relating to a taxpayer’s application for release from their debt are actioned by  the Micro Enterprises and Individuals interpretative advice team, providing an  independent assessment of the case.  

Objecting to a decision not to release a debt

3.74 Taxpayers can object to a decision to refuse their application for full or  partial release from a debt. Where the ATO has reviewed the case and upheld  the  original  decision,  the  taxpayer  may  lodge  an  appeal  with  the  Administrative Appeals Tribunal (AAT).  

3.75 Objections to decisions not to grant taxpayers’ applications for full or  partial  release  from  their  debt  cases,  for  the  period  1  July  2010  to  22 February 2013, are set out in Table 3.6. No data is available for the outcomes  of  the  objections  for  2010-11,  but  the  outcomes  for  the  period  2011-12 and  1 July 2012 to 22 February 2013 are included. 

Table 3.6

Objections to debt release decisions for the period 2010-11 to 22 February 2013

Year Objections

received

Objections finalised Allowed or partially

allowed

Disallowed Other

2010-11 118 901 n/a n/a n/a

2011-12 224 209 4 113 75

1 July 2012 to 22 February 2013

204 114 0 122 22

Total 546 413 4 235 97

Source: ANAO analysis of ATO data.

Note 1: Estimated by the ATO, as data was incomplete.

                                                       106 The ANAO is currently undertaking an audit examining the ATO’s management of complaints and other feedback.

Assessing Debt Relief Applications

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

71

3.76 While the data is not complete for 2010-11, the 2011-12 figures indicate  that  very  few  taxpayers’  objections  (less  than  two  per  cent)  to  the  ATO’s  decisions on their application for release are upheld. 

Pre-AAT reviews of release decisions

3.77 In  March  2008,  the  ATO  introduced  a  scheme  that  allows  taxpayers  whose applications for release from debt have been refused by the ATO to  have  their  case  reviewed  by  an  expert  (a  registered  lawyer,  tax  agent  or  accountant)  before  deciding  to  pursue  a  formal  review  to  the  AAT.  In  the  ‘objection disallowed’ letter, taxpayers are advised of their right to apply for  this type of independent review.  

3.78 The scheme allows the taxpayer to select an adviser to review the case,  for a fee of up to $3000 that is paid by the ATO.107 Taxpayers whose release  application has been refused can access this scheme, but can still go to the AAT  irrespective of the recommendations in the review. 

3.79 The ATO introduced this scheme to strengthen the transparency of the  ATO’s release decisions and to reduce the incidence of AAT appeals. Between  the  introduction  of  the  scheme  in  March  2008  and  December  2012,  23 information  packs  have  been  requested  by  taxpayers,  resulting  in  10 accessing the expert advice. Of the 10 who received the expert advice, eight  proceeded with a review to the AAT.  

3.80 The number of taxpayers who have accessed this scheme is very low in  comparison  to  the  number  of  objections  disallowed  by  the  ATO.  This  may  reflect that the taxpayer accepts the decision, or the review scheme may be too  complex or could be promoted more effectively. There would be benefit in the  ATO reviewing the reasons behind the low take‐up rate for this scheme.  

AAT reviews of release decisions

3.81 The  AAT  conducts  independent  merit  reviews  of  administrative  decisions. For the period 2010-11 to 31 December 2012, 41 appeals were made  to the AAT relating to debt release decisions. This figure represents 21 per cent  of the 197 disallowed objection decisions relating to debt release over the same  period. 

                                                       107 The ATO does not pay for this expert to represent the taxpayer in the AAT or Federal Court proceedings, where the taxpayer decides to escalate the appeal, irrespective of the advice of the independent review.

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

72

3.82 Of the 41 appeals, 15 were finalised during the reporting period: the  AAT upheld or partially upheld the ATO’s decision in four cases, with seven  being  withdrawn  or  settled  before  the  AAT  hearing,  and  four  cases  being  dismissed. The results of the AAT appeals regarding debt release decisions are  set out in Table 3.7. 

Table 3.7

Debt release appeals to the Administrative Appeals Tribunal

Appeal / finalised result

2010-11 2011-12 July to Dec 2012

AAT appeals 6 12 23

ATO decision upheld 1 1 2

Withdrawn / settled 2 2 3

Dismissed 2 0 2

Source: ATO.

3.83 The ATO advised that of the total cases overturned by the AAT since  2003, the Commissioner of Taxation has initiated two appeals to the Federal  Court concerning applications for release. The ATO lost both cases—with the  release applications being upheld.108  

Conclusion 3.84 Assessing a taxpayer’s circumstances and eligibility for some form of  debt relief involves an understanding of the relevant legislation and the ATO’s  policies  and  procedures.  ATO  staff  are  required  to  assess  taxpayers’  circumstances  against  factors  that,  by  their  nature,  require  a  degree  of  judgement,  including  that  the  decision  to  grant  debt  release  will  allow  taxpayers  to  gain  control  of  their  finances.  The  ANAO’s  analysis  of  the  administration of a sample of applications for waiver and release of a debt  indicated  general  compliance  with  ATO  processes  and  record  keeping  obligations. However, in respect of compromise, the ATO could strengthen its  record keeping for the relatively small number of cases it manages each year. 

                                                       108 FC of T v Milne 2006 ATC 4503, the Federal Court agreed with the Small Taxation Claims Tribunal that the solicitor should be granted release from his income tax debt because he would otherwise suffer serious hardship. In a similar

case, FC of T v A Taxpayer (name suppressed) 2006 ATC 4393, the Federal Court found that another solicitor earning $250 000 should have his debt partially released because of the costs of caring for his family and complicated financial arrangements in his firm.

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

72

3.82 Of the 41 appeals, 15 were finalised during the reporting period: the  AAT upheld or partially upheld the ATO’s decision in four cases, with seven  being  withdrawn  or  settled  before  the  AAT  hearing,  and  four  cases  being  dismissed. The results of the AAT appeals regarding debt release decisions are  set out in Table 3.7. 

Table 3.7

Debt release appeals to the Administrative Appeals Tribunal

Appeal / finalised result

2010-11 2011-12 July to Dec 2012

AAT appeals 6 12 23

ATO decision upheld 1 1 2

Withdrawn / settled 2 2 3

Dismissed 2 0 2

Source: ATO.

3.83 The ATO advised that of the total cases overturned by the AAT since  2003, the Commissioner of Taxation has initiated two appeals to the Federal  Court concerning applications for release. The ATO lost both cases—with the  release applications being upheld.108  

Conclusion 3.84 Assessing a taxpayer’s circumstances and eligibility for some form of  debt relief involves an understanding of the relevant legislation and the ATO’s  policies  and  procedures.  ATO  staff  are  required  to  assess  taxpayers’  circumstances  against  factors  that,  by  their  nature,  require  a  degree  of  judgement,  including  that  the  decision  to  grant  debt  release  will  allow  taxpayers  to  gain  control  of  their  finances.  The  ANAO’s  analysis  of  the  administration of a sample of applications for waiver and release of a debt  indicated  general  compliance  with  ATO  processes  and  record  keeping  obligations. However, in respect of compromise, the ATO could strengthen its  record keeping for the relatively small number of cases it manages each year. 

                                                       108 FC of T v Milne 2006 ATC 4503, the Federal Court agreed with the Small Taxation Claims Tribunal that the solicitor should be granted release from his income tax debt because he would otherwise suffer serious hardship. In a similar

case, FC of T v A Taxpayer (name suppressed) 2006 ATC 4393, the Federal Court found that another solicitor earning $250 000 should have his debt partially released because of the costs of caring for his family and complicated financial arrangements in his firm.

Assessing Debt Relief Applications

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

73

3.85 In  examining  decision‐making  processes  for  the  non‐pursuit  of  individual debts and the remission of general interest charges, this audit drew  on  the  findings  of  the  ANAO’s  2010-11  and  2011-12  audits  of  the  ATO’s  financial  statements.  These  audits  indicated  that  the  ATO  had  appropriate  approvals and recording of remittal values. The audits also noted that there  was generally less oversight of the decisions to remit general interest charges  than other forms of debt relief. This is despite decisions to remit these charges  being made across the ATO and often by officers at relatively low classification  levels. 

3.86 The  ATO  commissions  external  consultants  to  conduct  annual  independent  reviews  of  its  debt  release  decisions.  As  these  reviews  have  a  relatively narrow focus, examining only the assessment of ‘serious hardship’  and if taxpayers were kept informed of the progress of their application, there  would be benefit in the ATO reviewing the ongoing value of these reviews.  The ATO does not assess the outcomes of debt release decisions, including the  extent to which they have supported taxpayers to meet their taxation payment  obligations  in  the  longer  term.  Such  analysis  would  provide  a  better  understanding  of  the  factors  involved  in  assessing  taxpayers’  financial  hardship and the quality of debt release decisions, as well as informing debt  release strategies. 

Recommendation No.1 3.87 To  inform  debt  release  strategies,  the  ANAO  recommends  that  the  Australian Taxation Office assesses (through a sampling approach) the extent  to which it has achieved its objective of supporting taxpayers to gain control of  their  financial  circumstances  and  meet  taxation  payment  obligations  in  the  longer term. 

ATO response: Agreed. 

3.88 As  previously  noted,  taxpayers  are  expected  to  meet  their  debt  obligations where they have the capacity to pay. Decisions to reduce or cancel  debts  represent  a  loss  of  revenue  for  the  Commonwealth,  and  if  not  consistently applied may advantage one taxpayer over another. The ATO has  several mechanisms to assess the quality and consistency of its administration  and decision making. In particular, the IQF processes aim to provide assurance  that  there  are  no  systemic  issues  in  the  administration  of  the  tax  and  superannuation systems, and the Debt Quality Management System is used to 

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

74

assess the quality of the work of individual staff members in the Debt business  line. 

3.89 While the Debt Quality Management System assessment processes are  generally sound, the ATO is redesigning the IQF to provide a greater level of  assurance on the work being undertaken. The new IQF processes are to be  implemented  in  2013-14.  There  would  be  benefit  in  increasing  the  quality  assurance  reviews  for  the  remission  of  general  interest  charges  to  provide  greater assurance that decisions are being applied consistently and staff are  following the appropriate procedures, including not to remit these charges as  an inducement to finalise a debt. 

Recommendation No.2 3.90 To  provide  increased  assurance  of  the  quality  and  consistency  of  decisions to remit general interest charges, the ANAO recommends that the  Australian Taxation Office undertakes specific quality assurance assessments  on general interest charge remission decisions and includes a focus on these  decisions in the IQF summary reports. 

ATO response: 

Agreed.  The  ATO  is  currently  in  the  process  of  moving  to  an  enterprise  quality  reporting system and future enhancements to the IQF reporting database will enable  reporting on GIC remission quality assurance assessments across the ATO. 

3.91 Taxpayers can request the ATO to review a decision not to grant relief  from their debt. However, information provided by the ATO about the main  options  for  review  is  not  clear  in  all  instances.  Notably,  the  ATO  website  advises taxpayers that they cannot dispute or disagree with a general interest  charge decision through the objections process, only advising taxpayers that  they can contact the ATO to discuss the matter. Further, it does not advise that  complaints and objections regarding release decisions are dealt with differently  by the ATO. While the ATO’s processes for managing taxpayers’ objections are  sound, it would be helpful if the ATO better communicated the processes for  disputing or disagreeing with their decisions. There have been relatively few  objections  and  reviews  of  the  ATO’s  debt  relief  decisions  upheld  in  recent  years. Only four of 209 objections finalised in 2011-12 were upheld (less than  2 per  cent),  and  similarly  one  of  12  appeals  to  the  Administrative  Appeal  Tribunal was upheld. 

 

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

74

assess the quality of the work of individual staff members in the Debt business  line. 

3.89 While the Debt Quality Management System assessment processes are  generally sound, the ATO is redesigning the IQF to provide a greater level of  assurance on the work being undertaken. The new IQF processes are to be  implemented  in  2013-14.  There  would  be  benefit  in  increasing  the  quality  assurance  reviews  for  the  remission  of  general  interest  charges  to  provide  greater assurance that decisions are being applied consistently and staff are  following the appropriate procedures, including not to remit these charges as  an inducement to finalise a debt. 

Recommendation No.2 3.90 To  provide  increased  assurance  of  the  quality  and  consistency  of  decisions to remit general interest charges, the ANAO recommends that the  Australian Taxation Office undertakes specific quality assurance assessments  on general interest charge remission decisions and includes a focus on these  decisions in the IQF summary reports. 

ATO response: 

Agreed.  The  ATO  is  currently  in  the  process  of  moving  to  an  enterprise  quality  reporting system and future enhancements to the IQF reporting database will enable  reporting on GIC remission quality assurance assessments across the ATO. 

3.91 Taxpayers can request the ATO to review a decision not to grant relief  from their debt. However, information provided by the ATO about the main  options  for  review  is  not  clear  in  all  instances.  Notably,  the  ATO  website  advises taxpayers that they cannot dispute or disagree with a general interest  charge decision through the objections process, only advising taxpayers that  they can contact the ATO to discuss the matter. Further, it does not advise that  complaints and objections regarding release decisions are dealt with differently  by the ATO. While the ATO’s processes for managing taxpayers’ objections are  sound, it would be helpful if the ATO better communicated the processes for  disputing or disagreeing with their decisions. There have been relatively few  objections  and  reviews  of  the  ATO’s  debt  relief  decisions  upheld  in  recent  years. Only four of 209 objections finalised in 2011-12 were upheld (less than  2 per  cent),  and  similarly  one  of  12  appeals  to  the  Administrative  Appeal  Tribunal was upheld. 

 

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

75

4. Automated Debt Relief Processes

This chapter examines the ATO’s automated processes supporting the administration  of debt relief.  

4.1 The ATO relies on Information and Communication Technology (ICT)  business  systems  for  the  effective  and  efficient  delivery  of  its  outputs,  including the administration of taxpayers’ debt. 

4.2 To establish an up‐to‐date ICT capability, in 2002 the ATO initiated the  Change Program, to ‘improve the client experience, reduce operational costs,  and improve flexibility and sustainability for future change’.109 Specifically, the  Change Program aimed to replace the agency’s multiple ICT systems with a  single  integrated  core  processing  system  that  would  process  all  taxes  and  replace all previous core processing systems. 

4.3 Implementation of the Change Program was scheduled over six years,  2003-04 to 2008-09, at an estimated cost of $445 million.110 In June 2010, the  ATO announced that the implementation of the Change Program was formally  completed.111  However,  a  range  of  legislative  changes  (most  notably  the  introduction  of  the  Super  Simplification  Reform  in  2007),  combined  with  changes in project scope and a series of delays and extensions, resulted in the  full functionality of the original program specifications not being achieved. As  a result, a number of legacy core processing systems could not be retired. 

4.4 The  ATO  continues  to  use  two  ICT  systems  that  are  not  fully  integrated—the  legacy  systems  used  to  manage  a  number  of  tax  and  superannuation  products,  and  the  new  Integrated  Core  Processing  (ICP)  system. While this arrangement has no direct impact on taxpayers, it limits the  ATO’s capacity to administer certain business operations without intervention.  For debt management, these limitations include the requirement to maintain  separate or standalone systems (from the main ICT systems), to support the  management of taxpayers’ applications for release, waiver and compromise.  

                                                       109 ATO, The Australian Tax Office Change Program, February 2011, p. 2, available at [accessed 19 September 2012]. 110

ANAO, Audit Report No.8 2009-10, The Australian Taxation Office’s Implementation of the Change Program: a strategic overview, p. 19. 111 At completion, the cost of the program was $814 million, an increase of $369 million over the cost initially estimated.

ATO, Annual Report 2011-12, p. 127.

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

76

4.5 The  ATO  applies  processes  in  both  ICT  systems  to  allow  the  bulk   non‐pursuit  of  debts  that  are  assessed  as  uneconomical  to  pursue  or  irrecoverable  at  law.  This  bulk  non‐pursuit  process  allows  the  ATO  to  efficiently manage large volumes of lower value and more aged debt cases that  remain outstanding and may not be otherwise actioned. As previously noted,  these debts may be re‐raised where a taxpayer’s circumstances have changed  such  that  they  become  able  to  pay  the  liability.  A  similar  bulk  process  is  applied to ‘clean‐up’ very low amounts of GIC that have accrued on taxpayers’  accounts. 

4.6 To assess the effectiveness of the ATO’s ICT systems supporting the  administration of debt, including debt relief, the ANAO examined the: 

 bulk non‐pursuit (BNP) process; 

 re‐raising of debts;  

 standalone systems used by the DHC team for managing applications  and referrals in relation to taxpayers’ financial hardship; and 

 automatic processes for the bulk remission of low‐value GIC. 

A diagram of the systems’ processes and work flows (at Figure 4.1 on page 78)  provides context. 

Debt management in the legacy and ICP systems

4.7 The  two  ICT  systems  that  support  the  ATO’s  administration  of  different types of taxes are the: 

 legacy systems, used to manage a number of tax and superannuation  liabilities. Legacy operating systems are the:  

 ATO  Integrated  System  (AIS),  an  accounting  system  that  maintains  transactions  including  those  related  to  taxpayers’  activity statement instalments; 

 General Accounting System (GAS), an accounting system that  maintains  transactions  mainly  relevant  to  superannuation  products; and  

 Receivables  Management  System  (RMS),  a  case  management  system that maintains the creation, tracking and recording of  ATO  internal  business  activities  related  to  specific  taxpayers’  matters. 

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

76

4.5 The  ATO  applies  processes  in  both  ICT  systems  to  allow  the  bulk   non‐pursuit  of  debts  that  are  assessed  as  uneconomical  to  pursue  or  irrecoverable  at  law.  This  bulk  non‐pursuit  process  allows  the  ATO  to  efficiently manage large volumes of lower value and more aged debt cases that  remain outstanding and may not be otherwise actioned. As previously noted,  these debts may be re‐raised where a taxpayer’s circumstances have changed  such  that  they  become  able  to  pay  the  liability.  A  similar  bulk  process  is  applied to ‘clean‐up’ very low amounts of GIC that have accrued on taxpayers’  accounts. 

4.6 To assess the effectiveness of the ATO’s ICT systems supporting the  administration of debt, including debt relief, the ANAO examined the: 

 bulk non‐pursuit (BNP) process; 

 re‐raising of debts;  

 standalone systems used by the DHC team for managing applications  and referrals in relation to taxpayers’ financial hardship; and 

 automatic processes for the bulk remission of low‐value GIC. 

A diagram of the systems’ processes and work flows (at Figure 4.1 on page 78)  provides context. 

Debt management in the legacy and ICP systems

4.7 The  two  ICT  systems  that  support  the  ATO’s  administration  of  different types of taxes are the: 

 legacy systems, used to manage a number of tax and superannuation  liabilities. Legacy operating systems are the:  

 ATO  Integrated  System  (AIS),  an  accounting  system  that  maintains  transactions  including  those  related  to  taxpayers’  activity statement instalments; 

 General Accounting System (GAS), an accounting system that  maintains  transactions  mainly  relevant  to  superannuation  products; and  

 Receivables  Management  System  (RMS),  a  case  management  system that maintains the creation, tracking and recording of  ATO  internal  business  activities  related  to  specific  taxpayers’  matters. 

Automated Debt Relief Processes

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

77

 ICP system, established in 2010 that maintains taxpayers’ accounts and  processes  transactions  relating  to  fringe  benefits  tax,  income  tax,  superannuation co‐contribution and other taxes.112 

4.8 Taxpayers can have multiple, concurrent accounts associated with their  tax  and  superannuation  liabilities.  For  example,  a  taxpayer  may  have  an  income  tax  account  in  the  ICP  system,  and  goods  and  services  tax  and  superannuation  guarantee  charge  liabilities  in  the  legacy  systems.  Staff  managing  debt  cases  are  required  to  manually  review  all  the  taxpayer’s  accounts in both systems, to check the total debts the taxpayer has, and their  characteristics, including the age and value, of those debts. 

Debt management process flow

4.9 In both ICT systems, the ATO applies various business rules, defined  by ATO policies, to examine all taxpayers’ accounts and to identify account  balances that are in debt. Subject to the business rules, that include different  balance  thresholds  and  grace  periods113  categorised  by  account  type,  the  systems  function  automatically  to  identify  new  debts  and  gather  updated  information for existing debts. These debts are maintained in separate debt  pools  and  then  filtered  for  distinct  treatment  strategies.  The  stages  in  the  end‐to‐end business process for debt management, including debt relief, are  set out in Figure 4.1. 

                                                       112 Together with the ICP system, the Change Program also established Siebel, a workflow management system that manages the routing, tracking and recording of tasks and activities between business functions. Siebel is a third-party

vendor application widely used by large organisations for customer relationship management. 113 The ATO allows a longer period of grace before instigating recovery action for lower value debts.

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

78

Figure 4.1

Debt management process flow

 

Source: ANAO analysis of ATO business systems. 

Note 1: The process workflow and treatment strategies are iterative processes.

Bulk non-pursuit process 4.10 The BNP process was established in August 2007, to run in the ATO  Integrated  System  and  the  (then)  National  Tax  System.  In  September  2010,  operations conducted in the National Tax System, including the administration  of income tax, were transferred to the ICP system. Since the transfer, the bulk  process has been applied almost exclusively in the legacy systems, with the  BNP capability scheduled to be available in the ICP system from September  2013. In the meantime, the ATO applies an interim process in the ICP system  that targets only debts that are uneconomical to pursue (and does not include  debts that are irrecoverable at law). 

Bulk non-pursuit process in the legacy systems

4.11 Business rules (or debt case parameters) targeting debts with specific  characteristics  (including  the  age  and  value  of  the  debt)  for  the  bulk 

Accounting treatment

Debt reliefs

Process workflow and treatment strategies

Maintain debt case pools

Identify debt cases

New cases

New cases

Update client information

Update client information

Iteration based on new or additional information

Seibel (debt case management )

Manual posting on ICP client account

Filter debt cases according to 4 Business Strategies

AIS Account Review & Reconciliation processes

identify debt cases

Manual posting on AIS client account

ICP Operational Analytical process identify debt cases

Case officer decisions

RMS (debt case management )

1. Pending auto action 2. Keep in mind 3. Held & review 4. Receivable team

1. Waiver 2. Release 3. Compromise 4. Non-pursuit (INP)

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

78

Figure 4.1

Debt management process flow

 

Source: ANAO analysis of ATO business systems. 

Note 1: The process workflow and treatment strategies are iterative processes.

Bulk non-pursuit process 4.10 The BNP process was established in August 2007, to run in the ATO  Integrated  System  and  the  (then)  National  Tax  System.  In  September  2010,  operations conducted in the National Tax System, including the administration  of income tax, were transferred to the ICP system. Since the transfer, the bulk  process has been applied almost exclusively in the legacy systems, with the  BNP capability scheduled to be available in the ICP system from September  2013. In the meantime, the ATO applies an interim process in the ICP system  that targets only debts that are uneconomical to pursue (and does not include  debts that are irrecoverable at law). 

Bulk non-pursuit process in the legacy systems

4.11 Business rules (or debt case parameters) targeting debts with specific  characteristics  (including  the  age  and  value  of  the  debt)  for  the  bulk 

Accounting treatment

Debt reliefs

Process workflow and treatment strategies

Maintain debt case pools

Identify debt cases

New cases

New cases

Update client information

Update client information

Iteration based on new or additional information

Seibel (debt case management )

Manual posting on ICP client account

Filter debt cases according to 4 Business Strategies

AIS Account Review & Reconciliation processes

identify debt cases

Manual posting on AIS client account

ICP Operational Analytical process identify debt cases

Case officer decisions

RMS (debt case management )

1. Pending auto action 2. Keep in mind 3. Held & review 4. Receivable team

1. Waiver 2. Release 3. Compromise 4. Non-pursuit (INP)

Automated Debt Relief Processes

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

79

non‐pursuit  process  are  submitted  to  the  Debt  Executive  for  review  and  approval prior to application. There are two sets of parameters: a standard set  that is run on a monthly basis, and ad hoc sets that are designed to capture  specific debt cases that the ATO has decided not to pursue at different times.  The parameters assist the ATO to manage debt recovery more efficiently by  setting aside large numbers of low value debts that are difficult or costly to  collect. The parameters can be changed, and the debts can be re‐raised and  collected at a later date if the taxpayer’s circumstances change. 

4.12 The BNP data showed that just over $462 million—comprising debts  that were uneconomical to pursue or irrecoverable at law—was not pursued  during 2011-12. The process is conducted by three ATO teams. The teams are  the: 

 BNP  team  has  overall  responsibility  for  the  management  and  administration of the BNP process. Specific activities undertaken by the  team  include:  developing  the  BNP  parameters  and  having  them  endorsed  by  the  DBL  executive;  and  conducting  a  reconciliation  process to check that the BNP process is working as intended; 

 data warehouse team is responsible for applying the BNP parameters to  the  ATO’s  data  warehouse  and  producing  a  list  of  the  targeted  population  of  debt  cases.  The  list  is  returned  to  the  BNP  team  to  determine whether the business rules need to be adjusted—this usually  takes  a  few  iterations  between  the  teams,  before  a  final  debt  case  population is specified; and  

 Enterprise Solutions and Technology accounting support team execute the  non‐pursuit of debt based on the final approved list. This process is  made more complex by the requirement to update the value of GIC  imposed on a taxpayer’s primary debt (so it is accurate at the time of  non‐pursuit),  to  maintain  data  integrity  between  multiple  system  processes.  

4.13 The BNP process in the legacy systems is complex, requiring several  exchanges of data and co‐ordination between teams across the ATO. To ensure  process integrity, the process also requires the segregation of control and the  checking of a sample of non‐pursuit cases. The process in the legacy systems is  outlined in Figure 4.2. 

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

80

Figure 4.2

Bulk non-pursuit process workflow in the legacy systems

Source: ANAO analysis of ATO business systems. 

4.14 Each month the total number and value of debts subject to the BNP  process is reconciled by the BNP team. While referred to as a reconciliation, the  activity more accurately reflects an assurance process, as it checks that: 

 all debts not pursued have been approved by the DBL executive. This  approval  is  sought  retrospectively  through  an  email  exchange  informing the delegate of the number and value of debts that have not  been pursued under the (previously approved) BNP parameters; and 

 the  process  output  is  accurate.  This  assurance  is  gained  through  a  testing  methodology  (based  on  an  Australian  Bureau  of  Statistics 

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

80

Figure 4.2

Bulk non-pursuit process workflow in the legacy systems

Source: ANAO analysis of ATO business systems. 

4.14 Each month the total number and value of debts subject to the BNP  process is reconciled by the BNP team. While referred to as a reconciliation, the  activity more accurately reflects an assurance process, as it checks that: 

 all debts not pursued have been approved by the DBL executive. This  approval  is  sought  retrospectively  through  an  email  exchange  informing the delegate of the number and value of debts that have not  been pursued under the (previously approved) BNP parameters; and 

 the  process  output  is  accurate.  This  assurance  is  gained  through  a  testing  methodology  (based  on  an  Australian  Bureau  of  Statistics 

Automated Debt Relief Processes

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

81

sampling  methodology).  Each  sampled  case  is  manually  checked  against the BNP parameters to ensure that the value of the debt not  pursued is accurate. 

4.15 The  ANAO  observed  the  preparation  and  reconciliation  of  the  BNP  process undertaken in September 2012 and examined ad hoc BNP results for  the 2011-12 financial year. It was evident that the endorsed business processes  and procedures were closely followed by the operational teams, including that: 

 segregation of control was enforced to minimise the risk of debt cases  being included in the BNP process where ATO staff may have had a  personal interest; 

 the BNP team worked closely with other operational teams to ensure  the  business  rules  were  accurately  applied  (in  the  programming  parameters) for selecting and filtering BNP debt case population; and 

 the submissions and approvals documents, and all execution data files,  are kept on an ATO share drive to provide an appropriate audit trail. 

The ATO’s internal controls provide reasonable assurance of the accuracy and  integrity of the BNP process in the legacy systems. 

Interim BNP process in the ICP system

4.16 The BNP process in the ICP system is designed to identify only debts  that are considered uneconomical to pursue. Referred to by the ATO as an  interim solution (until the full BNP process is available in September 2013) as  at April 2013, it had been run on three occasions—in February, March and  April 2013—resulting in 35 692 debt cases not being pursued. These cases were  valued at $49.5 million.114 The ATO advised that there is potential to expand  these parameters in the future, and the use of the BNP process is expected to  increase  as  additional  accounts  are  transitioned  from  the  legacy  to  the  ICP  system. 

4.17 Prior  to  February  2013,  the  ATO  estimated  (from  data  warehouse  queries) that there would be 54 000 debts with a total value of $27 million for  BNP  treatment  in  the  ICP  system.  The  ATO  advised  that  the  BNP  interim  solution run in April 2013 has cleared all known backlogs (of debts considered  uneconomical to pursue). The ATO further advised that the interim solution 

                                                       114 The ANAO did not conduct testing on this interim solution as it was not operational during the audit’s fieldwork phase.

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

82

will be run at the beginning of each month to action any new debts that meet  the non‐pursuit BNP parameters.  

Re-raising non-pursued debts 4.18 Debts that the ATO has assessed as uneconomical to pursue through  the BNP and individual non‐pursuit processes can be re‐raised at a later date,  subject to changes in the taxpayer’s circumstances, using either ICT system. 

Re-raising debt in the legacy systems

4.19 Changes in the taxpayer’s circumstances that automatically trigger a  debt being re‐raised for further review in the legacy systems include that: 

 the taxpayer lodges a tax return; 

 the taxpayer has been traced by the ATO; or  

 a decision is made to pursue the debt. 

4.20 Once non‐pursued debts have been ‘triggered’, system‐based processes  in the legacy systems select those with a specified value  and transfer them  electronically to ATO staff members, who assess whether the debt should be  pursued. This process of review and assessment of a previously non‐pursued  debt  is  resource  intensive.  The  system  identifies  debts  by  tax  type,  not  by  taxpayer. A taxpayer may have multiple debts across different types of taxes,  requiring a review of all the taxpayer’s accounts, and the manual processing of  the result of the re‐raise and review. 

Re-raising debt in the ICP system

4.21 Debts that have not been pursued in the ICP system—either as a result  of the limited BNP process or that have been individually not pursued, may be  re‐raised automatically, subject to specific business rules (also referred to as  re‐raise ‘triggers’).  

4.22 The ICP system applies a daily process for evaluating credit balance  risk. If the output reveals a high risk that a re‐raised debt will not be collected  (based  on  the  characteristics  of  the  debt  and  the  taxpayer)  the  system  will  create  a  review  item  for  manual  intervention.  Additional  business  rules  applied to low‐risk cases exclude debts where the: 

 taxpayer’s total income is below a particular threshold; or 

 debt was assessed by the ATO as aged debt.  

Automated Debt Relief Processes

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

83

4.23 After these initial filters, the system will automatically check whether  the taxpayer has had, or is scheduled to have, a debt not pursued in the legacy  systems.115 If this is the case, no debts will be triggered for re‐raise in the ICP  system and the system will automatically create a review item for actioning by  an ATO staff member. The final system check is to verify if the sub‐transaction  code is ‘uneconomical to pursue’. Only when all system checks are completed  and all business rules matched and satisfied, will the system re‐raise debt. 

Analysis of the re-raising process

4.24 The ANAO tested the ATO’s systems for re‐raising non‐pursued debt  by examining whether the business rules are being correctly implemented in  the legacy and ICP systems. Depending on the ICT system, these business rules  may  be  actioned  automatically  or  require  manual  processing.  The  business  rules examined were the: 

 transaction code ‘non‐economic to pursue’,  

 debt threshold; 

 taxpayer’s income threshold; 

 debt age threshold; and  

 integration between the legacy and ICP systems. 

4.25 The ANAO found that the business rules for re‐raising non‐pursued  debt are being properly implemented in the relevant systems. The program  logic  and  parameters  relating  to  these  business  rules  were  appropriately  specified, and the automatic information exchange between the legacy and ICP  computer systems operated effectively. 

Standalone systems supporting the Debt Hardship Capability team 4.26 Cases where taxpayers have applied for release, waiver or compromise  of a debt; claimed financial hardship; or have been identified through one of  the treatment strategies outlined in Figure 4.1 are assessed and processed by  the DHC team. 

                                                       115 This is done through system programming interface between the legacy systems and ICP system.

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

82

will be run at the beginning of each month to action any new debts that meet  the non‐pursuit BNP parameters.  

Re-raising non-pursued debts 4.18 Debts that the ATO has assessed as uneconomical to pursue through  the BNP and individual non‐pursuit processes can be re‐raised at a later date,  subject to changes in the taxpayer’s circumstances, using either ICT system. 

Re-raising debt in the legacy systems

4.19 Changes in the taxpayer’s circumstances that automatically trigger a  debt being re‐raised for further review in the legacy systems include that: 

 the taxpayer lodges a tax return; 

 the taxpayer has been traced by the ATO; or  

 a decision is made to pursue the debt. 

4.20 Once non‐pursued debts have been ‘triggered’, system‐based processes  in the legacy systems select those with a specified value  and transfer them  electronically to ATO staff members, who assess whether the debt should be  pursued. This process of review and assessment of a previously non‐pursued  debt  is  resource  intensive.  The  system  identifies  debts  by  tax  type,  not  by  taxpayer. A taxpayer may have multiple debts across different types of taxes,  requiring a review of all the taxpayer’s accounts, and the manual processing of  the result of the re‐raise and review. 

Re-raising debt in the ICP system

4.21 Debts that have not been pursued in the ICP system—either as a result  of the limited BNP process or that have been individually not pursued, may be  re‐raised automatically, subject to specific business rules (also referred to as  re‐raise ‘triggers’).  

4.22 The ICP system applies a daily process for evaluating credit balance  risk. If the output reveals a high risk that a re‐raised debt will not be collected  (based  on  the  characteristics  of  the  debt  and  the  taxpayer)  the  system  will  create  a  review  item  for  manual  intervention.  Additional  business  rules  applied to low‐risk cases exclude debts where the: 

 taxpayer’s total income is below a particular threshold; or 

 debt was assessed by the ATO as aged debt.  

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

84

4.27 Once referred to the DHC team, reporting and work flow management  is  largely  manual,  and  reliant  on  two  standalone  computer  systems,  the  Release Management and Reporting System and the Hardship Database. There  is insufficient reporting functionality in the ATO’s legacy and ICP systems to  effectively report on the DHC workloads, and there is no interface between  these  systems  and  the  standalone  systems,  requiring  manual  data  entry.  Effectively, staff in the DHC team have to:  

 research  information  on  a  debt  case  in  the  ATO’s  main  business  systems  (this  means  the  officer  must  access  the  AIS,  RMS,  ICP  and  Siebel systems to obtain a full view of all the taxpayer’s accounts); 

 record  the  receipt,  assessment  and  administration  of  the  case  in  the  standalone systems; and 

 enter  the  results  of  the  case  in  the  taxpayer’s  accounts  in  the  main  business  systems.  This  final  stage  includes  entering  any  accounting  ‘write‐off’  of  the  approved  debt  relief  type  and  the  amount  on  the  taxpayer’s accounts, in AIS or ICP (as outlined in Figure 4.1), and then  completing the case notes in RMS or Siebel, subject to the type of tax  debt. 

4.28 This  is  a  cumbersome  and  manual process  with  multiple  data  entry  processes  that  reduce  operational  efficiency  and  increase  the  potential  for  error. The ATO advised the ANAO that there are no current plans to integrate  the required business functionalities into the ATO’s main business systems. 

Reconciliation of debt cases

4.29 All debt relief cases (waiver, release and compromise) actioned by the  DHC are reconciled to verify that the type and amount of debt relief approved  is  accurately  entered  and  processed  in  the  ATO  accounting  systems:  AIS  (legacy) or ICP. Waiver is reconciled annually against Department of Finance  and Deregulation records by the Waiver officer in DHC (and verified by ATO  Finance);  release  cases are  reconciled  monthly  by  a  dedicated  officer  in  the  DBL;  and  the  reconciliation  for  compromise  is  conducted  by  the  Non‐Pursuable Debt Reconciliation team. 

4.30 The  ANAO  examined  the  reconciliation  process  conducted  in  September  2012.  While  a  full  reconciliation  process  is  undertaken  for  AIS  account postings, only a partial reconciliation is performed for ICP account  postings due to a lack of system functionality. 

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

84

4.27 Once referred to the DHC team, reporting and work flow management  is  largely  manual,  and  reliant  on  two  standalone  computer  systems,  the  Release Management and Reporting System and the Hardship Database. There  is insufficient reporting functionality in the ATO’s legacy and ICP systems to  effectively report on the DHC workloads, and there is no interface between  these  systems  and  the  standalone  systems,  requiring  manual  data  entry.  Effectively, staff in the DHC team have to:  

 research  information  on  a  debt  case  in  the  ATO’s  main  business  systems  (this  means  the  officer  must  access  the  AIS,  RMS,  ICP  and  Siebel systems to obtain a full view of all the taxpayer’s accounts); 

 record  the  receipt,  assessment  and  administration  of  the  case  in  the  standalone systems; and 

 enter  the  results  of  the  case  in  the  taxpayer’s  accounts  in  the  main  business  systems.  This  final  stage  includes  entering  any  accounting  ‘write‐off’  of  the  approved  debt  relief  type  and  the  amount  on  the  taxpayer’s accounts, in AIS or ICP (as outlined in Figure 4.1), and then  completing the case notes in RMS or Siebel, subject to the type of tax  debt. 

4.28 This  is  a  cumbersome  and  manual process  with  multiple  data  entry  processes  that  reduce  operational  efficiency  and  increase  the  potential  for  error. The ATO advised the ANAO that there are no current plans to integrate  the required business functionalities into the ATO’s main business systems. 

Reconciliation of debt cases

4.29 All debt relief cases (waiver, release and compromise) actioned by the  DHC are reconciled to verify that the type and amount of debt relief approved  is  accurately  entered  and  processed  in  the  ATO  accounting  systems:  AIS  (legacy) or ICP. Waiver is reconciled annually against Department of Finance  and Deregulation records by the Waiver officer in DHC (and verified by ATO  Finance);  release  cases are  reconciled  monthly  by  a  dedicated  officer  in  the  DBL;  and  the  reconciliation  for  compromise  is  conducted  by  the  Non‐Pursuable Debt Reconciliation team. 

4.30 The  ANAO  examined  the  reconciliation  process  conducted  in  September  2012.  While  a  full  reconciliation  process  is  undertaken  for  AIS  account postings, only a partial reconciliation is performed for ICP account  postings due to a lack of system functionality. 

Automated Debt Relief Processes

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

85

4.31 The reconciliation process in the legacy systems consists of two parts: 

 debt cases are extracted from the RMS system and checked to ensure  that the debt treatment recorded in RMS is accurately reflected in AIS;  and 

 the reverse is tested—a report extracted from AIS is matched against  the RMS records to ensure that each ‘write‐off’ posting in AIS has the  corresponding case approval in RMS and the amounts are the same.  

The ANAO found that the reconciliation process in the legacy systems worked  as intended. 

4.32 The  reconciliation  process  involving  the  ICP  system  is  still  under  development. Rather than a full reconciliation involving two processes, as at  31 March 2013 only one process exists: matching debt write‐offs from ICP to  the  ATO’s  case  management  system.  As  a  result,  the  reconciliation  process  only  provides  assurance  that  write‐off  accounting  treatments  in  ICP  are  verified as approved by the DBL Executive (as recorded in Siebel). The process  does not provide assurance that all approved debts are actioned accurately in  the accounting system and will not be achieved until the reconciliation process  is fully developed.  

GIC remission 4.33 As previously noted, taxpayers’ full or partial GIC liabilities may be  remitted through: 

 a monthly system‐based process that cancels, or ‘cleans up’ very low  value amounts of GIC that have been imposed on taxpayers’ records; 

 a decision by an ATO officer or staff of an external collection agency; or 

 the taxpayer being included in a GIC‐free payment arrangement. 

GIC  remission  may  be  provided  while  the  primary  debt  remains,  or  the  primary debt and GIC can be cancelled together. 

4.34 The DBL does not have primary responsibility for the administration or  remission of GIC. The Client Account Services business line has responsibility  for the management of the systems that impose GIC on taxpayers’ accounts  and the application of the monthly ‘clean up’. Reporting on GIC is provided by  ATO Finance (which is further discussed in Chapter 5). ATO officers in other  areas of the ATO, as well as staff from external collection agencies may also  remit GIC. 

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

86

4.35 This audit did not examine the processes for imposing or remitting GIC  but reviewed the ATO’s documentation for implementing the processes, and  drew  on  the  results  of  the  ANAO  audit  of  the  ATO’s  2011-12  financial  statements: 

 the ATO’s documentation showed that appropriate processes were in  place for implementing and controlling the automatic imposition and  remission of GIC calculations on taxpayer’s accounts; and 

 the ANAO testing found there were no material mistakes in the GIC  monthly ‘clean ups’. 

Conclusion 4.36 The  ATO  initiated  the  Change  Program  in  2002  to  establish  an  up‐to‐date ICT capability and replace the agency’s multiple ICT systems with a  single  business  system.  In  June  2010,  the  ATO  announced  that  the  implementation of the Change Program was formally completed. However, a  range of legislative changes, combined with changes in project scope and a  series of delays and extensions, resulted in the full functionality of the original  program specifications not being achieved. As a result, the ATO continues to  use two ICT systems to administer tax and superannuation.  

4.37 While these ICT arrangements have no direct impact on taxpayers, they  limit  the  ATO’s  capacity  to  administer  certain  business  operations  without  intervention. For debt management, this means using systems separate from  the main ICT systems to support the management of taxpayers’ applications  for release, waiver and compromise, and to report on the movement of debt  cases and the different categories of debt relief. While the ATO recognises the  risks  and  challenges  of  maintaining  two  complex,  parallel  ICT  systems,  it  noted that there are multiple demands for system upgrades and enhancements  that have to be prioritised across the ATO. 

4.38 The  ATO  applies  processes  in  both  ICT  systems  to  allow  the  bulk  non‐pursuit  of  debts  that  have  been  outstanding  for  some  time  and  are  considered uneconomical to follow up or are irrecoverable at law. In the legacy  systems, just over $462 million of debt was not pursued during 2011-12. This  bulk  process  is  safeguarded  by  two  key  controls—executive  review  and  approval of bulk non‐pursuit parameters and a sampling review of the output  of  the  process—that  provide  reasonable  assurance  of  the  integrity  of  the  process. 

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

86

4.35 This audit did not examine the processes for imposing or remitting GIC  but reviewed the ATO’s documentation for implementing the processes, and  drew  on  the  results  of  the  ANAO  audit  of  the  ATO’s  2011-12  financial  statements: 

 the ATO’s documentation showed that appropriate processes were in  place for implementing and controlling the automatic imposition and  remission of GIC calculations on taxpayer’s accounts; and 

 the ANAO testing found there were no material mistakes in the GIC  monthly ‘clean ups’. 

Conclusion 4.36 The  ATO  initiated  the  Change  Program  in  2002  to  establish  an  up‐to‐date ICT capability and replace the agency’s multiple ICT systems with a  single  business  system.  In  June  2010,  the  ATO  announced  that  the  implementation of the Change Program was formally completed. However, a  range of legislative changes, combined with changes in project scope and a  series of delays and extensions, resulted in the full functionality of the original  program specifications not being achieved. As a result, the ATO continues to  use two ICT systems to administer tax and superannuation.  

4.37 While these ICT arrangements have no direct impact on taxpayers, they  limit  the  ATO’s  capacity  to  administer  certain  business  operations  without  intervention. For debt management, this means using systems separate from  the main ICT systems to support the management of taxpayers’ applications  for release, waiver and compromise, and to report on the movement of debt  cases and the different categories of debt relief. While the ATO recognises the  risks  and  challenges  of  maintaining  two  complex,  parallel  ICT  systems,  it  noted that there are multiple demands for system upgrades and enhancements  that have to be prioritised across the ATO. 

4.38 The  ATO  applies  processes  in  both  ICT  systems  to  allow  the  bulk  non‐pursuit  of  debts  that  have  been  outstanding  for  some  time  and  are  considered uneconomical to follow up or are irrecoverable at law. In the legacy  systems, just over $462 million of debt was not pursued during 2011-12. This  bulk  process  is  safeguarded  by  two  key  controls—executive  review  and  approval of bulk non‐pursuit parameters and a sampling review of the output  of  the  process—that  provide  reasonable  assurance  of  the  integrity  of  the  process. 

Automated Debt Relief Processes

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

87

4.39 There is, however, only a limited, interim bulk non‐pursuit capacity in  the ICP system as full functionality is not yet available. Since September 2010,  debts  in  this  system  totalling  just  under  $50  million  were  not  pursued,  covering debts that are potentially uneconomical to pursue, but none that are  potentially irrecoverable at law. There is a potential backlog of cases that will  not be processed until the full bulk non‐pursuit capability is available in the  ICP system, scheduled for September 2013. 

4.40 Debts that the ATO has assessed as uneconomical to pursue through  the bulk non‐pursuit and individual non‐pursuit processes can be re‐raised at a  later date, subject to changes in the taxpayer’s circumstances, using either ICT  system. Analysis of the ATO’s systems for re‐raising non‐pursued debt found  that the five relevant business rules are being properly implemented in the  relevant systems. The ATO’s internal procedures to impose general interest  and penalty charges and to run monthly bulk processes to deal with very low  value automatic remissions are also sound, and ANAO testing has found no  material mistakes in the process. 

 

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

88

5. Reporting of Debt Relief Arrangements

This chapter examines the reporting of debt relief arrangements by the ATO. 

Background 5.1 Accurate  and  transparent  reporting  is  critical  to  maintaining  the  confidence of the Government and broader community in the administration  of  taxation  laws,  and  allows  meaningful  analysis  and  review  by  external  parties.  It  also  supports  the  ATO’s  business  strategies  by  providing  useful  management  information  about  the  incidence,  value  and  circumstances  of  applying the various provisions for debt collection and relief. 

5.2 The ATO’s public reporting of debt relief has generally been through  the Commissioner of Taxation’s annual reports and accompanying financial  statements.  Information  for  the  annual  report  is  prepared  by  ATO  Finance  from  data  mapped  from  the  ATO’s  business  systems  to  its  accounting  system.116 At the operational or business line level, the focus of reporting has  been primarily on debt collection rather than the incidence of debt relief, which  the  ATO  advised  has  traditionally  been  regarded  as  a  lower  priority  and  undertaken on an ad hoc basis.  

5.3 The  reporting  requirements  associated  with  new  program  funding  provided in the 2012-13 Budget presented a ‘key driver’ for changes in the  DBL’s debt reporting capacity. The ATO was allocated $106 million over four  years to fund a new tax compliance initiative—managing tax debt in challenging  times: a balanced and differentiated approach.117 Under the program, referred to as  the Managing Challenging Tax Debt program, the ATO is required to provide  data in respect of all debt reduction, including the different categories of debt  relief.  To  enable  this  level  of  reporting,  a  framework  was  developed  in  early 2013 to: 

support  a  breakdown  of  management  components,  including  business  as  usual  and  specific  commitments  to  government,  and  also  enable  reporting  across all categories of Debt Relief. 

                                                       116 ATO Finance also prepares many other data requirements, including for Senate Estimates briefs, ATO funding proposals, or to respond to requests from the Department of the Treasury.

117 Federal Budget papers, 2012-13, Part 1 Revenue Measures, May 2012.

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

88

5. Reporting of Debt Relief Arrangements

This chapter examines the reporting of debt relief arrangements by the ATO. 

Background 5.1 Accurate  and  transparent  reporting  is  critical  to  maintaining  the  confidence of the Government and broader community in the administration  of  taxation  laws,  and  allows  meaningful  analysis  and  review  by  external  parties.  It  also  supports  the  ATO’s  business  strategies  by  providing  useful  management  information  about  the  incidence,  value  and  circumstances  of  applying the various provisions for debt collection and relief. 

5.2 The ATO’s public reporting of debt relief has generally been through  the Commissioner of Taxation’s annual reports and accompanying financial  statements.  Information  for  the  annual  report  is  prepared  by  ATO  Finance  from  data  mapped  from  the  ATO’s  business  systems  to  its  accounting  system.116 At the operational or business line level, the focus of reporting has  been primarily on debt collection rather than the incidence of debt relief, which  the  ATO  advised  has  traditionally  been  regarded  as  a  lower  priority  and  undertaken on an ad hoc basis.  

5.3 The  reporting  requirements  associated  with  new  program  funding  provided in the 2012-13 Budget presented a ‘key driver’ for changes in the  DBL’s debt reporting capacity. The ATO was allocated $106 million over four  years to fund a new tax compliance initiative—managing tax debt in challenging  times: a balanced and differentiated approach.117 Under the program, referred to as  the Managing Challenging Tax Debt program, the ATO is required to provide  data in respect of all debt reduction, including the different categories of debt  relief.  To  enable  this  level  of  reporting,  a  framework  was  developed  in  early 2013 to: 

support  a  breakdown  of  management  components,  including  business  as  usual  and  specific  commitments  to  government,  and  also  enable  reporting  across all categories of Debt Relief. 

                                                       116 ATO Finance also prepares many other data requirements, including for Senate Estimates briefs, ATO funding proposals, or to respond to requests from the Department of the Treasury.

117 Federal Budget papers, 2012-13, Part 1 Revenue Measures, May 2012.

Reporting of Debt Relief Arrangements

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

89

5.4 The  first  report  under  the  new  framework,  the  debt  flow  weekly  summary report (debt flow report), was phased in between November 2012  and May 2013, with the first full report produced in April 2013. Prior to this,  ATO  reporting  on  debt  relief  consisted  of  a  non‐pursuit  report,  a  hardship  capability report, and a report on the value of GIC remitted each month. These  reports provide consolidated data on aspects of debt relief that are used in  other reports on debt management more generally, and will complement the  information provided in the new report. 

5.5 The ANAO examined the ATO’s: 

 management reporting on debt relief; and  

 external  reporting  of  debt  relief  in  the  Commissioner  of  Taxation’s    annual reports, and other reporting requirements. 

As part of this audit, the ANAO examined the extent to which key measures of  debt  relief  were  being  effectively  communicated  within  the  ATO  and  externally.  The  ANAO  also  examined  whether  these  measures  were  being  reported  consistently  in  different  reports  but  did  not  seek  to  establish  the  integrity of the relevant data in these reports. 

Management reporting of debt relief 5.6 As noted in Chapter 1, the ATO’s use of the term debt ‘write‐off’ was  the subject of a report by the Commonwealth Ombudsman in March 2009. In a  later response to a Senate Committee, the ATO stated that:  

all information available to taxpayers and Tax Office staff will be updated to  use the term non‐pursuit rather than write‐off, where necessary.118 

5.7 For  reporting  purposes,  the  ATO  still  uses  the  terms  ‘write‐off’  and  ‘non‐pursuit’ of debt interchangeably. Either term may be used:  

 collectively, for all types of debt where the ATO has provided full or  partial reduction in the amount of the liability collected; irrespective of  the supporting legislative provisions; and 

 to describe some debts that are not pursued by the ATO at a point in  time, but could be re‐raised at a later date. Where the ATO refers to a 

                                                       118 Senate Standing Committee on Economics, Treasury portfolio, budget estimates 2-4 June 2009. Answer to question on notice.

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

90

debt being ‘written‐off’, the term, in effect, is not always being used in  the general commercial sense that the debt has been cancelled. 

The ATO advised in May 2013 that its use of these terms is under review. 

5.8 The ATO may also use the term ‘forgiven debt’ to collectively describe  debt that has been waived, released or compromised—that is, where the debt  has effectively been cancelled rather than not pursued (because the ATO has  assessed that it is uneconomical to pursue or irrecoverable at law) and cannot  be re‐raised at a later date. 

5.9 Transaction codes in the legacy and ICP systems record activities on  debt cases, including where taxpayers have been granted some form of relief  from  their  debt,  and  are  the  source  of  management  reporting  data.  As  at  March 2013, there are some constraints in the transaction codes and associated  sub‐codes available for recording and reporting aspects of debt relief. These  constraints  affect  the  ATO’s  financial  reporting  system,  preventing  it  from  being able to differentiate between impeded (disputed and insolvent debt) and  collectable  debt,  and  further  between  collectable  debt  that  is  compromised  (and cannot be re‐raised) or not pursued (and could be re‐raised). 

5.10 Drawing on data in the ATO’s financial reporting system, the ATO’s  2010-11 financial statements reported that, as at 30 June 2011 the value of total  taxation receivables was $27 680 million. For the same period, the DBL’s debt  reporting reflected $27 460 million in total debt holdings, some $220 million  less. The ATO explained that these figures will be different because of: 

 the timing when figures are referred from the business systems to the  ATO’s accounting system; 

 the  parameters  that  the  Debt  Reporting  team  uses  to  run  its  debt  reports; and  

 the actual reporting timelines (Debt Reporting may run its reports at  different dates).  

5.11 As part of the financial statement audits in recent years, the ANAO has  attempted to reconcile the two sets of figures (the Debt Reporting figure and  the annual report gross receivable figure), on the assumption that the two sets  of figures should be equal. To date, this reconciliation has not been achieved.  The ATO is researching this issue for the ANAO’s 2012-13 audit of the ATO’s  financial statements. 

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

90

debt being ‘written‐off’, the term, in effect, is not always being used in  the general commercial sense that the debt has been cancelled. 

The ATO advised in May 2013 that its use of these terms is under review. 

5.8 The ATO may also use the term ‘forgiven debt’ to collectively describe  debt that has been waived, released or compromised—that is, where the debt  has effectively been cancelled rather than not pursued (because the ATO has  assessed that it is uneconomical to pursue or irrecoverable at law) and cannot  be re‐raised at a later date. 

5.9 Transaction codes in the legacy and ICP systems record activities on  debt cases, including where taxpayers have been granted some form of relief  from  their  debt,  and  are  the  source  of  management  reporting  data.  As  at  March 2013, there are some constraints in the transaction codes and associated  sub‐codes available for recording and reporting aspects of debt relief. These  constraints  affect  the  ATO’s  financial  reporting  system,  preventing  it  from  being able to differentiate between impeded (disputed and insolvent debt) and  collectable  debt,  and  further  between  collectable  debt  that  is  compromised  (and cannot be re‐raised) or not pursued (and could be re‐raised). 

5.10 Drawing on data in the ATO’s financial reporting system, the ATO’s  2010-11 financial statements reported that, as at 30 June 2011 the value of total  taxation receivables was $27 680 million. For the same period, the DBL’s debt  reporting reflected $27 460 million in total debt holdings, some $220 million  less. The ATO explained that these figures will be different because of: 

 the timing when figures are referred from the business systems to the  ATO’s accounting system; 

 the  parameters  that  the  Debt  Reporting  team  uses  to  run  its  debt  reports; and  

 the actual reporting timelines (Debt Reporting may run its reports at  different dates).  

5.11 As part of the financial statement audits in recent years, the ANAO has  attempted to reconcile the two sets of figures (the Debt Reporting figure and  the annual report gross receivable figure), on the assumption that the two sets  of figures should be equal. To date, this reconciliation has not been achieved.  The ATO is researching this issue for the ANAO’s 2012-13 audit of the ATO’s  financial statements. 

Reporting of Debt Relief Arrangements

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

91

Management reports

5.12 As  at  April  2013,  the  ATO  produces  the  following  four  reports  that  provide information on debt relief: 

 non-pursuit report, prepared by DBL’s Debt Reporting team; 

 hardship  capability  report,  prepared  by  the  DBL’s  Debt  Hardship    Capability (DHC) team;  

 GIC remission report, prepared by the ATO Finance team; and 

 debt flow weekly summary report, prepared by DBL’s Debt Reporting  team. 

The non-pursuit, hardship capability and GIC remission reports are produced  monthly, while the new debt flow report provides weekly information. 

Non-pursuit report

5.13 The non-pursuit report provides information on the value of collectable  debt that the ATO has ‘not pursued’ each month, with year‐to‐date totals. The  report includes both individual non‐pursuit cases and bulk non‐pursuit119 debt,  as  well  as  debts  that  are  subject  to  waiver,  release,  or  where  the  ATO  has  accepted a compromised amount of the liability, with the figure reported being  the  value  of  the  debt  reduction.  Essentially,  the  reports  combine  various  categories of debt relief rather than debts that have not been pursued because  they  are  uneconomical  to  pursue,  or  irrecoverable  at  law,  and  could  be  subsequently re‐raised for collection action. 

5.14 The  non-pursuit  report  was  initially  developed  in  May  2011  by  the  DBL’s  Debt  Reporting  team.  The  aim  of  the  report  was  to  provide  a  more  detailed view of the overall levels of debt not pursued across the ATO, in an  attempt to reconcile the DBL’s Debt Reporting figure with the corresponding  values prepared by ATO Finance for the ATO’s financial statements. 

5.15 The  June  2012  non-pursuit  report  for  2011-12  reflects  that   213 780 non‐pursuit transactions120 were processed during the financial year, 

                                                       119 As noted in Chapter 4, the bulk non-pursuit process has had limited application in the ICP environment since September 2010. 120

Transactions reflect the activity on a taxpayer’s record, not the number of individual taxpayers. For example, a taxpayer may have several accounts: income tax and activity statement accounts, and transactions relate to the activities on these accounts. Reporting by transactions does not readily provide an indication of the number of taxpayers whose debts have been subject to some form of relief.

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

92

and $2613.4 million in collectable debt was ‘written off’. Table 5.1 shows the  reported breakdown of these figures. 

Table 5.1

Reasons for non-pursuit of debt in 2011-12

Reason

June 2012 2011-12

Number of transactions

Value ($m)

Number of transactions

Value ($m)

Irrecoverable 6336 -359.8 49 532 -2445.7

Uneconomical 8250 -41.1 132 493 -764.8

Re-raise/cancel 3589 57.5 31 755 597.1

Total 18 175 -343.5 213 780 -2613.4

Source: ATO debt reporting, Non-pursuit report, June 2012.

The definitions of the terms used in the report are: 

 Irrecoverable: includes debts that were not pursued because they were  assessed as irrecoverable at law, as well as debts that were waived,  released, or a compromised amount had been accepted by the ATO.  Of the $2445.7 million, $10 million was waived and $61 million was  released  under  the  relevant  provisions.  No  separate  data  was  provided for compromised debts;  

 Uneconomical: includes debts that have not been pursued because the  value and circumstances of the debt indicated it was uneconomical to  do so. The debt could, however, be re‐raised at a later date, and so  was not ‘written‐off’ in the commercial use of the term; and  

 Re‐raise / cancel: reflects the value of debts that had previously been  non‐pursued  and  then  subsequently  either:  re‐raised  for  collection  action; or that the non‐pursuit indicator had been incorrectly applied  and was subsequently cancelled, reversing a non‐pursuit transaction  on  the  taxpayer’s  account.  Of  the  31 755 transactions  in  the   re‐raise / cancel category, 28 908 transactions with a value in excess of  $480  million  were  re‐raised  for  collection  action;  and  2847 transactions, with a value of almost $117 million, were cancelled. 

5.16 The format and content of the non‐pursuit report for December 2012  reflects further development in the presentation and level of detail provided in  these reports since they were established in May 2011. The December report  includes: 

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

92

and $2613.4 million in collectable debt was ‘written off’. Table 5.1 shows the  reported breakdown of these figures. 

Table 5.1

Reasons for non-pursuit of debt in 2011-12

Reason

June 2012 2011-12

Number of transactions

Value ($m)

Number of transactions

Value ($m)

Irrecoverable 6336 -359.8 49 532 -2445.7

Uneconomical 8250 -41.1 132 493 -764.8

Re-raise/cancel 3589 57.5 31 755 597.1

Total 18 175 -343.5 213 780 -2613.4

Source: ATO debt reporting, Non-pursuit report, June 2012.

The definitions of the terms used in the report are: 

 Irrecoverable: includes debts that were not pursued because they were  assessed as irrecoverable at law, as well as debts that were waived,  released, or a compromised amount had been accepted by the ATO.  Of the $2445.7 million, $10 million was waived and $61 million was  released  under  the  relevant  provisions.  No  separate  data  was  provided for compromised debts;  

 Uneconomical: includes debts that have not been pursued because the  value and circumstances of the debt indicated it was uneconomical to  do so. The debt could, however, be re‐raised at a later date, and so  was not ‘written‐off’ in the commercial use of the term; and  

 Re‐raise / cancel: reflects the value of debts that had previously been  non‐pursued  and  then  subsequently  either:  re‐raised  for  collection  action; or that the non‐pursuit indicator had been incorrectly applied  and was subsequently cancelled, reversing a non‐pursuit transaction  on  the  taxpayer’s  account.  Of  the  31 755 transactions  in  the   re‐raise / cancel category, 28 908 transactions with a value in excess of  $480  million  were  re‐raised  for  collection  action;  and  2847 transactions, with a value of almost $117 million, were cancelled. 

5.16 The format and content of the non‐pursuit report for December 2012  reflects further development in the presentation and level of detail provided in  these reports since they were established in May 2011. The December report  includes: 

Reporting of Debt Relief Arrangements

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

93

 a more accurate net figure for debts that were uneconomical to pursue  and irrecoverable at law;  

 differentiating non‐pursuit, release and waiver for each of the systems; 

 the split between manual and bulk processes; and 

 inclusion of graphs for comparison to prior years. 

5.17 The December 2012 report also included an adjustment made to the  June 2011 report, for 2010-11, removing one very large debt relief item to align  with ATO Finance’s figures for that year. Further proposed developments to  the report include initiating coverage of GIC and penalty remissions. 

Hardship capability reports

5.18 Hardship  capability  reports  were  established  in  2009,  and  produced  from data maintained in standalone databases by the DHC team. The reports  provide information on the number and value of cases where taxpayers have  submitted a claim for release or waiver of their tax debt, or have been referred  to the specialist team for assessment of financial hardship. The report fulfils its  role as a work management tool.  

GIC remission report

5.19 As previously noted, the DBL does not report on the value of GIC and  penalty remissions. While ATO Finance prepares some reports on GIC, this  reporting  is  at  an  aggregated  level  as  the  ATO’s  systems  do  not  capture  detailed data about the various methods for remitting GIC.121 

5.20 The ATO advised that the purpose of the Finance reports is to provide  readily available information for use by the ATO executive when they face  parliamentary or external scrutiny, such as in Senate Estimates hearings, rather  than for use in ongoing management.  

Reconciliation of the general interest charge

5.21 While  the  DBL’s  Debt  Reporting  team  does  not  undertake  any  GIC  reporting, the team participates in a monthly reconciliation process between  the  GIC  data  from  the  financial  reporting  system  and  the  ATO’s  business 

                                                       121 These methods include: in the monthly system runs to cancel small amounts of GIC; following a decision by the ATO or an external collection agency; or if the GIC has been cancelled when the primary debt has been subject to full or partial

relief.

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

94

systems.  ATO  Finance  uses  various  systems  for  these  GIC  reconciliation  process:  

 for GIC transactions occurring in the legacy systems, a daily national  reconciliation  report  that  captures  the  year‐to‐date  GIC  transaction  dollar amounts; and 

 for GIC transactions occurring in the ICP system, the GIC figures are  accessed  via  the  ATO  enterprise  reporting  portal  from  the  data  warehouse. 

5.22 ATO Finance matches these monthly transaction amounts recorded in  the legacy and ICP systems against the aggregate monthly GIC journal entries  in  the  financial  management  system.  The  GIC  reconciliation  process  is  to  ensure that the GIC figures reported from its financial system accurately reflect  the actual GIC transactions recorded in the business systems.  

5.23 The  ANAO  examined  the  reconciliation  process  applied  for  three  months—July,  August  and  September  2012,  and  found  that  the  GIC  reconciliation  process  provides  a  useful  control  of  the  value  of  GIC  transactions.  Additionally,  the  ANAO  financial  statement  audit  for  2011-12  concluded that the value of GIC reported in the ATO’s financial statements is  free from material error. 

Debt holdings and flow summary report

5.24 The new debt reporting framework is designed to provide a weekly  summary report of the value of debt holdings at the start and end of the week,  and  debt  in‐flow  and  out‐flow,  including  debts  resolved  by  collection  or  reduction  (debt  relief).  The  report  also  provides  information  on  debt  reductions by categories.122  

5.25 The  reporting  capability  attributes  each  debt  outcome  to  the  work  undertaken in areas across the DBL (firmer action, strategic recovery, and early  collections), and other business lines that contribute to debt management (for  example, the Customer Service and Solutions business line), providing better  visibility of the results achieved by any particular debt collection strategy or  initiative. As at April 2013, the framework has been substantially developed,  with remaining components scheduled for delivery at the end of May 2013. 

                                                       122 The categories are: non-pursuit (uneconomical to pursue and irrecoverable at law); GIC remission; GIC adjustment (that aligns the effective date of the remission decision with the actual amount in the taxpayer’s record); penalty remission;

interest on overpayment; compromise; and waiver.

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

94

systems.  ATO  Finance  uses  various  systems  for  these  GIC  reconciliation  process:  

 for GIC transactions occurring in the legacy systems, a daily national  reconciliation  report  that  captures  the  year‐to‐date  GIC  transaction  dollar amounts; and 

 for GIC transactions occurring in the ICP system, the GIC figures are  accessed  via  the  ATO  enterprise  reporting  portal  from  the  data  warehouse. 

5.22 ATO Finance matches these monthly transaction amounts recorded in  the legacy and ICP systems against the aggregate monthly GIC journal entries  in  the  financial  management  system.  The  GIC  reconciliation  process  is  to  ensure that the GIC figures reported from its financial system accurately reflect  the actual GIC transactions recorded in the business systems.  

5.23 The  ANAO  examined  the  reconciliation  process  applied  for  three  months—July,  August  and  September  2012,  and  found  that  the  GIC  reconciliation  process  provides  a  useful  control  of  the  value  of  GIC  transactions.  Additionally,  the  ANAO  financial  statement  audit  for  2011-12  concluded that the value of GIC reported in the ATO’s financial statements is  free from material error. 

Debt holdings and flow summary report

5.24 The new debt reporting framework is designed to provide a weekly  summary report of the value of debt holdings at the start and end of the week,  and  debt  in‐flow  and  out‐flow,  including  debts  resolved  by  collection  or  reduction  (debt  relief).  The  report  also  provides  information  on  debt  reductions by categories.122  

5.25 The  reporting  capability  attributes  each  debt  outcome  to  the  work  undertaken in areas across the DBL (firmer action, strategic recovery, and early  collections), and other business lines that contribute to debt management (for  example, the Customer Service and Solutions business line), providing better  visibility of the results achieved by any particular debt collection strategy or  initiative. As at April 2013, the framework has been substantially developed,  with remaining components scheduled for delivery at the end of May 2013. 

                                                       122 The categories are: non-pursuit (uneconomical to pursue and irrecoverable at law); GIC remission; GIC adjustment (that aligns the effective date of the remission decision with the actual amount in the taxpayer’s record); penalty remission;

interest on overpayment; compromise; and waiver.

Reporting of Debt Relief Arrangements

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

95

5.26 Further refinements are dependent on system changes, for example (as  previously noted) data for compromised debt cases is not available from the  ATO’s  business  systems,  and  data  is  still  sourced  from  the  DHC  team’s  standalone systems.123  

5.27 The  scope  for  further  enhancements  has  been  endorsed  by  the  DBL  Executive  and  the  Debt  Enterprise  Reporting  Program  of  Work  Steering  Committee, but is subject to other priorities across the ATO. The proposal: 

 enables enterprise reporting methodologies to be applied in the legacy  systems, whereby a debt can be identified before an actual debt case is  created in both systems, allowing the reporting of total debt holdings as  well as debt holdings under management; and  

 designing  the  new  reporting  framework  (based  on  the  enterprise  reporting  architectural  principle)  to  be  more  fully  integrated  within  existing business systems. 

5.28 The  ATO  advised  that  when  fully  developed  the  new  reporting  framework will assist in debt management, including by:  

 identifying an accurate population of overdue tax liabilities in the form  of an annual debt inventory built on weekly rather than monthly debt  flow events, capturing a more accurate picture of debt flow; 

 quantifying  financial  outcomes  attributable  to  broad  collection  strategies, by business group and program;  

 clearly  quantifying  year‐to‐date  revenue  collected  or  reduced,  including debt relief sub categories; and  

 measuring debt inflow and outflow by consistent categories of stock,  new and additional assessments, providing better intelligence on the  age of debts collected or reduced.  

5.29 The newly developed debt flow report and recent developments in the  non‐pursuit report will provide the ATO with more detailed information on  debt management, and increase the reporting capacity for debt relief in other  reports. 

                                                       123 Consequently, this new report also combines the reporting of compromised debt and non-pursuit categories under ‘non-pursuit’.

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

96

External reporting of debt relief 5.30 As  previously  noted,  aspects  of  debt  relief  are  reported  in  the  Commissioner  of  Taxation’s  annual  reports  and  accompanying  financial  statements,  and  may  be  included  in  other  documents—for  example,  in  response  to  a  request  for  information  at  Senate  Estimate  committees  or  to  support an ATO funding proposal. As at March 2013, the extent to which the  new debt flow report can support the ATO’s external reporting has not been  fully  determined  and,  as  previously  noted,  other  system  constraints  may  continue to impact on the ATO’s debt reporting capacity. 

5.31 The  ANAO  reviewed  the  information  in  the  ATO’s  management  reports, and in the annual report and the financial statements for the: value of  debt  the  ATO  had  not  pursued,  or  written‐off;  and  the  value  of  GIC  remissions, in the reporting period 2011-12. 

Reported value of debt not pursued or written-off

5.32 The ATO’s reported value of debt not pursued, or written‐off, for the  period 2011-12 includes: 

 the non‐pursuit report reflected a year‐to‐date total of $2613 million in  non‐pursued debt, that did not include the value of penalty and interest  charge remission expenses; 

 the annual report included that the ATO had written‐off $2.6 billion of  debt124,  with  GIC  and  penalty  remission  of  $2034  million  reported  separately125; 

 the  financial  statements  included  that  the  ATO  had  written‐down  $6115 million  in  debt:  $4081  million  from  impairment  on  taxation  receivables and $2034 million in penalty and interest charge remission  expenses.126 

5.33 The data reflects some variations in reporting, relating to the value of  non‐pursued debt and the inclusion, or not, of GIC and penalty remissions.  The variations in reporting of non‐pursued debt mainly relate to: accounting 

                                                       124 Commissioner of Taxation, Annual Report, 2011-12, p. 59. 125

ibid., p. 44. 126 ibid, financial statements, note 18C, p. 264.

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

96

External reporting of debt relief 5.30 As  previously  noted,  aspects  of  debt  relief  are  reported  in  the  Commissioner  of  Taxation’s  annual  reports  and  accompanying  financial  statements,  and  may  be  included  in  other  documents—for  example,  in  response  to  a  request  for  information  at  Senate  Estimate  committees  or  to  support an ATO funding proposal. As at March 2013, the extent to which the  new debt flow report can support the ATO’s external reporting has not been  fully  determined  and,  as  previously  noted,  other  system  constraints  may  continue to impact on the ATO’s debt reporting capacity. 

5.31 The  ANAO  reviewed  the  information  in  the  ATO’s  management  reports, and in the annual report and the financial statements for the: value of  debt  the  ATO  had  not  pursued,  or  written‐off;  and  the  value  of  GIC  remissions, in the reporting period 2011-12. 

Reported value of debt not pursued or written-off

5.32 The ATO’s reported value of debt not pursued, or written‐off, for the  period 2011-12 includes: 

 the non‐pursuit report reflected a year‐to‐date total of $2613 million in  non‐pursued debt, that did not include the value of penalty and interest  charge remission expenses; 

 the annual report included that the ATO had written‐off $2.6 billion of  debt124,  with  GIC  and  penalty  remission  of  $2034  million  reported  separately125; 

 the  financial  statements  included  that  the  ATO  had  written‐down  $6115 million  in  debt:  $4081  million  from  impairment  on  taxation  receivables and $2034 million in penalty and interest charge remission  expenses.126 

5.33 The data reflects some variations in reporting, relating to the value of  non‐pursued debt and the inclusion, or not, of GIC and penalty remissions.  The variations in reporting of non‐pursued debt mainly relate to: accounting 

                                                       124 Commissioner of Taxation, Annual Report, 2011-12, p. 59. 125

ibid., p. 44. 126 ibid, financial statements, note 18C, p. 264.

Reporting of Debt Relief Arrangements

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

97

treatments in the ATO’s financial statements127; and some rounding differences  in the annual reports. While the variations can be explained, the effect is to  reduce  the  transparency  of  the  value  of  debt  that  the  ATO  decides  not  to  collect.  

Reported value of GIC remissions

5.34 GIC data is reported in the Commissioner of Taxation’s annual reports  (including in financial statements that present the combined value of GIC and  penalty remissions), and the ATO Finance GIC management reports. The value  of GIC imposed and remitted in the ATO’s annual reports for 2011-12 and in  ATO Finance reports for the same period is set out in Table 5.2. 

Table 5.2

GIC reported in annual reports and ATO Finance reports, 2011-12

GIC

Annual report ($ million)

ATO Finance reports ($ million)

GIC posted / imposed 4782 4901

GIC remitted 1643 1712

Source: ATO.

5.35 After  allowing  for  rounding,  the  data  reflects  variances  between  the  figures  including  a  difference  of  $69  million  in  the  value  of  GIC  remitted  (approximately 4 per cent).  

Conclusion 5.36 The  ATO  developed  a  new  debt  reporting  framework  in  2012-13,  primarily to meet the reporting requirements associated with the additional  program funding allocated in the 2012-13 Budget. The framework provides the  DBL with improved management information on the value and ‘flow’ of debts,  including for the categories of debt relief. Previously, the focus of reporting  had  been  on  debt  collection,  with  the  ATO  advising  that  reporting  of  debt 

                                                      

127  The figure in the financial statements is made of two elements:

(1) the net movement in the Impairment Allowance Account for taxation receivables, which represents changes in the current year for the amount of estimated bad and doubtful debts ; and

(2)   the actual value of GIC and penalty remissions.

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

98

relief had traditionally been regarded as a lower priority and undertaken on an  ad hoc basis. 

5.37 The first full report under the new framework, the debt flow weekly  summary report, was produced in April 2013. The ATO now produces four  reports that provide information on debt relief—the other reports being the  non‐pursuit report, the hardship capability report, and a report on the value of  general interest and penalty charges imposed and remitted each month. These  reports provide high‐level data on some but not all aspects of debt relief, and  will complement the more detailed information provided in the new report.  Refinements to the four debt reports depend on the ATO further developing its  ICT systems. These changes would address issues that currently constrain the  debt  reporting  capability,  including  that  data  must  be  sourced  from  the  standalone systems used by the Debt Hardship Capability team. 

5.38 There  is  limited  public  reporting  of  debt  relief  arrangements  in  the  Commissioner  of  Taxation’s  annual  reports  and  accompanying  financial  statements. Reporting would be strengthened by the consolidated presentation  of all debt relief arrangements, shown by category, and by the ATO ceasing to  use the terms ‘non‐pursuit’ and ‘write‐off’ interchangeably. These terms do not  accurately distinguish between those debts the ATO has chosen not to pursue  but can re‐raise at a later date (non‐pursuit) and those it had decided not to  recover (write‐off). 

Ian McPhee 

Auditor‐General 

Canberra ACT 

25 June 2013 

 

 

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

98

relief had traditionally been regarded as a lower priority and undertaken on an  ad hoc basis. 

5.37 The first full report under the new framework, the debt flow weekly  summary report, was produced in April 2013. The ATO now produces four  reports that provide information on debt relief—the other reports being the  non‐pursuit report, the hardship capability report, and a report on the value of  general interest and penalty charges imposed and remitted each month. These  reports provide high‐level data on some but not all aspects of debt relief, and  will complement the more detailed information provided in the new report.  Refinements to the four debt reports depend on the ATO further developing its  ICT systems. These changes would address issues that currently constrain the  debt  reporting  capability,  including  that  data  must  be  sourced  from  the  standalone systems used by the Debt Hardship Capability team. 

5.38 There  is  limited  public  reporting  of  debt  relief  arrangements  in  the  Commissioner  of  Taxation’s  annual  reports  and  accompanying  financial  statements. Reporting would be strengthened by the consolidated presentation  of all debt relief arrangements, shown by category, and by the ATO ceasing to  use the terms ‘non‐pursuit’ and ‘write‐off’ interchangeably. These terms do not  accurately distinguish between those debts the ATO has chosen not to pursue  but can re‐raise at a later date (non‐pursuit) and those it had decided not to  recover (write‐off). 

Ian McPhee 

Auditor‐General 

Canberra ACT 

25 June 2013 

 

 

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

99

Appendices

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

100

Appendix 1: Agency response

 

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

100

Appendix 1: Agency response

 

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

101

Index

Compromise, 28, 57-60 

Debt  ATO holdings, 25-26  definition, 24 

Debt case assessment, 48-49  compromise, 57-60  delegations, 56  GIC remission, 61-63  non‐pursuit, 60-61  release, 51-57  timeliness, 56  waiver, 49-51  Debt Quality Management System 

(DQMS), 66-68  Debt relief  applications, 31  taxpayer guidance, 38-40 

types, 27-30  Decision review  Administrative Appeals Tribunal, 70-72  appeals, 69 

independent review, 68  objections, 70-71 

Financial Counsellors Australia (FCA), 40- 41 

G  GIC remission, 29-30, 61-63, 86-87 

Information and Communication  Technology (ICT)  debt case reconciliation, 85‐86  debt management systems, 76-79  Integrated Quality Framework (IQF), 63-66 

Non‐pursuit, 29, 60-61 

Release, 28, 51-57  Reporting  external, 97-98  financial statements, 91 

management reports, 92-96  transaction codes, 91  Re‐raise  process, 83-84 

triggers, 83 

Staff training, 44-46 

W  Waiver, 27-28, 49-51 

 

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

102

Series Titles

ANAO Audit Report No.1 2012-13  Administration of the Renewable Energy Demonstration Program  Department of Resources, Energy and Tourism 

ANAO Audit Report No.2 2012-13  Administration of the Regional Backbone Blackspots Program  Department of Broadband, Communications and the Digital Economy 

ANAO Audit Report No.3 2012-13  The Design and Conduct of the First Application Round for the Regional Development  Australia Fund  Department of Regional Australia, Local Government, Arts and Sport 

ANAO Audit Report No.4 2012-13  Confidentiality in Government Contracts: Senate Order for Departmental and Agency  Contracts (Calendar Year 2011 Compliance)  Across Agencies 

ANAO Audit Report No.5 2012-13  Management of Australia’s Air Combat Capability—F/A‐18 Hornet and Super  Hornet Fleet Upgrades and Sustainment  Department of Defence  Defence Materiel Organisation 

ANAO Audit Report No.6 2012-13  Management of Australia’s Air Combat Capability—F‐35A Joint Strike Fighter  Acquisition   Department of Defence  Defence Materiel Organisation 

ANAO Audit Report No.7 2012-13  Improving Access to Child Care—the Community Support Program  Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations 

ANAO Audit Report No.8 2012-13  Australian Government Coordination Arrangements for Indigenous Programs  Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs 

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

102

Series Titles

ANAO Audit Report No.1 2012-13  Administration of the Renewable Energy Demonstration Program  Department of Resources, Energy and Tourism 

ANAO Audit Report No.2 2012-13  Administration of the Regional Backbone Blackspots Program  Department of Broadband, Communications and the Digital Economy 

ANAO Audit Report No.3 2012-13  The Design and Conduct of the First Application Round for the Regional Development  Australia Fund  Department of Regional Australia, Local Government, Arts and Sport 

ANAO Audit Report No.4 2012-13  Confidentiality in Government Contracts: Senate Order for Departmental and Agency  Contracts (Calendar Year 2011 Compliance)  Across Agencies 

ANAO Audit Report No.5 2012-13  Management of Australia’s Air Combat Capability—F/A‐18 Hornet and Super  Hornet Fleet Upgrades and Sustainment  Department of Defence  Defence Materiel Organisation 

ANAO Audit Report No.6 2012-13  Management of Australia’s Air Combat Capability—F‐35A Joint Strike Fighter  Acquisition   Department of Defence  Defence Materiel Organisation 

ANAO Audit Report No.7 2012-13  Improving Access to Child Care—the Community Support Program  Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations 

ANAO Audit Report No.8 2012-13  Australian Government Coordination Arrangements for Indigenous Programs  Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs 

Series Titles

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

103

ANAO Audit Report No.9 2012-13  Delivery of Bereavement and Family Support Services through the Defence  Community Organisation  Department of Defence  Department of Veterans’ Affairs 

ANAO Audit Report No.10 2012-13  Managing Aged Care Complaints  Department of Health and Ageing 

ANAO Audit Report No.11 2012-13  Establishment, Implementation and Administration of the Quarantined Heritage  Component of the Local Jobs Stream of the Jobs Fund  Department of Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population and  Communities 

ANAO Audit Report No.12 2012-13  Administration of Commonwealth Responsibilities under the National Partnership  Agreement on Preventive Health  Australian National Preventive Health Agency  Department of Health and Ageing 

ANAO Audit Report No.13 2012-13  The Provision of Policing Services to the Australian Capital Territory  Australian Federal Police 

ANAO Audit Report No.14 2012-13  Delivery of Workplace Relations Services by the Office of the Fair Work Ombudsman  Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations  Office of the Fair Work Ombudsman 

ANAO Audit Report No.15 2012-13  2011-12 Major Projects Report   Defence Materiel Organisation 

ANAO Audit Report No.16 2012-13  Audits of the Financial Statements of Australian Government Entities for the Period  Ended 30 June 2011  Across Agencies 

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

104

ANAO Audit Report No.17 2012-13  Design and Implementation of the Energy Efficiency Information Grants Program  Department of Climate Change and Energy Efficiency 

ANAO Audit Report No.18 2012-13  Family Support Program: Communities for Children  Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs 

ANAO Audit Report No.19 2012-13  Administration of New Income Management in the Northern Territory  Department of Human Services 

ANAO Audit Report No.20 2012-13  Administration of the Domestic Fishing Compliance Program  Australian Fisheries Management Authority 

ANAO Audit Report No.21 2012-13  Individual Management Services Provided to People in Immigration Detention  Department of Immigration and Citizenship 

ANAO Audit Report No.22 2012-13  Administration of the Tasmanian Forests Intergovernmental Contractors Voluntary  Exit Grants Program  Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry 

ANAO Audit Report No.23 2012-13  The Australian Government Reconstruction Inspectorate’s Conduct of Value for  Money Reviews of Flood Reconstruction Projects in Victoria  Department of Regional Australia, Local Government, Arts and Sport 

ANAO Audit Report No.24 2012-13  The Preparation and Delivery of the Natural Disaster Recovery Work Plans for  Queensland and Victoria  Department of Regional Australia, Local Government, Arts and Sport 

ANAO Audit Report No.25 2012-13  Defence’s Implementation of Audit Recommendations  Department of Defence 

   

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

104

ANAO Audit Report No.17 2012-13  Design and Implementation of the Energy Efficiency Information Grants Program  Department of Climate Change and Energy Efficiency 

ANAO Audit Report No.18 2012-13  Family Support Program: Communities for Children  Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs 

ANAO Audit Report No.19 2012-13  Administration of New Income Management in the Northern Territory  Department of Human Services 

ANAO Audit Report No.20 2012-13  Administration of the Domestic Fishing Compliance Program  Australian Fisheries Management Authority 

ANAO Audit Report No.21 2012-13  Individual Management Services Provided to People in Immigration Detention  Department of Immigration and Citizenship 

ANAO Audit Report No.22 2012-13  Administration of the Tasmanian Forests Intergovernmental Contractors Voluntary  Exit Grants Program  Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry 

ANAO Audit Report No.23 2012-13  The Australian Government Reconstruction Inspectorate’s Conduct of Value for  Money Reviews of Flood Reconstruction Projects in Victoria  Department of Regional Australia, Local Government, Arts and Sport 

ANAO Audit Report No.24 2012-13  The Preparation and Delivery of the Natural Disaster Recovery Work Plans for  Queensland and Victoria  Department of Regional Australia, Local Government, Arts and Sport 

ANAO Audit Report No.25 2012-13  Defence’s Implementation of Audit Recommendations  Department of Defence 

   

Series Titles

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

105

ANAO Audit Report No.26 2012-13  Remediation of the Lightweight Torpedo Replacement Project  Department of Defence; Defence Material Organisation 

ANAO Audit Report No.27 2012-13  Administration of the Research Block Grants Program  Department of Industry, Innovation, Climate Change, Science, Research and  Tertiary Education 

ANAO Report No.28 2012-13  The Australian Government Performance Measurement and Reporting Framework:  Pilot Project to Audit Key Performance Indicators  Across Agencies 

ANAO Audit Report No.29 2012-13  Administration of the Veterans’ Children Education Schemes  Department of Veterans’ Affairs 

ANAO Audit Report No.30 2012-13  Management of Detained Goods  Australian Customs and Border Protection Service 

ANAO Audit Report No.31 2012-13  Implementation of the National Partnership Agreement on Homelessness  Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs 

ANAO Audit Report No.32 2012-13  Grants for the Construction of the Adelaide Desalination Plant  Department of Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population and  Communities  Department of Finance and Deregulation  Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet 

ANAO Audit Report No.33 2012-13  The Regulation of Tax Practitioners by the Tax Practitioners Board  Tax Practitioners Board  Australian Taxation Office 

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

106

ANAO Audit Report No.34 2012-13  Preparation of the Tax Expenditures Statement  Department of the Treasury  Australian Taxation Office 

ANAO Audit Report No.35 2012-13  Control of Credit Card Use  Australian Trade Commission  Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet  Geoscience Australia 

ANAO Audit Report No.36 2012-13  Commonwealth Environmental Water Activities  Department of Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population and  Communities 

ANAO Audit Report No.37 2012-13  Administration of Grants from the Education Investment Fund  Department of Industry, Innovation, Climate Change, Science, Research and  Tertiary Education 

ANAO Audit Report No.38 2012-13  Indigenous Early Childhood Development: Children and Family Centres  Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations 

ANAO Audit Report No.39 2012-13  AusAID’s Management of Infrastructure Aid to Indonesia  Australian Agency for International Development (AusAID) 

ANAO Audit Report No. 40 2012-13  Recovery of Centrelink Payment Debts by External Collection Agencies  Department of Human Services 

ANAO Audit Report No.41 2012-13  The Award of Grants Under the Supported Accommodation Innovation Fund  Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs 

ANAO Audit Report No.42 2012-13  Co‐location of the Department of Human Services’ Shopfronts  Department of Human Services 

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

106

ANAO Audit Report No.34 2012-13  Preparation of the Tax Expenditures Statement  Department of the Treasury  Australian Taxation Office 

ANAO Audit Report No.35 2012-13  Control of Credit Card Use  Australian Trade Commission  Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet  Geoscience Australia 

ANAO Audit Report No.36 2012-13  Commonwealth Environmental Water Activities  Department of Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population and  Communities 

ANAO Audit Report No.37 2012-13  Administration of Grants from the Education Investment Fund  Department of Industry, Innovation, Climate Change, Science, Research and  Tertiary Education 

ANAO Audit Report No.38 2012-13  Indigenous Early Childhood Development: Children and Family Centres  Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations 

ANAO Audit Report No.39 2012-13  AusAID’s Management of Infrastructure Aid to Indonesia  Australian Agency for International Development (AusAID) 

ANAO Audit Report No. 40 2012-13  Recovery of Centrelink Payment Debts by External Collection Agencies  Department of Human Services 

ANAO Audit Report No.41 2012-13  The Award of Grants Under the Supported Accommodation Innovation Fund  Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs 

ANAO Audit Report No.42 2012-13  Co‐location of the Department of Human Services’ Shopfronts  Department of Human Services 

Series Titles

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

107

ANAO Audit Report No.43 2012-13  Establishment, Implementation and Administration of the General Component of the  Local Jobs Stream of the Jobs Fund  Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations 

ANAO Audit Report No. 44 2012-13  Management and Reporting of Goods and Services Tax and Fringe Benefits Tax  Information  Australian Taxation Office 

ANAO Audit Report No. 45 2012-13  Cross‐Agency Coordination of Employment Programs  Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations  Department of Human Services 

ANAO Audit Report No. 46 2012-13  Compensating F‐111 Fuel Tank Workers  Department of Veterans’ Affairs  Department of Defence 

ANAO Audit Report No. 47 2012-13  AUSTRAC’s Administration of its Financial Intelligence Function  Australian Transaction Reports and Analysis Centre 

ANAO Audit Report No.48 2012-13  Management of the Targeted Community Care (Mental Health) Program  Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs 

ANAO Audit Report No.49 2012-13  Interim Phase of the Audits of the Financial Statements of Major General Government  Sector Agencies for the year ending 30 June 2013  Across Agencies 

ANAO Audit Report No.50 2012-13  Administration of the GP Super Clinics Program  Department of Health and Ageing 

ANAO Audit Report No.51 2012-13  Management of the Australian Taxation Office’s Property Portfolio  Australian Taxation Office 

ANAO Audit Report No.52 2012-13 Management of Debt Relief Arrangements

108

Current Better Practice Guides

The following Better Practice Guides are available on the ANAO website. 

 

Preparation of Financial Statements by Public Sector Entities  Jun 2013 

Human  Resource  Management  Information  Systems  -  Risks  and Controls  Jun 2013 

Public Sector Internal Audit  Sept 2012 

Public Sector Environmental Management  Apr 2012 

Developing  and  Managing  Contracts  -  Getting  the  right  outcome, achieving value for money  Feb 2012 

Public Sector Audit Committees  Aug 2011 

Fraud Control in Australian Government Entities  Mar 2011 

Strategic  and  Operational  Management  of  Assets  by  Public  Sector  Entities  -  Delivering  agreed  outcomes  through  an  efficient and optimal asset base 

Sept 2010 

Implementing Better Practice Grants Administration  Jun 2010 

Planning and Approving Projects - an Executive Perspective  Jun 2010 

Innovation in the Public Sector - Enabling Better Performance,  Driving New Directions  Dec 2009 

SAP ECC 6.0 - Security and Control  Jun 2009 

Business Continuity Management - Building resilience in public  sector entities  Jun 2009 

Developing and Managing Internal Budgets  Jun 2008 

Agency Management of Parliamentary Workflow  May 2008 

Fairness and Transparency in Purchasing Decisions - Probity in  Australian Government Procurement  Aug 2007 

Administering Regulation  Mar 2007 

Implementation  of  Program  and  Policy  Initiatives  -  Making  implementation matter  Oct 2006