Note: Where available, the PDF/Word icon below is provided to view the complete and fully formatted document
Australian National Audit Office Report by Independent Auditor Quality control around financial statements audits June 2013


Download PDF Download PDF

Quality Control Around Financial Statements Audits

Australian National Audit Office

Report by the Independent Auditor

June 2013

2 Quality Control Around Financial Statements Audits

 

       

© Commonwealth of Australia 2013

ISBN 0 642 81353 1 (Print)  ISBN 0 642 81354 X (On‐line) 

Except for the content in this document supplied by third parties, the Australian National Audit Office logo, the Commonwealth Coat of Arms, and any material protected by a trade mark, this document is licensed by the

Australian National Audit Office for use under the terms of a

Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 3.0 Australia licence. To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/au/

You are free to copy and communicate the document in its current form for non-commercial purposes, as long as you attribute the document to the Australian National Audit Office and abide by the other licence terms. You may not alter or adapt the work in any way.

Permission to use material for which the copyright is owned by a third party must be sought from the relevant copyright owner. As far as practicable, such material will be clearly labelled.

For terms of use of the Commonwealth Coat of Arms, visit It’s an Honour at http://www.itsanhonour.gov.au/coat-arms/index.cfm.

Requests and inquiries concerning reproduction and rights should be addressed to:

Executive Director Corporate Management Branch Australian National Audit Office 19 National Circuit BARTON ACT 2600

Or via email: webmaster@anao.gov.au

2 Quality Control Around Financial Statements Audits

 

       

© Commonwealth of Australia 2013

ISBN 0 642 81353 1 (Print)  ISBN 0 642 81354 X (On‐line) 

Except for the content in this document supplied by third parties, the Australian National Audit Office logo, the Commonwealth Coat of Arms, and any material protected by a trade mark, this document is licensed by the

Australian National Audit Office for use under the terms of a

Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 3.0 Australia licence. To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/au/

You are free to copy and communicate the document in its current form for non-commercial purposes, as long as you attribute the document to the Australian National Audit Office and abide by the other licence terms. You may not alter or adapt the work in any way.

Permission to use material for which the copyright is owned by a third party must be sought from the relevant copyright owner. As far as practicable, such material will be clearly labelled.

For terms of use of the Commonwealth Coat of Arms, visit It’s an Honour at http://www.itsanhonour.gov.au/coat-arms/index.cfm.

Requests and inquiries concerning reproduction and rights should be addressed to:

Executive Director Corporate Management Branch Australian National Audit Office 19 National Circuit BARTON ACT 2600

Or via email: webmaster@anao.gov.au

Quality Control Around Financial Statements Audits 3

19 June 2013

Dear Mr President Dear Madam Speaker

I have undertaken a performance audit of the Australian National Audit Office, in accordance with the authority contained in the Auditor-General Act 1997.

I present the report of this audit to the Parliament. The report is titled Australian National Audit Office Performance Audit: Quality Control Around Financial Statements Audits.

Following its presentation and receipt, the report will be placed on the Australian National Audit Office’s Homepage—http://www.anao.gov.au.

Yours sincerely

Geoff Wilson Independent Auditor Appointed under Section 41 of The Auditor-General Act 1997

Quality Control Around Financial Statements Audits 5

Contents Abbreviations ............................................................................................................. 7 

Summary .................................................................................................................. 11 

Introduction ................................................................................................................ 11 

Background to the performance audit ........................................................................ 11 

Audit objective ........................................................................................................... 12 

Conclusion ................................................................................................................. 13 

Summary of considerations ....................................................................................... 13 

ANAO response ......................................................................................................... 14 

1.  Introduction .................................................................................................... 17 

Background ............................................................................................................... 17 

This Performance Audit ............................................................................................. 18 

Report structure ......................................................................................................... 21 

2.  Leadership responsibilities for quality control ........................................... 23 

ASQC 1 Requirements .............................................................................................. 23 

Audit Procedures ....................................................................................................... 23 

ANAO Implementation ............................................................................................... 24 

Considerations ........................................................................................................... 27 

Conclusion ................................................................................................................. 27 

3.  Relevant ethical requirements ...................................................................... 28 

ASQC 1 Requirements .............................................................................................. 28 

Audit Procedures ....................................................................................................... 31 

ANAO Implementation ............................................................................................... 31 

Considerations ........................................................................................................... 38 

Conclusion ................................................................................................................. 40 

4.  Human resources .......................................................................................... 41 

ASQC 1 Requirement ................................................................................................ 41 

Audit Procedures ....................................................................................................... 41 

ANAO Implementation ............................................................................................... 42 

Considerations ........................................................................................................... 53 

Conclusion ................................................................................................................. 53 

5.  Engagement performance............................................................................. 54 

ASQC 1 Requirements .............................................................................................. 54 

Audit Procedures ....................................................................................................... 57 

ANAO Implementation ............................................................................................... 57 

Considerations ........................................................................................................... 69 

Conclusion ................................................................................................................. 69 

6 Quality Control Around Financial Statements Audits

6.  Monitoring ...................................................................................................... 70 

ASQC 1 Requirement ................................................................................................ 70 

Audit Procedures ....................................................................................................... 72 

ANAO implementation ............................................................................................... 72 

Considerations ........................................................................................................... 76 

Conclusion ................................................................................................................. 77 

Appendix 1:  ANAO’s response to the proposed report .................................. 80 

Appendix 2:  Key ANAO documents and external references ........................ 81 

6 Quality Control Around Financial Statements Audits

6.  Monitoring ...................................................................................................... 70 

ASQC 1 Requirement ................................................................................................ 70 

Audit Procedures ....................................................................................................... 72 

ANAO implementation ............................................................................................... 72 

Considerations ........................................................................................................... 76 

Conclusion ................................................................................................................. 77 

Appendix 1:  ANAO’s response to the proposed report .................................. 80 

Appendix 2:  Key ANAO documents and external references ........................ 81 

Quality Control Around Financial Statements Audits 7

Abbreviations

AASG Assurance Audit Services Group

the Act Auditor-General Act 1997

ANAO Australian National Audit Office

APS Australian Public Service

ASAE Australian Standard on Assurance Engagements

BPG Better Practice Guide

Changepoint Project management and time recording system

CFO Chief Financial Officer

CMB Corporate Management Branch

EBOM Executive Board of Management

E-hive Document management system

ED Executive Director

EL Executive Level

FTE Full Time Equivalent

GED Group Executive Director for AASG

IT Information Technology

JCPAA Joint Committee of Public Accounts and Audit

KPI Key Performance Indicator

KRA Key Result Area

L&D Learning and Development

PAAM AASG Policy, Audit and Administration Manual

8 Quality Control Around Financial Statements Audits

PASG Performance Audit Services Group

PSB Professional Services Branch

SES Senior Executive Staff

Quality Control Around Financial Statements Audits 9

Summary

Quality Control Around Financial Statements Audits 9

Summary

Quality Control Around Financial Statements Audits 11

Summary

Introduction 1. The  Australian  National  Audit  Office  (ANAO)  assists  the  Auditor‐ General  to  provide  an  independent  view  of  the  performance  and  financial  management of Australian Government entities. The Auditor‐General Act 1997  (the Act) sets out the Auditor‐General’s functions, mandate and powers. The  Act establishes an independent relationship between the Auditor‐General and  the Australian Parliament. 

2. The  Independent  Auditor  of  the  ANAO  has  led  and  undertaken  a  performance  audit  of  quality  control  around  financial  statements  audits  performed by the ANAO.1 

Background to the performance audit 3. The Auditor‐General Ian McPhee stated that ‘the  pursuit of quality in  audit work is a constant journey for all auditors and all audit organisations’ in a  presentation  to  the  5th  Symposium  of  Supreme  Audit  Institutions  on  2 March 2012. 

4. Legislation  requires  the  Auditor‐General  to  set  standards  for  the  conduct of audits by the ANAO. The Auditor‐General has adopted standards  published  by  the  Australian  Auditing  and  Assurance  Standards  Board  (AUASB)  and  the  Accounting  Professional  and  Ethical  Standards  Board  (APESB).  

5. The AUASB has issued ASQC 1 Quality Control for Firms that Perform  Audits and Reviews of Financial Reports and Other Financial Information, and Other  Assurance Engagements. ASCQ 1 deals with auditing firms’ responsibilities for  their system of quality control for audits and reviews of financial reports, other  financial information and other assurance engagements.  

6. The  ANAO  has  established  a  system  of  quality  control  designed  to  support and monitor quality in the conduct of financial statements audits (the  Quality Assurance Framework). 

1 Refer to Chapter 1, paragraphs 1.9 to 1.11 for more information on the Independent Auditor.

12 Quality Control Around Financial Statements Audits

Audit objective 7. The objective of the performance audit is to provide an assessment as to  whether the Quality Assurance Framework established and maintained by the  ANAO is consistent with the requirements of the applicable quality control  and ethical standards issued by the ANAO, the AUASB and the APESB, in  respect  to  financial  statements  audits  conducted  by  the  Assurance  Audit  Services Group (AASG) of the ANAO.  

8. This Quality Assurance Framework is designed to support: 

i. financial statements audits to comply with the applicable standards issued  by the AUASB, APESB and the Auditor‐General under section 24 of the  Auditor‐General Act 1997; and  

i. ANAO  personnel  to  comply  with  relevant  ethical,  legal  and  regulatory  requirements. 

9. The assessment included quality control as designed and maintained at  the  policy  framework  level  by  the  Professional  Services  Branch  (PSB),  conducted  at  the  engagement  level  by  AASG,  and  oversighted  by  the  Executive  Board  of  Management  (EBOM).  This  assessment  considered  the  requirements and guidance contained in the following standards: 

i. ASQC1  Quality  Control  for  Firms  that  Perform  Audits  and  Reviews  of  Financial  Reports  and  Other  Financial  Information,  and  Other  Assurance  Engagements issued by the AUASB; 

ii. ASA 220 Quality Control for Audits of Historical Financial Information issued  by the AUASB;  

iii. APES 110 Code of Ethics for Professional Accountants issued by the APESB;  and 

iv. APES 320 Quality Control for Firms issued by the APESB.  

10. Consistent with ASQC1, the performance audit has been structured to  consider the policies and procedures established and maintained to address  each of the following: 

i. Leadership responsibilities with respect to quality control; 

ii. Compliance with relevant ethical, legal and regulatory requirements; 

iii. Human resources (including the competence, capabilities and commitment  to ethical principles of personnel); 

Summary

Quality Control Around Financial Statements Audits 13

iv. Engagement  performance  (including  matters  relevant  to  promoting  consistency in the quality in the performance of financial statements audits,  supervision responsibilities and review responsibilities); and  

v. Monitoring of compliance with established policies and procedures. 

Conclusion 11. As  at  the  date  of  this  report,  the  Quality  Assurance  Framework  established and implemented by the ANAO in respect of financial statements  audits is consistent with the relevant requirements of ASQC1 Quality Control  for Firms that Perform Audits and Reviews of Financial Reports and Other Financial  Information, and Other Assurance Engagements.  

12. Overall the ANAO, through the AASG, the PSB, and the EBOM, has  demonstrated a strong commitment to the establishment and implementation  of  an  effective  Quality  Assurance  Framework  to  support  the  conduct  of  financial statements audits. This commitment is evident through review of the  policies, procedures and resources that have been designed and implemented,  as  well  as  being  reinforced  through  discussions  with  the  Auditor‐General,  Deputy Auditor‐General, Group Executive Directors, SES Officers and staff of  the AASG and PSB. 

Summary of considerations 13. This  performance  audit  has  identified  four  considerations  for  the  ANAO to consider to potentially enhance the Quality Assurance Framework.  The  inclusion  of  the  considerations  does  not  detract  from  the  overall  conclusion provided. The considerations relate to: 

i. Maintaining a central register of potential or actual threats to independence  identified in applying the ANAO policy framework in financial statements  audits and discussions amongst the Signing Officers. The register would be  available  for  review  by  the  Auditor‐General,  the  GEDs  and/or  relevant  governance committees; 

ii. Supplementing the existing annual independence and ethical confirmations  completed for each financial statements audit by audit team members with  an  additional  specific  reference  to  compliance  with  the  ANAO’s  independence and ethical requirements policies in respect of all financial  statements audits performed by ANAO staff; 

12 Quality Control Around Financial Statements Audits

Audit objective 7. The objective of the performance audit is to provide an assessment as to  whether the Quality Assurance Framework established and maintained by the  ANAO is consistent with the requirements of the applicable quality control  and ethical standards issued by the ANAO, the AUASB and the APESB, in  respect  to  financial  statements  audits  conducted  by  the  Assurance  Audit  Services Group (AASG) of the ANAO.  

8. This Quality Assurance Framework is designed to support: 

i. financial statements audits to comply with the applicable standards issued  by the AUASB, APESB and the Auditor‐General under section 24 of the  Auditor‐General Act 1997; and  

i. ANAO  personnel  to  comply  with  relevant  ethical,  legal  and  regulatory  requirements. 

9. The assessment included quality control as designed and maintained at  the  policy  framework  level  by  the  Professional  Services  Branch  (PSB),  conducted  at  the  engagement  level  by  AASG,  and  oversighted  by  the  Executive  Board  of  Management  (EBOM).  This  assessment  considered  the  requirements and guidance contained in the following standards: 

i. ASQC1  Quality  Control  for  Firms  that  Perform  Audits  and  Reviews  of  Financial  Reports  and  Other  Financial  Information,  and  Other  Assurance  Engagements issued by the AUASB; 

ii. ASA 220 Quality Control for Audits of Historical Financial Information issued  by the AUASB;  

iii. APES 110 Code of Ethics for Professional Accountants issued by the APESB;  and 

iv. APES 320 Quality Control for Firms issued by the APESB.  

10. Consistent with ASQC1, the performance audit has been structured to  consider the policies and procedures established and maintained to address  each of the following: 

i. Leadership responsibilities with respect to quality control; 

ii. Compliance with relevant ethical, legal and regulatory requirements; 

iii. Human resources (including the competence, capabilities and commitment  to ethical principles of personnel); 

Summary

Quality Control Around Financial Statements Audits 13

iv. Engagement  performance  (including  matters  relevant  to  promoting  consistency in the quality in the performance of financial statements audits,  supervision responsibilities and review responsibilities); and  

v. Monitoring of compliance with established policies and procedures. 

Conclusion 11. As  at  the  date  of  this  report,  the  Quality  Assurance  Framework  established and implemented by the ANAO in respect of financial statements  audits is consistent with the relevant requirements of ASQC1 Quality Control  for Firms that Perform Audits and Reviews of Financial Reports and Other Financial  Information, and Other Assurance Engagements.  

12. Overall the ANAO, through the AASG, the PSB, and the EBOM, has  demonstrated a strong commitment to the establishment and implementation  of  an  effective  Quality  Assurance  Framework  to  support  the  conduct  of  financial statements audits. This commitment is evident through review of the  policies, procedures and resources that have been designed and implemented,  as  well  as  being  reinforced  through  discussions  with  the  Auditor‐General,  Deputy Auditor‐General, Group Executive Directors, SES Officers and staff of  the AASG and PSB. 

Summary of considerations 13. This  performance  audit  has  identified  four  considerations  for  the  ANAO to consider to potentially enhance the Quality Assurance Framework.  The  inclusion  of  the  considerations  does  not  detract  from  the  overall  conclusion provided. The considerations relate to: 

i. Maintaining a central register of potential or actual threats to independence  identified in applying the ANAO policy framework in financial statements  audits and discussions amongst the Signing Officers. The register would be  available  for  review  by  the  Auditor‐General,  the  GEDs  and/or  relevant  governance committees; 

ii. Supplementing the existing annual independence and ethical confirmations  completed for each financial statements audit by audit team members with  an  additional  specific  reference  to  compliance  with  the  ANAO’s  independence and ethical requirements policies in respect of all financial  statements audits performed by ANAO staff; 

14 Quality Control Around Financial Statements Audits

iii. Following the audit cycle, completion of a self assessment questionnaire by  Executive Directors in respect of the performance of their audits against  key aspects of the ANAO Quality Assurance Framework. This information  could provide additional input into the overall AASG Transparency Report  to EBOM; and 

iv. Enhancing the reporting of the annual inspection program to provide an  overall  rating  for  each  audit  reviewed  and  enhance  the  policy  guidance  relating  to  the  potential  consequences  that  may  result  from  reviews  of  completed audit files. 

ANAO response 14. The proposed report was given to the ANAO for formal comment. The  ANAO provided the following summary response, with its full response at  Appendix 1. 

The ANAO places a high degree of importance on the quality of our audit and  the  overarching  quality  control  framework.  We  have  made  a  significant  investment  in  the  training  of  our  staff  and  the  supporting  systems  and  processes so that we are able to deliver quality audits in an efficient manner. 

Against  that  background,  this  performance  audit  conducted  by  the  Independent Auditor of the ANAO is timely. We welcome the conclusion that  our system of quality control over financial audits is sound. We are supportive  of the four considerations identified as potential enhancements to our quality  framework, with action on one consideration completed, and the balance to be  finalised in the 2013-14 financial year. 

 

 

14 Quality Control Around Financial Statements Audits

iii. Following the audit cycle, completion of a self assessment questionnaire by  Executive Directors in respect of the performance of their audits against  key aspects of the ANAO Quality Assurance Framework. This information  could provide additional input into the overall AASG Transparency Report  to EBOM; and 

iv. Enhancing the reporting of the annual inspection program to provide an  overall  rating  for  each  audit  reviewed  and  enhance  the  policy  guidance  relating  to  the  potential  consequences  that  may  result  from  reviews  of  completed audit files. 

ANAO response 14. The proposed report was given to the ANAO for formal comment. The  ANAO provided the following summary response, with its full response at  Appendix 1. 

The ANAO places a high degree of importance on the quality of our audit and  the  overarching  quality  control  framework.  We  have  made  a  significant  investment  in  the  training  of  our  staff  and  the  supporting  systems  and  processes so that we are able to deliver quality audits in an efficient manner. 

Against  that  background,  this  performance  audit  conducted  by  the  Independent Auditor of the ANAO is timely. We welcome the conclusion that  our system of quality control over financial audits is sound. We are supportive  of the four considerations identified as potential enhancements to our quality  framework, with action on one consideration completed, and the balance to be  finalised in the 2013-14 financial year. 

 

 

Quality Control Around Financial Statements Audits 15

Audit Conclusions and Considerations

Quality Control Around Financial Statements Audits 17

1. Introduction

This chapter provides background to the Quality Assurance Framework for financial  statements audits conducted by the ANAO. It also outlines the objectives, scope and  methodology for this performance audit. 

Background 1.1 The  primary  client  of  the  ANAO  is  the  Australian  Parliament.  The  ANAO’s  main  point  of  contact  with  Parliament  is  the  Joint  Committee  of  Public  Accounts  and  Audit  (JCPAA),  although  interaction  does  occur  with  other  parliamentary  committees  and  parliamentarians  to  support  parliamentary  priorities, public administration matters and the outcomes of  audits. 

1.2 The ANAO’s role is to provide Parliament with independent assurance  of public sector financial reporting, public administration and accountability.  These  functions  are  operationally  delivered  through  the  Assurance  Audit  Services Group (AASG) and the Performance Audit Services Group (PASG).  The two audit groups are supported by the Professional Services Branch (PSB)  and  the  Corporate  Management  Branch  (CMB).  The  PSB  provide  the  overarching  quality  assurance  framework  and  technical  assistance,  and  the  CMB provide practice management related services.  

1.3 The  ANAO’s  audits  of  financial  statements  assist  Australian  Government  entities  to  fulfil  their  annual  accountability  obligations  under  either  the  Financial  Management  and  Accountability  Act  1997  (FMA  Act),  the  Commonwealth Authorities and Companies Act 1997 (CAC Act) or the Corporations  Act 2001.2 

1.4 Each year Australian Government entities must publish their financial  statements,  accompanied  by  an  audit  report  pursuant  to  legislative  requirements,  in  their  annual  reports.  In  accordance  with  the  legislative  requirements,  the  ANAO  audits  the  financial  statements  and  expresses  an  opinion on whether the financial statements: 

 have  been  prepared  in  accordance  with  the  Government’s  financial  reporting framework; and  

2 The Auditor-General Annual Report 2011-12.

18 Quality Control Around Financial Statements Audits

 give a true and fair view (in accordance with Australian Accounting  Standards) of the entity’s financial position, financial performance and  cash flows.3 

1.5 The ANAO, through the AASG, performs the independent audits of the  financial  statements  of  all  Australian  Government  controlled  entities.  In   2011-12, the AASG performed 261 financial statements audit engagements. 

1.6 The  AASG,  undertakes  the  financial  statements  audits  either  using  ANAO  staff,  or  through  project‐managed  arrangements  with  private  sector  audit  firms.  For  all  audits,  a  Signing  Officer  is  assigned  and  has  overall  responsibility for the audit and the signing of the auditor’s report. 

1.7 Of the 261 financial statements audit engagements, 92 were performed  using ANAO staff and 169 audits were project‐managed where, oversighted by  an ANAO Signing Officer, a private sector audit firm is engaged to undertake  the  audit.  As  outlined  in  paragraphs  5.24  and  5.25,  AASG  applies  guiding  principles  to  determine  which  audits  will  be  performed  by  ANAO  staff.  AASG’s core skill set is auditing the General Government Sector, particularly  departments of state, regulatory bodies and security entities. 

1.8 In  2011-12,  the  audits  performed  by  AASG  staff  consisted  of  over  85 per cent of both the General Government Sector and whole of government  income and expenses. 

This Performance Audit The Independent Auditor

1.9 Mr  Geoff  Wilson,  the  Independent  Auditor  for  the  ANAO,  has  undertaken this performance audit. Mr Geoff Wilson is the Chief Executive  Officer of KPMG Australia and has been a partner of the firm since 1990. 

1.10 Mr Geoff Wilson, was assisted in the conduct of the performance audit  by Mr Julian Bishop and Ms Jessica Regueiro. Mr Julian Bishop is a partner of  KPMG Australia and leads KPMG’s Audit Quality group. Ms Jessica Regueiro  is a senior audit manager in KPMG’s audit group. 

1.11 Pursuant  to  Schedule  24  of  the  Auditor‐General  Act  1997,  the  Independent  Auditor  is  appointed  by  the  Governor‐General  for  a  term  of 

3 The Auditor-General Annual Report 2011-12. 4 Schedule 2, Section 1 of the Auditor-General Act 1997.

18 Quality Control Around Financial Statements Audits

 give a true and fair view (in accordance with Australian Accounting  Standards) of the entity’s financial position, financial performance and  cash flows.3 

1.5 The ANAO, through the AASG, performs the independent audits of the  financial  statements  of  all  Australian  Government  controlled  entities.  In   2011-12, the AASG performed 261 financial statements audit engagements. 

1.6 The  AASG,  undertakes  the  financial  statements  audits  either  using  ANAO  staff,  or  through  project‐managed  arrangements  with  private  sector  audit  firms.  For  all  audits,  a  Signing  Officer  is  assigned  and  has  overall  responsibility for the audit and the signing of the auditor’s report. 

1.7 Of the 261 financial statements audit engagements, 92 were performed  using ANAO staff and 169 audits were project‐managed where, oversighted by  an ANAO Signing Officer, a private sector audit firm is engaged to undertake  the  audit.  As  outlined  in  paragraphs  5.24  and  5.25,  AASG  applies  guiding  principles  to  determine  which  audits  will  be  performed  by  ANAO  staff.  AASG’s core skill set is auditing the General Government Sector, particularly  departments of state, regulatory bodies and security entities. 

1.8 In  2011-12,  the  audits  performed  by  AASG  staff  consisted  of  over  85 per cent of both the General Government Sector and whole of government  income and expenses. 

This Performance Audit The Independent Auditor

1.9 Mr  Geoff  Wilson,  the  Independent  Auditor  for  the  ANAO,  has  undertaken this performance audit. Mr Geoff Wilson is the Chief Executive  Officer of KPMG Australia and has been a partner of the firm since 1990. 

1.10 Mr Geoff Wilson, was assisted in the conduct of the performance audit  by Mr Julian Bishop and Ms Jessica Regueiro. Mr Julian Bishop is a partner of  KPMG Australia and leads KPMG’s Audit Quality group. Ms Jessica Regueiro  is a senior audit manager in KPMG’s audit group. 

1.11 Pursuant  to  Schedule  24  of  the  Auditor‐General  Act  1997,  the  Independent  Auditor  is  appointed  by  the  Governor‐General  for  a  term  of 

3 The Auditor-General Annual Report 2011-12. 4 Schedule 2, Section 1 of the Auditor-General Act 1997.

Introduction

Quality Control Around Financial Statements Audits 19

three years and not more than five years. Mr. Geoff Wilson was appointed as  the Independent Auditor of the ANAO on 24 April 2009. 

Audit objective

1.12 The objective of the performance audit is to provide an assessment as to  whether the Quality Assurance Framework established and maintained by the  ANAO is consistent with the requirements of the applicable quality control  and ethical standards issued by the ANAO, the AUASB and the APESB, in  respect to financial statements audits conducted by the AASG. 

Audit scope

1.13 The scope of this performance audit was developed after consultation  with  key  stakeholders  and  consideration  of  the  requirements  for  the  development of a framework of quality control for financial statements audits. 

1.14 Key  stakeholders  interviewed  or  otherwise  involved  in  the  scoping  process are outlined below in paragraph 1.17. 

1.15 The performance audit did not encompass: 

 evaluation  of  the  appropriateness  of  individual  financial  statements  audit  reports  issued  by  the  ANAO.  The  performance  audit  did  not  extend to inspection of individual audit files; 

 acceptance  and  continuance  of  client  relationships  and  specific  engagements5; and 

 quality  control  around  assurance  engagements  other  than  financial  statements audits. 

Audit methodology

1.16 This performance audit was conducted in accordance with Australian  Auditing and Assurance Standard ASAE 3500 Performance Engagements6 and  examined:  

 Leadership responsibilities with respect to quality control; 

5 The Auditor-General is mandated to audit the financial statements of Australian Government agencies by the Financial Management and Accountability Act 1997, and the financial statements of Commonwealth Authorities, Commonwealth companies and their respective subsidiaries by the Commonwealth

Authorities and Companies Act 1997. 6 Standard on Assurance Engagements ASAE 3500 Performance Engagements (July 2008) issued by the Auditing and Assurance Standards Board.

20 Quality Control Around Financial Statements Audits

 Compliance with relevant ethical, legal and regulatory requirements; 

 Human  resources  (including  the  competence,  capabilities  and  commitment to ethical principles of personnel); 

 Engagement  performance  (including  matters  relevant  to  promoting  consistency in the quality in the performance of financial statements  audits, supervision responsibilities and review responsibilities); and  

 Monitoring of compliance with established policies and procedures. 

1.17 During the course of the performance audit, interviews were held with  the: 

 Auditor‐General and Deputy Auditor‐General; 

 ANAO Audit Committee; 

 Secretary of the JCPAA; 

 AASG Group Executive Directors; 

 Executive Directors of the AASG; 

 Executive Director and staff of the PSB;  

 Executive Director of the CMB; and 

 AASG  audit  managers  and  staff  responsible  for  financial  statements  audits.  

1.18 The focus of the interviews and the review of key documentation were  to: 

 understand the ANAO’s Quality Assurance Framework established for  financial statements audits; and 

 obtain evidence to support the assessment of consistency of the Quality  Assurance  Framework  with  ASQC  1  Quality  Control  for  Firms  that  Perform  Audits  and  Reviews  of  Financial  Reports  and  Other  Financial  Information, and Other Assurance Engagements.  

20 Quality Control Around Financial Statements Audits

 Compliance with relevant ethical, legal and regulatory requirements; 

 Human  resources  (including  the  competence,  capabilities  and  commitment to ethical principles of personnel); 

 Engagement  performance  (including  matters  relevant  to  promoting  consistency in the quality in the performance of financial statements  audits, supervision responsibilities and review responsibilities); and  

 Monitoring of compliance with established policies and procedures. 

1.17 During the course of the performance audit, interviews were held with  the: 

 Auditor‐General and Deputy Auditor‐General; 

 ANAO Audit Committee; 

 Secretary of the JCPAA; 

 AASG Group Executive Directors; 

 Executive Directors of the AASG; 

 Executive Director and staff of the PSB;  

 Executive Director of the CMB; and 

 AASG  audit  managers  and  staff  responsible  for  financial  statements  audits.  

1.18 The focus of the interviews and the review of key documentation were  to: 

 understand the ANAO’s Quality Assurance Framework established for  financial statements audits; and 

 obtain evidence to support the assessment of consistency of the Quality  Assurance  Framework  with  ASQC  1  Quality  Control  for  Firms  that  Perform  Audits  and  Reviews  of  Financial  Reports  and  Other  Financial  Information, and Other Assurance Engagements.  

Introduction

Quality Control Around Financial Statements Audits 21

Report structure 1.19 This audit report is structured as follows: 

Chapter 2 Leadership responsibilities for quality control

Examines the: 

 Policies and procedures established and designed to  promote an internal culture recognising that quality  is  essential  in  performing  financial  statements  audits; 

 Individuals  or  groups  assigned  ultimate  responsibility  for  the  ANAO’s  Quality  Assurance  Framework; and 

 Policies and procedures established to ensure those  individuals  or  bodies  assigned  with  operational  responsibility  have  sufficient  and  appropriate  experience and ability, and the necessary authority  to assume that responsibility.  

Chapter 3 Relevant ethical requirements

Examines the policies and procedures designed to: 

 Provide the ANAO with reasonable assurance that  its  personnel  comply  with  relevant  ethical  requirements;  

 Communicate  independence  requirements  to  its  personnel; and  

 Identify  and  evaluate  circumstances  and  relationships  that  create  threats  to  independence,  and  to  take  appropriate  action  to  eliminate  those  threats or reduce them to an acceptable level.  

22 Quality Control Around Financial Statements Audits

Chapter 4 Human resources

Examines  the  policies  and  procedures  designed  to  provide the ANAO with reasonable assurance that it has  sufficient  personnel  with  the  competence,  capabilities  and commitment to ethical principals necessary to: 

 Perform  financial  statements  audits  in  accordance  with Auditing Standards set by the Auditor‐General  that must be complied with by persons performing  an audit in accordance with the requirements of the  Auditor‐General  Act  1997,  relevant  ethical  requirements  and  applicable  legal  and  regulatory  requirements; and  

 Enable  the  ANAO  to  issue  audit  reports  that  are  appropriate in the circumstances.  

Chapter 5 Engagement performance

Examines  the  policies  and  procedures  to  determine  whether they include: 

 Matters  relevant  to  promoting  consistency  in  the  quality of engagement performance; 

 Supervision responsibilities; and 

 Review responsibilities.  

Chapter 6 Monitoring

Examines the monitoring processes designed to provide  the ANAO with reasonable assurance that the policies  and  procedures  established  by  the  Quality  Assurance  Framework,  are  relevant,  adequate  and  operating  effectively. 

22 Quality Control Around Financial Statements Audits

Chapter 4 Human resources

Examines  the  policies  and  procedures  designed  to  provide the ANAO with reasonable assurance that it has  sufficient  personnel  with  the  competence,  capabilities  and commitment to ethical principals necessary to: 

 Perform  financial  statements  audits  in  accordance  with Auditing Standards set by the Auditor‐General  that must be complied with by persons performing  an audit in accordance with the requirements of the  Auditor‐General  Act  1997,  relevant  ethical  requirements  and  applicable  legal  and  regulatory  requirements; and  

 Enable  the  ANAO  to  issue  audit  reports  that  are  appropriate in the circumstances.  

Chapter 5 Engagement performance

Examines  the  policies  and  procedures  to  determine  whether they include: 

 Matters  relevant  to  promoting  consistency  in  the  quality of engagement performance; 

 Supervision responsibilities; and 

 Review responsibilities.  

Chapter 6 Monitoring

Examines the monitoring processes designed to provide  the ANAO with reasonable assurance that the policies  and  procedures  established  by  the  Quality  Assurance  Framework,  are  relevant,  adequate  and  operating  effectively. 

Quality Control Around Financial Statements Audits 23

2. Leadership responsibilities for quality control

ASQC 1 Requirements

2.1 The firm shall establish policies and procedures designed to promote  an  internal  culture  recognising  that  quality  is  essential  in  performing  engagements.  Such  policies  and  procedures  shall  require  the  firm’s  Chief  Executive  Officer  (or  equivalent)  or,  if  appropriate,  the  firm’s  managing  board of partners (or equivalent) to assume ultimate responsibility for the  firm’s systems of quality control. 

2.2 The firm shall establish policies and procedures such that any person  assigned operational responsibility for the firm’s system of quality control  by  the  firm’s  chief  executive  officer  or  managing  board  of  partners  has  sufficient  and  appropriate  experience  and  ability,  and  the  necessary  authority, to assume that responsibility. 

ANAO Context

2.3 The  definition  of  a  firm  is  an  entity  of  assurance  practitioners  and  ASQC  1  states  that  the  term  should  be  read  as  referring  to  a  public  sector  equivalent  where  relevant.  One  public  sector  equivalent  is  the  ANAO.  The  Auditor‐General Act 1997 establishes the ANAO and states that the function of  the  ANAO  is  to  assist  the  Auditor‐General  in  performing  the  Auditor‐ General’s functions. The Auditor‐General Act 1997 states that the functions of  the Auditor‐General include the auditing of financial statements. Accordingly,  references to the firm should be read as referring to the ANAO.  

2.4 In  the  ANAO,  the  Chief  Executive  Officer  is  the  Auditor‐General.  References to the Chief Executive Officer should be read as referring to the  Auditor‐General. The ANAO does not have a statutory board of directors, it  has an Executive Board of Management (EBOM) that performs an advisory  function in support of the Auditor‐General. 

Audit Procedures 2.5 Interviews  with  regards  to  leadership  responsibilities  for  quality  control were conducted with the: 

 Auditor‐General and Deputy Auditor‐General; 

24 Quality Control Around Financial Statements Audits

 AASG Group Executive Directors (GEDs) ; 

 Executive Directors in the AASG; and 

 APS staff in the AASG  

2.6      Key documentation as detailed in Appendix Two was reviewed. 

2.7      The focus of the interviews and review of key documentation were to: 

 identify  and  consider  the  appropriateness  of  the  individuals  with  ultimate  and  operational  responsibility  for  the  Quality  Assurance  Framework and communication of this responsibility to the AASG; and 

 identify and assess the appropriateness of the policies and procedures  established in relation to leadership responsibilities within the Quality  Assurance Framework. 

ANAO Implementation Leadership responsibility for quality control

2.8 The  Auditor‐General  Act 1997 establishes the  position of the  Auditor‐ General for the Commonwealth as an Independent Officer of the Parliament. 

2.9 The  Auditor‐General  Act  1997  Division  1,  states  that  the  Auditor‐ General’s functions include auditing financial statements of Commonwealth  agencies, authorities and companies and their subsidiaries.  

2.10 Division 5 of the Auditor‐General Act 1997 provides that the Auditor‐ General  must  set  auditing  standards  that  are  to  be  observed  by  persons  performing the audits. Under the Auditor‐General Act 1997 the ANAO has been  established to assist the Auditor‐General in performing the Auditor‐General’s  functions. ANAO staff are employed under the Public Service Act 1999. 

2.11 The ANAO has established a Quality Assurance Framework designed  to provide reasonable assurance that audits performed by the ANAO comply  with  applicable  professional  standards  and  relevant  regulatory  and  legal  requirements  and  that  audit  reports  issued  are  appropriate  in  the  circumstances.  

2.12 The Quality Assurance Framework describes how the ANAO meets the  requirements of APES 320 Quality Control for Firms and ASQC 1 Quality Control  for Firms that perform Audits and Reviews of Financial Reports and Other Financial  Information  and  Other  Assurance  Engagements.  The  Quality  Assurance  Framework  states  the  Auditor‐General  has  ultimate  responsibility  for  the  quality control of audits conducted by the ANAO. 

24 Quality Control Around Financial Statements Audits

 AASG Group Executive Directors (GEDs) ; 

 Executive Directors in the AASG; and 

 APS staff in the AASG  

2.6      Key documentation as detailed in Appendix Two was reviewed. 

2.7      The focus of the interviews and review of key documentation were to: 

 identify  and  consider  the  appropriateness  of  the  individuals  with  ultimate  and  operational  responsibility  for  the  Quality  Assurance  Framework and communication of this responsibility to the AASG; and 

 identify and assess the appropriateness of the policies and procedures  established in relation to leadership responsibilities within the Quality  Assurance Framework. 

ANAO Implementation Leadership responsibility for quality control

2.8 The  Auditor‐General  Act 1997 establishes the  position of the  Auditor‐ General for the Commonwealth as an Independent Officer of the Parliament. 

2.9 The  Auditor‐General  Act  1997  Division  1,  states  that  the  Auditor‐ General’s functions include auditing financial statements of Commonwealth  agencies, authorities and companies and their subsidiaries.  

2.10 Division 5 of the Auditor‐General Act 1997 provides that the Auditor‐ General  must  set  auditing  standards  that  are  to  be  observed  by  persons  performing the audits. Under the Auditor‐General Act 1997 the ANAO has been  established to assist the Auditor‐General in performing the Auditor‐General’s  functions. ANAO staff are employed under the Public Service Act 1999. 

2.11 The ANAO has established a Quality Assurance Framework designed  to provide reasonable assurance that audits performed by the ANAO comply  with  applicable  professional  standards  and  relevant  regulatory  and  legal  requirements  and  that  audit  reports  issued  are  appropriate  in  the  circumstances.  

2.12 The Quality Assurance Framework describes how the ANAO meets the  requirements of APES 320 Quality Control for Firms and ASQC 1 Quality Control  for Firms that perform Audits and Reviews of Financial Reports and Other Financial  Information  and  Other  Assurance  Engagements.  The  Quality  Assurance  Framework  states  the  Auditor‐General  has  ultimate  responsibility  for  the  quality control of audits conducted by the ANAO. 

Leadership responsibilities for quality control

Quality Control Around Financial Statements Audits 25

Operational responsibility for quality control

2.13 The Quality Control Framework states that organisationally the Deputy  Auditor‐General  carries  responsibility  for  ensuring  the  system  of  quality  control satisfies the requirements of applicable standards and is assisted by the  Group Executive Directors (GEDs) in fulfilling this responsibility. 

2.14 Within  the  ANAO,  the  PSB  is  responsible  for  establishing  and  maintaining the Quality Assurance Framework. This framework includes the  overarching  financial  statements  audit  policy  framework,  the  financial  statements audit methodology and the quality monitoring program over all  financial statements audit engagements. 

2.15 The  GEDs  are  Senior  Executive  Service  Band  2  Officers.  The  requirements  for  ensuring  the  SES  Officers  have  sufficient  and  appropriate  experience  and  ability  is  mandated  in  the  Public  Service  Commissioner’s  Directions  Act  1999.  The  Public  Service  Commissioner’s  Directions  Act  1999  chapter  6  paragraph  6.1(2)  states  that  an  Agency  Head  must  put  in  place  measures to ensure that SES Officers are effectively deployed in the Agency  and to monitor the skills required for SES Officer positions in the Agency. 

2.16 The GEDs operationally report to the Deputy Auditor‐General and also  engage  with  the  Auditor‐General  as  needed  in  relation  to  specific  audit  matters. The GEDs are responsible for the delivery of services to the required  quality within the AASG. 

2.17 There are currently three GEDs in the AASG. The GEDs are members of  the  Executive  Board  of  Management  (EBOM).  The  EBOM  is  chaired  by  the  Auditor‐General and is responsible for setting and monitoring the ANAO’s  strategic  direction,  oversight  of  business  opportunities  and  risks,  and  managing the ANAO workforce. The GEDs are also members of the following  committees:  the  ANAO  Audit  Committee,  Information  Strategy  committee,  People  and  Capability  Strategy  committee,  and  the  Qualifications  and  Accounting Policy committee.  

2.18 Executive Directors, who are SES Band 1 Officers, report to the GEDs  and have a delegated responsibility for individual financial statements audits  as Signing Officers. Together with the GEDs they provide a leadership role in  implementing the ANAO’s policies and procedures across the service group  and in the delivery and management of quality audit services. 

2.19 For the purposes of this report, the Signing Officer is the equivalent to  the  engagement  partner under  ASCQ  1. In the ANAO,  a Signing  Officer is 

26 Quality Control Around Financial Statements Audits

primarily either the Auditor‐General, or as delegate, a GED or an Executive  Director. 

2.20 In some instances, a Senior Director, mentored by a GED, may also be a  Signing Officer. Refer to paragraphs 4.15 to 4.17 for further commentary.  

2.21  In  2011-12,  the  Auditor‐General  was  the  Signing  Officer  for  11 Commonwealth entities. To support the Auditor‐General, the Engagement  Executive role has been assigned to a GED or Executive Director. They assist  with  some  of  the  responsibilities  of  the  engagement  partner.  Refer  to  paragraph 4.13 to 4.20 for further commentary. 

Key Communication Forums

2.22 To assist the GEDs in the delivery and management of quality audit  services,  the  AASG  has  established  the  Signing  Officer  Technical  Forum  (SOTF) and the Executive Level Staff forum.  

2.23 The SOTF is attended by all Signing Officers, the IT Audit Executive  Director, the PSB Executive Director and the Audit Methodology Manager.  

2.24 The  SOTF  is  held  fortnightly  and  provides  participants  with  an  opportunity  to  discuss  accounting  and  auditing  issues  relevant  to  the  performance  of  financial  statements  audits  and  to  facilitate  open  and  frank  discussion  on  these  issues.  The  aim  is  to  promote  consistent  application  of  accounting and auditing matters by Signing Officers across AASG. Minutes of  the meetings are prepared and published on the AASG intranet.  

2.25 The Executive Level Staff forum is attended by Senior Directors. Senior  Directors are Executive level 2 staff. This forum is held at least quarterly. The  purpose is to provide an opportunity for discussion of general audit matters as  well as accounting and auditing technical issues. Minutes of the meeting are  prepared and published on the AASG intranet.  

2.26 AASG  is  organised  into  four  audit  groups  along  Australian  Government  portfolio  lines,  an  IT  Audit  group  and  an  Assurance  Projects  Branch.  The  groups  meet  monthly  to  discuss  key  administrative  and  audit  matters. The GEDs, the Executive Director of the PSB and SES Officers use the  meetings as a forum to discuss audit quality, operational messages and other  ANAO issues with all AASG staff. 

Oversight by ANAO Executive

2.27 An annual AASG Business Plan is published and distributed. The plan  details the key messages, initiatives and targets for the financial year. The key  messages for the 2012-2013 year include: 

26 Quality Control Around Financial Statements Audits

primarily either the Auditor‐General, or as delegate, a GED or an Executive  Director. 

2.20 In some instances, a Senior Director, mentored by a GED, may also be a  Signing Officer. Refer to paragraphs 4.15 to 4.17 for further commentary.  

2.21  In  2011-12,  the  Auditor‐General  was  the  Signing  Officer  for  11 Commonwealth entities. To support the Auditor‐General, the Engagement  Executive role has been assigned to a GED or Executive Director. They assist  with  some  of  the  responsibilities  of  the  engagement  partner.  Refer  to  paragraph 4.13 to 4.20 for further commentary. 

Key Communication Forums

2.22 To assist the GEDs in the delivery and management of quality audit  services,  the  AASG  has  established  the  Signing  Officer  Technical  Forum  (SOTF) and the Executive Level Staff forum.  

2.23 The SOTF is attended by all Signing Officers, the IT Audit Executive  Director, the PSB Executive Director and the Audit Methodology Manager.  

2.24 The  SOTF  is  held  fortnightly  and  provides  participants  with  an  opportunity  to  discuss  accounting  and  auditing  issues  relevant  to  the  performance  of  financial  statements  audits  and  to  facilitate  open  and  frank  discussion  on  these  issues.  The  aim  is  to  promote  consistent  application  of  accounting and auditing matters by Signing Officers across AASG. Minutes of  the meetings are prepared and published on the AASG intranet.  

2.25 The Executive Level Staff forum is attended by Senior Directors. Senior  Directors are Executive level 2 staff. This forum is held at least quarterly. The  purpose is to provide an opportunity for discussion of general audit matters as  well as accounting and auditing technical issues. Minutes of the meeting are  prepared and published on the AASG intranet.  

2.26 AASG  is  organised  into  four  audit  groups  along  Australian  Government  portfolio  lines,  an  IT  Audit  group  and  an  Assurance  Projects  Branch.  The  groups  meet  monthly  to  discuss  key  administrative  and  audit  matters. The GEDs, the Executive Director of the PSB and SES Officers use the  meetings as a forum to discuss audit quality, operational messages and other  ANAO issues with all AASG staff. 

Oversight by ANAO Executive

2.27 An annual AASG Business Plan is published and distributed. The plan  details the key messages, initiatives and targets for the financial year. The key  messages for the 2012-2013 year include: 

Leadership responsibilities for quality control

Quality Control Around Financial Statements Audits 27

 AASG’s  continued  commitment  to  providing  quality  financial  statements and assurance services to the Parliament; 

 being a leader in public sector assurance; and  

 being independent and responsive to Parliament and the ANAO’s audit  clients. 

2.28 The  Auditor‐General,  Deputy  Auditor‐General,  the  GEDs  and  the  Executive Director of the Professional Services Branch meet on a weekly basis  to discuss operational matters. Items discussed include audit quality matters,  audit client matters, practice management matters, and oversight of the status  of financial statements audits. To assist in the oversight of AASG’s financial  statements  audits,  the  GEDs  provide  the  Auditor‐General  and  Deputy  Auditor‐General with a weekly ‘Hot Issues’ report that is compiled from an  enterprise wide project management tool (Changepoint) and input from AASG  Engagement Executives.  

2.29 The  AASG  submits  an  annual  AASG  Transparency  Report  to  the  EBOM. The purpose of this report is to document the AASG’s compliance with  the  Quality  Assurance  Framework.  The  2011-2012  transparency  report  discusses  key  aspects  of  the  Quality  Assurance  Framework  and  documents  progress against each.  

Considerations 2.30 No considerations noted. 

Conclusion 2.31 As  at  the  date  of  this  report,  the  activities  and  responsibilities  established  by  the  ANAO’s  Quality  Assurance  Framework  in  relation  to  leadership responsibilities for financial statements audits, are consistent with  the  relevant  requirements  of  ASQC  1  Quality  Control  for  Firms  that  Perform  Audits and Reviews of Financial Reports and Other Financial Information, and Other  Assurance Engagements.  

28 Quality control around financial statements audits

3. Relevant ethical requirements

ASQC 1 Requirements

3.1 The firm shall establish policies and procedures designed to provide  it with reasonable assurance that the firm and its personnel comply with  relevant ethical requirements. The firm is required to comply with relevant  ethical  requirements,  including  those  pertaining  to  independence  when  performing  audits  and  reviews  and  other  assurance  engagements  as  defined  in  ASA  102  Compliance  with  Ethical  Requirements  when  Performing  Audits, Reviews and Other Assurance Engagements. 

3.2 The firm shall establish policies and procedures designed to provide  it  with  reasonable  assurance  that  the  firm,  its  personnel  and,  where  applicable, others subject to independence requirements (including network  firm personnel) maintain independence where required by relevant ethical  requirements,  laws  and  regulations.  Examples  of  independence  requirements that may be applicable are addressed in the Corporations Act  2001 Part 2M.3 Division 3. Such policies and procedures shall enable the  firm to:  

(a) communicate  its  independence  requirements  to  its  personnel  and,  where applicable, others subject to them; and  

(b) identify  and  evaluate  circumstances  and  relationships  that  create  threats to independence, and to take appropriate action to eliminate  those  threats  or  reduce  them  to  an  acceptable  level  by  applying  safeguards  or,  if  considered  appropriate,  to  withdraw  from  the  engagement where withdrawal is possible under applicable law or  regulation. 

3.3 Such policies and procedures shall require:  

(a) engagement partners to provide the firm with relevant information  about client engagements, including the scope of services, to enable  the  firm  to  evaluate  the  overall  impact,  if  any,  on  independence  requirements; and 

(b) personnel  to  promptly  notify  the  firm  of  circumstances  and  relationships that create a threat to independence so that appropriate  action can be taken. 

28 Quality control around financial statements audits

3. Relevant ethical requirements

ASQC 1 Requirements

3.1 The firm shall establish policies and procedures designed to provide  it with reasonable assurance that the firm and its personnel comply with  relevant ethical requirements. The firm is required to comply with relevant  ethical  requirements,  including  those  pertaining  to  independence  when  performing  audits  and  reviews  and  other  assurance  engagements  as  defined  in  ASA  102  Compliance  with  Ethical  Requirements  when  Performing  Audits, Reviews and Other Assurance Engagements. 

3.2 The firm shall establish policies and procedures designed to provide  it  with  reasonable  assurance  that  the  firm,  its  personnel  and,  where  applicable, others subject to independence requirements (including network  firm personnel) maintain independence where required by relevant ethical  requirements,  laws  and  regulations.  Examples  of  independence 

requirements that may be applicable are addressed in the Corporations Act  2001 Part 2M.3 Division 3. Such policies and procedures shall enable the  firm to:  

(a) communicate  its  independence  requirements  to  its  personnel  and,  where applicable, others subject to them; and  

(b) identify  and  evaluate  circumstances  and  relationships  that  create  threats to independence, and to take appropriate action to eliminate  those  threats  or  reduce  them  to  an  acceptable  level  by  applying  safeguards  or,  if  considered  appropriate,  to  withdraw  from  the  engagement where withdrawal is possible under applicable law or  regulation. 

3.3 Such policies and procedures shall require:  

(a) engagement partners to provide the firm with relevant information  about client engagements, including the scope of services, to enable  the  firm  to  evaluate  the  overall  impact,  if  any,  on  independence  requirements; and 

(b) personnel  to  promptly  notify  the  firm  of  circumstances  and  relationships that create a threat to independence so that appropriate  action can be taken. 

Relevant ethical requirements

Quality Control Around Financial Statements Audits 29

(c) the  accumulation  and  communication  of  relevant  information  to  appropriate personnel so that:  

i. the firm and its personnel can readily determine whether they  satisfy independence requirements; 

ii. the  firm  can  maintain  and  update  its  records  relating  to  independence; and 

iii. the firm can take appropriate action regarding identified threats  to independence that are not at an acceptable level.  

3.4 The firm shall establish policies and procedures designed to provide  it with reasonable assurance that it is notified of breaches of independence  requirements, and to enable it to take appropriate actions to resolve such  situations. The policies and procedures shall include requirements for:  

(a) Personnel to promptly notify the firm of independence breaches of  which they become aware; 

(b) The  firm  to  promptly  communicate  identified  breaches  of  these  policies and procedures to: 

iv. The engagement partner who, with the firm, needs to address  the breach; and 

v. Other relevant personnel in the firm and where appropriate, the  network,  and  those  subject  to  the  independence  requirements  who need to take appropriate action; and 

(c) Prompt communication to the firm, if necessary, by the engagement  partner  and  the  other  individuals  referred  to  in  subparagraph  23  (b)(ii) of this Standard, of the actions taken to resolve the matter, so  that the firm can determine whether it should take further action.  

3.5 At  least  annually,  the  firm  shall  obtain  written  confirmation  of  compliance with its policies and procedures on independence from all firm  personnel required to be independent by relevant ethical requirements, and  applicable legal and regulatory requirements.  

30 Quality Control Around Financial Statements Audits

3.6 The firm shall establish policies and procedures:  

(a) Setting out criteria for determining the need for safeguards to reduce  the familiarity threats to an acceptable level when using the same  senior personnel on an assurance engagement over a long period of  time; and  

(b) Requiring, for audits of financial reports of listed entities, the rotation  of  the  engagement  partner  and  the  individuals  responsible  for  engagement  quality  control  review,  and  where  applicable,  others  subject  to  rotation  requirements,  after  a  specified  period  in  compliance with relevant ethical requirements.  

3.7 ASQC 1 states the following with respect to requirements for public  sector entities: 

 Statutory measures may provide safeguards for the independence of  public sector auditors. However, threats to independence may still  exist  regardless  of  any  statutory  measures  designed  to  protect  it.  Therefore, in establishing the policies and procedures required, the  public sector auditor may have regard to the public sector mandate  and address any threats to independence in that context. 

 Listed entities are not common in the public sector. However, there  may be other public sector entities that are significant due to size,  complexity or public interest aspects, and which consequently have a  wide range of stakeholders. Therefore, there may be instances when a  firm determines, based on its quality control policies and procedures,  that a public sector entity is significant for the purposes of expanded  quality control procedures. 

 In the public sector, legislation may establish the appointments and  terms of office of the auditor with engagement partner responsibility.  As  a  result,  it  may  not  be  possible  to  comply  strictly  with  the  engagement  partner  rotation  requirements  envisaged  for  listed  entities. Nonetheless, for public sector entities considered significant,  it may be in the public interest for public sector audit organisations to  establish policies. 

30 Quality Control Around Financial Statements Audits

3.6 The firm shall establish policies and procedures:  

(a) Setting out criteria for determining the need for safeguards to reduce  the familiarity threats to an acceptable level  when using the same  senior personnel on an assurance engagement over a long period of  time; and  

(b) Requiring, for audits of financial reports of listed entities, the rotation  of  the  engagement  partner  and  the  individuals  responsible  for  engagement  quality  control  review,  and  where  applicable,  others  subject  to  rotation  requirements,  after  a  specified  period  in  compliance with relevant ethical requirements.  

3.7 ASQC 1 states the following with respect to requirements for public  sector entities: 

 Statutory measures may provide safeguards for the independence of  public sector auditors. However, threats to independence may still  exist  regardless  of  any  statutory  measures  designed  to  protect  it.  Therefore, in establishing the policies and procedures required, the  public sector auditor may have regard to the public sector mandate  and address any threats to independence in that context. 

 Listed entities are not common in the public sector. However, there  may be other public sector entities that are significant due to size,  complexity or public interest aspects, and which consequently have a  wide range of stakeholders. Therefore, there may be instances when a  firm determines, based on its quality control policies and procedures,  that a public sector entity is significant for the purposes of expanded  quality control procedures. 

 In the public sector, legislation may establish the appointments and  terms of office of the auditor with engagement partner responsibility.  As  a  result,  it  may  not  be  possible  to  comply  strictly  with  the  engagement  partner  rotation  requirements  envisaged  for  listed  entities. Nonetheless, for public sector entities considered significant,  it may be in the public interest for public sector audit organisations to  establish policies. 

Relevant ethical requirements

Quality Control Around Financial Statements Audits 31

Audit Procedures 3.8 Interviews in regards to ethical requirements were conducted with the: 

 Auditor‐General and Deputy Auditor‐General; 

 AASG Group Executive Directors (GEDs); 

 Executive Directors in the AASG;  

 Staff in the AASG; and  

 Executive Director and staff of the Professional Services Branch (PSB). 

3.9 The focus of the interviews and review of key documentation was to  identify ethical and independence mandates of the ANAO and communication  of these requirements to all staff in the AASG.  

3.10 The following documents were reviewed: 

 Key documentation as detailed in Appendix Two; and 

 Relevant ANAO reporting templates.  

3.11 Procedures  performed  included  understanding  and  analysing  the  process for:  

 Managing and monitoring compliance with ethical and independence  requirements by the Engagement Executive, ANAO staff, and ANAO  contractors on financial statements audits; and  

 Implementing safeguards to any identified threat to independence. 

ANAO Implementation Policy designed to provide the ANAO with reasonable assurance that the ANAO and its personnel maintain independence where required by relevant ethical requirements, laws and regulations.

3.12 The Australian Public Service (APS) values and code of conduct are a  broad set of principles mandated in sections 10 and 13 of the Public Service Act  1999. The values and code of conduct is the framework for the behaviour of  APS employees. Under amendments to the Public Service Act 1999, there are  five values, including that the APS has the highest ethical standards.  

3.13 The ANAO has a publication titled A Guide to conduct in the Australian  National Audit Office. The guide puts into practice the APS values and code of  conduct and forms the basis of the independence and ethical requirements for  the ANAO. The guide provides information on the conduct expected of ANAO 

32 Quality Control Around Financial Statements Audits

staff in their performance of their responsibilities, including interactions with  clients,  colleagues  and  other  stakeholders  and  provides  guidance  on  the  application  of  APS  values.  The  guide  is  applicable  to  all  employees  of  the  ANAO.  

3.14 A Guide to conduct in the Australian National Audit Office describes how  the APS values are applied and include:  

 acting with honesty and integrity;  

 acting with care and diligence;  

 treating individuals with respect, courtesy and without harassment;  

 complying with Australian laws and complying with any lawful and  reasonable direction; 

 maintaining  appropriate  confidentiality,  disclosure  and  reasonable  steps to avoid, any conflict of interest in connection with ones work;  

 use of Australian Government resources for a proper purpose;  

 providing  accurate,  evidence  based  information in  response to  work  related request for information; 

 not  making  improper  use  of  inside  information,  status,  power  or  authority in order to gain, or seek to gain, a benefit or advantage for  one’s own advantage; and  

 acting in a way that upholds APS values and complying with conduct  prescribed by regulations.7 

3.15 The guide is supported by the ANAO’s e‐learning module on Values  and  Code  of  Conduct.  Since  the  implementation  of  this  module  in  August 2012, all Engagement Executives have completed the module. 

3.16 The independence policy of the ANAO is documented in the Policy and  Audit Administration Manual (PAAM). The independence policy applies to  staff and contractors working as part of an ANAO financial statements audit  team.  Contractors  working  as  part  of  an  ANAO  audit  team  are  considered  members of the audit team and must meet the independence requirements as  though they were ANAO staff. 

7 Guide to conduct in the Australian National Audit Office.

32 Quality Control Around Financial Statements Audits

staff in their performance of their responsibilities, including interactions with  clients,  colleagues  and  other  stakeholders  and  provides  guidance  on  the  application  of  APS  values.  The  guide  is  applicable  to  all  employees  of  the  ANAO.  

3.14 A Guide to conduct in the Australian National Audit Office describes how  the APS values are applied and include:  

 acting with honesty and integrity;  

 acting with care and diligence;  

 treating individuals with respect, courtesy and without harassment;  

 complying with Australian laws and complying with any lawful and  reasonable direction; 

 maintaining  appropriate  confidentiality,  disclosure  and  reasonable  steps to avoid, any conflict of interest in connection with ones work;  

 use of Australian Government resources for a proper purpose;  

 providing  accurate,  evidence  based  information in  response to  work  related request for information; 

 not  making  improper  use  of  inside  information,  status,  power  or  authority in order to gain, or seek to gain, a benefit or advantage for  one’s own advantage; and  

 acting in a way that upholds APS values and complying with conduct  prescribed by regulations.7 

3.15 The guide is supported by the ANAO’s e‐learning module on Values  and  Code  of  Conduct.  Since  the  implementation  of  this  module  in  August 2012, all Engagement Executives have completed the module. 

3.16 The independence policy of the ANAO is documented in the Policy and  Audit Administration Manual (PAAM). The independence policy applies to  staff and contractors working as part of an ANAO financial statements audit  team.  Contractors  working  as  part  of  an  ANAO  audit  team  are  considered  members of the audit team and must meet the independence requirements as  though they were ANAO staff. 

7 Guide to conduct in the Australian National Audit Office.

Relevant ethical requirements

Quality Control Around Financial Statements Audits 33

3.17 The policy states staff and contractors must have independence of mind  and in appearance and documents five categories of threats to independence  including:  self  interest;  self  review;  advocacy;  familiarity  threats;  and  intimidation threats. The independence policy provides examples of situations  where  threats  to  independence  may  arise  including:  financial  arrangements  with  audit  clients,  personal  or  business  dealings  with  the  audit  client,  employment relationship and involvement in senior manager recruitment for  clients. 

3.18 AASG contracts private sector audit firms to assist in the conduct of  selected audits (project‐managed audits). The Auditor‐General, or his delegate,  continues to exercise the statutory role to sign the auditor’s report for these  project‐managed audits and takes responsibility for the quality of the audit. 

3.19 The ANAO independence policy applies equally to financial statements  audits  performed  by  ANAO  staff  or  conducted  under  project  management  arrangements.  

3.20 The  ANAO  policy  that  governs  the  provision  of  other  services  to  ANAO  audit  clients  is  documented  in  PAAM  40.3.  All  private  sector  audit  firms under project management arrangements are required to apply APES 110  Code of Ethics for Professional Accountants including the need to identify threats,  identify  safeguards  for  all  threats  (other  than  those  that  are  clearly  insignificant) and apply those safeguards. The policy imposes the following  restrictions: 

 Prohibited services: In addition to other services expressly prohibited  by  APES  110  Code  of  Ethics  for  Professional  Accountants,  the  ANAO  prohibits  private  sector  audit  firms  under  project  management  arrangements  from  providing  tax  advice  (strategic  or  planning),  accounting, financial services for entities material to the consolidated  Commonwealth financial statements and internal audit services where  management responsibility is assumed. 

 Other services: All other services requested to be provided by ANAO  contractors must be pre‐approved by the Engagement Executive and be  accompanied  by  formal  documentation  prepared  by  the  ANAO  contractor.  The  documentation  must  detail  the  proposed  service,  proposed fees and a description of the procedures to monitor the other  services.  The  request  must  be  approved  by  the  firm’s  independence  panel or partner. The Engagement Executive is required to document  the other services  proposed, the nature of  the threat, the safeguards 

34 Quality Control Around Financial Statements Audits

considered, consultation undertaken and if the threat can be reduced to  an acceptable level.  

 Fee  parity:  Fee  parity  should  be  maintained  over  the  period  of  a  proposed or existing ANAO contract. If the total value of other services  provided, or to be provided, by the firm exceeds the audit fee the firm  receives  from  the  ANAO,  this  is  considered  to  be  a  potentially  significant  threat  to  the  firm’s  independence.  All  proposed  ‘other  services’ must be discussed with the AASG GEDs. In addition to the  policy  statement,  the  GEDs  have  provided  Engagement  Executives  with  specific  guidance  on  the  policy’s  broad  principles,  additional  consideration  points  to  be  included  in  the  Engagement  Executive  analysis  and  additional  circumstances  where  the  Engagement  Executive should seek approval from the GEDs. 

3.21 Proposed  other  services  to  be  delivered  by  contractors  to  entities  audited by the ANAO must be approved by the ANAO prior to provision of  the service in accordance with the ANAO independence policy. On completion  of project‐managed audits, the engagement partner of the private sector audit  firm is required to provide a representation letter to confirm that the audit  firm: 

 has  complied  with  the  independence  requirement  of  applicable  legislation and APES 110 Code of Ethics for Professional Accountants; 

 has not entered into arrangements for, or provided other services to,  the  audit  client  during  the  year  without  the  written  consent  of  the  ANAO; 

 does not have, or the other services have not given rise to, any conflict  of  interest  or  economic  dependence  which  could  jeopardise  the  independence of the audit firm; and 

 provided an independence declaration under section 307C, if the audit  is undertaken in accordance with the Corporations Act 2001.  

Policy and procedures designed to provide the ANAO with relevant information about client engagements, including the scope of services, to enable the firm to evaluate the overall impact, if any, on independence requirements.

3.22 The Engagement Executive is required to disclose to the audit client’s  audit committee at least annually, the nature of any other services provided by  an ANAO contractor to the audit client and the fees paid or payable for those  services.  This  information  is  communicated  to  audit  committees  through  written reports or as part of a presentation by the Signing Officer. 

34 Quality Control Around Financial Statements Audits

considered, consultation undertaken and if the threat can be reduced to  an acceptable level.  

 Fee  parity:  Fee  parity  should  be  maintained  over  the  period  of  a  proposed or existing ANAO contract. If the total value of other services  provided, or to be provided, by the firm exceeds the audit fee the firm  receives  from  the  ANAO,  this  is  considered  to  be  a  potentially  significant  threat  to  the  firm’s  independence.  All  proposed  ‘other  services’ must be discussed with the AASG GEDs. In addition to the  policy  statement,  the  GEDs  have  provided  Engagement  Executives  with  specific  guidance  on  the  policy’s  broad  principles,  additional  consideration  points  to  be  included  in  the  Engagement  Executive  analysis  and  additional  circumstances  where  the  Engagement  Executive should seek approval from the GEDs. 

3.21 Proposed  other  services  to  be  delivered  by  contractors  to  entities  audited by the ANAO must be approved by the ANAO prior to provision of  the service in accordance with the ANAO independence policy. On completion  of project‐managed audits, the engagement partner of the private sector audit  firm is required to provide a representation letter to confirm that the audit  firm: 

 has  complied  with  the  independence  requirement  of  applicable  legislation and APES 110 Code of Ethics for Professional Accountants; 

 has not entered into arrangements for, or provided other services to,  the  audit  client  during  the  year  without  the  written  consent  of  the  ANAO; 

 does not have, or the other services have not given rise to, any conflict  of  interest  or  economic  dependence  which  could  jeopardise  the  independence of the audit firm; and 

 provided an independence declaration under section 307C, if the audit  is undertaken in accordance with the Corporations Act 2001.  

Policy and procedures designed to provide the ANAO with relevant information about client engagements, including the scope of services, to enable the firm to evaluate the overall impact, if any, on independence requirements.

3.22 The Engagement Executive is required to disclose to the audit client’s  audit committee at least annually, the nature of any other services provided by  an ANAO contractor to the audit client and the fees paid or payable for those  services.  This  information  is  communicated  to  audit  committees  through  written reports or as part of a presentation by the Signing Officer. 

Relevant ethical requirements

Quality Control Around Financial Statements Audits 35

3.23 At the completion of the audit, contractors must provide the ANAO a  summary  of  the  other  services  provided  to  each  relevant  entity  during  the  audit cycle. This listing is reconciled to the services approved by the ANAO  during the audit cycle and discrepancies, if any, are investigated.  

3.24 The AASG, through its annual Transparency Report, communicates to  the Deputy Auditor‐General and the EBOM, the nature and fees for all other  services for audits under project management arrangements and the total fees  payable by the ANAO to each private sector audit firm.  

3.25 Figure  1  illustrates  the  independence  declaration  process.  This  identifies  the  policies  and  procedures  that  require  ANAO  personnel  to  promptly  notify  the  ANAO  of  circumstances  and  relationships  that  might  create a threat to independence so appropriate action can be taken. 

Figure 1

Independence Declaration Process

 

 

Yes

Engagement Executive Independence Declaration completed Paragraph 3.29

Annual Personal Interest declaration Paragraph 3.30 and 3.31

Individual Declaration of Independence by AASG personnel Paragraph 3.26

Exception identified in the Individual Declaration of Independence?

Individual Declaration of Independence provided to Engagement Executive

Paragraph 3.26

Resolution memorandum completed by the Engagement Executive

in consultation with the AASG GED Paragraph 3.28 No

36 Quality Control Around Financial Statements Audits

3.26 All ANAO staff, including contracted resources, engaged in financial  statements audits, regardless of their role in the audit, are required to complete  an Individual Declaration of Independence prior to commencing every audit.  The declaration must be provided to the Engagement Executive and included  with the audit documentation after review by the Engagement Executive. 

3.27 The Individual Declaration of Independence requires a staff member to  declare they have read and understood the ANAO independence policy and  APES 110 Code of Ethics for Professional Accountants and that they hold a current  Australian  Government  security  clearance  to  a  level  appropriate  for  the  information and assets they will have access to during the audit.8 

3.28 If an exception is identified, the Engagement Executive is required to  consider  and  evaluate  the  impact  of  the  exception  and  complete  an  Engagement Executive Independence Resolution Memorandum. The relevant  GED  is  consulted  regarding  the  matter.  If  the  matter  is  in  relation  to  an  Executive Director, this is discussed with the Auditor‐General. 

3.29 Prior  to  the  issue  of  the  audit  report,  the  Engagement  Executive  is  required to complete an Engagement Executive Independence Confirmation.  The  confirmation  requires  the  Engagement  Executive  to  confirm  they  were  provided  with  an  Individual  Declaration  of  Independence  by  each  staff  member  on  the  audit  (including  contractors  and  contract  firms)  and  appropriate  action  has  been  taken  to  respond  and  address  any  exceptions  noted  in  the  Individual  Declaration  of  Independence,  if  applicable.  The  Engagement Executive Independence Confirmation is required to be included  as mandatory audit documentation. 

3.30 Annually  all  Senior  Executive  Service  (SES)  Officers,  staff  members  acting in SES positions for more than three months, and other individuals the  Auditor‐General believes may have similar decision making responsibilities9,  are required to make a declaration of independence to the Auditor‐General.  The declaration is documented in the Declaration of Personal Interests retained  by the Auditor‐General. 

3.31 The  Declaration  of  Personal  Interests  requires  the  GEDs  and  the  Executive  Directors  to  disclose  any  interests  or  relationships  that  may  be  a  conflict of interest or perceived to be a conflict of interest such as: real estate 

8 Financial Statements and Other AASG assurance engagements Individual Declaration of Independence. 9 Australian National Audit Office Declaration of Personal Interests.

36 Quality Control Around Financial Statements Audits

3.26 All ANAO staff, including contracted resources, engaged in financial  statements audits, regardless of their role in the audit, are required to complete  an Individual Declaration of Independence prior to commencing every audit.  The declaration must be provided to the Engagement Executive and included  with the audit documentation after review by the Engagement Executive. 

3.27 The Individual Declaration of Independence requires a staff member to  declare they have read and understood the ANAO independence policy and  APES 110 Code of Ethics for Professional Accountants and that they hold a current  Australian  Government  security  clearance  to  a  level  appropriate  for  the  information and assets they will have access to during the audit.8 

3.28 If an exception is identified, the Engagement Executive is required to  consider  and  evaluate  the  impact  of  the  exception  and  complete  an  Engagement Executive Independence Resolution Memorandum. The relevant  GED  is  consulted  regarding  the  matter.  If  the  matter  is  in  relation  to  an  Executive Director, this is discussed with the Auditor‐General. 

3.29 Prior  to  the  issue  of  the  audit  report,  the  Engagement  Executive  is  required to complete an Engagement Executive Independence Confirmation.  The  confirmation  requires  the  Engagement  Executive  to  confirm  they  were  provided  with  an  Individual  Declaration  of  Independence  by  each  staff  member  on  the  audit  (including  contractors  and  contract  firms)  and  appropriate  action  has  been  taken  to  respond  and  address  any  exceptions  noted  in  the  Individual  Declaration  of  Independence,  if  applicable.  The  Engagement Executive Independence Confirmation is required to be included  as mandatory audit documentation. 

3.30 Annually  all  Senior  Executive  Service  (SES)  Officers,  staff  members  acting in SES positions for more than three months, and other individuals the  Auditor‐General believes may have similar decision making responsibilities9,  are required to make a declaration of independence to the Auditor‐General.  The declaration is documented in the Declaration of Personal Interests retained  by the Auditor‐General. 

3.31 The  Declaration  of  Personal  Interests  requires  the  GEDs  and  the  Executive  Directors  to  disclose  any  interests  or  relationships  that  may  be  a  conflict of interest or perceived to be a conflict of interest such as: real estate 

8 Financial Statements and Other AASG assurance engagements Individual Declaration of Independence. 9 Australian National Audit Office Declaration of Personal Interests.

Relevant ethical requirements

Quality Control Around Financial Statements Audits 37

investments,  shareholdings,  trusts  or  nominee  companies,  company  directorships or partnerships, other significant sources of income, significant  liabilities,  gifts,  private  business  or  social/personal  relationships  and  paid,  unpaid or voluntary outside employment.  

3.32 All  GEDs,  Executive  Directors  and  Senior  Directors  are  required  to  complete a quarterly Certificate of Compliance. The Certificate of Compliance  covers  ethical  matters,  expenditure,  procurement,  and  accountability.  The  results are reported to the EBOM. 

Policy and procedures requiring communication of ethical requirements to appropriate personnel, documentation of independence and the action taken by the ANAO to address any identified threats

3.33 The PSB conducts monthly Technical Updates. The Technical Updates  discuss  key  issues  relating  to  auditing,  accounting,  ethical  and  legislative  requirements. Recent Technical Updates that discussed ethical and legislative  requirements  included  key  changes  to  requirements  of  the  APESB  Code  of  Ethics issued by the APESB effective 1 July 2011, the Finance Minister’s Orders  for 2012-2013 and an Auditor Independence Requirements refresher in May  2013.  Attendance  at  Technical  Updates  is  tracked  and  all  AASG  staff  are  expected to attend all Technical Updates.  

3.34 Contracts  governing  the  use  of  contract  resources  on  AASG  audits  require contractors to identify any existing or potential conflicts of interest and  the manner in which they will be resolved.  

3.35 Private sector audit firms engaged under project‐managed contracts are  required  to  comply  with  the  conflict  of  interest  provisions  and  other  independence requirements contained in the contract with the ANAO during  the  service  period  and  the  engagement  partner  of  the  contractor  firm  is  required to represent at audit completion, that the firm has complied with the  ANAO’s independence and ethics policies. Refer to paragraphs 3.20 to 3.21 for  further commentary. 

3.36 Contractors engaged to work on financial statements audits performed  by the ANAO are required to comply with the ANAO’s policies as discussed  in paragraphs 3.25 to 3.30. 

ANAO policies and procedures relating to confirmation of independence by personnel

3.37 All GEDs, Executive Directors and Executive Level officers are required  to  complete  a  quarterly  Certificate  of  Compliance.  The  Certificate  of 

38 Quality Control Around Financial Statements Audits

Compliance  covers  ethical  matters,  expenditure,  procurement  and  accountability.  

ANAO policies and procedures setting out criteria for determining the need for safeguards to reduce familiarity threats to an acceptable level.

3.38 The  ANAO’s  Independence  Policy  states  that  no  key  personnel  (defined as the Engagement Executive and the Quality Review Executive) in a  financial statements audit team for a significant public sector entity shall be a  member of the audit team for more than five years, within a seven year period.  The GEDs may decide there are circumstances where the involvement of key  personnel in an audit of a significant public sector entity up to a seven year  period does not constitute a familiarity threat.10 The Auditor‐General approves  the allocation of Signing Officers and the involvement of key personnel in a  financial statements audit for a period greater than five years.  

3.39 The ANAO maintains a register that documents the number of years  Signing Officers, Engagement Executives and Quality Review Executives have  been a member of an audit team. No Signing Officer, Engagement Executive or  Quality Review Executive has been a member of an audit team for longer than  a seven year period. 

Considerations 3.40 Included  below  is  an  observation  for  the  ANAO  to  consider  to  potentially enhance the Quality Assurance Framework with respect to ethical  requirements.  The  inclusion  of  this  consideration  does  not detract  from  the  overall conclusion provided below. 

Consideration 1  

3.41 The ANAO’s independence policy requires:  

(a) ANAO staff, contract firms of project managed audits and contract‐in  personnel  to  complete  either  an  Individual  Declaration  of  Independence or Contractor’s Representation Letter in regards to each  financial  statements  audit  for  each  individual  or  firm  that  was  a  member  of  the  engagement  team.  The  Engagement  Executive  will  review  the  declarations  and  evaluate  the  results.  The  Engagement  Executive  will  complete  an  Independence  Resolution  Memorandum  whenever an independence declaration identifies an actual or potential 

10 PAAM 40.2 ANAO Independence Policy.

38 Quality Control Around Financial Statements Audits

Compliance  covers  ethical  matters,  expenditure,  procurement  and  accountability.  

ANAO policies and procedures setting out criteria for determining the need for safeguards to reduce familiarity threats to an acceptable level.

3.38 The  ANAO’s  Independence  Policy  states  that  no  key  personnel  (defined as the Engagement Executive and the Quality Review Executive) in a  financial statements audit team for a significant public sector entity shall be a  member of the audit team for more than five years, within a seven year period.  The GEDs may decide there are circumstances where the involvement of key  personnel in an audit of a significant public sector entity up to a seven year  period does not constitute a familiarity threat.10 The Auditor‐General approves  the allocation of Signing Officers and the involvement of key personnel in a  financial statements audit for a period greater than five years.  

3.39 The ANAO maintains a register that documents the number of years  Signing Officers, Engagement Executives and Quality Review Executives have  been a member of an audit team. No Signing Officer, Engagement Executive or  Quality Review Executive has been a member of an audit team for longer than  a seven year period. 

Considerations 3.40 Included  below  is  an  observation  for  the  ANAO  to  consider  to  potentially enhance the Quality Assurance Framework with respect to ethical  requirements.  The  inclusion  of  this  consideration  does  not  detract  from  the  overall conclusion provided below. 

Consideration 1  

3.41 The ANAO’s independence policy requires:  

(a) ANAO staff, contract firms of project managed audits and contract‐in  personnel  to  complete  either  an  Individual  Declaration  of  Independence or Contractor’s Representation Letter in regards to each  financial  statements  audit  for  each  individual  or  firm  that  was  a  member  of  the  engagement  team.  The  Engagement  Executive  will  review  the  declarations  and  evaluate  the  results.  The  Engagement  Executive  will  complete  an  Independence  Resolution  Memorandum  whenever an independence declaration identifies an actual or potential 

10 PAAM 40.2 ANAO Independence Policy.

Relevant ethical requirements

Quality Control Around Financial Statements Audits 39

threat or where an independence threat has existed during the course  of the audit. The Independence Resolution Memorandum is completed  in  consultation  with  the  GEDs.  The  Independence  Resolution  Memorandum is required to be included in the audit file.   

(b) Annually, all SES Officers, staff members acting in an SES position for  more  than  three  months,  and  other  individuals  that  the  Auditor‐ General believes may have similar decision making responsibilities11,  are  required  to  make  a  declaration  of  independence  to  the  Auditor‐ General. 

(c) All GEDs, Executive Directors and Executive Level officers are required  to  complete  a  quarterly  Certificate  of  Compliance. The  Certificate of  Compliance  covers  ethical  matters,  expenditure,  procurement  and  accountability.  

3.42 Due  to  the  number  of  AASG  employees,  relative  consistency  in  the  client  base,  nature  and  extent  of  services,  the  frequency  and  extent  of  discussions  amongst  the  Signing  Officers  regarding  potential  or  actual  breaches to independence or ethics and values does occur on a timely basis.  

3.43 The ANAO could consider the benefits of also maintaining a central  register of potential or actual threats to independence. Engagement Executives  could populate the register each time they identify a potential or actual threat  to  independence,  in  addition  to  completing  the  Independence  Resolution  Memorandum.  

3.44 The  register  would  be  available  for  review  by  the  Auditor‐General,  Deputy Auditor‐General, the GEDs and/or relevant governance committees to  assess: 

 frequency and nature of items arising; 

 emerging issues;  

 effectiveness  of  policies  and  procedures  to  address  recurring  or  pervasive matters; and 

 compliance with key directives of the ANAO’s leadership group.  

11 Australian National Audit Office Declaration of Personal Interests.

40 Quality Control Around Financial Statements Audits

Consideration 2  

3.45 ANAO staff (including personnel contracted from external firms) and  contract  firms  are  required  to  complete  an  Individual  Declaration  of  Independence  and the ANAO engagement executive and the partner of the  contract firm (where relevant) complete a declaration that have independence  declarations for all audit team members and have satisfactorily resolved all  actual or potential independence issues. 

3.46 In addition, all SES Officers, staff members acting in SES positions for  more than three months and other individuals the Auditor‐General believes  may have similar decision making responsibilities, are required to make an  annual  declaration  of  independence  to  the  Auditor‐General.  All  signing  officers  and  senior  directors  complete  a  quarterly  certificate  of  compliance  sign‐off that includes ethical behaviours and specific Financial Management  and Accountability Act requirements. 

3.47  All ANAO staff are required to be Australian citizens, hold a current  security clearance, and comply with legislated Australian Public Service code  of conduct and values. Under the Protective Security Policy Framework of the  Australian Government and ANAO policy, audit information is controlled on  a ‘need to know’ basis. Audit information is held on client specific databases  with strict access controls which limit access to relevant audit team members. 

3.48  The  ANAO  could  consider  including  in  the  current  declarations  of  independence, required for each audit, specific reference to compliance with  the ANAO’s independence and ethical requirements policies in respect of all  financial statements audits performed by ANAO staff. 

Conclusion 3.49 As  at  the  date  of  this  report,  the  activities  and  responsibilities  established by the ANAO’s Quality Assurance Framework in relation to ethical  requirements for financial statements audits are consistent with the relevant  requirements  of  ASQC  1  Quality  Control  for  Firms  that  Perform  Audits  and  Reviews of Financial Reports and Other Financial Information, and Other Assurance  Engagements.  

40 Quality Control Around Financial Statements Audits

Consideration 2  

3.45 ANAO staff (including personnel contracted from external firms) and  contract  firms  are  required  to  complete  an  Individual  Declaration  of  Independence  and the ANAO engagement executive and the partner of the  contract firm (where relevant) complete a declaration that have independence  declarations for all audit team members and have satisfactorily resolved all  actual or potential independence issues. 

3.46 In addition, all SES Officers, staff members acting in SES positions for  more than three months and other individuals the Auditor‐General believes  may have similar decision making responsibilities, are required to make an  annual  declaration  of  independence  to  the  Auditor‐General.  All  signing  officers  and  senior  directors  complete  a  quarterly  certificate  of  compliance  sign‐off that includes ethical behaviours and specific Financial Management  and Accountability Act requirements. 

3.47  All ANAO staff are required to be Australian citizens, hold a current  security clearance, and comply with legislated Australian Public Service code  of conduct and values. Under the Protective Security Policy Framework of the  Australian Government and ANAO policy, audit information is controlled on  a ‘need to know’ basis. Audit information is held on client specific databases  with strict access controls which limit access to relevant audit team members. 

3.48  The  ANAO  could  consider  including  in  the  current  declarations  of  independence, required for each audit, specific reference to compliance with  the ANAO’s independence and ethical requirements policies in respect of all  financial statements audits performed by ANAO staff. 

Conclusion 3.49 As  at  the  date  of  this  report,  the  activities  and  responsibilities  established by the ANAO’s Quality Assurance Framework in relation to ethical  requirements for financial statements audits are consistent with the relevant  requirements  of  ASQC  1  Quality  Control  for  Firms  that  Perform  Audits  and  Reviews of Financial Reports and Other Financial Information, and Other Assurance  Engagements.  

Quality Control Around Financial Statements Audits 41

4. Human resources

ASQC 1 Requirement

4.1 The firm shall establish policies and procedures designed to provide  it  with  reasonable  assurance  that  it  has  sufficient  personnel  with  the  competence, capabilities, and commitment to ethical principles necessary to: 

(a) perform  engagements  in  accordance  with  AUASB  Standards,  relevant  ethical  requirements,  and  applicable  legal  and  regulatory  requirements; and 

(b) enable  the  firm  or  engagement  partners  to  issue  reports  that  are  appropriate in the circumstances. 

4.2 The  firm  shall  assign  responsibility  for  each  engagement  to  an  engagement partner and shall establish policies and  procedures requiring  that: 

(a) the identity and role of the engagement partner are communicated to  key  members  of  client  management  and  those  changed  with  governance; 

(b) the engagement partner has the appropriate competence, capabilities,  and authority to perform the role; and  

(c) the responsibilities of the engagement partner are clearly defined and  communicated to that partner. 

4.3 The  firm  shall  also  establish  policies  and  procedures  to  assign  appropriate personnel with the necessary competence, and capabilities to: 

(a) perform  engagements  in  accordance  with  AUASB  Standards,  relevant  ethical  requirements,  and  applicable  legal  and  regulatory  requirements; and 

(b) enable  the  firm  or  engagement  partners  to  issue  reports  that  are  appropriate in the circumstances. 

Audit Procedures 4.4 Interviews in regards to human resources were conducted with the: 

 Auditor‐General and Deputy Auditor‐General; 

 AASG Group Executive Directors (GEDs); 

42 Quality Control Around Financial Statements Audits

 Executive Directors in the AASG; 

 Executive Director and staff of the Professional Services Branch (PSB); 

 Executive Director of Corporate Management Branch (CMB); and  

 Director of Learning and Development in the CMB. 

4.5 The  focus  of  the  interviews  and  review  of  key  documentation  was  recruitment,  learning,  development,  performance  review  and  other  ANAO  policy  requirements  relating  to  AASG  staff  and  communication  of  these  requirements to all staff in the AASG. 

4.6 The following documents were reviewed: 

 documentation as detailed in Appendix Two; and 

 ANAO reporting templates that support the communication of the final  audit outcome. 

4.7 Procedures included understanding and analysing the process for:  

 assignment of the Quality Review Executives, Engagement Executives  and Signing Officers to financial statements audits;  

 assignment of APS staff to financial statements audits;  

 recruitment of APS staff in line with the Public Service Act 1999; and 

 performance assessments.  

ANAO Implementation Policies and procedures designed to provide the ANAO with reasonable assurance that it has sufficient personnel with the competence, capabilities and commitments to ethical principles necessary to perform financial statements audits and the ANAO to issue audit reports that are appropriate in the circumstances.

4.8 The  GEDs  have  developed  an  Assurance  Audit  Service  Group  Workforce  Plan  covering  the  period  2011-2014.  The  plan  is  a  roadmap  for  managing the  AASG and identifies and  addresses five key areas:  attracting  talent, retaining talent, retaining knowledge, professionalism and skilling, and  effective  management  of  change.  The  plan  documents  the  key  strategic  objectives, and the initiatives identified to address each objective; as well as a  basis to evaluate performance over the period. The workforce plan is a key tool  underpinning the AASG’s policies and procedures relating to audit quality.  

42 Quality Control Around Financial Statements Audits

 Executive Directors in the AASG; 

 Executive Director and staff of the Professional Services Branch (PSB); 

 Executive Director of Corporate Management Branch (CMB); and  

 Director of Learning and Development in the CMB. 

4.5 The  focus  of  the  interviews  and  review  of  key  documentation  was  recruitment,  learning,  development,  performance  review  and  other  ANAO  policy  requirements  relating  to  AASG  staff  and  communication  of  these  requirements to all staff in the AASG. 

4.6 The following documents were reviewed: 

 documentation as detailed in Appendix Two; and 

 ANAO reporting templates that support the communication of the final  audit outcome. 

4.7 Procedures included understanding and analysing the process for:  

 assignment of the Quality Review Executives, Engagement Executives  and Signing Officers to financial statements audits;  

 assignment of APS staff to financial statements audits;  

 recruitment of APS staff in line with the Public Service Act 1999; and 

 performance assessments.  

ANAO Implementation Policies and procedures designed to provide the ANAO with reasonable assurance that it has sufficient personnel with the competence, capabilities and commitments to ethical principles necessary to perform financial statements audits and the ANAO to issue audit reports that are appropriate in the circumstances.

4.8 The  GEDs  have  developed  an  Assurance  Audit  Service  Group  Workforce  Plan  covering  the  period  2011-2014.  The  plan  is  a  roadmap  for  managing the  AASG and identifies and  addresses five key areas:  attracting  talent, retaining talent, retaining knowledge, professionalism and skilling, and  effective  management  of  change.  The  plan  documents  the  key  strategic  objectives, and the initiatives identified to address each objective; as well as a  basis to evaluate performance over the period. The workforce plan is a key tool  underpinning the AASG’s policies and procedures relating to audit quality.  

Human resources

Quality Control Around Financial Statements Audits 43

4.9 The  ANAO  conducts  a  recruitment  process  for  all  APS  positions,  including graduate positions. The position is advertised through a variety of  means including the APS Employment Gazette, newspapers, internet and the  ANAO website. The selection process must comply with requirements of the  Public  Service Act 1999. The  selection process includes the submission  of an  application by each candidate. The ANAO will short list candidates and each  candidate  is  required  to  undertake  an  assessment  process.  The  assessment  process includes an interview and specific capability exercises. Psychometric  testing is commonly used in the ANAO’s external recruitment processes.   

4.10 The ANAO Enterprise Agreement 2011-2014 applies to all ANAO staff.  The GEDs and Executive Directors are employed under individual contracts.  The  Enterprise  Agreement  provides  a  set  of  employment  conditions  and  includes:  classification  structure,  remuneration,  work  level  standards,  employment conditions, miscellaneous items and performance management.  

4.11 The  ANAO  Enterprise  Agreement  2011-2014  states  that  in  implementing the enterprise agreement and performing their duties staff will  uphold the APS values and adhere to the APS Code of Conduct contained in  the Public Service Act 1999 and ANAO specific values which are drawn from  the APS values.12 The APS Code of Conduct is defined in section 13 of the  Public Service Act 1999. The APS Code of Conduct requirements include the  need for staff to behave honestly, with integrity, comply with all applicable  Australian  laws,  take  reasonable  steps  to  avoid  conflict  and  maintain  appropriate confidentiality.  

4.12 The  risk,  complexity,  and  size  of  an  audit  impacts  the  skill  level  required  to  be  assigned  to  an  audit.  The  assignment  of  Quality  Review  Executives,  Engagement  Executives,  and  Signing  Officers  are  assessed  and  reconfirmed  annually  by  the  GEDs  in  conjuction  with  the  Auditor‐General.  The  assignment of the senior team members is discussed at the AASG SES  annual meeting, minuted and approved by the GEDs prior to confirming with  the  Auditor‐General.  The  key  factors  considered  in  the  

2012-13  annual  meeting  included  rotation  requirements  (as  documented  in  paragraph 4.55), the number of audits assigned to each senior team member  and  the  budgeted  engagement  hours  allocated  to  each  staff  member.  In  addition, other considerations in assigning audits include the combined level  of audit experience on the audit and security requirements of the audit. 

12 Australian National Audit Office Enterprise Agreement 2011-2014.

44 Quality Control Around Financial Statements Audits

Policies and procedures to assign responsibility to an engagement partner ensure the role of the engagement partner is communicated, the engagement partner has the appropriate competence, capabilities and authority to perform the role and the responsibilities of the engagement partner are communicated.

4.13 The Auditor‐General delegates the conduct of, including the signing of  the  auditor’s  report,  to  the  GEDs,  Executive  Directors  and  selected  Senior  Directors.  

4.14 PAAM states the role and responsibilities of the Signing Officer. The  policy defines the Signing Officer as the person who signs the audit report on  the  financial  statements  and  in  most  cases  the  Signing  Officer  is  the  Engagement Executive for the audit.  

4.15 Some moderate or low risk audits are delegated to Senior Directors.  The  role  and  oversight  processes  of  Senior  Directors  is  minuted  in  the  document Role of AASG’s audit principals and the audit quality oversight modalities  of all EL2 signing officers for the 2012-2013 audit cycle.13 These Signing Officers  report to a GED aligned to their respective audit group on audit client matters,  and each is assigned a GED or Executive Director as a mentor. Additionally, all  audits led by a Senior Director Signing Officer with an audit budget of greater  than  250  hours  will  also  have  a  Second  Reviewer  assigned,  which  is  an  Executive Director. 

4.16 The appointment of Senior Director Signing Officers and the associated  mentor and, where required a second reviewer, is reviewed annually by the  GEDs and approved by the Auditor‐General. 

4.17  PAAM 60.3 Roles and Responsibilities of the Second Reviewer states the  Second Reviewer must be a Senior Executive and will ordinarily be at least one  level  higher  than  the  Engagement  Executive.  The  policy  also  states  that  a  Second Reviewer  who  is  a  GED  must  also  be  appointed to  an  engagement  when it is planned that the Auditor‐General will sign the audit report, except  where  the  GED  already  has  a  formal  role  in  the  engagement  as  the  Engagement Executive or Quality Review Executive.  

4.18 PAAM policy 60.1 Role and Responsibilities of the Engagement Executive  states  that  one  of  the  responsibilities  of  the  Engagement  Executive  is  to  communicate the role of the Engagement Executive and where different, the 

13 Role of AASG’s audit principals and the audit quality oversight modalities of all EL2 signing officers for the 2012-2013 audit cycle.

44 Quality Control Around Financial Statements Audits

Policies and procedures to assign responsibility to an engagement partner ensure the role of the engagement partner is communicated, the engagement partner has the appropriate competence, capabilities and authority to perform the role and the responsibilities of the engagement partner are communicated.

4.13 The Auditor‐General delegates the conduct of, including the signing of  the  auditor’s  report,  to  the  GEDs,  Executive  Directors  and  selected  Senior  Directors.  

4.14 PAAM states the role and responsibilities of the Signing Officer. The  policy defines the Signing Officer as the person who signs the audit report on  the  financial  statements  and  in  most  cases  the  Signing  Officer  is  the  Engagement Executive for the audit.  

4.15 Some moderate or low risk audits are delegated to Senior Directors.  The  role  and  oversight  processes  of  Senior  Directors  is  minuted  in  the  document Role of AASG’s audit principals and the audit quality oversight modalities  of all EL2 signing officers for the 2012-2013 audit cycle.13 These Signing Officers  report to a GED aligned to their respective audit group on audit client matters,  and each is assigned a GED or Executive Director as a mentor. Additionally, all  audits led by a Senior Director Signing Officer with an audit budget of greater  than  250  hours  will  also  have  a  Second  Reviewer  assigned,  which  is  an  Executive Director. 

4.16 The appointment of Senior Director Signing Officers and the associated  mentor and, where required a second reviewer, is reviewed annually by the  GEDs and approved by the Auditor‐General. 

4.17  PAAM 60.3 Roles and Responsibilities of the Second Reviewer states the  Second Reviewer must be a Senior Executive and will ordinarily be at least one  level  higher  than  the  Engagement  Executive.  The  policy  also  states  that  a  Second Reviewer  who  is  a  GED  must  also  be  appointed to  an  engagement  when it is planned that the Auditor‐General will sign the audit report, except  where  the  GED  already  has  a  formal  role  in  the  engagement  as  the  Engagement Executive or Quality Review Executive.  

4.18 PAAM policy 60.1 Role and Responsibilities of the Engagement Executive  states  that  one  of  the  responsibilities  of  the  Engagement  Executive  is  to  communicate the role of the Engagement Executive and where different, the 

13 Role of AASG’s audit principals and the audit quality oversight modalities of all EL2 signing officers for the 2012-2013 audit cycle.

Human resources

Quality Control Around Financial Statements Audits 45

identity of the Signing Officer to the Chief Executive and those charged with  governance. The identity and role of the Signing Officer is communicated to  key members of client management and those charged with governance in the  Audit Strategy Document (ASD). The ASD is a mandatory document issued  for  each  financial  statements  audit  to  those  charged  with  governance.  The  ANAO  defines  those  charged  with  governance  to  be  the  Chief  Executive,  Directors, and the Audit Committee of the entity. 

4.19 The role and responsibility of the Engagement Executive is documented  in PAAM 60.1 Roles and Responsibilities of the Engagement Executive. The policy  states  that  in  practice  in  the  ANAO,  the  Engagement  Executive  fulfils  the  duties of the engagement partner. 

4.20  The Engagement Executive’s key responsibilities are to: 

 approve and/or review key aspects of the audit approach, assessment  of materiality, schedule of unadjusted differences, the Signing Officer  Review Memorandum, the audited financial statements and the audit  report; 

 discuss  the  audit  with  the  Signing  Officer,  if  different  from  the  Engagement  Executive,  at  regular  intervals  and  ensure  they  are  satisfied  procedures  have  been  completed  in  accordance  with  the  Auditing Standards;  

 ensure they are satisfied the Quality Review Executive’s role has been  completed satisfactorily; and 

 review any other information they consider appropriate and document  their involvement in the financial statements audit.  

4.21 PAAM policy 60.2 Role and Responsibilities of the Signing Officer states  that  the  Signing  Officer  must  approve  the  Signing  Officer  Review  Memorandum  and  review  the  Closing  Report.  The  Signing  Officer  Review  Memorandum  and  the  Closing  Report  are  key  audit  deliverables  produced  during the completion of the audit. These reports summarise the key outcomes  of  the  audit  and  whether  a  modified  or  unmodified  audit  opinion  will  be  issued.  

4.22 The  Signing  Officer  Review  Memorandum  summarises  the  key  components of the audit including audit scope, audit risk, audit focus areas,  independence,  accounting  and  audit  matters  noted  during  the  audit  cycle,  audit findings, commentary on the financial statement preparation process and  movements in key financial statement line items. 

46 Quality Control Around Financial Statements Audits

4.23 The Signing Officer Review Memorandum is prepared by each audit  manager and is required to be reviewed by the Signing Officer, Engagement  Executive and the Quality Review Executive where one is appointed to the  engagement.  The  Signing  Officer  Review  Memorandum  is  an  internal  document that summarises key information from the audit file and supports  the information presented in the Closing Report. 

4.24 The  Closing  Report  is  the  external  document  provided  to  client  management  and  those  charged  with  governance  and  is  prepared  at  the  completion  of  the  audit.  The  Closing  Report  documents  accounting  and  auditing matters including audit scope, audit findings and commentary on the  financial statement preparation process. The Closing Report is prepared by the  audit manager and reviewed by the Signing Officer, Engagement Executive  and Quality Review Executive if one is appointed to the engagement. 

4.25 In making a decision to promote an individual from outside or within  the APS as an Executive Director, the requirements set out in the Public Service  Commissioner’s Directions 1999 must be satisfied. Whenever a SES opportunity  becomes available it must be advertised and a selection advisory committee is  established to assess each applicant. For Executive Director positions within  the AASG the committee is chaired by a GED and the committee includes an  independent  party  who  acts  as  the  Public  Service  Commissioner’s  representative.  

4.26 The core SES selection criteria are the five key elements identified in the  Senior Executive Leadership Framework which are: shapes strategic thinking,  achieves results, exemplifies personal drive and integrity, cultivates productive  working relationships and communicates with influence.  

4.27 The performance of the GEDs and the Executive Directors is assessed  against the five elements in the Executive Leadership Framework. The annual  assessment of the performance of each Executive Director is a collective matter  agreed  by  the  three  GEDs.  The  GEDs  recommend  to  the  Deputy  Auditor‐ General and Auditor‐General the indicative rating for each Executive Director.  

4.28 Annually,  an  ANAO  staff  survey  is  conducted  by  an  independent  research  firm.  The  2012‐13  staff  survey  asked  questions  on  leadership,  job  satisfaction, career development, recruitment and selection, work life balance,  performance  management,  ANAO  values  and  behaviour,  supervisor  performance and supervisor performance management. The results of the staff  survey are assessed by the GEDs and are included in the overall assessment of  performance of the AASG. Refer to paragraph 6.27. 

46 Quality Control Around Financial Statements Audits

4.23 The Signing Officer Review Memorandum is prepared by each audit  manager and is required to be reviewed by the Signing Officer, Engagement  Executive and the Quality Review Executive where one is appointed to the  engagement.  The  Signing  Officer  Review  Memorandum  is  an  internal  document that summarises key information from the audit file and supports  the information presented in the Closing Report. 

4.24 The  Closing  Report  is  the  external  document  provided  to  client  management  and  those  charged  with  governance  and  is  prepared  at  the  completion  of  the  audit.  The  Closing  Report  documents  accounting  and  auditing matters including audit scope, audit findings and commentary on the  financial statement preparation process. The Closing Report is prepared by the  audit manager and reviewed by the Signing Officer, Engagement Executive  and Quality Review Executive if one is appointed to the engagement. 

4.25 In making a decision to promote an individual from outside or within  the APS as an Executive Director, the requirements set out in the Public Service  Commissioner’s Directions 1999 must be satisfied. Whenever a SES opportunity  becomes available it must be advertised and a selection advisory committee is  established to assess each applicant. For Executive Director positions within  the AASG the committee is chaired by a GED and the committee includes an  independent  party  who  acts  as  the  Public  Service  Commissioner’s  representative.  

4.26 The core SES selection criteria are the five key elements identified in the  Senior Executive Leadership Framework which are: shapes strategic thinking,  achieves results, exemplifies personal drive and integrity, cultivates productive  working relationships and communicates with influence.  

4.27 The performance of the GEDs and the Executive Directors is assessed  against the five elements in the Executive Leadership Framework. The annual  assessment of the performance of each Executive Director is a collective matter  agreed  by  the  three  GEDs.  The  GEDs  recommend  to  the  Deputy  Auditor‐ General and Auditor‐General the indicative rating for each Executive Director.  

4.28 Annually,  an  ANAO  staff  survey  is  conducted  by  an  independent  research  firm.  The  2012‐13  staff  survey  asked  questions  on  leadership,  job  satisfaction, career development, recruitment and selection, work life balance, 

performance  management,  ANAO  values  and  behaviour,  supervisor  performance and supervisor performance management. The results of the staff  survey are assessed by the GEDs and are included in the overall assessment of  performance of the AASG. Refer to paragraph 6.27. 

Human resources

Quality Control Around Financial Statements Audits 47

4.29 The  ANAO  sets  key  performance  indicator  targets  and  assesses  the  actual results against the key performance indicators. The results of the staff  survey are used by the GEDs to formulate the business plan including key  areas where performance is on target and areas for improvement. 

Policies and procedures to assign appropriate personnel with the necessary competence and capabilities to perform engagements in accordance with auditing standards, relevant ethical requirements, legal and regulatory requirements and enable the ANAO to issue reports that are appropriate in the circumstances.

4.30 The  Public  Service  Act  1999  section  10(2)  states  for  the  purposes  of  ensuring  employment  decisions  are  made  on  merit,  a  decision  relating  to  engagement or promotion is based on merit if:  

 an assessment is made of the relative suitability of the candidates for  the duties, using a competitive selection process;  

 the  assessment  is  based  on  the  relationship  between  the  candidate  work‐related  qualities  and  the  work‐related  qualities  genuinely  required for the duties;  

 the  assessment  focuses  on  the  relative  capacity  of  the  candidates  to  achieve outcomes related to the duties; and  

 the assessment is the primary consideration in making the decision.  

4.31 The Australian National Audit Office Enterprise Agreement 2011-2014  states  the  performance  assessment  cycle  operates  from  1  November  to  31  October,  with  a  mid‐term  assessment  in  May  each  year.  The  Enterprise  Agreement Performance Assessment Scheme is a framework to administer the  process  to  review  staff  performance  and  ensure  the  performance  is  aligned  with ANAO service group objectives. The Performance Assessment Scheme is  applicable to all ongoing staff employed continuously for twelve months or  longer.  The  performance  management  arrangements  for  the  GEDs  and  the  Executive Directors are set out in their individual contracts.  

4.32 The ANAO Capability Framework was updated in December 2012. The  Capability Framework is designed to communicate the skills and behaviours  required at each staff level. The ANAO Capability Framework includes work  level standards, job requirements and responsibilities and provides guidance  on  expected  staff  behaviour  for  each  capability  level.  The  Capability  Framework contains three key areas and six capabilities. The capabilities are  described across four levels of proficiencies for Graduates to Senior Directors.  

48 Quality Control Around Financial Statements Audits

4.33 Learning  and  development  courses  are  mapped  to  one  of  the  six  capabilities and the four proficiency levels in the Capability Framework. This  assists staff to identify courses applicable to their role and level. The learning  and  development  courses  include  technical  audit,  technical  accounting  and  soft skill courses. The technical audit courses focus on applying the auditing  standards and ANAO audit methodology. The technical accounting courses  focus on the application of the accounting standards and any changes to the  financial framework and accounting standards. The soft skills include courses  on project management, written communication, working in teams, coaching  and leadership, problem solving, analytical skills and professional judgement. 

4.34  The ANAO is in the process of incorporating the updated Capability  Framework into the 2013-2014 performance assessment process.  

4.35 Performance  expectations  are  established  between  staff  and  their  administrative  supervisors  at  the  commencement  of  the  performance  assessment period. These expectations must incorporate job expectations, key  responsibilities, performance standards and an individual development plan.  The  supervisor  and  staff  are  required  to  identify  appropriate  learning  and  development courses that are available to assist the staff member achieve their  performance agreement plan.  

4.36 The  ANAO  uses  a  five  level  performance  assessment  scale  to  rate  overall performance. The overall performance assessment rating is based on  the staff member’s performance against each of their key responsibilities. The  assessment  takes  into  account  behaviours  exhibited  during  the  cycle  and  whether those behaviours uphold the APS values. The ratings are outstanding,  more  than  fully  effective,  fully  effective,  requires  development  and  unsatisfactory.  

4.37 The key components of the Performance Assessment Scheme process  include: 

 discussions  between  the  staff  member  and  their  administrative  supervisor  on  expectations  for  the  year.  The  outcomes  of  these  discussions are included in a performance agreement; 

 a mid‐year assessment of the staff member’s performance against the  performance agreement is conducted and each supervisor is required to  document their assessment and provide a summary of performance to  the relevant Executive Director; 

48 Quality Control Around Financial Statements Audits

4.33 Learning  and  development  courses  are  mapped  to  one  of  the  six  capabilities and the four proficiency levels in the Capability Framework. This  assists staff to identify courses applicable to their role and level. The learning  and  development  courses  include  technical  audit,  technical  accounting  and  soft skill courses. The technical audit courses focus on applying the auditing  standards and ANAO audit methodology. The technical accounting courses  focus on the application of the accounting standards and any changes to the  financial framework and accounting standards. The soft skills include courses  on project management, written communication, working in teams, coaching  and leadership, problem solving, analytical skills and professional judgement. 

4.34  The ANAO is in the process of incorporating the updated Capability  Framework into the 2013-2014 performance assessment process.  

4.35 Performance  expectations  are  established  between  staff  and  their  administrative  supervisors  at  the  commencement  of  the  performance  assessment period. These expectations must incorporate job expectations, key  responsibilities, performance standards and an individual development plan.  The  supervisor  and  staff  are  required  to  identify  appropriate  learning  and  development courses that are available to assist the staff member achieve their  performance agreement plan.  

4.36 The  ANAO  uses  a  five  level  performance  assessment  scale  to  rate  overall performance. The overall performance assessment rating is based on  the staff member’s performance against each of their key responsibilities. The  assessment  takes  into  account  behaviours  exhibited  during  the  cycle  and  whether those behaviours uphold the APS values. The ratings are outstanding,  more  than  fully  effective,  fully  effective,  requires  development  and  unsatisfactory.  

4.37 The key components of the Performance Assessment Scheme process  include: 

 discussions  between  the  staff  member  and  their  administrative  supervisor  on  expectations  for  the  year.  The  outcomes  of  these  discussions are included in a performance agreement; 

 a mid‐year assessment of the staff member’s performance against the  performance agreement is conducted and each supervisor is required to  document their assessment and provide a summary of performance to  the relevant Executive Director; 

Human resources

Quality Control Around Financial Statements Audits 49

 final  review  of  the  staff  member’s  performance  at  the  end  of  the  performance  assessment  cycle.  Final  indicative  ratings  are  discussed  and reviewed;  

 the  Auditor‐General  discusses  and  provides  feedback  on  the  performance of the ANAO and the AASG with the GEDs; 

 the indicative ratings of staff members are reviewed by the Executive  Directors and the GEDs as an executive group. The indicative ratings  for all AASG staff are discussed and reviewed against the performance  assessment  scheme  guidance.  This  meeting  occurs  at  the  end  of  the  performance cycle prior to the approval and notification of the ratings  to staff members;  

 the  GEDs  discuss  the  AASG  staff  ratings  with  the  Deputy  Auditor‐General; and  

 the  indicative  ratings  are  confirmed  by  the  People  and  Capabilities  Strategy Committee prior to final notification to staff. 

4.38 The ANAO Capability Framework communicates the responsibility of  the  staff  member,  and  supervisor,  to  identify  appropriate  learning  and  development courses to assist in the staff member’s skill development.  

4.39 The  PSB  and  AASG  run  regular  technical  accounting  and  auditing  training to all AASG staff. This training builds upon the financial accounting  and auditing skills sourced from formal training programs run by the Institute  of  Chartered  Accountants  Australia  (ICAA)  and  the  CPA  Australia.  The  ANAO  has  supported  ANAO  staff  to  undertake  the  ICAA  and  the  CPA  Australia programs, for more than 15 years. 84 per cent of AASG staff have full  membership of either ICAA or CPA Australia (or overseas equivalent) or are  undertaking one of these two programs. The bulk of the remaining staff will  commence one of these two programs in the next six to 12 months. 

4.40 In January 2012, in recognition of the ANAO’s strong commitment to  learning  and  development,  CPA  Australia  awarded  the  ANAO  Recognised  Employee Partner Status (Knowledge Level). 

4.41 The  AASG  staff  also  need  to  identify  appropriate  courses  to  attend  during  performance  assessment  discussions  in  order  to  address  the  expectations  set  in  the  capability  framework,  their  performance  agreements  and their individual development plans. Attendance at the monthly technical  updates run by the PSB and AASG technical courses are mandatory. 

50 Quality Control Around Financial Statements Audits

4.42 Opportunities for staff development outside of the AASG are provided  and  can  include  work  rotation  to  other  service  groups  within  the  ANAO,  international audit offices and attendance at industry specific seminars. 

4.43 An Executive Director monitors the AASG’s learning and development  nominations,  tracks  attendance,  and  provides  statistics  to  the  GEDs,  all  Executive Directors and administration managers.  

4.44 The  collective  attendance  at  learning  and  development  courses  is  monitored and reviewed by the:  

 People and Capabilities Strategy Committee— the committee includes  the Deputy Auditor‐General, a GED from each of the business groups  and the Head of Corporate; and 

 Executive  Board  of  Management  (EBOM)  -  EBOM  includes  the  Auditor‐General,  Deputy  Auditor‐General,  Chief  Financial  Officer  of  the ANAO, the GEDs and Head of Corporate. EBOM receives various  statistics  covering  the  costs  and  hours  for  each  group  of  employees  from  the  Corporate  Management  Branch.  In  addition,  the  AASG  reports detailed learning and development statistics to EBOM through  the annual AASG Transparency Report. 

4.45 The AASG leadership group uses the attendance information to assist  in the evaluation of current year initiatives and identification of future learning  and development strategies. 

4.46 The ANAO has a Professional Development Opportunities Policy. The  policy sets out the conditions for ANAO staff undertaking an approved course  of external study at an educational institution such as a university, professional  association, TAFE College or a registered training organisation to develop and  strengthen skill level and capabilities of ANAO staff. The assistance includes  financial assistance, paid study leave, use of accrued leave for attendance at  courses  and  compensation  under  the  Safety,  Rehabilitation  and  Compensation  Act 1988. 

4.47 The studies assistance categories are: 

 Tier 1 Formal Professional Qualifications - Relate to programs essential  to the business needs of the ANAO and are directly related to the staff  member’s  work  (for  example,  accreditation  with  the  Institute  of  Chartered Accountants Australia, CPA Australia, and the Information 

50 Quality Control Around Financial Statements Audits

4.42 Opportunities for staff development outside of the AASG are provided  and  can  include  work  rotation  to  other  service  groups  within  the  ANAO,  international audit offices and attendance at industry specific seminars. 

4.43 An Executive Director monitors the AASG’s learning and development  nominations,  tracks  attendance,  and  provides  statistics  to  the  GEDs,  all  Executive Directors and administration managers.  

4.44 The  collective  attendance  at  learning  and  development  courses  is  monitored and reviewed by the:  

 People and Capabilities Strategy Committee— the committee includes  the Deputy Auditor‐General, a GED from each of the business groups  and the Head of Corporate; and 

 Executive  Board  of  Management  (EBOM)  -  EBOM  includes  the  Auditor‐General,  Deputy  Auditor‐General,  Chief  Financial  Officer  of  the ANAO, the GEDs and Head of Corporate. EBOM receives various  statistics  covering  the  costs  and  hours  for  each  group  of  employees  from  the  Corporate  Management  Branch.  In  addition,  the  AASG  reports detailed learning and development statistics to EBOM through  the annual AASG Transparency Report. 

4.45 The AASG leadership group uses the attendance information to assist  in the evaluation of current year initiatives and identification of future learning  and development strategies. 

4.46 The ANAO has a Professional Development Opportunities Policy. The  policy sets out the conditions for ANAO staff undertaking an approved course  of external study at an educational institution such as a university, professional  association, TAFE College or a registered training organisation to develop and  strengthen skill level and capabilities of ANAO staff. The assistance includes  financial assistance, paid study leave, use of accrued leave for attendance at  courses  and  compensation  under  the  Safety,  Rehabilitation  and  Compensation  Act 1988. 

4.47 The studies assistance categories are: 

 Tier 1 Formal Professional Qualifications - Relate to programs essential  to the business needs of the ANAO and are directly related to the staff  member’s  work  (for  example,  accreditation  with  the  Institute  of  Chartered Accountants Australia, CPA Australia, and the Information 

Human resources

Quality Control Around Financial Statements Audits 51

Systems  Audit  and  Control  Association). 14   All  AASG  personnel 

working  on  financial  statements  audits  are  expected  to  complete  a  formal professional qualification;  

 Tier 2 Accredited Tertiary Educations â€ Relate to programs that have a  high  degree  of  relevance  to  the  ANAO  and  a  priority  for  the  development of internal capabilities 15

; and 

 Tier  3  Study  Programs  -  Relate  to  study  programs  which  are  not  a  priority  to  the  ANAO  but  have  a  broader  Australian  Public  Service  relevance.16 

4.48 To assist graduates and other junior audit team members develop their  core  auditing skills,  the  AASG  has  published  the Assurance Audit  Services  Group  Auditor’s  Handbook.  The  Handbook  documents  twelve  activities  designed to provide a structured approach to on the job training. Each staff  member participating in the program is required to document their activities  against the twelve tasks and discuss their progress with their supervisor. The  activities relate to collecting and analysing data, documentation of systems and  processes, performing core audit procedures and time management.  

4.49 As part of the annual assessment of AASG’s business model, the AASG  assesses their financial statements audit base, associated planned audit effort,  and  resource  levels  including  the  most  appropriate  workforce  mix  for  the  coming year. In determining the AASG’s resourcing requirements, the AASG  performs an analysis of the risk, complexity, size, skill level and the security  requirements  for  each  audit.  This  analysis  is  performed  against  AASG’s  guiding resource principles. Refer to paragraphs 5.23 to 5.25.  

4.50 In order to determine the planned audit effort required to deliver all  financial statements audits, the AASG has developed a model that details the  number  of  hours  required  to  deliver  a  quality  audit  by  individual  staffing  levels. The Capability Framework details the skill and experience required at  each AASG staff level.  

4.51 The  planned  audit  effort  model  is  reassessed  annually  through  the  development of individual financial statements audit budgets, an analysis of  new  Commonwealth  entities,  the  anticipated  audit  effort  required  and 

14 ANAO Studies Assistance Policy & Guidelines April 2012. 15 ibid.

16 ibid.

52 Quality Control Around Financial Statements Audits

significant  events  that  may  lead  to  scope  changes  including  machinery  of  government changes. 

4.52 The total demand across all financial statements audits is assessed in  association  with  recruitment,  staff  retention,  learning  and  development  commitments and promotion assumptions. The total resource demand is met  by AASG staff, supplemented by contractors resources. Throughout the year,  the AASG’s resourcing needs are continuously monitored.  

4.53 The  individual  audit  budgets  are  developed,  approved  by  each  Engagement Executive, and compared against the planned audit effort model  for  each  audit.  Any  variances  between  the  audit  budget  and  the  model 

requires  GED  approval.  Once  approved  the  planned  audit  effort  model  is  updated,  by  staffing  level,  and  forms  the  new  benchmark  hours  and  staff  profile for the audit. In addition, each financial statements audit team updates  the project management system (Changepoint) with the approved budget by  staff level. 

4.54 Throughout the financial statements audit, the budget and actual hours  are compared and analysed by audit teams. Budget to actual performance is  monitored  by  the  GEDs  and  significant  exceptions  are  reported  to  EBOM  through the annual AASG Transparency Report. 

4.55 The assignment of Quality Review Executives, Engagement Executives  and Signing Officers is assessed and reconfirmed annually by the GEDs. The  assignment of the senior team members is discussed at the SES annual resource  allocation meeting.  

4.56 The AASG is structured into four work areas functionally grouped on  government portfolio lines. Within the AASG, a GED is assigned an oversight  function for quality and administration for each group and a GED is assigned  to oversight the general management of the AASG practice.  

4.57 The AASG publishes on their intranet site a consolidated view of staff  allocations, by day, across all ANAO audits. 

4.58 If changes to the allocation are required throughout the year as a result  of staff movements, the resource manager within the work area will attempt to  find a replacement for the individual. If a replacement cannot be identified  within the work area, a discussion with the resource managers in the other  work areas will occur to identify available resources within other work areas.  

4.59 The  Assurance  Audit  Service  Group  Workforce  Plan  2011-2014  is  a  strategic  platform  for  managing  the  AASG  workforce  over  the  period  

52 Quality Control Around Financial Statements Audits

significant  events  that  may  lead  to  scope  changes  including  machinery  of  government changes. 

4.52 The total demand across all financial statements audits is assessed in  association  with  recruitment,  staff  retention,  learning  and  development  commitments and promotion assumptions. The total resource demand is met  by AASG staff, supplemented by contractors resources. Throughout the year,  the AASG’s resourcing needs are continuously monitored.  

4.53 The  individual  audit  budgets  are  developed,  approved  by  each  Engagement Executive, and compared against the planned audit effort model  for  each  audit.  Any  variances  between  the  audit  budget  and  the  model  requires  GED  approval.  Once  approved  the  planned  audit  effort  model  is  updated,  by  staffing  level,  and  forms  the  new  benchmark  hours  and  staff  profile for the audit. In addition, each financial statements audit team updates  the project management system (Changepoint) with the approved budget by  staff level. 

4.54 Throughout the financial statements audit, the budget and actual hours  are compared and analysed by audit teams. Budget to actual performance is  monitored  by  the  GEDs  and  significant  exceptions  are  reported  to  EBOM  through the annual AASG Transparency Report. 

4.55 The assignment of Quality Review Executives, Engagement Executives  and Signing Officers is assessed and reconfirmed annually by the GEDs. The  assignment of the senior team members is discussed at the SES annual resource  allocation meeting.  

4.56 The AASG is structured into four work areas functionally grouped on  government portfolio lines. Within the AASG, a GED is assigned an oversight  function for quality and administration for each group and a GED is assigned  to oversight the general management of the AASG practice.  

4.57 The AASG publishes on their intranet site a consolidated view of staff  allocations, by day, across all ANAO audits. 

4.58 If changes to the allocation are required throughout the year as a result  of staff movements, the resource manager within the work area will attempt to  find a replacement for the individual. If a replacement cannot be identified  within the work area, a discussion with the resource managers in the other  work areas will occur to identify available resources within other work areas.  

4.59 The  Assurance  Audit  Service  Group  Workforce  Plan  2011-2014  is  a  strategic  platform  for  managing  the  AASG  workforce  over  the  period  

Human resources

Quality Control Around Financial Statements Audits 53

2011-201417 and is prepared by the GEDs. The plan identifies and discusses key  work force risks and strategy areas. 

4.60 The AASG’s current workforce includes ANAO staff and is supported  by contract resources based on the Workforce Plan 2011-2014. The planned  audit effort (AASG staff hours required to complete the audit work) is used as  a basis to determine the benchmark profile of all AASG staff, and the extent of  contract  resources.  Factors  impacting  resource  availability  such  as  retention  rates, recruitment, internal promotions and changes to the environment and  services are discussed in the workforce plan and are used in calculating the  planned audit effort and resource level requirements. 

Considerations 4.61 No considerations noted. 

Conclusion 4.62 As  at  the  date  of  this  report,  the  activities  and  responsibilities  established  by  the  ANAO’s  Quality  Assurance  Framework  in  relation  to  human  resources  for  financial  statements  audits  are  consistent  with  the  relevant requirements of ASQC 1 Quality Control for Firms that Perform Audits  and  Reviews  of  Financial  Reports  and  Other  Financial  Information,  and  Other  Assurance Engagements. 

17 Australian National Audit Office Assurance Audit Services Group Workforce Plan 2011-2014.

54 Quality Control Around Financial Statements Audits

5. Engagement performance

ASQC 1 Requirements

5.1 The firm shall establish policies and procedures designed to provide  it with reasonable assurance that engagements are performed in accordance  with AUASB Standards, relevant ethical requirements, and applicable legal  and regulatory requirements, and that the firm or the engagement partner  issue reports that are appropriate in the circumstances. Such policies and  procedures shall include: 

(a) matters  relevant  to  promoting  consistency  in  the  quality  of  engagement performance; 

(b) supervision responsibilities; and 

(c) review responsibilities. 

5.2 The  firm’s  review  responsibility  policies  and  procedures  shall  be  determined  on  the  basis  that  work  of  less  experienced  engagement  team  members is reviewed by more experienced engagement team members. 

5.3 The firm shall establish policies and procedures designed to provide  it with reasonable assurance that:  

(a) appropriate  consultation  takes  place  on  difficult  or  contentious  matters; 

(b) sufficient resources are available to enable appropriate consultation  to take place; 

(c) the  nature  and  scope  of,  and  conclusions  resulting  from,  such  consultations are documented and are agreed by both the individual  seeking consultation and the individual consulted; and 

(d) conclusions resulting from consultations are implemented.  

5.4 The reasons for alternative course of action from consultations were  undertaken, are documented.  

5.5 The  firm  shall  establish  policies  and  procedures  requiring,  for  appropriate  engagements,  an  engagement  quality  control  review  that  provides an objective evaluation of the significant judgements made by the  engagement  team  and  the  conclusions  reached  in  formulating  the  report.  Such policies and procedures shall: 

54 Quality Control Around Financial Statements Audits

5. Engagement performance

ASQC 1 Requirements

5.1 The firm shall establish policies and procedures designed to provide  it with reasonable assurance that engagements are performed in accordance  with AUASB Standards, relevant ethical requirements, and applicable legal  and regulatory requirements, and that the firm or the engagement partner  issue reports that are appropriate in the circumstances. Such policies and  procedures shall include: 

(a) matters  relevant  to  promoting  consistency  in  the  quality  of  engagement performance; 

(b) supervision responsibilities; and 

(c) review responsibilities. 

5.2 The  firm’s  review  responsibility  policies  and  procedures  shall  be  determined  on  the  basis  that  work  of  less  experienced  engagement  team  members is reviewed by more experienced engagement team members. 

5.3 The firm shall establish policies and procedures designed to provide  it with reasonable assurance that:  

(a) appropriate  consultation  takes  place  on  difficult  or  contentious  matters; 

(b) sufficient resources are available to enable appropriate consultation  to take place; 

(c) the  nature  and  scope  of,  and  conclusions  resulting  from,  such  consultations are documented and are agreed by both the individual  seeking consultation and the individual consulted; and 

(d) conclusions resulting from consultations are implemented.  

5.4 The reasons for alternative course of action from consultations were  undertaken, are documented.  

5.5 The  firm  shall  establish  policies  and  procedures  requiring,  for  appropriate  engagements,  an  engagement  quality  control  review  that  provides an objective evaluation of the significant judgements made by the  engagement  team  and  the  conclusions  reached  in  formulating  the  report.  Such policies and procedures shall: 

Engagement performance

Quality Control Around Financial Statements Audits 55

(a) require  an  engagement  quality  control  review  for  all  audits  of  financial reports of listed entities; 

(b) set out criteria against which all other audits and reviews of historical  financial  information  and  other  assurance  engagements  shall  be  evaluated  to  determine  whether  an  engagement  quality  control  review should be performed; and 

(c) require an engagement quality control review for all engagements, if  any,  meeting  the  criteria  established  in  compliance  with  subparagraph 35(b) of this Standard. 

5.6 The  firm  shall  establish  policies  and  procedures  setting  out  the  nature, timing  and  extent  of  an  engagement quality  control  review. Such  policies  and  procedures  shall  require  that  the  engagement  report  not  be  dated until the completion of the engagement quality control review. 

5.7 The  firm  shall  establish  policies  and  procedures  to  require  the  engagement quality control review to include: 

(a) discussion of significant matters with the engagement partner; 

(b) review of the financial report or other subject matter information and  the proposed report; 

(c) review of selected engagement documentation relating to significant  judgements  the  engagement  team  made  and  the  conclusions  it  reached; and 

(d) evaluation of the conclusions reached in formulating the report and  consideration of whether the proposed report is appropriate. 

5.8 The  firm  shall  establish  policies  and  procedures  to  address  the  appointment  of  engagement  quality  control  reviewers  and  establish  their  eligibility through: 

(a) the technical qualifications  required to perform the role,  including  the necessary experience and authority; and 

(b) the degree to which an engagement quality control reviewer can be  consulted on the engagement without compromising the reviewerʹs  objectivity. 

5.9 The firm shall establish policies and procedures designed to maintain  the objectivity of the engagement quality control reviewer. 

56 Quality Control Around Financial Statements Audits

5.10 The firmʹs policies and procedures shall provide for the replacement  of the engagement quality control reviewer where the reviewerʹs ability to  perform an objective review may be impaired. 

5.11 The firm shall establish policies and procedures on documentation of  the engagement quality control review which require documentation that: 

(a) the procedures required by the firmʹs policies on engagement quality  control review have been performed; 

(b) the engagement quality control has been completed on or before the  date of the report; and  

(c) the  reviewer  is  not  aware  of  any  unresolved  matters  that  would  cause  the  reviewer  to  believe  that  the  significant  judgements  the  engagement  team  made  and  the  conclusions  it  reached  were  not  appropriate. 

5.12 The firm shall establish policies and procedures for dealing with and  resolving  differences  of  opinion  within  the  engagement  team,  with  those  consulted and, where applicable, between the engagement partner and the  engagement quality control reviewer. 

5.13 Such policies and procedures shall require that: 

(a) conclusions reached be documented and implemented; and 

(b) the date of the report cannot be earlier than the date on which the  matter is resolved. 

5.14 The  firm  shall  establish  policies  and  procedures  for  engagement  teams to complete the assembly of final engagement files on a timely basis  after the engagement reports have been finalised. 

5.15 The firm shall establish policies and procedures designed to maintain  the confidentiality, safe custody, integrity, accessibility and retrievability of  engagement documentation. 

5.16 The firm shall establish policies and procedures for the retention of  engagement documentation for a period sufficient to meet the needs of the  firm or as required by law or regulation. 

56 Quality Control Around Financial Statements Audits

5.10 The firmʹs policies and procedures shall provide for the replacement  of the engagement quality control reviewer where the reviewerʹs ability to  perform an objective review may be impaired. 

5.11 The firm shall establish policies and procedures on documentation of  the engagement quality control review which require documentation that: 

(a) the procedures required by the firmʹs policies on engagement quality  control review have been performed; 

(b) the engagement quality control has been completed on or before the  date of the report; and  

(c) the  reviewer  is  not  aware  of  any  unresolved  matters  that  would  cause  the  reviewer  to  believe  that  the  significant  judgements  the  engagement  team  made  and  the  conclusions  it  reached  were  not  appropriate. 

5.12 The firm shall establish policies and procedures for dealing with and  resolving  differences  of  opinion  within  the  engagement  team,  with  those  consulted and, where applicable, between the engagement partner and the  engagement quality control reviewer. 

5.13 Such policies and procedures shall require that: 

(a) conclusions reached be documented and implemented; and 

(b) the date of the report cannot be earlier than the date on which the  matter is resolved. 

5.14 The  firm  shall  establish  policies  and  procedures  for  engagement  teams to complete the assembly of final engagement files on a timely basis  after the engagement reports have been finalised. 

5.15 The firm shall establish policies and procedures designed to maintain  the confidentiality, safe custody, integrity, accessibility and retrievability of  engagement documentation. 

5.16 The firm shall establish policies and procedures for the retention of  engagement documentation for a period sufficient to meet the needs of the  firm or as required by law or regulation. 

Engagement performance

Quality Control Around Financial Statements Audits 57

Audit Procedures 5.17 Interviews in regards to engagement performance were conducted with  the: 

 Auditor‐General and Deputy Auditor‐General; 

 AASG Group Executive Directors (GEDs); 

 Executive Directors in the AASG; and 

 Executive Director of the Professional Services Branch (PSB).  

5.18 The focus of the interviews and review of key documentation was to  discuss  engagement  performance  policy  requirements  of  the  ANAO  and  communication of these requirements to all staff in the AASG.  

5.19 The following documents were reviewed: 

 key documentation as detailed in Appendix Two:  

 ANAO  reporting  templates  for  Quality  Review  Executives,  Engagement  Executives  and  Signing  Officers  specifying  the  requirements  for  their  involvement in the planning, control, substantive and completion phases of  the financial statements audit;  

 ANAO templates for documenting consultation and relying on the work of  an expert in the financial statements audit; and 

 content available on the AASG and PSB intranet. 

5.20 Procedures included understanding and analysing the process for the: 

 selection of project managed engagements and private sector audit firms;  and  

 supervision and review by Engagement Executives and/or Signing Officers  of project managed engagements. 

ANAO Implementation Policies and procedures designed to provide the ANAO with reasonable assurance that engagements are performed in accordance with AUASB standards, relevant ethical requirements and applicable regulatory requirements including matters promoting consistency in the quality of the engagement, supervision responsibilities and review responsibilities.

5.21 The AASG performed 261 financial statements audits for the financial  year ended 30 June 2012. 

58 Quality Control Around Financial Statements Audits

5.22 Under section 27 of the Auditor‐General Act 1997, the Auditor‐General,  on behalf of the Commonwealth, may engage any person under contract to  assist  in  the  performance  of  any  Auditor‐General  function.  Of  the  total  261 financial statements audits performed in 2011-12, 92 were performed by  ANAO staff and 169 were project‐managed audits where, oversighted by an  ANAO Signing Officer, an audit firm is engaged to undertake the audit on  behalf of the Auditor‐General.  

5.23 In  2011-12,  the  audits  performed  by  AASG  staff  consisted  of  over  85 per cent of both the General Government Sector and whole of government  income and expenses. 

5.24 As part of AASG’s business model, each year AASG assess their audit  base, associated planned audit effort, and resource levels including the most  appropriate workforce mix. As part of this process, the selection of financial  statements audits to be performed by ANAO staff or project managed by an  ANAO  Signing  Officer  is  assessed  against  guiding  principles.  The  guiding  principles have been developed by the GEDs in consultation with the Auditor‐ General and consider the nature, risk, industry, location and complexity of the  entity.  

5.25 ANAO  staff  perform  the  audits  of  departments  of  state,  regulatory  bodies and information entities, as the core skill set of the ANAO is auditing  public sector entities. Audits that require specialist skill sets, or are based in  locations  where  it  is  not  efficient  to  perform  the  audit  from  Canberra,  are  generally project managed with the assistance of private sector audit firms.  

5.26 A Signing Officer is allocated to each project‐managed audit and takes  responsibility for the quality of the audit.  

5.27 PAAM  60.4  Project  Managed  Audits  sets  out  the  Signing  Officer’s  responsibilities where an audit firm is engaged to assist in the conduct of the  audit.  The  policy  sets  out  minimum  requirements  for  Signing  Officers  and  Engagement Executives in meeting their responsibilities for project managed  audits.  The  policy  also  requires  the  contracted  audit  firm  to  use  an  audit  methodology that enables compliance  with the requirements of: the  ANAO  auditing standards, legislation or regulations relevant to the audit, APES 110  Code of Ethics for Professional Accountants and such policies and procedures as  are notified to the contractor by the ANAO Engagement Executive.18 

18 PAAM 60.4 Project Management Audits.

58 Quality Control Around Financial Statements Audits

5.22 Under section 27 of the Auditor‐General Act 1997, the Auditor‐General,  on behalf of the Commonwealth, may engage any person under contract to  assist  in  the  performance  of  any  Auditor‐General  function.  Of  the  total  261 financial statements audits performed in 2011-12, 92 were performed by  ANAO staff and 169 were project‐managed audits where, oversighted by an  ANAO Signing Officer, an audit firm is engaged to undertake the audit on  behalf of the Auditor‐General.  

5.23 In  2011-12,  the  audits  performed  by  AASG  staff  consisted  of  over  85 per cent of both the General Government Sector and whole of government  income and expenses. 

5.24 As part of AASG’s business model, each year AASG assess their audit  base, associated planned audit effort, and resource levels including the most  appropriate workforce mix. As part of this process, the selection of financial  statements audits to be performed by ANAO staff or project managed by an  ANAO  Signing  Officer  is  assessed  against  guiding  principles.  The  guiding  principles have been developed by the GEDs in consultation with the Auditor‐ General and consider the nature, risk, industry, location and complexity of the  entity.  

5.25 ANAO  staff  perform  the  audits  of  departments  of  state,  regulatory  bodies and information entities, as the core skill set of the ANAO is auditing  public sector entities. Audits that require specialist skill sets, or are based in  locations  where  it  is  not  efficient  to  perform  the  audit  from  Canberra,  are  generally project managed with the assistance of private sector audit firms.  

5.26 A Signing Officer is allocated to each project‐managed audit and takes  responsibility for the quality of the audit.  

5.27 PAAM  60.4  Project  Managed  Audits  sets  out  the  Signing  Officer’s  responsibilities where an audit firm is engaged to assist in the conduct of the  audit.  The  policy  sets  out  minimum  requirements  for  Signing  Officers  and  Engagement Executives in meeting their responsibilities for project managed  audits.  The  policy  also  requires  the  contracted  audit  firm  to  use  an  audit  methodology that enables compliance  with the requirements of: the  ANAO  auditing standards, legislation or regulations relevant to the audit, APES 110  Code of Ethics for Professional Accountants and such policies and procedures as  are notified to the contractor by the ANAO Engagement Executive.18 

18 PAAM 60.4 Project Management Audits.

Engagement performance

Quality Control Around Financial Statements Audits 59

5.28 All  contract  procurement  arrangements  are  performed  in  accordance  with the Commonwealth Procurement Rules. As part of the tender evaluation  process, contract audit firms are assessed against set criteria and their ability to  satisfy the overall requirements. The criteria includes how the contract audit  firms’  audit  methodology,  proposed  approach  and  management  processes  meet  the  needs  of  the  ANAO.  Key  elements  of  the  assessment  include  the  qualifications and experience of the tenderer’s professional staff proposed to  be involved in the provision of the services and price. 

5.29 The  Engagement  Executive  Progressive  Involvement  Report  is  completed  by  the  Engagement  Executive  for  each  project‐managed  engagement. The report summarises the Engagement Executive’s involvement  in the financial statements audit.  

5.30 The following table (Table 1) outlines the key requirements and how  the ANAO addresses each in practice. 

Table 1

Key requirements19 and ANAO response

Requirement Response

Require the use of an audit methodology that enables compliance with ANAO auditing standards, legislation or regulations relevant to the audit and APES 110 Code of Ethics for Professional Accountants.

The Request for Tender for each project-managed audit evaluates the tenderer’s audit methodology, approach and the management process proposed to meet the requirements of the ANAO.

The contract states the successful tenderer will be required to comply, and must ensure its personnel and subcontractors comply, with laws and Commonwealth policies (as listed in the contract). The engagement partner of the contract out firm must formally represent to each Signing Officer for each financial statements audit that the audit services have been completed in accordance with the applicable ANAO auditing standards.

The Engagement Executive Progressive Involvement Record requires the Engagement Executive to confirm that they are satisfied that relevant PAAM policies have been notified to the contractor and the policy requirements have been followed. PAAM policies contain the ANAO auditing standards.

19 PAAM 60.4 Project Managed Audits.

60 Quality Control Around Financial Statements Audits

Requirement Response

ANAO Signing Officer is responsible for the audit and is the engagement partner for the purposes of the Auditing Standards.

The AASG maintains a listing of each financial statement audit performed per the Financial Management and Accountability Act 1997 and Commonwealth Authorities and Companies Act 1997. The listing details the Engagement Executive, the Signing Officer, the Quality Review Executive (if applicable), and the Second Reviewer (if applicable). An Engagement Executive is assigned to each project-managed engagement.

Engagement Executive to be briefed by the project-managed partner at appropriate times during the audit.

The Engagement Executive Progressive Involvement Record requires the Engagement Executive to confirm that they have documented evidence of their involvement, including briefings, at the planning, interim and final stages.

The Engagement Executive is required to approve:

 Key aspects of the audit approach;

 Assessment of overall and performance materiality assessment;

 Unadjusted audit differences;

 Signing Officer Review Memorandum;

 Audited financial statements; and

 Audit report.

The Engagement Executive Progressive Involvement Record requires the Engagement Executive to confirm that the requirements have been achieved.

Engagement Executive (and if different, the Signing Officer) shall be satisfied that the project managed engagement partner has completed their work in accordance with the ANAO auditing standards.

The Engagement Executive Progressive Involvement Report requires that the Engagement Executive make enquiries and review such work papers as they consider necessary to be satisfied that the quality control procedures applied to the audit are in accordance with the requirements of the contract, including meeting ANAO auditing standards and obtaining sufficient and appropriate audit evidence. As noted above, the engagement partner of the contract out firm must represent to the Engagement Executive for each financial statements audit that the audit services have been completed in accordance with the applicable ANAO auditing standards at audit completion.

60 Quality Control Around Financial Statements Audits

Requirement Response

ANAO Signing Officer is responsible for the audit and is the engagement partner for the purposes of the Auditing Standards.

The AASG maintains a listing of each financial statement audit performed per the Financial Management and Accountability Act 1997 and Commonwealth Authorities and Companies Act 1997. The listing details the Engagement Executive, the Signing Officer, the Quality Review Executive (if applicable), and the Second Reviewer (if applicable). An Engagement Executive is assigned to each project-managed engagement.

Engagement Executive to be briefed by the project-managed partner at appropriate times during the audit.

The Engagement Executive Progressive Involvement Record requires the Engagement Executive to confirm that they have documented evidence of their involvement, including briefings, at the planning, interim and final stages.

The Engagement Executive is required to approve:

 Key aspects of the audit approach;

 Assessment of overall and performance materiality assessment;

 Unadjusted audit differences;

 Signing Officer Review Memorandum;

 Audited financial statements; and

 Audit report.

The Engagement Executive Progressive Involvement Record requires the Engagement Executive to confirm that the requirements have been achieved.

Engagement Executive (and if different, the Signing Officer) shall be satisfied that the project managed engagement partner has completed their work in accordance with the ANAO auditing standards.

The Engagement Executive Progressive Involvement Report requires that the Engagement Executive make enquiries and review such work papers as they consider necessary to be satisfied that the quality control procedures applied to the audit are in accordance with the requirements of the contract, including meeting ANAO auditing standards and obtaining sufficient and appropriate audit evidence. As noted above, the engagement partner of the contract out firm must represent to the Engagement Executive for each financial statements audit that the audit services have been completed in accordance with the applicable ANAO auditing standards at audit completion.

Engagement performance

Quality Control Around Financial Statements Audits 61

Requirement Response

Where a Quality Review Executive is appointed the Engagement Executive is satisfied that the review processes have been completed satisfactorily before the audit report is issued.

The Engagement Executive Progressive Involvement Record requires the Engagement Executive to confirm that the Quality Review Executive’s processes have been completed satisfactorily before the audit report date.

The audit file must contain documented evidence of the Engagement Executive’s (and if different, the Signing Officer’s) involvement, including at the briefings at the planning, interim and final stages.

The Engagement Executive Progressive Involvement Record requires the Engagement Executive to confirm that they have documented evidence of their involvement, including briefings, at the planning, interim and final stages.

5.31 The  engagement  risk  rating  for  each  financial  statements  audit  is  assessed in planning. The engagement risk rating considers the risk that the  financial information might be materially misstated before considering audit  procedures to reduce this risk to an acceptable level.20 

5.32 At the commencement of the audit cycle, the GEDs and the Executive  Directors meet to discuss the engagement risk rating of all financial statements  audits to be undertaken by the ANAO during the coming audit cycle. Factors  that may impact the engagement risk rating are discussed and include: size,  complexity  and  stability,  business  risks  of  the  entity  in  the  current  period,  previous audit findings, significant changes in the business and the legal or  regulatory environment.  

5.33 The  AASG  uses  a  three‐tiered  engagement  risk  rating  scale  of  high,  moderate  or  low.  Of  the  total  261  financial  statements  audits  the  ANAO  performed  in  2011-12,  two  audits  were  rated  as  high  engagement  risk,  70 audits were rated as moderate engagement risk and 189 audits were rated  as low engagement risk. The two audits rated high risk were performed by  ANAO staff. 

5.34 Following the conclusion of the preliminary engagement risk rating by  the GEDs and Executive Directors, the engagement risk ratings for all audits  are documented in the minutes of the meeting and updated in Changepoint.  The minutes detail the key changes to the engagement risk ratings (increase or  decrease in the risk rating), engagement risk ratings to be finalised and checks 

20 PAAM Engagement Risk Rating 70.1.3.

62 Quality Control Around Financial Statements Audits

that are performed to ensure a complete list of financial statements audits have  been reviewed.  

5.35 The  entity’s  overall  risk  rating  (as  determined  at  planning)  is  documented in the Risk Assessment Template  for  each financial statements  audit conducted by ANAO staff. The Risk Assessment Template requires the  audit  team  to  consider  key  financial  information,  key  non‐financial  information,  audit  findings  (including  audit  qualifications,  statutory  and  legislative matters and carried forward findings from the previous year audit),  internal controls assessments and information technology control assessments  in  concluding  on  the  entity’s  overall  risk  rating.  This  assessment  is  documented and must be approved by the Signing Officer.  

5.36 PAAM 60.1 Role and Responsibilities of the Engagement Executive state the  supervision and review responsibilities of the Engagement Executive include: 

 the  direction,  supervision  and  performance  of  the  engagement  in  accordance with professional and auditing standards and regulatory and  legal requirements. The Engagement Executive is required to document the  extent and timing of their reviews; 

 the  assignment  of  engagement  teams  and  auditor’s  experts  which  collectively have the appropriate levels of competencies and capabilities;  

 following  appropriate  procedures  for  consultations  and  differences  of  opinion;  

 sufficient  involvement  in  the  audit  engagement  at  appropriate  stages  throughout the engagement;  

 assessing  the  engagement  team’s  compliance  with  ethical  requirements  including the ANAO’s independence policy; and  

 concluding whether sufficient and appropriate audit evidence exists and  has been documented to support the conclusions reached and the auditor’s  report can be issued.  

5.37 PAAM  60.2  Role  and  Responsibilities  of  the  Signing  Officer  states  the  supervision and review responsibilities of the Signing Officer include: 

 review of key aspects of the audit strategy including key judgements in the  audit;  

 approval  of  the  Signing  Officer  Review  Memorandum  which  includes  details  of  significant  matters  arising  in  the  audit,  and  in  particular, 

62 Quality Control Around Financial Statements Audits

that are performed to ensure a complete list of financial statements audits have  been reviewed.  

5.35 The  entity’s  overall  risk  rating  (as  determined  at  planning)  is  documented in the Risk Assessment Template  for  each financial statements  audit conducted by ANAO staff. The Risk Assessment Template requires the  audit  team  to  consider  key  financial  information,  key  non‐financial  information,  audit  findings  (including  audit  qualifications,  statutory  and 

legislative matters and carried forward findings from the previous year audit),  internal controls assessments and information technology control assessments  in  concluding  on  the  entity’s  overall  risk  rating.  This  assessment  is  documented and must be approved by the Signing Officer.  

5.36 PAAM 60.1 Role and Responsibilities of the Engagement Executive state the  supervision and review responsibilities of the Engagement Executive include: 

 the  direction,  supervision  and  performance  of  the  engagement  in  accordance with professional and auditing standards and regulatory and  legal requirements. The Engagement Executive is required to document the  extent and timing of their reviews; 

 the  assignment  of  engagement  teams  and  auditor’s  experts  which  collectively have the appropriate levels of competencies and capabilities;  

 following  appropriate  procedures  for  consultations  and  differences  of  opinion;  

 sufficient  involvement  in  the  audit  engagement  at  appropriate  stages  throughout the engagement;  

 assessing  the  engagement  team’s  compliance  with  ethical  requirements  including the ANAO’s independence policy; and  

 concluding whether sufficient and appropriate audit evidence exists and  has been documented to support the conclusions reached and the auditor’s  report can be issued.  

5.37 PAAM  60.2  Role  and  Responsibilities  of  the  Signing  Officer  states  the  supervision and review responsibilities of the Signing Officer include: 

 review of key aspects of the audit strategy including key judgements in the  audit;  

 approval  of  the  Signing  Officer  Review  Memorandum  which  includes  details  of  significant  matters  arising  in  the  audit,  and  in  particular, 

Engagement performance

Quality Control Around Financial Statements Audits 63

consultation and conclusion on matters that were difficult or contentious;  and  

 review any other matters that the Signing Officer considers appropriate in  the circumstances.  

5.38 The  GEDs  oversee  the  allocation  of  Signing  Officers  to  financial  statements audits taking into account the audit engagement risk and auditor  rotation requirements. The role of allocating AASG staff to financial statement  audits is delegated to an individual Executive Director. The Executive Director  allocates AASG employees to the engagement based on resource requirements  in consultation with the GEDs. Refer to paragraphs 4.16 and paragraphs 4.49 to  4.58 for further commentary. 

5.39  The  ANAO  financial  audit  manual  is  PAAM.  The  AASG  uses  an  electronic  audit  tool  to  support  the  application  of  audit  policy,  audit  methodology and to maintain documentation in relation to the execution of the  financial statements audit. The electronic audit tool has an on‐line guidance  manual, supported by a large international private audit firm, and includes  audit  programs  for  the  conduct  of  financial  statements  audit  in  accordance  with the ANAO auditing standards. 

5.40 The ANAO utilises a number of resources to promote consistency in the  quality of the audit. In addition to the electronic audit tool, PSB and AASG  have  intranet  sites  that  contain  audit  reference  material.  Reference  material  includes, but is not limited to the following: 

 PAAM  -  Documents  ANAO  audit  methodology  and  policy.  The  Professional Services Branch also maintains a matrix that reconciles the  ANAO audit methodology to auditing standards requirements.  

 Audit Quality Aide Memoire - The document communicates to AASG  staff the Auditor‐General’s and the GEDs’ expectations. The document  sets  out  common  audit  themes  from  reviews  such  as  the  Australian  Securities and Investments Commission’s assessment of private sector  audit  firms  and  internal  ANAO  reviews.  The  document  is  updated  annually  and  highlights  areas  where  additional  care  by  audit  teams  may be required. 

 Technical bulletins - The bulletins discuss application of auditing and  accounting standard requirements.  

 Question and answer database (Q&A database) - The database is used  by audit teams to submit questions relating to the application of audit 

64 Quality Control Around Financial Statements Audits

methodology,  accounting  standards  and  legislative  and/or  reporting  requirements.  Audit  teams  are  able  to  view  questions  submitted  previously and answers published. Audit teams can use this database  as  a  resource  to  understand  the  basis  of  prior  answers  to  questions  submitted which may be applicable to their current audits.  

 Guides  -  The  guides  include  audit  and  non  audit  topics.  The  audit  guides provide direction and guidance on how to audit components of  financial  statements.  The  non  audit  guides  address  topics  such  as  writing  skills,  the  use  of  the  electronic  audit  tool  and  project  management. These guides support staff in the consistent application of  audit and operational skills.  

 Other - Includes links to external reference material, illustrative guides  of financial statements, financial reporting frameworks, contact details  for  audit  methodology  champions  etc.  The  resources  are  developed  collaboratively by the AASG and the PSB and are in response to needs  identified by audit teams, audit inspection programs and continuous  improvement program such as the methodology support project.  

5.41 To assess engagement performance, an independent company conducts  a client survey each year. The survey is sent to all public service entities for  which the AASG performs a financial statements audit. The survey asks the  participants to respond to questions on the overall performance of the ANAO,  consultation,  communication,  understanding  of  the  public  sector  entity,  knowledge,  skills,  conduct,  reporting  and  value  added  by  the  ANAO.  The  2011-12  survey  showed  overall  performance  was  positive  with  noted  improvements in some metrics.  

Policies and procedures designed to provide the ANAO with reasonable assurance that appropriate consultation takes place, sufficient resources are available, the nature and scope of consultations are documented and agreed, and conclusions reached from consultations are implemented.

5.42 The  ANAO  policy  relating  to  consultation  is  documented  in  PAAM  100.1 Consultation. The audit team is required to undertake consultation during  the  course  of  the  audit  with  members  of  the  engagement  team,  within  the  ANAO and outside the ANAO as appropriate.  

5.43 All consultations are required to be documented on the audit file. The  key  matters  that  must  be  documented  are  the  nature  and  scope  of,  and  conclusions  resulting  from,  such  consultations,  evidence  the  documentation 

64 Quality Control Around Financial Statements Audits

methodology,  accounting  standards  and  legislative  and/or  reporting  requirements.  Audit  teams  are  able  to  view  questions  submitted  previously and answers published. Audit teams can use this database  as  a  resource  to  understand  the  basis  of  prior  answers  to  questions  submitted which may be applicable to their current audits.  

 Guides  -  The  guides  include  audit  and  non  audit  topics.  The  audit  guides provide direction and guidance on how to audit components of  financial  statements.  The  non  audit  guides  address  topics  such  as  writing  skills,  the  use  of  the  electronic  audit  tool  and  project  management. These guides support staff in the consistent application of  audit and operational skills.  

 Other - Includes links to external reference material, illustrative guides  of financial statements, financial reporting frameworks, contact details  for  audit  methodology  champions  etc.  The  resources  are  developed  collaboratively by the AASG and the PSB and are in response to needs  identified by audit teams, audit inspection programs and continuous  improvement program such as the methodology support project.  

5.41 To assess engagement performance, an independent company conducts  a client survey each year. The survey is sent to all public service entities for  which the AASG performs a financial statements audit. The survey asks the  participants to respond to questions on the overall performance of the ANAO,  consultation,  communication,  understanding  of  the  public  sector  entity,  knowledge,  skills,  conduct,  reporting  and  value  added  by  the  ANAO.  The  2011-12  survey  showed  overall  performance  was  positive  with  noted  improvements in some metrics.  

Policies and procedures designed to provide the ANAO with reasonable assurance that appropriate consultation takes place, sufficient resources are available, the nature and scope of consultations are documented and agreed, and conclusions reached from consultations are implemented.

5.42 The  ANAO  policy  relating  to  consultation  is  documented  in  PAAM  100.1 Consultation. The audit team is required to undertake consultation during  the  course  of  the  audit  with  members  of  the  engagement  team,  within  the  ANAO and outside the ANAO as appropriate.  

5.43 All consultations are required to be documented on the audit file. The  key  matters  that  must  be  documented  are  the  nature  and  scope  of,  and  conclusions  resulting  from,  such  consultations,  evidence  the  documentation 

Engagement performance

Quality Control Around Financial Statements Audits 65

was  agreed  with  the  consulting  party  and  conclusions  resulting  from  consideration of the consultation.21 

5.44 PAAM 100.1 Consultation states that it is a matter of judgement as to  whether  consultation  is  needed.  The  Engagement  Executive  is  required  to  consider whether for each difficult or contentious matter the team collectively  has the expertise and experience to resolve the matter without consultation or  whether there is a need to consult. Engagement teams can consult internally  with  the  PSB.  The  PSB  provides  services  such  as  technical  advice  on  the  application of accounting standards, audit methodology and legislative issues.  

5.45 The  Engagement  Executive  may  consult  with  the  Quality  Review  Executive, the PSB or experts outside the ANAO.  

5.46 Audit  teams  submit  matters  for  consultation  to  the  PSB  using  a  Question and Answer (‘Q&A’) database. When audit teams submit a matter for  consultation  they  are  required  to  provide  background  facts,  details  of  communications with other parties (e.g. other experts, external agencies etc.),  the  matter  in  question  and  a  proposed  answer/resolution  if  available.  The  matter  must  be  approved  by  the  Signing  Officer  prior  to  the  matter  being  submitted and following this the matter is allocated to a subject matter expert  in the PSB to address.  

5.47 The PSB has auditing and accounting standards subject matter experts.  The Executive Director of the PSB monitors the volume of matters submitted  using the  Question and Answer database and  evaluates  whether additional  resources are required to meet demand.  

5.48 Following  resolution  of  the  matter,  the  response  is  published  in  the  Q&A  database  for  the  audit  team  to  view.  If  the  matter  does  not  contain  confidential information it will be available on the intranet for all AASG staff  to view.  

5.49  The ANAO has a Qualifications and Accounting Policy Committee. All  proposed  modifications  to  audit  opinions  are  referred  to  the  Committee.  Unresolved  significant  differences  of  opinion  are  also  referred  to  the  Qualifications and Accounting Policy Committee. A difference of opinion may  occur  between  two  or  more  of  the  following  parties:  the  Engagement  Executive, Executive Director of the PSB, the Quality Review Executive, the  GEDs and other parties consulted on the matter.  

21 PAAM 100.1 Consultation.

66 Quality Control Around Financial Statements Audits

5.50 Differences  in  opinion  and  the  advice  of  the  Qualifications  and  Accounting  Policy  Committee  are  required  to  be  documented  by  the  Engagement  Executive.  The  Signing  Officer  Review  Memorandum  should  identify such differences and include the resolutions to each matter.  

Policies and procedures requiring, for appropriate engagements, an engagement quality control review that provides objective evaluation of the significant judgements made by the engagement team and the conclusions reached in formulating the report.

5.51 PAAM 110.1 Role and Responsibilities of the Quality Review Executive sets  out the circumstances for the appointment of a Quality Review Executive and  the responsibilities of the Quality Review Executive.  

5.52 A Quality Review Executive is required to be appointed when: 

 the risk of material misstatement has been assessed as high by the Signing  Officer  on  a  financial  statements  audit  that  is  material  to  the  Commonwealth’s consolidated financial statements; and  

 the audit is of a listed entity.

5.53 Quality  Review  Executives  appointed to  a  financial  statements  audit  must have a minimum of three years’ financial statements audit experience at  the Executive Director level or equivalent.22 

5.54 To  maintain  the  Quality  Review  Executive’s  objectivity,  the  Quality  Review  Executive  is  not  permitted  to  be  involved  in  the  decision  making  process  on  the  audit,  participate  in  the  engagement  during  the  period  of  appointment and must be different to the GED assigned to the audit as the  ‘sounding  board’  for  the  Engagement  Executive.  During  the  financial  statements  audit  if  the  Quality  Review  Executive’s  objectivity  may  have  become impaired, PAAM 110.1 Role and Responsibilities of the Quality Review  Executive  required  the  GEDs  to  recommend  to  the  Auditor‐General  the  appointment of a new Quality Review Executive for the financial statements  audit.  

5.55 PAAM 110.1 Role and Responsibilities of the Quality Review Executive sets  out the nature and extent of the quality review. The Quality Review Executive  is required to: 

22 PAAM 110.1.7 Role and responsibilities of the Quality Review Executive.

66 Quality Control Around Financial Statements Audits

5.50 Differences  in  opinion  and  the  advice  of  the  Qualifications  and  Accounting  Policy  Committee  are  required  to  be  documented  by  the  Engagement  Executive.  The  Signing  Officer  Review  Memorandum  should  identify such differences and include the resolutions to each matter.  

Policies and procedures requiring, for appropriate engagements, an engagement quality control review that provides objective evaluation of the significant judgements made by the engagement team and the conclusions reached in formulating the report.

5.51 PAAM 110.1 Role and Responsibilities of the Quality Review Executive sets  out the circumstances for the appointment of a Quality Review Executive and  the responsibilities of the Quality Review Executive.  

5.52 A Quality Review Executive is required to be appointed when: 

 the risk of material misstatement has been assessed as high by the Signing  Officer  on  a  financial  statements  audit  that  is  material  to  the  Commonwealth’s consolidated financial statements; and  

 the audit is of a listed entity.

5.53 Quality  Review  Executives  appointed to  a  financial  statements  audit  must have a minimum of three years’ financial statements audit experience at  the Executive Director level or equivalent.22 

5.54 To  maintain  the  Quality  Review  Executive’s  objectivity,  the  Quality  Review  Executive  is  not  permitted  to  be  involved  in  the  decision  making  process  on  the  audit,  participate  in  the  engagement  during  the  period  of  appointment and must be different to the GED assigned to the audit as the  ‘sounding  board’  for  the  Engagement  Executive.  During  the  financial  statements  audit  if  the  Quality  Review  Executive’s  objectivity  may  have  become impaired, PAAM 110.1 Role and Responsibilities of the Quality Review  Executive  required  the  GEDs  to  recommend  to  the  Auditor‐General  the  appointment of a new Quality Review Executive for the financial statements  audit.  

5.55 PAAM 110.1 Role and Responsibilities of the Quality Review Executive sets  out the nature and extent of the quality review. The Quality Review Executive  is required to: 

22 PAAM 110.1.7 Role and responsibilities of the Quality Review Executive.

Engagement performance

Quality Control Around Financial Statements Audits 67

 discuss  significant  matters  with  the  Engagement  Executive  and  the  Signing Officer; 

 review the financial report and the proposed audit report; 

 review  selected  engagement  documentation  relating  to  significant  judgements  made  by  the  audit  team  and  the  conclusions  that  were  reached; 

 evaluate the conclusions reached in formulating the audit report and  consider whether the proposed audit report is appropriate; 

 consider  the  Engagement  Executive’s  evaluation  of  independence  in  relating to the financial statements audit; 

 consider whether appropriate consultation has taken place on matters  involving  differences  in  opinion  or  other  difficult  or  contentious  matters and the conclusion reached from the consultation; and  

 consider  whether  documentation  reflects  the  work  performed  in  relation to significant judgements made and conclusions reached.  

5.56 The Quality Review Executive’s involvement in the financial statements  audit  is  documented  in  the  Quality  Review  Engagement  planning  and  completion checklists. The Audit Manager is required to organise a meeting  with the Engagement Executive and the Quality Review Executive following  the completion of the planning phase of the audit. At this meeting the key 

matters  will  be  discussed.  The  Quality  Review  Executive  must  sign  off  the  checklist  after  completing  the  required  procedures  and  reviewing  key  documentation. The  Quality Review Executive  is required  to evidence their  involvement in the financial statements audit throughout the audit cycle and  complete the required procedures in the completion checklist on a timely basis.  

5.57 PAAM 60.2 Role and Responsibilities of the Signing Officer requires the  Signing Officer to be satisfied that the review process by the Quality Review  Executive has been completed satisfactorily before the audit report is issued.  

5.58 PAAM 100.2 Differences of Opinion requires where there is a difference  of opinion  between any two or  more of the following  parties the matter is  referred  to  the  Qualifications  and  Accounting  Policy  Committee  or  the  Auditor‐General as appropriate: 

 the Engagement Executive; 

 the Executive Director, PSB; 

 the Quality Review Executive; 

68 Quality Control Around Financial Statements Audits

 the Group Executive Director; or 

 any other party consulted including professional firms and PASG.  

Policies and procedures relating to file assembly, retention of documentation and the confidentiality, safe custody, integrity, accessibility and retrievability of engagement documentation.

5.59 PAAM  120.1  Audit  Documentation  deals  with  documentation  requirements for AASG audits. The policy states: 

 audit documentation must be evidenced as reviewed prior to the date  of the audit report;  

 audit managers are responsible for the timely assembly of the audit file.  The audit file must be complete and ready for finalisation no later than  60 days after the audit report is signed;  

 audit documentation is to be recorded in the electronic working papers  or correspondence file (E‐Hive); and 

 documentation  must  be  prepared  which  enables  an  experienced  auditor  with  no  connection  to  the  audit  to  understand  the  nature,  timing and extent of audit procedures, the results of audit procedures,  audit  evidence  obtained,  significant  matters  arising  during  the  audit  and conclusions reached.  

5.60 The ANAO has the following policies relating to the management of  audit information which is available on the intranet: 

 ANAO record keeping policy; 

 Guidelines for managing ANAO records; 

 ANAO knowledge management policy; 

 ANAO security policy manual; and 

 E‐Hive policies and procedures.  

5.61 Section 36(1) of the Auditor‐General Act 1997 provides that if a person  has  obtained  information  in  the  course  of  performing  an  Auditor‐General  function, the person must not disclose the information except in the course of  performing an Auditor‐General function or for the purpose of any Act that  gives functions to the Auditor‐General.  

5.62 PAAM 120.4 Access to working papers by ANAO staff including contractors  provides that working papers and associated audit documentation shall only  be made available to those auditors with a need to know. Where information 

68 Quality Control Around Financial Statements Audits

 the Group Executive Director; or 

 any other party consulted including professional firms and PASG.  

Policies and procedures relating to file assembly, retention of documentation and the confidentiality, safe custody, integrity, accessibility and retrievability of engagement documentation.

5.59 PAAM  120.1  Audit  Documentation  deals  with  documentation  requirements for AASG audits. The policy states: 

 audit documentation must be evidenced as reviewed prior to the date  of the audit report;  

 audit managers are responsible for the timely assembly of the audit file.  The audit file must be complete and ready for finalisation no later than  60 days after the audit report is signed;  

 audit documentation is to be recorded in the electronic working papers  or correspondence file (E‐Hive); and 

 documentation  must  be  prepared  which  enables  an  experienced  auditor  with  no  connection  to  the  audit  to  understand  the  nature,  timing and extent of audit procedures, the results of audit procedures,  audit  evidence  obtained,  significant  matters  arising  during  the  audit  and conclusions reached.  

5.60 The ANAO has the following policies relating to the management of  audit information which is available on the intranet: 

 ANAO record keeping policy; 

 Guidelines for managing ANAO records; 

 ANAO knowledge management policy; 

 ANAO security policy manual; and 

 E‐Hive policies and procedures.  

5.61 Section 36(1) of the Auditor‐General Act 1997 provides that if a person  has  obtained  information  in  the  course  of  performing  an  Auditor‐General  function, the person must not disclose the information except in the course of  performing an Auditor‐General function or for the purpose of any Act that  gives functions to the Auditor‐General.  

5.62 PAAM 120.4 Access to working papers by ANAO staff including contractors  provides that working papers and associated audit documentation shall only  be made available to those auditors with a need to know. Where information 

Engagement performance

Quality Control Around Financial Statements Audits 69

about  an  audit  is  required  for  purpose  other  than  an  audit  or  a  quality  assurance review, the permission of the relevant Engagement Executive shall  be obtained.  

5.63 The  AASG  and  PSB  have  implemented  methods  for  ensuring  key  messages regarding audit quality are communicated to contract‐in personnel  and contract‐out firms on a timely basis. Two recent initiatives include:  

 the  Executive  Director  of  the  PSB  summarises  the  key  audit  quality  matters  discussed  in  technical  updates  and  provides  these  to  the  Signing  Officers  for  consideration  and  discussion  with  contract  out  firms if relevant to the individual financial statements audit; and  

 the  Signing  Officer  Technical  Forum  includes  an  agenda  item  that  discusses the key items for communication to contract out firms.  

Considerations 5.64 No considerations noted. 

Conclusion 5.65 As  at  the  date  of  this  report,  the  activities  and  responsibilities  established  by  the  ANAO’s  Quality  Assurance  Framework  in  relation  to  engagement performance for financial statements audits are consistent with  the  relevant  requirements  of  ASQC  1  Quality  Control  for  Firms  that  Perform  Audits and Reviews of Financial Reports and Other Financial Information, and Other  Assurance Engagements. 

70 Quality Control Around Financial Statements Audits

6. Monitoring

ASQC 1 Requirement

6.1 The firm shall establish a monitoring process designed to provide it  with reasonable assurance that the policies and procedures relating to the  system of quality control are relevant, adequate, and operating effectively.  This process shall: 

(a) include an ongoing consideration and evaluation of the firm’s system  of quality control including on a cyclical basis, inspection of at least  one completed engagement for each engagement partner; 

(b) require responsibility for the monitoring process to be assigned to a  partner or partners or other persons with sufficient and appropriate  experience and authority in the firm to assume that responsibility;  and 

(c) require  that  those  performing  the  engagement  or  the  engagement  quality  control  review  are  not  involved  in  inspecting  the  engagements. 

6.2 The firm shall evaluate the effect of deficiencies noted as a result of  the monitoring process and determine whether they are either: 

(a) instances that do not necessarily indicate that the firm’s system of  quality control is insufficient to provide it with reasonable assurance  that  it  complies  with  AUASB  Standards,  relevant  ethical  requirements, and applicable legal and regulatory requirements, and  that  the  reports  issued  by  the  firm  or  engagement  partners  are  appropriate in the circumstances; or 

(b) systemic,  repetitive  or  other  significant  deficiencies  that  require  prompt corrective action. 

6.3 The  firm  shall  communicate  to  relevant  engagement  partners  and  other appropriate personnel deficiencies noted as a result of the monitoring  process and recommendations for appropriate remedial action. 

70 Quality Control Around Financial Statements Audits

6. Monitoring

ASQC 1 Requirement

6.1 The firm shall establish a monitoring process designed to provide it  with reasonable assurance that the policies and procedures relating to the  system of quality control are relevant, adequate, and operating effectively.  This process shall: 

(a) include an ongoing consideration and evaluation of the firm’s system  of quality control including on a cyclical basis, inspection of at least  one completed engagement for each engagement partner; 

(b) require responsibility for the monitoring process to be assigned to a  partner or partners or other persons with sufficient and appropriate  experience and authority in the firm to assume that responsibility;  and 

(c) require  that  those  performing  the  engagement  or  the  engagement  quality  control  review  are  not  involved  in  inspecting  the  engagements. 

6.2 The firm shall evaluate the effect of deficiencies noted as a result of  the monitoring process and determine whether they are either: 

(a) instances that do not necessarily indicate that the firm’s system of  quality control is insufficient to provide it with reasonable assurance  that  it  complies  with  AUASB  Standards,  relevant  ethical  requirements, and applicable legal and regulatory requirements, and  that  the  reports  issued  by  the  firm  or  engagement  partners  are  appropriate in the circumstances; or 

(b) systemic,  repetitive  or  other  significant  deficiencies  that  require  prompt corrective action. 

6.3 The  firm  shall  communicate  to  relevant  engagement  partners  and  other appropriate personnel deficiencies noted as a result of the monitoring  process and recommendations for appropriate remedial action. 

Monitoring

Quality Control Around Financial Statements Audits 71

6.4 Recommendations for appropriate remedial actions for deficiencies  noted shall include one or more of the following: 

(a) taking  appropriate  remedial  action  in  relation  to  an  individual  engagement or member of personnel; 

(b) the communication of the findings to those responsible for training  and professional development; 

(c) changes to the quality control policies and procedures; and 

(d) disciplinary actions against those who fail to comply with the policies  and procedures of the firm, especially those who do so repeatedly.  

6.5 The  firm  shall  establish  policies  and  procedures  to  address  cases  where the results of the monitoring procedures indicate that an audit report  may  be  inappropriate  or  that  procedures  were  omitted  during  the  performance of the engagement. Such policies and procedures shall require  the  firm  to  determine  what  further  action  is  appropriate  to  comply  with  relevant  AUASB  Standards,  relevant  ethical  requirements,  and  applicable  legal and regulatory requirements, and to consider whether to obtain legal  advice.  

6.6 The  firm  shall  communicate  at  least  annually  the  results  of  the  monitoring of its system of quality control to engagement partners and other  appropriate individuals with the firm, including the firm’s chief executive  officer  or,  if  appropriate,  its  managing  board  of  partners.  This  communication shall be sufficient to enable the firm and these individuals to  take  prompt  and  appropriate  action  where  necessary  in  accordance  with  their defined roles and responsibilities. Information   communicated  shall include the following: 

(a) a description of the monitoring procedures performed; 

(b) the conclusions drawn from the monitoring procedures; and 

(c) where  relevant,  a  description  of  systemic,  repetitive  or  other  significant deficiencies and of the actions to resolve or amend those  deficiencies. 

72 Quality Control Around Financial Statements Audits

6.7 In the public sector, an auditor appointed under statute (for example,  an  Auditor‐General)  may  delegate  responsibility  for  an  engagement.  The  monitoring process needs to include, on a cyclical basis, inspection of at least  one completed engagement of each person with delegated responsibility for  an  engagement  and  its  performance.  This  includes  an  external  person  engaged as the person responsible for an engagement. 

Audit Procedures 6.8 Interviews in regards to monitoring were conducted with the: 

 Auditor‐General and Deputy Auditor‐General; 

 AASG Group Executive Directors (GEDs); 

 Executive Directors in the AASG; and 

 Executive Director and staff of the Professional Services Branch (PSB).  

6.9 Key documentation as detailed in Appendix Two was reviewed.  

6.10 Review  of  procedures  including  understanding  and  analysing  the  process for: 

 ANAO monitoring policy; 

 ANAO  template  for  inspection  programs  and  internal  and  external  reporting provided to relevant parties; and  

 reporting provided at the completion of the inspection program. 

ANAO implementation 6.11 The  ANAO  has  mechanisms  for  monitoring  the  implementation  of  policies and procedures relating to the Quality Assurance Framework. The key  monitoring mechanisms are discussed below. 

Inspection of AASG assurance engagements, including financial statements audits

6.12 PAAM 130.1 Monitoring describes the ANAO policy for inspection of  financial statements audit files.  

6.13 The  Deputy  Auditor‐General  has  overall  responsibility  for  the  inspection  of  AASG  assurance  engagements,  including  financial  statements  audits. The Executive Director, PSB has responsibility for the design, conduct  and reporting of inspection programs.  

72 Quality Control Around Financial Statements Audits

6.7 In the public sector, an auditor appointed under statute (for example,  an  Auditor‐General)  may  delegate  responsibility  for  an  engagement.  The  monitoring process needs to include, on a cyclical basis, inspection of at least  one completed engagement of each person with delegated responsibility for  an  engagement  and  its  performance.  This  includes  an  external  person  engaged as the person responsible for an engagement. 

Audit Procedures 6.8 Interviews in regards to monitoring were conducted with the: 

 Auditor‐General and Deputy Auditor‐General; 

 AASG Group Executive Directors (GEDs); 

 Executive Directors in the AASG; and 

 Executive Director and staff of the Professional Services Branch (PSB).  

6.9 Key documentation as detailed in Appendix Two was reviewed.  

6.10 Review  of  procedures  including  understanding  and  analysing  the  process for: 

 ANAO monitoring policy; 

 ANAO  template  for  inspection  programs  and  internal  and  external  reporting provided to relevant parties; and  

 reporting provided at the completion of the inspection program. 

ANAO implementation 6.11 The  ANAO  has  mechanisms  for  monitoring  the  implementation  of  policies and procedures relating to the Quality Assurance Framework. The key  monitoring mechanisms are discussed below. 

Inspection of AASG assurance engagements, including financial statements audits

6.12 PAAM 130.1 Monitoring describes the ANAO policy for inspection of  financial statements audit files.  

6.13 The  Deputy  Auditor‐General  has  overall  responsibility  for  the  inspection  of  AASG  assurance  engagements,  including  financial  statements  audits. The Executive Director, PSB has responsibility for the design, conduct  and reporting of inspection programs.  

Monitoring

Quality Control Around Financial Statements Audits 73

6.14 The annual inspection program selects audits for inspection taking into  consideration the level of engagement risk, seniority and experience of staff  conducting the audit and the findings from previous inspections.  

6.15 The annual inspection program includes at a minimum one completed  ANAO audit engagement for each Engagement Executive over a three year  cycle and at least one mandated project‐managed audit for each Engagement  Executive once every three years. The inspection program for the 2011-2012  financial year included five ANAO audits, 10 project‐managed audits and two  audits by arrangement. 

6.16 The annual inspection program for ANAO audits is conducted by an  external private sector firm and for project‐managed engagements staff of the  PSB  perform  the  review. The  inspection  program  is  conducted  using  a  test  program which is designed to ensure the reviews are consistently undertaken  across all audits. The test program evaluates the audit teams familiarisation  with the client, planning, risk assessment, review of significant risks, general  audit  procedures,  communications  with  those  charged  with  governance,  independence,  consultations,  involvement  of  the  Quality  Review  Executive  (if applicable)  and  completion.  The  external  contracted  firm  provides  an  independent  Quality  Control  Report  summarising  the  results  of  their  inspection program.  

6.17 In the tender process for a project‐managed engagement, contractors  are  asked  to  provide  details  regarding  the  contractors  own  inspection  programs. The contractor may nominate the financial statements audit to be  included in the contractor’s own inspection program.  

6.18 The findings of the inspection program are discussed with the GEDs  and the Deputy Auditor‐General. All findings from the inspection program are  rated as compliant, needs improvement, non‐compliance with ANAO policy,  non‐compliance with auditing standards or audit opinion is not supportable.  

6.19 The findings from the inspection program are scrutinised by the GEDs  and Signing Officers to identify whether the finding is pervasive or recurring.  The findings are reviewed against previous periods to determine whether the  issue  has  reoccurred.  For  each  finding  the  root  cause  is  assessed  and  a  conclusion on the driver made including whether the finding was a result of  lack  of  understanding  of  audit  methodology,  and/or  inadequate  audit  tools  and assignment of personnel with the required competence and/or skills did  not occur for example insufficient understanding of entity’s business or key  risks. The root cause of the finding drives the action to address the finding.  

74 Quality Control Around Financial Statements Audits

6.20 The Signing Officers will discuss the results of their findings with the  GEDs and the Engagement Executive will discuss the results with the Auditor‐ General  for  financial  statements  audits  where  the  Auditor‐General  is  the  Signing Officer. The Executive Director of the PSB will develop an action plan.  The GEDs will review and approve the plan. The findings of the inspection  program are then communicated to AASG staff by the Executive Director of  the PSB. 

6.21 A report detailing findings, proposed actions and status is provided to  the Auditor‐ General and Deputy Auditor‐General.  

6.22 The Professional Services Branch will also communicate findings of the  inspection program to contract firms. The results are communicated via letters  detailing audit results for each audit firm’s applicable engagement and also the  aggregate inspection results of other contract firm inspection programs. The  PSB  provides  a  presentation  to  all  contract  audit  firms  discussing  findings,  emerging issues and any security matters. For those firms outside Canberra a  webinar is held.  

6.23 In addition, key audit and client matters are raised with the Auditor‐ General, the Deputy Auditor‐General, and the Executive Director of PSB, on a  weekly basis through ‘Hot Issues’. The GEDs communicate key audit matters  directly  to  the  Auditor‐General  as  required.  The  AASG  Executive  Director  responsible for audit methodlogy and the Methodology Manager work closely  with PSB on key audit matters. 

Methodology Support Project

6.24 The Methodology Support Project is a combined project between the  AASG  and  the  PSB  with  the  assistance  of  a  private  sector  audit  firm.  The  Methodology  Support  Project  is  designed  to  assist  the  AASG  improve  the  efficiency  of  financial  statements  audits.  The  project  involves  the  review  of  financial statements audit files to assess how the ANAO’s audit methodology  has  been  applied  to  the  financial  statements  audits  to  identify  recommendations for the improvement of the efficient and effective conduct of  the audit. The project involves the development of AASG efficiency champions  within  financial  statements  and  information  technology  subgroups  in  the  AASG. The project commenced in 2010-11. 

6.25 The findings of the Methodology Support Project for the 2011-12 year  were reviewed by PSB and the AASG. The findings were communicated to  Signing Officers in a series of information sessions and in the Audit Quality 

Aide‐Memoir.  The  key  actions  to  improve  the  implementation  of  the  audit 

74 Quality Control Around Financial Statements Audits

6.20 The Signing Officers will discuss the results of their findings with the  GEDs and the Engagement Executive will discuss the results with the Auditor‐ General  for  financial  statements  audits  where  the  Auditor‐General  is  the  Signing Officer. The Executive Director of the PSB will develop an action plan.  The GEDs will review and approve the plan. The findings of the inspection  program are then communicated to AASG staff by the Executive Director of  the PSB. 

6.21 A report detailing findings, proposed actions and status is provided to  the Auditor‐ General and Deputy Auditor‐General.  

6.22 The Professional Services Branch will also communicate findings of the  inspection program to contract firms. The results are communicated via letters  detailing audit results for each audit firm’s applicable engagement and also the  aggregate inspection results of other contract firm inspection programs. The  PSB  provides  a  presentation  to  all  contract  audit  firms  discussing  findings,  emerging issues and any security matters. For those firms outside Canberra a  webinar is held.  

6.23 In addition, key audit and client matters are raised with the Auditor‐ General, the Deputy Auditor‐General, and the Executive Director of PSB, on a  weekly basis through ‘Hot Issues’. The GEDs communicate key audit matters  directly  to  the  Auditor‐General  as  required.  The  AASG  Executive  Director  responsible for audit methodlogy and the Methodology Manager work closely  with PSB on key audit matters. 

Methodology Support Project

6.24 The Methodology Support Project is a combined project between the  AASG  and  the  PSB  with  the  assistance  of  a  private  sector  audit  firm.  The  Methodology  Support  Project  is  designed  to  assist  the  AASG  improve  the  efficiency  of  financial  statements  audits.  The  project  involves  the  review  of  financial statements audit files to assess how the ANAO’s audit methodology  has  been  applied  to  the  financial  statements  audits  to  identify  recommendations for the improvement of the efficient and effective conduct of  the audit. The project involves the development of AASG efficiency champions  within  financial  statements  and  information  technology  subgroups  in  the  AASG. The project commenced in 2010-11. 

6.25 The findings of the Methodology Support Project for the 2011-12 year  were reviewed by PSB and the AASG. The findings were communicated to  Signing Officers in a series of information sessions and in the Audit Quality  Aide‐Memoir.  The  key  actions  to  improve  the  implementation  of  the  audit 

Monitoring

Quality Control Around Financial Statements Audits 75

methodology  include:  delivery  of  training  on  specific  audit  methodology  concepts  and  changes  to  ANAO  templates  including  the  provision  of  additional guidance.   

ANAO client and staff surveys

6.26 Annually a survey of ANAO staff and AASG clients is performed. The  client survey asks AASG clients to respond to questions on the audit team’s  overall performance, performance on individual aspects of the audit process  and overall quality. The key results of the 2011-12 survey indicated that there  is  a  high  level  of  agreement  that  AASG  staff  had  the  appropriate  understanding  and  skills,  AASG  reporting  was  appropriate  and  agreed  AASG’s consultation and communication was appropriate.  

6.27 The 2011-12 staff survey asked ANAO staff questions on leadership,  job  satisfaction,  career  development,  recruitment  and  selection,  work  life  balance, performance management, ANAO values and behaviour, supervisor  performance and supervisor performance management. The ANAO sets key  performance indicator targets and assesses the actual results against the key  performance indicators. The AASG demonstrated strong results across the key  indicators  including  staff  satisfaction,  employee  engagement,  loyalty  and  commitment, leadership performance and learning and development. On key  performance indicators AASG ranked above APS averages.  

Performance management

6.28 Statistics relating to  attendance of staff at learning and development  training courses are provided to the staff member’s Administration Manager,  Executive  Directors,  the  People  and  Capabilities  Projects  Governance  Committee and the Executive Board of Management.  

6.29 Indicative  ratings  of  staff  set  as  part  of  the  performance  assessment  scheme  are  reviewed  by  Executive  Directors,  GEDs  and  the  People  and  Capabilities Strategy Committee prior to finalisation. Refer to paragraph 4.36  to 4.37 for further commentary. 

6.30 The AASG has developed an executive score card that tracks key audit  and practice management matters.  

Annual AASG Transparency Report

6.31 The AASG provide a AASG Transparency Report to the EBOM. The  purpose of the report is to document the AASG’s compliance with the ANAO’s  Quality Assurance Framework. The 2011-2012 transparency report discusses 

76 Quality Control Around Financial Statements Audits

key aspects of the AASG quality assurance process and documents progress  against each key results area in the 2011-12 financial year.  

Considerations 6.32 Included  below  is  an  observation  for  the  ANAO  to  consider  to  potentially  enhance  the  Quality  Assurance  Framework  with  respect  to  monitoring.  The  inclusion  of  this  consideration  does  not  detract  from  the  overall conclusion provided below.  

Consideration No. 3 

6.33 The Quality Assurance Framework describes how the ANAO meets the  requirements of APES 320 Quality Control for Firms and ASQC 1 Quality Control  for Firms that perform Audits and Reviews of Financial Reports and Other Financial  Information and Other Assurance Engagements. 

6.34 The  AASG  submits  an  annual  AASG  Transparency  Report  to  the  EBOM.  This  report  documents  the  AASG’s  compliance  with  the  ANAO’s  Quality Assurance Framework. The 2011-2012 transparency report discusses  key aspects of the AASG quality assurance process and documents progress  against each in the 2011-12 financial year. 

6.35 Following  the  audit  cycle,  each  Executive  Director  could  complete  a  self‐assessment  questionnaire  in  respect  of  the  performance  of  their  audits  against  key  aspects  of  the  Quality  Assurance  Framework.  This  information  could provide additional input into the overall AASG Transparency Report to  EBOM. 

Consideration No. 4 

6.36 The annual inspection program findings are conducted in accordance  with a test program. The test program for the 2012 in‐house inspection had 81  compliance  check  procedures  for  in‐house  engagements  and  83  compliance  check procedures for project‐managed audits.  

6.37 For each engagement subject to review, the reviewer concludes on each  procedure in the test program and rates the performance as compliant, needs  improvement, non‐compliant with ANAO policy, non‐compliant with auditing  standards  or  audit  opinion  is  not  supportable.  No  further  overall  rating  is  given  and  all the ratings and analysis are  provided to the relevant Signing  Officer and the GEDs.   

76 Quality Control Around Financial Statements Audits

key aspects of the AASG quality assurance process and documents progress  against each key results area in the 2011-12 financial year.  

Considerations 6.32 Included  below  is  an  observation  for  the  ANAO  to  consider  to  potentially  enhance  the  Quality  Assurance  Framework  with  respect  to  monitoring.  The  inclusion  of  this  consideration  does  not  detract  from  the  overall conclusion provided below.  

Consideration No. 3 

6.33 The Quality Assurance Framework describes how the ANAO meets the  requirements of APES 320 Quality Control for Firms and ASQC 1 Quality Control  for Firms that perform Audits and Reviews of Financial Reports and Other Financial  Information and Other Assurance Engagements. 

6.34 The  AASG  submits  an  annual  AASG  Transparency  Report  to  the  EBOM.  This  report  documents  the  AASG’s  compliance  with  the  ANAO’s  Quality Assurance Framework. The 2011-2012 transparency report discusses  key aspects of the AASG quality assurance process and documents progress  against each in the 2011-12 financial year. 

6.35 Following  the  audit  cycle,  each  Executive  Director  could  complete  a  self‐assessment  questionnaire  in  respect  of  the  performance  of  their  audits  against  key  aspects  of  the  Quality  Assurance  Framework.  This  information 

could provide additional input into the overall AASG Transparency Report to  EBOM. 

Consideration No. 4 

6.36 The annual inspection program findings are conducted in accordance  with a test program. The test program for the 2012 in‐house inspection had 81  compliance  check  procedures  for  in‐house  engagements  and  83  compliance  check procedures for project‐managed audits.  

6.37 For each engagement subject to review, the reviewer concludes on each  procedure in the test program and rates the performance as compliant, needs  improvement, non‐compliant with ANAO policy, non‐compliant with auditing  standards  or  audit  opinion  is  not  supportable.  No  further  overall  rating  is  given  and  all the ratings and analysis are  provided to the relevant Signing  Officer and the GEDs.   

Monitoring

Quality Control Around Financial Statements Audits 77

6.38 The  Professional  Services  Branch  Executive  Director  and  the  GEDs  review  all  ratings  and  assess  using  professional  judgement  whether  the  deficiencies noted, if any, are one off occurrences or systematic deficiencies  and determine the corrective action required. 

6.39 The ANAO policy prescribes that where serious or extensive significant  deficiencies  are  noted  in  an  audit  reviewed,  the  Engagement  Executive  is  required to be reviewed in the following year’s inspection program. It is also  noted that the Public Service Act provides for specific processes for any code of  conduct  or  disciplinary  issues.  The  ANAO  policy  allows  for  professional  judgement and does not define serious or extensive deficiencies. 

6.40 Consideration could be given to  enhancing guidance to  assist in the  assessment of the overall rating from the review of the audit file. In addition,  further detail could be developed around the consequences of unsatisfactory  ratings, if any, in order to further enhance transparency and consistency in the  process. 

Conclusion 6.41 As  at  the  date  of  this  report,  the  activities  and  responsibilities  established  by  the  ANAO’s  Quality  Assurance  Framework  in  relation  to  monitoring  of  quality  control  for  financial  statements  audits  are  consistent  with the relevant requirements of ASQC 1 Quality Control for Firms that Perform  Audits and Reviews of Financial Reports and Other Financial Information, and Other  Assurance Engagements.  

Quality Control Around Financial Statements Audits 79

Appendices

80 Quality Control Around Financial Statements Audits

Appendix 1: ANAO’s response to the proposed report

80 Quality Control Around Financial Statements Audits

Appendix 1: ANAO’s response to the proposed report

Quality Control Around Financial Statements Audits 81

Appendix 2: Key ANAO documents and external references

The following key documentation has been reviewed as part of this audit: 

Key ANAO related documents23

 Australian National Audit Office, Audit Work Program, July 2012. 

 Australian  National  Audit  Office,  Assurance  Audit  Services  Group  Workforce Plan 2011-2014. 

 Australian  National  Audit  Office,  Quality  Assurance  Framework,  October 2012. 

 Australian  National  Audit  Office,  Assurance  Audit  Services  Group  Business Plan 2011-12. 

 Australian  National  Audit  Office,  Assurance  Audit  Services  Group  Business Plan 2010-11, 2011-12 and 2012-13. 

 Australian  National  Audit  Office,  Executive  Staff  Forum  Terms  of  Reference. 

 Australian National Audit Office, Signing Officer Technical Forum Terms  of Reference. 

 Australian  National  Audit  Office,  Minute  of  role  of  AASG’s  Audit  Principals  and  the  audit  quality  oversight  modalities  of  all  EL2  Signing  Officers for the 2012-13 audit cycle. 

 Australian National Audit Office, AASG Transparency Report to EBOM.  2011-12 Compliance with the Quality Control Framework. 

 Australian  National  Audit  Office,  Protective  Security  Overview  2011-2012. 

 Australian National Audit Office, Financial Statements Audit Engagement  Executive Independence Confirmation. 

 Australian  National  Audit  Office,  Financial  statements  audit  and  other  AASG assurance engagements Individual Declaration of Independence.  

23 All key ANAO related documents were sourced during the fieldwork phase of this performance audit. (December 2011 to May 2012).

82 Quality Control Around Financial Statements Audits

 Australian National Audit Office, Financial Statement Audit Engagement  Executive Independence Resolution Memorandum. 

 Australian National Audit Office, Declaration of Personal Interests. 

 Australian  National  Audit  Office,  Guide  to  Conduct  in  the  Australian  National Audit Office. 

 Australian  National  Audit  Office,  ANAO  Studies  Assistance  Policy  &  Guidelines. 

 Australian National Audit Office, Enterprise Agreement 2011-2014. 

 Australian  National  Audit  Office,  Assurance  Audit  Services  Group  Auditor’s Handbook 2012. 

 Australian  National  Audit  Office,  Performance  Assessment  Scheme,  November 2011. 

 Australian National Audit Office, Work Level Standards. 

 Australian National Audit Office, Capability Framework. 

 Australian  National  Audit  Office,  Audit  Quality  Aide  Memoire:  Audit  Quality Guide 2013. 

 PAAM, Leadership Responsibilities for Quality within AASG, June 2012. 

 PAAM,  Auditor‐General’s  Mandate  under  the  Commonwealth  Authorities  and Companies Act 1997, June 2012. 

 PAAM,  ANAO  Independence  policy  (Staff  and  in‐house  Contractors),  November 2012. 

 PAAM, Provision of other services by ANAO Contractors to ANAO audit  clients, September 2012. 

 PAAM,  Role  and  Responsibilities  of  the  Engagement  Executive,  September 2012. 

 PAAM,  Role  and  Responsibilities  of  the  Quality  Review  Executive,  June 2012. 

 PAAM, Engagement Risk Rating, November 2012. 

 PAAM, Role and Responsibilities of the Second Reviewer, April 2012. 

 PAAM, Consultation, June 2012. 

 PAAM, Differences of Opinion, March 2011. 

 PAAM, Project Managed Audits, November 2012. 

Quality Control Around Financial Statements Audits 83

 PAAM, Role and Responsibilities of the Signing Officer, June 2012. 

 PAAM,  Role  of  the  Qualifications  and  Accounting  Policy  Committee,  October 2012. 

 PAAM, Role of the Qualification and Accounting Policy Committee. 

 Orima  Research,  ANAO  Assurance  Audit  Services  Group  2012-13,  Financial Audit Client Survey, February 2013. 

 Australian  National  Audit  Office,  Hitchhiker’s  Guide  to  TeamMate  (Electronic Audit Tool). 

 Australian National Audit Office, Hitchhiker Guide’s to Changepoint. 

 Australian  National  Audit Office, Effective  Report  Writing: A Guide to  writing in the AASG. 

 Australian National Audit Office, Report Writing Tips Guide. 

External References

 ASQC  1  Quality  Control  for  Firms  that  Perform  Audits  and  Reviews  of  Financial  Reports  and  Other  Financial  Information,  and  Other  Assurance  Engagements issued by the Auditing and Assurance Standards Board. 

 ASA  220  Quality  Control  for  Audits  of  Historical  Financial  Information  issued by the Auditing and Assurance Standards Board. 

 APES  110  Code  of  Ethics  for  Professional  Accountants  issued  by  the  Accounting Professional & Ethics Standards Board. 

 APES  320  Quality  Control  for  Firms  issued  by  the  Accounting  Professional & Ethics Standards Board. 

 Auditor‐General Act 1997. 

 Public Service Act 1999. 

82 Quality Control Around Financial Statements Audits

 Australian National Audit Office, Financial Statement Audit Engagement  Executive Independence Resolution Memorandum. 

 Australian National Audit Office, Declaration of Personal Interests. 

 Australian  National  Audit  Office,  Guide  to  Conduct  in  the  Australian  National Audit Office. 

 Australian  National  Audit  Office,  ANAO  Studies  Assistance  Policy  &  Guidelines. 

 Australian National Audit Office, Enterprise Agreement 2011-2014. 

 Australian  National  Audit  Office,  Assurance  Audit  Services  Group  Auditor’s Handbook 2012. 

 Australian  National  Audit  Office,  Performance  Assessment  Scheme,  November 2011. 

 Australian National Audit Office, Work Level Standards. 

 Australian National Audit Office, Capability Framework. 

 Australian  National  Audit  Office,  Audit  Quality  Aide  Memoire:  Audit  Quality Guide 2013. 

 PAAM, Leadership Responsibilities for Quality within AASG, June 2012. 

 PAAM,  Auditor‐General’s  Mandate  under  the  Commonwealth  Authorities  and Companies Act 1997, June 2012. 

 PAAM,  ANAO  Independence  policy  (Staff  and  in‐house  Contractors),  November 2012. 

 PAAM, Provision of other services by ANAO Contractors to ANAO audit  clients, September 2012. 

 PAAM,  Role  and  Responsibilities  of  the  Engagement  Executive,  September 2012. 

 PAAM,  Role  and  Responsibilities  of  the  Quality  Review  Executive,  June 2012. 

 PAAM, Engagement Risk Rating, November 2012. 

 PAAM, Role and Responsibilities of the Second Reviewer, April 2012. 

 PAAM, Consultation, June 2012. 

 PAAM, Differences of Opinion, March 2011. 

 PAAM, Project Managed Audits, November 2012.