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Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations Reports Australian vocational education and training system 2009


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Annual National Report of the

Australian Vocational Education and Training System 1

Enquiries regarding this report should be directed to:

Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations GPO Box 9BBD CANBERRA ACT 2601

Website: http://www.deewr.gov.au

© Commonwealth of Australia 201 1

This work is copyright. Apart from any use as permitted under the Copyright Act *ä 9GB, no part may be reproduced

by any process without prior written permission from the Commonwealth. Requests and inquiries concerning reproduction and rights should be addressed to Commonwealth Copyright Administration, Attorney General *s Department, Robert Garran

Offices, National Circuit, Barton ACT 2600 or posted at http://www.ag .gov.au/cca

ISSN 1 324-3185

Section 1: Overview * Designing a sustainable Voctional Education and Training (VET] System 1 About this report 2

Key Messages 4

The National Training System 6

Disadvantaged Groups in VET 12

Economic and social content for VET 27

Section 2: Performance of the national VET system 36 Key Indicators 40

Students participation and achievement in VET and training 40

Student achievements 52

Student outcomes , 60

Employer engagement and satisfaction with VET 66

VET system effiency 74

Disadvantage in VET 77

Participation in VET 77

Full-Year Training Equivalents (FYTEs) 79

Student achievements 81

Student outcomes 83

Satisfaction with VET 88

Section 3: Commonwealth, State and Territory achievements in VET 91

Australian Government 92

New South Wales 101

Victoria 102

Queensland 103

South Australia 105

Western Australia 107

Tasmania 109

Northern Territory 111

Australian Capital Territory 113

Section 4: Appendices 115 Appendix A: Key Indicators Data Tables 116

Appendix B: Disadvantage in VET 161

Appendix C: COAG Performance Indicators 215

Appendix D: State and Territory Tables 239

Appendix E: Membership during 2009 240

Appendix F: Acronyms 244

annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009 P

List of Tables Table 1: Real GDP of selected countries, 2008-2009 27

Table 2: Unemployment rates of selected countries, 2008-2009 28

Table 3: Internet Vacancy Index (three-month average) 31

Table 4: Employment by industry, Australia, 2008-2009 31

Table 5: Labour force status, by level of highest post-school qualification, Australia, 2007-2009 33

Table 6: VET in Schools student qualification level 51

Table 7: Proportion of total reported VET students with RPL by age groups, 2005-2009 54

Table 8: Qualifications completed at Diploma level and above by jurisdiction, 2003-2008 57

Table 9: Employment and further study outcomes, 2009 65

Table A.1: The number of Australians who participate in vocational education and training each year 119

Table A.2: The number of total reported VET students who participate in vocational education and training each year, by age and course level 120

Table A.3: The number of government funded students who participate in vocational education and training each year, by age and course level 121

Table A.4: The number of Full-Year Training Equivalents (FYTE) undertaken in vocational education and training each year, by age and course level 122

Table A.5: The number of Full-Year Training Equivalents (FYTE) undertaken in government funded vocational education and training each year, by age and course level 123

Table A.6: The rate of successfully completed VET student activity undertaken each year, by age and course level 124

Table A.7: The rate of successfully completed VET student activity undertaken by government funded VET students each year, by age and course level 124

Table A.8: The number of qualifications completed each year by students in vocational education and training 125

Table A.9: The number of Qualification Equivalents completed by students in vocational education and training 126 Table A.10: The number of Qualification Equivalents completed by students in government funded vocational education and training 128

Table A.11: Employment and further study outcomes after completing VET 131

Table A.12: Employment and further study outcomes after completing VET 132

Table A. 13: Employment and further study outcomes after completing VET, age groups. People aged 15-19 years, 20-24 years, 25-39 years, 40+ years 133

Table A.14: Employment and further study outcomes after completing VET, age groups. People aged 15-19 years, 20-24 years, 25-39 years, 40+ years 135

Table A.15: Employer engagement with VET 138

Table A.16: Employer engagement with VET 139

Table A.17: Employer satisfaction with aspects of VET 140

Table A.18: Employer satisfaction with aspects of VET 141 Table A.19: Employer overall satisfaction with the VET system 142

Table A.20: Employer overall satisfaction with the VET system 143

pll annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009

Table A.21: Vocational education and training efficiency 144

Table A.22: Cost of Capital per Vocational Output 146

Table A.23: Vocational education and training efficiency 147

Table A.24: Cost of Capital per Vocational Output 149

Table A.25: Vocational education and training efficiency 150

Table A.26: Cost of Capital per Vocational Output 152

Table A.27: Agreed values equivalent to Qualifications by Field of Education and AQF Level 153

Table B.1: The number of students who participate in vocational education and training each year by student groups 162

Table B.2: The number of government funded students who participate in vocational education and training each year by student groups 163

Table B.3: The number of Full-Year Training Equivalents (FYTE) undertaken in vocational education and training each year by student groups 165

Table B.4: The number of Full-Year Training Equivalents (FYTE) undertaken in government funded vocational education and training each year by student groups 169

Table B.5: The rate of successfully completed VET student activity undertaken each year by student groups and course level 173 Table B.6: The rate of successfully completed VET student activity undertaken by government funded VET students each year by student groups and course level 176

Table B.7: The number of qualifications completed by students in vocational education and training each year by student groups 179

Table B.8: Employment and further study outcomes after completing VET, for female students 183

Table B.9: Employment and further study outcomes after completing VET, for female students 184

Table B.10: Employment and further study outcomes after completing VET, for male students 185

Table B.11: Employment and further study outcomes after completing VET, for male students 186

Table B.12: Employment and further study outcomes after completing VET, for Indigenous students 187

Table B.13: Employment and further study outcomes after completing VET, for indigenous students 188 Table B.14: Employment and further study outcomes after completing VET, for students with a disability 189

Table B.15: Employment and further study outcomes after completing VET, for students with a disability 190

Table B.16: Employment and further study outcomes after completing VET, for people who speak a language other than English at home 191

Table B.17: Employment and further study outcomes after completing VET, for people who speak a language other than English at home 192

Table B. 18: Employment and further study outcomes after completing VET, by education attainment 193

Table B.19: Employment and further study outcomes after completing VET, by education attainment 196

Table B.20: Employment and further study outcomes after completing VET, by SEIFA Index of Relative Socio-Economic Disadvantage 199

annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009 pill

Table B.21: Employment and further study outcomes after completing VET, by SEIFA Index of Relative Socio-Economic Disadvantage 202

Table B.22: Employment and further study outcomes after completing VET, ABS Accessibility/ Remoteness Index of Australia 205

Table B.23: Employment and further study outcomes after completing VET, ABS Accessibility/ Remoteness Index of Australia 207

Table C.1: The number of government funded course enrolments in VET, Baseline, 2008-2009 215

Table C.2: The number of Course completions in VET (total reported VET), Baseline, 2007≠ 2008 215

Table C.3: The number of unit/module completions in VET (government funded students), Baseline, 2008-2009 216

Table C.4: The number of enrolments in higher level (Certificate III and above) VET (government funded VET activity), Baseline, 2008-2009 216

Table C.5: The proportion of graduates employed, unemployed and not in the labour force after completing training, 2008-2009 216

Table C.6: The proportion of Indigenous graduates employed, unemployed and not in the labour force after completing training, 2008-2009 217

Table C.7: The proportion of graduates employed, unemployed and not in the labour force after completing training, by SEIFA Index of Relative Socio-economic Disadvantage, 2008-2009 217

Table C.8: The proportion of graduates employed, unemployed and not in the labour force after completing training, by highest level of prior educational attainment, 2008≠ 2009 219

Table C.9: The proportion of graduates employed, unemployed and not in the labour force after completing training, by previous employment status, 2008-2009 220

Table C.10: The proportion of Indigenous graduates employed, unemployed and not in the labour force after completing training, by previous employment status, 2008-2009 221

Table C.11: The proportion of graduates employed, unemployed and not in the labour force after completing training, by previous employment status and SEIFA Index of Relative Socio-economic Disadvantage, 2008-2009 222

Table C.12: The proportion of graduates employed, unemployed and not in the labour force after completing training, by previous employment status and highest level of prior educational attainment, 2008-2009 227

Table C.13: The proportion of graduates with improved employment status after training, 2008-2009 233

Table C.14: The proportion of Indigenous graduates with improved employment status after training, 2008-2009 233

Table C.15: The proportion of graduates with improved employment status after training, by SEIFA Index of Relative Socio-economic Disadvantage, 2008-2009 234

Table C.16: The proportion of graduates with improved employment status after training, by highest level of prior educational attainment, 2008-2009 235

pIV annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009

List Figures

Figure 1: Unemployment rate, Australia, 2000-2009 28

Figure 2: 12-Monthly percentage change, part-time and full-time employment, Australia, 2001-2009 30

Figure 3: Skilled vacancy index, Australia, 2000-2009 30

Figure 4: Proportion of workers with a post-school qualification, by occupation, Australia, 2009 32

Figure 5: Proportion of population with a post-school qualification, Australia, 2001-2009 34

Figure 6: Number of persons unable to gain placement on application, Australia, 2002-2009 35

Figure 7: Scope of Reporting 37

Figure 8: Number of total reported VET students and participation rate, aqes 15 to 64, 2005-2009 40

Figure 9: Proportion of total reported VET students by funding source, 2005-2009 41

Figure 10: Proportion of total reported VET students by age group, 2005-2009 42

Figure 11: Proportion of total reported VET students by course level, 2005-2009 43

Figure 12: Proportion of total reported VET students who participated in vocational education and training, by course level, 2005-2009 44

Figure 13: Proportion of total reported VET students and Full-Year Training Equivalents by funding source, 2005-2009 45

Figure 14: Proportion of total reported VET students and Full-Year Training Equivalents by age group, 2005-2009 46

Figure 15: Proportion of total reported VET students and Full-Year Training Equivalents by course level, 2005-2009 47

Figure 16: Proportion of total reported VET Full-Year Training Equivalents undertaken by male and female students by age group, 2005-2009 48

Figure 17: Proportion of total reported VET Full-Year Training Equivalents undertaken by male and female students by course level, 2005-2009 49

Figure 18: Proportion of male and female students in total reported vocational education and training by courses undertaken in each field of education, 2009 50

Figure 19: Load Pass Rates for total reported VET students by age group, 2005-2009 52

Figure 20: Load Pass Rates for total reported VET students by course level, 2005-2009 53

Figure 21: Number of qualifications completed by total reported VET students by age group, ages 15 to 64, 2005-2008 55

Figure 22: Number of qualifications completed by total reported VET students by course level, 2005-2008 56

Figure 23: Number of Qualification Equivalents completed by total reported VET students by course level, by field of education, 2009 58

Figure 24: Apprentice and trainee commencements, completions and cancellations/ withdrawals, seasonally adjusted, by quarter, 1999-2009 59

Figure 25: Trade and non-trade commencements, seasonally adjusted, by quarter, 1999-2009 59

Figure 26: Proportion of total reported VET graduates and module completers who improved their employment circumstances after training by age group, 2005-2009 61

annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009 pV

Figure 27: Proportion of total reported VET graduates and module completers who were employed before and after training by age group, 2009 62

Figure 28: Proportion of total reported VET graduates and module completers who achieved their main reason for training by age group, 2005-2009 63

Figure 29: Proportion of total reported VET graduates and module completers who were satisfied with the overall quality of training by age group, 2005-2009 64

Figure 30: Proportion of employers who engage with the VET system by type of engagement with training, 2005, 2007 and 2009 67

Figure 31: Proportion of employers who engage with the VET system by type of engagement with training, by employer size, 2005, 2007 and 2009 68

Figure 32: Proportion of employers who engage with the VET system by industry type, 2009 69

Figure 33: Proportion of employers engaged with an aspect of VET who were satisfied with VET as a way of meeting their skill needs, by type of engagement with training, 2005, 2007 and 2009 70

Figure 34: Proportion of employers engaged with an aspect of VET who were satisfied with VET as a way of meeting their skill needs, by type of engagement with training, by employer size, 2005, 2007 and 2009 71

Figure 35: Proportion of employers engaged with an aspect of VET who were satisfied with VET as a way of meeting their skill needs, by industry type, 2009 72

Figure 36: Satisfaction level of employers with all aspects of VET that they were engaged in, by industry/ type, 2009 73

Figure 37: Total expenditure per Full-Year Training Equivalent by state/territory ($/FYTE, 2009 prices), 2008-2009 75

Figure 38: Cost of capital per Full-Year Training Equivalent by state/territory, 2009 76

Figure 39: Students in disadvantaged groups as a proportion of total reported VET students, 2005-2009 78

Figure 40: Students as a proportion of total reported VET students, by highest level of prior educational attainment, 2005-2009 78

Figure 41: Number of Full-Year Training Equivalents undertaken by total reported VET students and students by highest level of prior educational attainment, 2005-2009 80

Figure 42: Load Pass Rates for total reported VET students and students in disadvantaged groups, 2005-2009 80

Figure 43: Number of qualifications completed by total reported VET students and students in disadvantaged groups, 2005-2008 82

Figure 44: Proportion of total reported VET graduates and graduates in disadvantaged groups who were employed after training, 2005-2009 84

Figure 45: Difference in proportion employed from before to after training for total reported VET graduates and graduates by highest level of prior educational attainment, 2005-2009 85

Figure 46: Proportion of total reported VET graduates and graduates in disadvantaged groups who improved their employment circumstances after training, 2005-2009 87

Figure 47: Proportion of total reported VET graduates and graduates by ABS Accessibility/ Remoteness Index who achieved their main reason for training, 2005-2009 88

Figure 48: Proportion of total reported VET graduates and graduates in disadvantaged groups who were satisfied with the overall quality of training, 2005-2009 90

pVI annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009

About this Report

Purpose of This Report The Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations

(DEEWR), on behalf of the Minister for Tertiary Education, Skills, Jobs and Workplace Relations, produces the annual national report for the national vocational

education and training (VET) system.

This report covers the 2009 calendar year and provides an assessment of the performance of the national training system as well as detailed information on die

operation of the national system and its achievements and challenges.

The report is presented in three sections:

Section 1: Overview provides an outline of the report, describing the national vocational education and training system, die relevant Intergovernmental Agreements

that relate to VET and the economic and social context for the national VET system during 2009.

Section 2: Performance of the national VET system in 2009 contains an analysis of the system *s performance in 2009 against performance indicators agreed by the Council of Australian Governments (COAG). This section includes information about the participation, achievements and outcomes of all VET students and those that are identified as having a disadvantage in VET. VET system efficiency and employer engagement and satisfaction with VET are also covered.

Section 3: Commonwealth, State and Territory Achievemen ts gives examples of achievements of the State, Territory and Australian Governments.

Scope of the Report The Annual National Report of the Australian VET System (ANR) 2009 covers total reported VET activity, which is broader than government funded VET

activity, and refers to all aspects of VET for which that data is available for reporting.

The Australian VET system (including apprentices and trainees) covers delivery of VET training through a variety of public and private training providers. These

include technical and further education (TAPE) institutes and other government providers, universities, secondary schools, industry organisations, adult migrant education scheme providers, enterprises, agricultural colleges, community education providers and privately operated registered training organisations.

Funding for VET is provided by the Australian Government and State and Territory Governments, by industry bodies, by employers and enterprises and by

individual students through the payment of fees, and through the acquisition of income contingent loans through die VET FEE HELP program.

Data available for statistical reporting on VET do not cover all vocational education and training undertaken, as arrangements

are not in place to collect all data from all community education providers and private providers.

A detailed explanation of data inclusions and exclusions is provided in Section 2.

p2 annual national report of the austraiian vocational education and training system 2009

Reporting Conventions for this Publication

The primary focus in reporting of performance relating to the implementation of national policy and advice (as set out in the National Strategy) is on *government funded VET * activity. Where this report

refers to *government funded VET * activity, it refers only to VET activity that is funded under the Commonwealth-State Training Funding Agreements. Where this report refers to information on *total reported VET * activity, it is referring to all VET data available for reporting.

Developments in Reporting Since the 2008 Report

The Intergovernmental Agreement (IGA) on Federal Financial Relations requires that the COAG Reform Council (CRC) report annually to COAG on the achievement by governments of the objectives, outcomes, outputs and performance indicators set out in all National Agreements (NA) and National Partnerships (NP) agreements.

The National Agreement for Skills and Workforce Development (NASWD), which replaced die Skilling Australia *s Workforce Agreement as of 1 January 2009, is

included as a schedule tinder the IGA. The NASWD requires that states and territories provide the necessary data and information to enable the production of the ANR which will be coordinated and published by

the Commonwealth.

The ANR of the Australian VET System is no longer seen as the accountability report for VET system performance under the NASWD as this requirement is discharged through reporting by the COAG Reform

Council. Instead, the report *s aim is to cover all COAG performance measures of the VET system. It also includes additional information to monitor the achievements of disadvantaged groups participating in VET, to take into account the National Agreements * emphasis on improvements to

be made in VET for Indigenous students and students from low-socio-economic backgrounds. This report includes expanded reporting of VET participation and qualifications completions, in Certificate III and above, and in Diploma and above, by these disadvantaged groups, in response to this.

annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009 p3

Headline M essages Australia has a very well developed VET system. It is run by states and territories with policy development and planning

conducted at the national level by the Ministerial Council of Tertiary Education and Employment (MCTEE). High-level

reform of VET is driven by MCTEE with strategic intervention by COAG. The system is flexible, allows wide participation and choice, and encourages active industry

involvement to influence policies and priorities. It has market-based features where non-public providers are also present.

The VET system includes well developed apprenticeship and traineeship arrangements that combine institution based learning with workplace training. This helps to ensure that Australia is equipped to meet the challenges of a changing global economy.

While VET plays a major role in achieving productivity and ensuring national economic prosperity there is a need for continuing progress in the sector to ensure that:

%∫ Australians are equipped with up to date industry-relevant skills and qualifications, now and into the future; %∫ Australians are equipped to respond to

the Global Economic Downturn; %∫ increasingly more Australians, as a proportion of the total population, take up vocational education and

training opportunities; %∫ the VET system is able to respond to the changing needs of users in the

labour market;

%∫ people from disadvantaged groups are participating in increasing numbers;

%∫ Australians are provided with an opportunity for improvement in their underlying foundation skills; and

%∫ unemployed and existing workers are provided access to training opportunities to enhance their employment skills.

In 2009, changes were made in a number of areas of the VET system. This included COAGV agreement to a new NASWD; the introduction of the Productivity Places

Program (PPP) aimed at delivering 711 000 training places in areas of skills shortage; the introduction of the VET FEE HELP arrangements; and the establishment

of targets for increasing qualification completions at the Certificate III level and above.

Challenges Ahead The goals of the COAG agenda for VET are to boost productivity, workforce participation and geographic mobility, and support wider objectives, including

improving services for the community, social inclusion, closing the gap on Indigenous disadvantage and environmental sustainability. In order to achieve these outcomes a set of ambitious targets was set for the nation and for jurisdictions

to reach through NAs and NPs. Specific performance measures were designed under COAG *s improved accountability

framework to monitor jurisdiction *s performance towards achieving these targets and related performance measures by 2020.

p4 annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009

While this report shows that progress was made during 2009, further effort is required from all jurisdictions to ensure that the COAG targets are met, and that the required, and agreed, outcomes are achieved.

Moreover, according to the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), there are some well recognised general issues related to the VET system itself that also require further attention. These include:

%∫ the lack of timely VET data provision to stakeholders to inform policy making and research; %∫ administrative inconsistencies between

states and territories and duplications with Australian Government; %∫ a VET fee imposed for lower level qualifications that contradict free-of-

charge equivalent courses at school;

%∫ variations in assessment standards between similar courses offered by different providers;

%∫ unclear entitlements and lack of information to prospective students on outcomes achieved by providers; %∫ user choice of providers constrained by

workplace training demand; %∫ over-reliance on forecasts, that usually are not very reliable, of skills shortages, in determining entitlements; %∫ the need for sufficient growth in

commencements of apprenticeships in the traditional trades to address the expected skills needs of the growing Australian economy;

%∫ too detailed training packages; and %∫ the ageing of the VET teacher labour force.

annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009 p5

The National Training System

Roles and Responsibilities The national training system brings together students, employers, governments, and registered training organisations in the delivery of VET. Its key roles involve addressing the nation *s skills needs and, in so doing, drive improved productivity and economic growth. Through strong industry leadership, the national training system provides Australians with the skills needed to enter the workforce for the first time, to re-enter the workforce, to retrain for a new job, to upgrade skills for an existing job,

and to learn throughout their lives.

The national training system includes both publicly and privately funded training providers. Training may take place in classrooms, in the workplace, off-the-job,

online and through other flexible delivery methods. The VET sector provides training for Australians of all ages and backgrounds, for small and large businesses, across all industries and in many communities.

The Commonwealth, State and Territory Governments work with industry to deliver a national training system that provides the basis for high quality, industry developed and nationally recognised training to about one in eight working-age Australians. Through a national network of around

5 000 public and private registered training providers, over 1.7 million Australians from all ages, backgrounds and locations participate in VET each year to support

their life goals. DEEWR is the lead national agency for the national training system.

During 2009, the Australian Government contributed $1.3 billion under the NASVVD. The Australian Government investment was part of its overall investment in VET during 2009 of $3.5 billion. Similarly, States and Territories contribute additional resources to skills development outside of the funding agreement with the Australian Government through a range of incentives, training programs and income forgone in areas such as payroll exemption and other tax incentives.

The national training system has undergone extensive change in recent years. This includes the establishment of a new Ministerial Council (MCTEE), to strengthen the focus on skills and training, new legislation, new agreements between

the States, Territories and the Australian Government, and new consultative bodies providing industry and client leadership.

Intergovernmental A greements Under the IGA on Federal Financial Relations, the Commonwealth Government committed to provide on-going financial

support to the States and Territories for delivery of VET services. The IGA commenced on 1 January 2009 and consists of separate National Agreements that relate to particular service areas such as health, education, skills and workforce development, disability, affordable housing and Indigenous reform. The existing funding mechanisms such as GST payments and general revenue assistance were expanded to include National Specific Purpose Payments (SSP) and NP payments. Each agreement and partnership has a set of objectives, outcomes and outputs

that States and Territories are committed to deliver, specific targets that are to be reached, and performance measures to monitor

pB annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009

progress. The overall objective of the framework for Federal Financial Relations is to improve the well-being of all Australians,

and in particular to address the issue of social inclusion, including Indigenous disadvantage. Of relevance to VET are the following agreements and partnerships:

NASVVD, National Indigenous Reform Agreement (NIRA) and NP Agreement on PPP.

National Agreement for Skills and Workforce Development (NASWD) The NASVVD was implemented on 1 January 2009 and replaced the previous agreement, Commonwealth-

State Agreement for Skilling Australia *s Workforce (CSASAW) that ran from 1 July 2005 to 31 December 2008.

The objectives of NASWD, which are consistent with those under CSASAW, are as follows:

%∫ All working aged Australians have the opportunity to develop the skills and qualifications needed, including through a responsive training system, to enable them to be effective participants in and contributors to the modern labour market.

%∫ Individuals are assisted to overcome barriers to education, training and employment, and are motivated to acquire and utilise new skills.

%∫ Australian industry and businesses develop, harness and utilise the skills and abilities of the workforce.

The targets of NASWD are:

%∫ Halve the proportion of Australians aged 20-64 without qualifications at Certificate III level and above between 2009 and 2020.

%∫ Double the number of higher qualification completions (Diploma and Advanced Diploma) between 2009 and 2020.

The performance indicators used to measure progress under the NASWD are the:

%∫ proportion of the working age population at literacy level 1, 2 and 3; %∫ proportion of 20 - 64 year olds who do not have qualifications at or above a

Certificate III; %∫ proportion of graduates employed after completing training, by previous

employment status; %∫ percentage of graduates with improved employment status after training; %∫ number of hard to fill vacancies; and %∫ proportion of people employed at or

above the level of their qualification, by field of study.

National Indigenous Reform Agreement

(NIRA)

Through NIRA, Commonwealth, State and Territory Governments are committed to working together with Indigenous

Australians to close the gap in Indigenous disadvantage. The foundation of the *Closing the Gap * strategy is the identification of and commitment to targets addressing

Indigenous disadvantage, and associated building blocks: in Early Childhood; Schooling, Health, Economic Participation, Healthy Homes, Safe Communities; and

Governance and Leadership.

The targets of NIRA are:

%∫ closing the life expectancy gap within a generation; %∫ halving the gap in mortality rates for

P7 annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009

Indigenous children under five within a decade; %∫ ensuring all Indigenous four years olds in remote communities have access to early

childhood education within five years; %∫ halving the gap for Indigenous students in reading, writing and numeracy within a decade; %∫ halving the gap for Indigenous students

in Year 12 attainment or equivalent attainment rates by 2020; and

%∫ halving the gap in employment outcomes between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians within a decade.

While all the *Closing the Gap * building blocks targets are interconnected, of particular relevance to Indigenous Australians in VET are the Schooling

and Economic Participation blocks; *Halving the gap for Indigenous students in Year 12 or equivalent attainment *; and *Halving the gap in employment outcomes between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians * targets.

The NIRA performance indicators that are directly related to VET are:

proportion of Indigenous 20-24 year- olds having attained at least a Year 12 or equivalent or Certificate II; proportion of Indigenous 18-24 year olds engaged in full-time employment, education or training at or above Certificate III; and %∫ proportion of Indigenous 20-64 year

olds with or working towards post school qualification in Certificate III, IV, Diploma and Advanced Diploma.

National Partnership Agreement on Productivity Places Program [PPP1

The NP - PPP commenced on 1 January 2009 and will expire on 30 June 2012. Its aim is to reduce skills shortages and increase the productivity of industry and enterprises through an increase in the number of people with qualifications at Certificate III and above including in higher level qualifications. The program is targeted to address areas of skills shortages and it contributes to meeting existing objectives set out for NASWD. The sources of funding are contributions from the Commonwealth Government, State and Territory Governments, and a contribution from individuals or enterprises.

The program has two outputs that are to be delivered: 557 556 course enrolments and 402 881 qualification commencements. The entitlements to training are divided between existing workers and job seekers. For each payment for an existing worker, the Commonwealth will contribute 50 per cent, the State or Territory will contribute 40 per cent and the individual/enterprise will contribute a minimum of 10 per cent. The Commonwealth will contribute 100 per cent of the cost of training places for job seekers.

National Disability Agreement (NDA)

The NDA began on 1 January 2009 and replaced the third Commonwealth State Territory Disability Agreement. Under this agreement all Australian governments committed to actively promote the rights of individuals with disability so that people with disability achieve economic participation and social inclusion. One of the agreed policy direction is to *improve provision of skills and opportunities to

p8 annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009

enhance the capability of people with disability to participate in social, economic and community activities *. It includes participation of people with disability in VET.

Governance Framework The National Governance Framework establishes the policy and decision-making processes and bodies responsible for training. It also includes planning and

performance monitoring arrangements to guide the operation and growth of the training system.

The Governance Framework brings together arrangements for joint planning, decision making and accountability between levels of governments and with industry. Processes involved in this framework ensure that die national training system is operating effectively in skilling workers to meet the ongoing economic and social needs of Australia.

The MCTEE replaced die Ministerial Council for Vocational and Technical Education (MCVTE) from 1 July 2009, giving effect to the decision made by COAG on 30 April 2009. A realignment of responsibilities and functions for MCTEE includes a broader, cross-sectoral role than that of die MCVTE. Australian and State and Territory government ministers, through the MCTEE provide direction on national policy, strategy, priorities, goals and objectives, in partnership with industry, and private and public training providers.

Another important component of the VET Governance Framework is the National Skills Framework (NSF). The NSF sets out die system *s requirements for quality and national consistency in terms of

qualifications and the delivery of training. This framework ensures that nationally consistent, industry developed, competency- based training packages remain at the centre

of the new training system. The framework also encompasses training packages, Industry Skills Councils, a new Ministerial Company to provide training materials, the National Training Information Service

(NTIS), the National Quality Council (NQC) and the Australian Quality Training Framework (AQTF). The components of the Framework are expanded below.

The MCTEE, comprising Ministers from each State and Territory and chaired by the Australian Government Minister, provides direction on national policy and planning.

The National Industry Skills Committee (NISC) advises MCTEE on workforce planning, future training priorities and other critical issues facing Australian industry.

The National Quality' Council (NQC) oversees quality' assurance, ensures national consistency in the application of the AQTF standards for the audit and registration of training providers, and endorses training packages.

The National Senior Officials Committee (NSOC) is the administrative arm of MCTEE and is responsible for implementing MCTEE decisions.

NSOC can establish National Action Groups on an as-needs basis, to advance the work of MCTEE secretariat function. Protocols are in place to ensure diat Action Groups have appropriate and balanced memberships, including representatives from Commonwealth and state government, training providers, and businesses. Action Groups operating during 2009 included the Client and Student Voice Action Group,

annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009 p9

Resourcing VET Action Group, the New Ministerial Company Action Group, and the NCVER Review Implementation Action Group.

The National VET Equity Advisory Council (NVEAC) has been established to provide high level advice to MCTEE to guide equity reform in the national training system.

Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) Australia Limited provides an integrated service to enable users of the national training system to identify and

acquire training materials, identify copyright requirements and enter into license agreements for use of that material. TVET Australia *s role also includes a national registration, audit and approval function

for multi-jurisdiction registered training providers. The charter for TVET Australia *s National Audit and Registration Agency was adopted in December 2007.

The National Training Statistics Committee (NTSC) is the key strategic and policy advisory forum for data collection and reporting. The NTSC inputs through NSOC.

Industry Skills Councils (ISCs) develop and support the implementation of training packages and related activities. This is a key feature of the Australian training system.

The Australian Government is continuing to reform the training system to be more demand driven, where industry decides what competencies they want in each qualification and these are delivered and recognised nationally.

The ISCs provide representation for industry to provide direct input to the various formal committees and councils which guide the policy agenda. This high

level of engagement at all levels of decision making ensures that industry plays a leading role in driving training policies, priorities and delivery.

Industry also has direct input to high level training policy and deliver)' through a direct line of advice to the MCTEE.

The National Centre for Vocational Education Research (NCVER) is a company owned by Ministers that manages a VET research programme and provides VET statistical services to the Australian

Government, States and Territories.

p10 annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009

2 0 0 9 structure of the policy advice and decision making bodies under the new national training system

MINISTERIAL COUNCIL FOR TERTIARY EDUCATION AND EMPLOYMENT (MCTEE)

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National Quality Council (NQC)

National VET Equity Advisory Council

(NVEAC)

National Senior Officials Committee

(NSOC)

National Industry Skills Committee

(NISC)

Australian Qualifications Framework Council

(AQFC)

Industry National NationalFlexible National

Skills Projects Action Groups LearningTraining

Councils Management Advisory Statistics

(ISCs) Committee NSOC & MCVTE Group Committee

(NPMC) as needed (FLAG) (NTSC)

Current Action Groups

ª National VET Sector Sustainability Action Group

%† National Data Strategy Action Group

" Adult and Community Education Action Group

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Joint MCTEE

Committees

" Joint Committee on International Education

* Joint

Committee on Higher Education

ª Joint Australian Health Ministers Advisory Committee

Cross Ministerial Council Advisory Bodies

" Australian Information & Communications Technology in Education Committee (AICTEC)

" National Education & Training Statistics Unit (NETSU)

" Productivity Data Development Group

" Youth Transitions

" Copyright Advisory Group

MCTEE Companies

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National Centre for Vocational Education

Research Ltd (NCVER)

TVET Australia Ltd

(Ministerial Company)

Australian Universities Quality Assurance Agency Ltd

(AUQA)

National Audit & Registration Agency

(NARA)

Æ ISCs are founded by DEEWR

MCEECDYA

Disadvantaged Groups in VET

Education is vital to a sustainable, productive and inclusive future. Research has shown that countries with high average

education and skills levels have higher gross domestic products and better standards of living. By acquiring new skills and knowledge throughout their working lives, people are empowered to develop their hill potential and to contribute to the country *s prosperity. At present there remains a significant gap between students with a disability and those without in the degree to which they attain year 12 or equivalent and VET qualifications and participate in university studies. As a consequence, as well as specific programs that assist people who are disadvantaged in education and in the workforce, mainstream programs will need to better cater to the needs of those who in the past may not have participated fully in education and training, such as people with disability.

Given the importance of education to Australians and the economy more broadly, it is not surprising that all jurisdictions have committed to improving the well-being of

those Australians who face disadvantage, under the Federal Financial Relations framework. It is therefore unsurprising that this report places an emphasis on reporting the progress being made in relation to disadvantaged groups in VET.

The five target groups that are identified as being subject to disadvantage in VET are:

%∫ Indigenous Australians; Based on self-identification as being of Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander descent as defined by the ABS standard and collected via the Australian Vocational Education and Training Management Information Statistical Standard (AVETMISS).

%∫ People with a disability; Based on self-identification of whether the client considers themselves to have a disability, impairment or long-term condition as collected via AVETMISS.

%∫ People of low socio-economic status; There is currently no consistent COAG definition of low socio-economic status, but it is proposed that the data be disaggregated by three proxy measures:

%∫ Educational attainment * self reported highest level of educational attainment (Year 12 or equivalent or below/ Certificate III or IV/Diploma and Advanced Diploma/Bachelor degree or above)

%∫ SEIEA Index * use of the ABS * SEIFA index of relative Socio-economic Disadvantage (5 quintiles)

%∫ Remoteness * using four categories from the ABS * Accessibility/Remoteness Index of Australia (major cities/inner regional area/outer regional areas/remote and very remote).

%∫ People who speak a language other than English at home; Self reported data as defined by the ABS standard and collected via AVETMISS.

%∫ Women; Self reported gender data as collected via AVETMISS.

It is highly desirable that VET participations by Australians in these target groups reach levels that are comparable to those that are achieved for the broader student population. Participation is defined as the number of participants in the VET system who self- identified that they are from a target group, as a proportion of the total number of people in the population in that group. There is a tendency for participants in the target groups not to

p12 annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009

identify as being from a target group making accurate reporting more difficult.

Policy response to address disadvantage Commonwealth, State and Territory Governments have developed initiatives to address disadvantage in VET.

These initiatives are in line with the following objectives under the NASWD:

%∫ all working Australian have the opportunity to develop the stills and qualifications needed, including through a responsive training system, to enable them to be effective participants in and contributors to the modern labour market; and

%∫ individuals are assisted to overcome barriers to education, training and employment, and are motivated to acquire and utilise new skills.

The establishment of NVEAC, a single layer advisory body that considers the issues and barriers that affect all equity groups indicates the commitment of all Government *s to address disadvantage. NVEAC provides high level advice to the MCTEE to guide equity reform in the national training system.

Recognising that many clients in the VET system experience multiple disadvantage, the new Council will identify shared priorities for all equity groups, while continuing to

build on the work of the previous client advisory groups around the particular barriers experienced by people with a disability and

Indigenous Australians.

The membership of the new Council well reflects the diverse range of stakeholders within the sector, including people with a disability, Indigenous Australians, refugees,

homeless youth, and people from a non- English speaking background. Practitioners whose role is to work in the education and training sectors with, or on behalf of, disadvantaged learners are also represented on the Council.

Further policy initiatives to address disadvantage in VET by Commonwealth, State and Territory Government are explained in the following section.

Australian Government

Foundation Skills Taster Course Program The Foundation Stills Taster Course (FSTC) Program was announced as part of the $28.2 million language, literacy and numeracy

(LLN) element of the *Building die Basics * package for additional training places in the 2009 Budget process.

The primary objective of the FSTC Program is to facilitate enhanced client engagement in the Language, Literacy and Numeracy Program (LLNP) and/or other foundations stills training in order to build the skills necessary for future success in more formal study and/ or employment.

The program involves the provision of short (6-8 weeks, part-time), informal *taster * courses in relaxed, safe and non-threatening community-based settings. Rather than being presented as specific LLN or foundation stills training, the FSTCs will be structured around topics of direct relevance to people *s lives (e.g. home maintenance, obtaining a driver *s licence). This approach recognises that embedding LLN learning into activities which are meaningful for participants is an important strategy for engaging reluctant learners.

annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009 p13

The Program targets adults (25-64yrs) with low LLN skills who are job seekers, or outside of the labour market, and who are not participating in education and training.

The FSTC Program also has a family literacy element which, in addition to the above, seeks to provide opportunities for

children and parents (or carers) to learn and grow together.

Language, Literacy and Numeracy Programs The LLN policy targets Australians with a language, literacy and/or numeracy barrier to employment and/or further education and provides training towards improved language, literacy and/or numeracy skills with the expectation that such improvements will enable more effective participation in training and/or in the labour force and lead to greater gains for society in the longer term

The program is available Australia wide through:

%∫ face-to-face mode;

%∫ distance-mode; and %∫ mixed mode.

The LLNP aims to help job seekers improve their language, literacy and numeracy skills. It provides three levels of English language training (initial, basic and advanced) and two levels of literacy and numeracy training (basic and advanced). Face to face services arc available from more than 300 locations across Australia and services are also available by distance education anywhere in Australia.

Youth During 2009, the Career Advice Australia initiative continued to support young people to make successful transitions. Under the Career and Transition Support (CTS) program Local Community Partnerships provided a range of career and transition support to young people, many of whom were disadvantaged. This included promoting VET opportunities and pathways, and the development of individual transition plans.

Through Structured Workplace Learning and CTS in particular, young people were encouraged to consider alternative options to school, such as those provided

by the VET system. This was particularly important for those at risk of disengaging.

During 2009 the NP on Youth Attainment and Transitions was developed, which consolidated a number of youth transitions programs and strengthened the focus on supporting those not productively engaged in education or training. This approach supported the COAG targets to improve Year 12 or Certificate II or above attainment, including for Indigenous young people, for whom VET is an important component of Year 12 or equivalent attainment rates.

As part of the focus on disengaged young people under the NP, a support program was developed (to begin in January 2010) which would include the achievement of specified numbers of outcomes for

Indigenous young people in regions with high Indigenous populations.

The NP also delivers the Compact with Young Australians which was agreed in April 2009. From 1 July 2009 the Compact provided an entitlement to

p14 annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009

a place in school, training or higher education for all young people aged 15 to 19 (to be extended to 24 year olds in January 2010) focussing on those without Year 12 or equivalent qualifications. This

entitlement ensures that young people are encouraged to gain qualifications. Such a focus also supports those from disadvantaged backgrounds,

The Compact also put in place strengthened income support arrangements from 1 July 2009 which made participation and training a pre-condition for receipt of Youth Allowance (Other) and Family Tax

Benefit (Part A). Exemptions and flexible arrangements were included to protect disadvantaged young people (e.g. homeless) who cannot meet the participation requirements. Participation in Disability Employment Services satisfies the new participation requirements.

Australian A ccess Apprenticeships Program In an effort to ensure that Australia continues to recruit and train apprentices in traditional trades and to meet the potential skills shortage head on the Government introduced the Australian Kickstart Apprenticeship Program. Under this program employers taking on apprentices aged between 15 and 19 years in die included trades were eligible for bonuses. The trades include traditional trades such

as butchers, bakers, bricklayers, carpenters, electricians, hairdressers and pastry cooks.

The Australian Apprenticeships Access Program (Access Program) also provides vulnerable job seekers who experience barriers to skilled employment with pre- vocational training and support to help

them obtain and successfully participate hi an Australian Apprenticeship or traineeship, or achieve a training or employment outcome. Eligible groups for the Access Program include Indigenous Australians, people with disability and vulnerable young job seekers - including at-risk Year 12 school leavers and those who left school prior to completing Year 12.

The Access Program provides participants with a unique suite of pre-vocational training on an Australian Apprenticeship pathway and individualised job search and post-placement support.

During die 2009 calendar year 12,226 vulnerable job seekers participated in die Access Program. Of these participants around 5 per cent identified as Indigenous Australians and 2.6 per cent identified

as having disability. As these categories are self-identified it is possible that more participants were Indigenous or had a disability than identified as such.

In addition 78 per cent of Access Program participants in 2009 were female.

Productivity Places Program The PPP has provided people who are traditionally disadvantaged in VET with opportunities to participate in training.

The government funding of die program and its availability to job seekers through Employment Services Providers (ESPs) has made training more accessible to women, people with a disability, people from Non English Speaking Backgrounds (NESB) and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander

people (ATSI).

annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009 p15

Under the Australian Government administration of PPP, of the 59 420 participant commencements in the program in 2009, 3 559 identify as NESB, 2 621 identify as people with a disability, 1 903 identify as ATSI and 25,648 of participants are women. This data cannot, however, reflect the true number of participants from these groups due to the element of unknown or not stated status in each category.

Infrastructure and Connections

The Teaching and Learning Capital Fund (TLCF) for VET is facilitating the provision of $500 million in grants during tire 2009-10 financial year, which will focus on modernising and improving the quality of teaching and learning across numerous disciplines. The benefits realised as a result will affect a broad and diverse range of individuals across more than 470 different community projects that are currently active. The five groups that have been identified as subject to disadvantage in VET make up a considerable representation to tire demographics of the individuals who will directly benefit from the completion and rollout of the program.

Delivering the product into the community will directly benefit these groups: People with a disability will be able to access training facilities constructed with improved access, parking, hearing links and visibility

aids. Non English speakers will be given assistance to seek employment and benefit from smart language and literacy classrooms. Women *s community centres will receive funding for building extensions, refurbishment and IT equipment upgrades. Low socio economic community members including youth at risk will be given access

to practical training courses facilitated by improvements to infrastructure and facilities.

Finally, Indigenous Australians will gain easier access to health services, IT resources and training programs/facilities. Indigenous Australians will also directly

benefit from the implementation of the VET infrastructure for Indigenous people program (VHP) which provides capital assistance to communities and training providers to facilitate on increasing the number of Indigenous people undertaking VET.

The 2009 Australian Flexible Learning Framework (Framework) provides the VET sector with the essential e-learning infrastructure and expertise needed to

respond to the challenges of a modern economy and the training needs of Australian businesses and workers. It supports and promotes the embedding

of e learning technologies to help meet the needs of students, business, industry, Indigenous learners, and communities regardless of geographical location.

Training Initiatives for Indigenous Adults in Regional and Remote Communities Program [TIFIARRC1

TIFLAKRC provides funding to attract, engage and support Indigenous adults in regional and remote communities to access

VET opportunities, including the Australian Government *s additional training places as part of 5 killing Australia for the Future policy. Funding is also available for projects to build the capacity of Indigenous training providers or to develop new community-

based providers. Preference is given to training that results in, or is linked to, Certificate Level II or above qualifications.

p16 annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009

TIFIARRC involves bilateral agreements with four jurisdictions: Western Australia, Queensland, South Australia and the

Northern Territory, which provide matched funding and manage the delivery of the program in their jurisdiction.

The Australian Government jointly administers VET Infrastructure for Indigenous People (VIIP) funding with State and Territory Training Authorities (STAs) on a calendar year basis, generally through a single, nationally competitive Rinding round. The purpose of VIIP funding is to provide capital assistance to

communities and VET providers to facilitate an increase in the numbers of Indigenous people undertaking VET by providing a range of accredited and non-accredited VET courses. VIIP Skill Centre funding also aims to help increase the capacity of Indigenous communities to be sustainable and self determining.

The purpose and objectives of VIIP Skill Centre funding are consistent with the priorities of Partners in a Learning Culture , the National Training Strategy for Aboriginal and Torres Strait

Islander people.

The Australian Training Awards arc the annual peak, national awards for VET, recognising innovation and excellence in the training sector. The awards are the culmination of the state and territory awards with winners from each state and territory competing at the national finals. The winner of the 2009 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Student of the Year was Dasha Newington.

Winner: Dasha Newington Course: Diploma of Aboriginal Studies Training Provider: TAPE NSW * Western Sydney Institute

After finishing school, Dasha Newington worked in retail and business, aged care, counselling and social science.

Dasha had always wanted to explore her Indigenous ancestry and completed a Diploma of Aboriginal Studies in 2008. One of Dasha *s teachers described her as *an advocate and ambassador, not only for education but also for Indigenous people *.

As a recipient of the Fuggy Hunter Memorial Scholarship, Dasha completed an Indigenous research internship with Onemda, the Koori health unit in Melbourne.

The only Indigenous student in the intake of 300 students, Dasha is now studying a Bachelor of Medicine/Bachelor of Surgery at the University of Sydney, her lifelong dream.

Training Program for Indigenous Australians The Indigenous Regional Projects program (IRP) provides support for a range of innovative projects and initiatives that assist key stakeholders to improve the participation of Indigenous Australians in nationally recognised training and skills development programs, specifically Australian Apprenticeships and training packages which lead to sustainable employment.

Away from Base for *mixed-mode * delivery (AFB) provides Rinding to cover travel costs including fares, meals and accommodation, for eligible Indigenous students studying

annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009 p1?

approved *mixed-mode * courses, when they are required to travel away from their permanent home for a short period of time to undertake approved activities. This

includes students required to attend short courses, field trips, occasional residential schools or practical placements.

A *mixed-mode * course is a nationally accredited course that is delivered through a combination of distance education and

face-to-face teaching for students who are based in their home communities and undertake occasional intensive study periods on campus. Eligible providers in the Higher Education and Vocational Educational and Training sectors administer this funding.

Indigenous Tutorial Assistance Scheme - Tertiary Tuition (ITAS TT) program provides funding for supplementary tuition

to support eligible Indigenous students studying university award level courses and Australian Qualifications Framework (AQF) accredited VET courses at eligible ITAS

funded institutions. Tuition is managed by education providers and is available only for subjects in a student *s formal education program. It is not usually available for

basic literacy, numeracy, enabling and bridging courses.

ITAS is intended to accelerate educational outcomes for Indigenous Australians beyond those which could reasonably

be expected from mainstream and the provider *s own source funding alone. ITAS TT aims to improve the educational outcomes of Indigenous students in tertiary courses to the same levels as those for non- Indigenous Australians.

Indigenous Tutorial Assistance Scheme for VET (ITAS VET) is a form of ITAS which provides up to two hours per

subject, per week of targeted tuition to Indigenous students enrolled and studying AQF accredited VET courses at eligible non-government VET institutions. Tuition is managed by education providers and is available only for subjects in a student *s formal education program. It is not usually available for basic literacy, numeracy, enabling and bridging courses.

Supplementary Recurrent A ssistance (SRA) - non-government VET providers SRA provides supplementary per capita assistance to eligible non government VET Institutions with a minimum Indigenous

enrolment of 20 Full Time Equivalent (FTE) students to assist them to accelerate educational outcomes for Indigenous Australians beyond those which could reasonably be expected from mainstream and

own-source funding alone.

New South Wales

Indigenous Australians TAFE NSW continued to assist Aboriginal students to achieve higher-level qualifications and sustainable employment through corporate and community partnerships. In

2009, initiatives included:

%∫ TAFE NSW * Hunter Institute partnered with Virgin Airlines to support specialised training to assist Aboriginal people to gain employment with the airline.

%∫ TAFE NSW * Western and New England Institutes, in conjunction with NSW Police, delivered the Indigenous Police Recruitment Out West Delivery Program

(IPROWD) in Dubbo and Tamworth.

p18 annual national report of the australian vocational edocation and training system 2009

%∫ TAPE NSW * Sydney Institute partnered with Energy Australia and RailCorp to provide pre-employment training and work opportunities for Aboriginal people.

The Way Ahead for Aboriginal People Program provides Aboriginal mentors to assist Aboriginal apprentices and trainees in understanding and dealing with workplace structure and organisation. In 2009, the

program was extended to Aboriginal pre≠ apprentices trained through the NSW Training Market.

New visual resources were commissioned in 2009 to engage young Aboriginal people to remain connected to the education system

and undertake vocational education and training courses. The resource Inspirational Indigenous Stories will be distributed to schools at the beginning of 2010. These highly effective profiles of Aboriginal apprentices, trainees and students are available on YouTube.

People with a Disability In 2009, 1 073 TAPE delivered VET enrolments of government school students received disability support.

In partnership with the Department of Ageing, Disability and Home Care and the Department of Human Services, TAPE

NSW developed an Employment Strategy to Enhance Employment Outcomes for TAPE NSW Students with a Disability.

The Career Moves web portal (www.careermoves.net.au) funded by the NSW Board of Vocational Education and Training was developed in 2009 to cater to

the wide range of needs of young people with a disability to assist their transition from school to work.

The NSW ACE Social Inclusion Program provides funds to community based ACE organisations to promote and increase vocational education and training for those

´'ho experience barriers to training and employment or who are at risk of being socially excluded. Priority target groups

include: people with disability, Indigenous Australians, people who speak a language other than English at home and die unemployed and underemployed.

People of Low Socio-Economic Status Commencing in 2009, thirty scholarships are available for 1st, 2nd and 3rd year apprentices from regional New South Wales under the Ben Chifley Scholarship funded by the NSW Board of Vocational Education and Training. Each scholarship is valued at $5 000 for each year while die apprentice is completing their apprenticeship up to a maximum of $15 000. At least two of the scholarships will be awarded to people of Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander background each year. Scholarships will be awarded on the basis of:

%∫ hardship %∫ aptitude for vocational education and training, and %∫ the nominee *s trade in an identified skill

shortage area in New South Wales and/ or the nominee *s local area.

Several specific strategies were successfully delivered through the Strategic Stills program:

%∫ Pre-Employment Strategy - targeting out-of-work or under-employed people of all ages

%∫ Corporate Partners for Change - initial training for unemployed people,

annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009 p19

with employers making an up-front commitment to take an active role in all aspects of the program. In 2009, die program was extended outside of Sydney to several regional areas across the State.

Assistance was provided to retrenched apprentices and trainees to re-establish their apprenticeships and traineeships with a new employer, to relocate to or from a regional area if necessary, to continue with their formal/off-the job training and to pay the administrative fee for their Registered Training Organisation (RTO).

TATE NSW has developed an Access and Employment Education and Training Framework, comprising unit-based qualifications that meet the needs of a wide range of people facing barriers by providing a pathway to work, community participation and further education and training.

People Who Speak a Language Other than English at Home New South Wales hinds the Skillmax Program which assists migrants with

overseas qualifications and work experience to secure employment in Australia at levels commensurate with their previous skills and experience. The Skillmax Program is provided by the NSW Adult Migrant English Service (AMES). On successful completion of the Skillmax Program, students are able to participate in the

Skilled Migrant Mentoring Program. This program, funded by the NSW AMES and delivered in partnership with the

ACE sector, offers access to an industry mentor and an opportunity to undertake work experience.

TAPE NSW provides a range of programs and services to assist people from language backgrounds other than English. In 2009, initiatives included:

%∫ TAPE NSW * New England Institute delivered English Language Skills for Employment to workers from the Philippines in response to the needs of a local meat processing operation

%∫ TAPE NSW * South Western Sydney Institute delivered a pre-employment program, Tamil Women * Preparation for the Australian Workforce, which aimed to build interpersonal and communication skills and empower participants to feel more confident and better equipped to participate in the Australian workforce.

%∫ TAPE NSW * Western Institute, in partnership with Orange City Council and Orange Multicultural Women's Group, delivered die Sudanese Women English Language Program, customised for a group of recently-settled humanitarian refugees from Sudan.

The Strategic Skills Program provides mostly part-qualification, non≠ apprenticeship /traineeship skills development in priority industries. In 2009, a specific strategy providing national competency training to Language Other than English participants was successfully delivered under the program.

Women TAPE NSW Institutes deliver a range of programs to assist women to reach their hill potential, gain meaningful employment and participate in the workforce and society. Achievements in 2009 included:

%∫ TAPE NSW * Hunter Institute delivered the program Enhancing

p20 annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009

Women on Boards, to rural women working in primary industries and to Aboriginal women to support increased representation of Indigenous women in

decision-making roles.

%∫ TAPE NSW * New England Institute implemented the Sustainability Project. A series of workshops was delivered to small farming communities in the Tam worth/

Gunnedah region. These workshops promoted awareness of education, community and business options for women and pathways for women in agriculture, industry organisations and community leadership.

%∫ TAPE NSW * Northern Sydney Institute delivered an accelerated technical skills program - Digi-Girls News Production for girls at school. The program aimed to

broaden the girls * career options in the entertainment industry by demonstrating a range of industry applications including News Production, Screen (Film and Television) and Multimedia.

Victoria The Victorian Government is continuing its commitment to increase access and equity in VET, particularly for disadvantaged Victorians. A number of programs support

this commitment.

Specifically, Victoria *s Priority Education and Training Program (PETP) aims to support die delivery of training for the development of skills and knowledge in priority areas.

PETP seeks to enable participation in the workforce specifically for equity groups, such as people with a disability, disadvantaged youth, and Indigenous learners. The Victorian TAPE Disability Network facilitates

resource and information collaboration

among TAPE Managers to support people with a disability to access and participate in VET.

Under the Indigenous Completions Initiative, Indigenous Victorians are supported to participate in training and the completion of training qualifications by paying only the minimum tuition fee for enrolments in government funded training. The Victorian Government is also working to improve cultural responsiveness in the VET sector to further stimulate demand in

education and training among culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) communities. Strategies for engagement with Victoria *s CALD communities are being identified in

the CALD Communication Plan and TAPE CALD Program Managers Network.

Queensland In order to assist in *closing die gap * between Indigenous and non-Indigenous VET and employment outcomes,

Queensland *s Department of Education and Training (DET) has committed to increasing die number of Indigenous enrolments and completions against higher

level qualifications. This was achieved by strategically directing Indigenous-specific training and training support (such as

mentoring) funds towards die provision of industry relevant training at the Certificate III level and above. During 2009, DET,

in partnership with the Department of Employment, Economic Development and Innovation (DEEDI), continued to co-ordinate the implementation of

the Positive Dreaming, Solid Futures Indigenous Employment and Training Strategy 2008-2011. This is a whole-of- govermnent strategy which commits a range of government agencies to a number

annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009 p21

of initiatives around four priority areas. Organisations and Indigenous Councils transitioning or recruiting for permanent service delivery positions, formerly supported by Community Development Employment Program subsidies, were able to access culturally appropriate mentoring

and support services, skills identification and access to training to help organisations and their employees through the change process. This assistance was provided by DEEDI Indigenous Employment and Training Managers and Indigenous

Employment and Training Support Officers.

A key priority for DET in 2009 was to support disadvantaged Queenslanders to access subsidised training and associated services which support successful training participation. In addition to the VET

Revenue General budget ($300 million in 2009), an extra $2.5 million was allocated to the public provider network in 2009 to provide learning support

services for students with a disability and to resource extra literacy and numeracy assistance for disadvantaged students. During the 2009 calendar year, Skilling

Queenslanders for Work, which targets priority population groups, delivered training to I 086 Indigenous participants. The program provides participants with additional support to ensure they are able to complete their training and enter employment. DEEDI Indigenous

Employment and Training Support Officers provided culturally appropriate mentoring and support services to 2 889 Indigenous

apprentices, trainees and vocational students. Skilling Queenslanders for Work also delivered targeted training to 1 156

people with a disability, 1 274 people from a non-English speaking background, and 5 474 women.

South Australia In 2009 South Australia provided a range of programs to address the challenges of disadvantaged groups in VET. TAFE SA *s Aboriginal Access Centre provided training, tutoring and case management support to around 40 per cent of the 3 700 Aboriginal students in TAFE SA, assisting them in developing a career pathway to transition

into study at higher Certificate levels and to seek employment.

In 2009 the VET to Work: Disability Support and Transition project provided a case management support service to assist unemployed people with a disability to

transition from VET to employment, resulting in positive outcomes for course completions and employment.

In 2009 South Australia Works was one of a number of ongoing South Australian Government initiatives aimed at addressing the training needs for people of low socio≠ economic status. This program partners with all levels of government, industry and community to re-connect disadvantaged target groups to training and employment pathways.

TAFEStart is a TAFE SA initiative that brings together a range of programs aimed at providing disadvantaged students with a strong foundation in general and vocational education to a level necessary to undertake VET at Certificate III or enter employment.

In 2009 TAFEStart courses included provision of:

%∫ English Proficiency Certificates from Certificate I through to Diploma level. Supplementary English language classes were provided for Non-English speaking

background students undertaking Introduction to Vocational Education Certificate (IVEC);

p22 annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009

%∫ Women *s Education Certificates at levels II, III & IV, to assist disadvantaged women to enter VET and proceed to further education or employment. South Australia is the only State that provides

a specific nationally accredited Women *s Education Certificate; and %∫ IVEC Certificate I classes for people with disability, where the student numbers

are reduced to allow staff more time to spend with each student.

Western Australia

Indigenous Australians The participation of Indigenous people in skilled employment, particularly at local and regional levels is of importance for Western Australia. The Training Together-Working Together committee was established in September 2009 as a sub-committee of

the State Training Board, which includes employers, RTOs and Government agencies who will lead the initiative. The committee will strengthen opportunities that enhance

Indigenous involvement in training and employment, as well as Government decision making.

In 2009 there was a number of specific programs in operation to assist Indigenous Australians in VET. These include the following:

%∫ The Aboriginal Education, Training and Employment Officer (AETEO) Program delivered to eight regions throughout Western Australia. This is a community capacity building program

based on the placement of AETEOs into organisations across the State. The aim of the program is to establish and expand partnerships between Indigenous people,

communities, RTOs and industry to increase training and employment opportunities within a range of agencies;

%∫ Professional development to Indigenous staff in TAPE Colleges; %∫ The Aboriginal School Based Training Program, which provides Indigenous

students in Years 10-12 with opportunities to start training in school to gain a qualification and practical work

experience; and

%∫ The Indigenous Training Support program, which funds public and private RTOs and not-for-profit group training organisations to co-ordinate the provision of support services for associated training programs to Indigenous students.

People with a Disability The Equity Development and Innovation (EDI) Program provides innovative and customised delivery of courses to meet the needs of diverse groups of disadvantaged learners not engaged with formal training.

The Provision of Attendant Care for Students with a Disability , piloted in 2008, was continued in 2009. This program provides for on campus attendant care for students with disabilities who have high

support needs and are emoiled full-time at Certificate III level or above. The aim of this program is to improve the transition of students with a disability through early contact by the Department *s TAPE

Admissions branch. Earlier intervention ensures access to the required services.

TAPE Admissions minimises barriers into TAPE by offering free applications and a choice of application modes, including an on line application process. The use

annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009 p23

of on line applications has increased to 82 per cent of all applications, compared with 18 per cent in 2005.

The EDI program has also funded other projects that have been developed specifically to improve the VET and employment outcomes for people with a disability.

People of Low Socio-Economic Status Western Australia commissioned a field- based study to explore the benefits of

men *s learning through participation in community settings. The study provided recommendations for consideration in policy development for this target group of men with a low socio-economic status. The report titled Men *s learning and wellbeing

through community organisations in Western Australia was published by Professor Barry Golding of the University of Ballarat in 2009.

In 2009 a total of five EDI projects targeted youth, adults and mature age learners on income support to improve their access,

participation and outcomes from VET.

People Who Speak a Language Other Than English at Home The Guide to Employability Skills and Workplace Culture in Australia was

developed and launched in June 2008 and has since been widely distributed. The guide is intended to provide assistance to

new migrants. The publication is available in botia hard copy and on line. In 2009, in response to demand, die second edition of die guide was published and it has also

been translated into Chinese. Work is now underway for translations into Burmese and French.

Women In 2009 EDI program funding was also provided to two projects specifically targeting women. One of the projects was aimed at teenage parents in the Rockingham area and the otiier for migrant, humanitarian and refugee women in the Perth suburb of Mirrabooka.

Tasmania Increasing opportunity is one of the four themes of the Tasmanian Skills Strategy. To execute this Strategy, Skills Tasmania has developed an Equity Policy and Action Plan which will deliver on increasing opportunity and reducing disadvantage by:

%∫ increasing participation and achievement in VET;

%∫ improving employment outcomes; and %∫ increasing die responsiveness of the training system.

This Plan covers all Equity groups and is implemented through two programs, Skills Equip and Equity Support Small Grants, as well as informing all Skills Tasmania *s

purchasing mechanisms. It is monitored by the Skills Tasmania Equity Committee, a sub committee of the Skills Tasmania Board. In 2009, 29 programs/grants supported language and literacy, women, return to work and study programs and Aboriginal programs.

In addition, Learning and Information Network Centres (LINCs) provide a local community learning environment for Tasmanian *s lacing disadvantage. The

LINCs, which bring togetiier various government and community organisations under one roof, deliver Year 11 and 12 courses, VET, adult literacy, language and

basic education courses to adults.

p24 annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009

Northern Territory To address the training needs of disadvantaged groups in the Northern Territory, a broad range of programs and activities was undertaken in 2009. Some examples of successful projects follow:

%∫ Over a period of ten months, 25 low security prison inmates constructed low security accommodation blocks on the grounds of the Darwin Correctional

Facility. While undertaking tasks such as concreting, welding structural steel, laying fibro flooring, assembling roof

trusses, roofing and constructing wall frames, the inmates undertook nationally recognised training with

the Batchelor Institute of Indigenous Tertiary Education.

%∫ The inmates obtained a range of technical stills, received statements of attainments for units of competency completed and were deemed work ready. Fifteen of the inmates obtained employment in the construction industry upon release, and thirteen were still employed some eight months later. A list of employers who wish to engage participants from the project upon release has also been compiled.

%∫ Ten Indigenous men from Tennant Creek completed a Certificate I in Resources and Infrastructure Operations over nine weeks, with the final week being devoted to work experience.

Participants took part in a variety of community projects around which the program was delivered, including vehicle repairs and maintenance, ceiling and furniture repairs, servicing and maintaining mining machinery and working on the manganese processing

plant at the Bootu Creek mine.

%∫ Five of the participants have gained employment since completing the program and the rest are looting for employment in the mining or civil construction industry. The success of the program is attributed to the strong partnership created between industry,

the community and Charles Darwin University as the training provider.

%∫ To celebrate International Women *s day 2009, the Department of Education and Training provided four Northern Territory women who had been out of

the workforce for five years or more, with a $1 000 study grant to support them in gaining stills through VET

to assist them in returning to the workforce. Courses undertaken by the awardees included recordkeeping,

community services work, business, information technology and English proficiency. All four women have either completed their studies or are continuing in 2010.

Australian Capital Territory In 2009 the ACT implemented a number of measures to address disadvantage in VET. An incentive payments scheme for

apprentices/trainees with a disability under User Choice (UC) was instigated. All Certificate I qualifications under

UC, including ASBAs, were opened to people with a disability. The Joint Group Training Program (JGTP) also offers an additional equity payment where the Australian Apprentice is a person with a

disability. In 2009 the Priorities Support Program (PSP) saw a five per cent increase in enrolments of students with a disability and a 43 per cent increase in enrolments of Indigenous students.

annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009 p25

The ACT has convened a Synergy Group to bring coordination and partnership to the range of programs in the ACT that support Indigenous young people. Five Indigenous apprentices were employed in the construction industry as part of the Nation Building Economic Stimulus Plan.

Twenty-one students with a disability completed work experience in order to enter the AS BA Disabilities Program. Five of these students then commenced an ASBA. Partnerships between schools, industry, and government agencies saw

the implementation of programs for students with disabilities in Construction, Automotive, Horticulture, Hospitality, Business, Childcare and Retail. The Inter≠ Agency Training Committee runs the Post

School Options Expo each year for students with a disability. In 2009 the Expo included Try-a-trade for the first time and over 500

students attended. CIT run an annual Girls Only Try-a-trade event, which in 2009 was attended by approximately 200 women and girls.

In 2009 approximately 300 disengaged youth were supported through the Students Participating in Community Enterprises (SPICE) program.

In 2009, a partnership was established between the ACT Department of Education and Training and the Canberra Institute of Technolog)' (CIT) to provide the students, parents and community members of four ACT public schools in low socio≠ economic areas with additional support and opportunities to engage in education.

p26 annual national report of the austraiian vocational education and training system 2009

TMs section provides an overview of overall economic activity, labour market and social trends in Australia relevant to the vocational education and training (VET) sector.

Global economic trends and the Australian economy Economies around the world continued to struggle during 2009, and a major

mark of the year was the uncertainty of economic revival. Signs of slow economic recovery emerged towards the latter part of 2009 with the US, Japanese, and Euro

zone economies reporting slight growth in the September and December quarters (Table 1). The Australian economy

experienced positive growth in the second half of 2009, partially due to the growth of the Chinese economy which recorded an 8.7 per cent increase in GDP in the four quarters of 2009.1

The economic uncertainty of 2009 was also reflected in global unemployment trends. While governments globally continued to aid the recovery of their economies through various expansionary measures, unemployment numbers in the leading world economies continued to rise throughout 2009 (Table 2).

Table 1: Real GDP of selected countries, 2008-2009

December 2008 117.1 107.1 112.5 117.8 144.0

March 2009 115.1 102.6 169.7 114.7 142.3

June 2009 114.9 104.3 109.6 113.9 141.3

September 2009 115.6 104.4 110.0 113.6 141.9

December 2009

Notes: Data are seasonally adjusted.

117.1 105.6 110.1 114.1 144.3

Australian data derived separately from Real Gross Domestic Income, based to December 2000.

Source: RBA, Bulletin Statistical Tables, June 2010, table 1.1.

ABS, Australian National Accounts: National Income, Expenditure and Product, March 2010, cat. no. 520B.0.

1 Chinese GDP figures were sourced from the National Bureau of Slatisfics of China.

annual national report of the australian vocational and technical education system 2009 P27

Table 2: Unemployment rates of selected countries, 2008-2009

%†BBSDecember 2008 7.4 4.4 8.2 6.4 4.6June 2009 9.5 5.3 9.4 7.8 5.8December 2009 10.0 5.2 9.9 7.8 5.5Notes: Data are seasonally adjusted.Australian data derived separately from ABS Labour Force. Source: RBA, Bulletin Statistical Tables, June 2010, table 1.3.ABS, Labour Force, May 2010, cat. no. B202.0.

Note: Figure shows monthly unemployment rate [trend series) from January 2000 to January 2009.

Source: ABS Labour Force, May 2010, cat. no. 6202.0.

p28 annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009

Australian labour market trends The Australian economic cycle for the past ten years can be best illustrated by

the overall national unemployment rate (Figure 1). The lowest unemployment rate of the past decade was in April 2008 (4.1 per cent), while the first significant increase in unemployment since late 2001 came in August 2009 (5.8 per cent). However, since this time, the unemployment rate in Australia has been slightly, but steadily dropping.

Also, at the time of the global financial downturn more people were engaging in part-time employment in Australia . As Figure 2 shows, from January 2008

to January 2009, the number of people in part-time employment increased by 2.6 per cent, whereas the number of people

in full-time employment has risen by a smaller percentage of 0.2 per cent. Further, from January 2009 to January 2010, the number of people in full-time employment

decreased by 0.3 per cent, whereas the number of people in part-time employment has risen by 5.6 per cent over this period.

Job vacancies also provide an indication of the strength of the labour market. Figure 3 shows the skilled vacancy index since the year 2000, and highlights that vacancies for both trade and professional

occupations decreased dramatically in 2008, pointing to a weakening demand. There has been an increase in the index for trade

occupations towards the latter part of 2009.

The Skilled vacancy index provides long≠ term time series and is based on a count of advertisements in major metropolitan newspapers for selected occupations. The Internet vacancy index provides shorter time series (dates back to March 2006 ) but covers all occupations (around

350 occupations), across all skill levels. The index is based on a count of online vacancies newly lodged on major online job boards.

annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2D09 p29

Figure 2: 12-Monthly percentage change, part-time and full-time employment, Australia, 2001-2009

4) cn nj

Iy

5 5 8 8 o o o o O o o 8 8 s o o o o

5 3 5 *Ü ß *> %†*äI 5

3 1 *Ü ß 5 1 1 *Ü *¶ Q

Fmnlovftd full-timeFmnloved nad-time

Note: Figure shows the annual percentage change in the number of people in full-time and part-time employment (trend series) from January 2000 to January 2010.

Source: ABS Labour Force, May 2010, cat. no. 6202.0.

Figure 3: Skilled vacancy index, Australia, 2000-2009

------- Tradespersons Professionals

Note: Figure shows monthly skilled vacancy index from January 2000 to June 2009.

Source: DEEWR historical skilled vacancy index data, June 2009.

p30 annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009

Table 3: Internet Vacancy Index [three-month average)

December 2DD8 December 2009 January 2010 May 2010

Professionals 124.4 74.6 71.9 90.8

Technicians and Trades Workers 110.5 78.9 76.5 87.0

Source: DEEWR Internet Vacancy Index

Table 4: Employment by industry, Australia, 2008-2009

Agriculture, Forestry and Fishing 361.3

Mining 173.9

Manufacturing 1021.8

Electricity, Gas, Water and Waste Services 136.1

Construction 988.4

Wholesale Trade 399.2

Retail Trade1209.5

Accommodation and Food Services 707.3

Transport, Postal and Warehousing 591.5

Information Media and Telecommunications 224.0

Financial and Insurance Services 397.5

Rental, Hiring and Real Estate Services 197.3

Professional, Scientific and Technical Services 782.4

Administrative and Support Services 342.7

Public Administration and Safety 664.3

Education and Training 800.5

Health Care and Social Assistance1125.3

Arts and Recreation Services 196.7

Other Services 450.9

Total 10 770.6

358.1

166.1

997.3

127.5

980.8

422.0

1178.6

739.4

568.3

211.6 400.3

180.3

819.4

368.7

667.0

1199.2

194.5

441.5

10 841.3

-0.9

-4.5

-2.4

-6.4

-0.8

5.7

-2.6

4.5

-3.9

-5.6

0.7

-8.6

4.7

7.6

0.4

820.8

6.6 -1.1

-2.1

0.7

Notes: Data classified according to Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC). 2006 edition. Data displayed is for November 2008 and 2009 (trend series).

Source: ABS, Labour Force, Quarterly. May 2010, cat. no. 6291.0.55.003.

Similar to the Skilled vacancy index, the Internet vacancy index indicates a decrease in vacancies for trade and professional occupations from December 2008 to December 2009, by 28.6 per cent and

40 per cent respectively. However, from January to May 2010, the Internet vacancy index has increased for both trade and

professional occupations.

Table 4 shows that some industries weathered the global financial downturn substantially better than others. The industries which experienced the largest

decreases in employment in 2009 were Rental, hiring and real estate services; Electricity, Gas, Water and Waste Services; Information Media and

annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009 p31

Figure 4: Proportion of workers with a post-school qualification, by occupation, Australia, 2009

Managers

Professionals

I

33.5

Technicians and trades workers 31.1

Higher education

Percentage (%)

VET Without post-school qualification

Notes: VET includes certificates not further defined. Persons with qualification level not determined have been distributed proportionally across the three categories.

Source: AGS, Education and Work, May 2009, cat. no. 6227.Q.

Telecommunications; Mining; Transport, Postal and Warehousing. However, while most other industries maintained similar levels of employment to 2008, some industries did particularly well in 2009. Wholesale trade experienced a 5.7 per cent increase in employment from November 2008 to November 2009, accompanied by administrative and support services (7.6 per cent increase), and health care and social assistance (6.6 per cent increase).

Qualification profile of workforce in 2 00 9 Overall, 60.8 per cent of the Australian workforce in 2009 had a post-school

qualification (Figure 4). Higher education qualifications are important for professionals, while VET is of

particular importance for technicians and trade workers and community and personal service workers. VET and higher education qualifications are also important for managers.

p32 annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 5009

Labour force status unemployment trends over the past three years show that during a significant economic downturn those holding no post-school qualifications are more threatened by unemployment that those with post-school qualifications (Table 5). While unemployment rates for 2007 and 2008 were almost identical, the situation changed in 2009. With unemployment rising in 2009, those without post-school qualifications

experienced a 2.1 percentage point increase in unemployment from 2008, bringing their total unemployment rate to 8.6 per cent. On the other hand, those holding post≠ school qualifications in higher education

or VET fared reasonably well in 2009, experiencing a 1.3 percentage point increase in unemployment since 2008, bringing unemployment to 4.2 per cent.

Table 5: Labour force status, by level of highest post-school qualification, Australia, 2007-2009

Employed *Ã¥00 2 428.5 3 471.3 5 975.1 4 145.9 10 121.0

Unemployed 000 52.4 118.0 173.0 288.1 459.1

% Unemployment2.1 3.3 2.8 6.5 4.3

Employed ODD 2 582.2 3 508.7 6 223.2 4117.1 10 340.3

Unemployed 000 54.3 129.5 188.4 284.2 472.6

% Unemployment 2.1 3.6 2.9 6.5 4.4

Employed ODD 2 7540 3 555.8 6 441.2 4 049.6 10 490.8

Unemployed 000 96.3 181.2 283.2 382.2 665.4

% Unemployment3.4 4.8 4.2 8.6 6.0

Note: VET qualifications include certificates n.f.d, while Total with a post-school qualification includes level not determined.

Source: ABS, Education and Work, May 2007-2009, cat. no. 6227.0.

annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009 p33

Social context

In the past decade, there has been a significant increase in the number of people with a post-school qualification in Australia. Figure 5 shows that the overall proportion of the Australian population with a post-school qualification increased from 47.2 per cent in 2001 to 55 per cent in 2009. Degree holders have contributed

to this trend with a steady increase of 6 percentage points, from 17 per cent in 2001, to 23 per cent in 2009. The proportion of the population with VET qualifications as their highest qualification has remained stable throughout the past decade.

An important driver of education and training provision is student demand. While there is no precise way of measuring unmet student demand, the ABS Survey of Education and Work provides some relevant data. The survey reports the number of students who applied for a TAPE or higher education place but were unable

to gain placement. Figure 6 shows that in comparison to 2008, the number of people unable to gain placement at TAFE remained virtually unchanged, whilst the number of

people unable to gain placement in higher education rose by over 50 per cent. For the first time in the past decade more people were unable to gain placement in higher

education than at TAFE.2

Figure 5: Proportion of population with a post-school qualification, Australia, 2001-2009

Note: Total with post-school qualification includes level not determined.

Source: ABS, Education and Work. May 2001-2009, cat. no. 6227.0.

2 The data reported in this ABS publication refers only !o TAFE placements and not other forms of VET.

p34 annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2G09

Figure 6: Number of persons unable to gain placement on application, Australia, 2002-2009

O) od *™ y a

2002

TAPE

2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009

Year

Higher education

Source: ABS, Education and Work, May 2002-2009, cat. no. 6227.0.

annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009 p35

Performance of the

National Vocational Education and Training (VET) System

This section reports the performance of the national vocational education and training system during 2009. This section is presented in two sub-sections, namely Key Indicators and Disadvantage in VET.

The Key Indicators section monitors student participation and achievement, outcomes, employer engagement and satisfaction and efficiency of the VET system. Similarly, the Disadvantage in VET section assesses participation, achievement, employment

Figure 7; Scope of Report!ng ________

outcomes and satisfaction with vocational education and training for different student groups.

This section of the report provides key findings and graphs structured around these sub-sections. Detailed data tables and background information are contained in

Section 4: Appendices.

Training Organisations

Training Funding Type TAFE and other government providers Community providers Private providers

Government F u n d ed __________________________________________________

Fee-for-Service (domestic and international)

%° Data available for reporting and used for performance reporting %° Data not available for reporting

The scope of reporting The Australian VET system (including apprentices and trainees) covers delivery

of VET through a variety of training providers. These include TAFE institutes and other government providers,

universities, secondary schools, industry organisations, AMES providers, enterprises, agricultural colleges, community education providers and privately operated registered training organisations.

Funding is provided by the Australian Government and State and Territory governments, by industry bodies, by employers and enterprises, and by individual students through the payment of fees.

Data available for statistical reporting on VET does not cover all vocational education and training undertaken, as arrangements

are not in place to collect all data from all community education providers and private providers. A detailed explanation of data inclusions and exclusions is provided in

Box 1.

A representation of data used for statistical reporting is provided in Figure 7 above.

Key changes Key changes in reporting of data in this publication include:

%∫ A new definition for *government funded * activity; %∫ Revision of scope for qualifications completed data A detailed explanation of key changes in this publication is provided in Box 2.

annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009 p37

Reporting conventions for this publication The scope of this report was broadened to reporting primarily on *total reported VET * activity rather than concentrating on *government funded VET * activity. Where this report refers to information on *total reported VET * activity, it is referring to all vocational education and

training data available for reporting. Where dais report refers to *government funded VET * activity, it refers to vocational education and training activity that is

funded under Commonwealth and state recurrent, Commonwealth specific and state specific funding.

Box 1

Data scope inclusions and exclusions

Total reported VET activity Activity' reported in this publication includes vocational education and training delivered by die following registered training providers:

%∫ TAPE and other government providers, including multi-sector higher education institutions

%∫ registered community providers (except non government funded delivery) %∫ registered private providers (except non-government funded delivery)

Activity reported in this publication excludes the following types of training activity:

%∫ recreation, leisure and personal enrichment ( *non-vocational * programs) %∫ delivery in schools where the delivery has been undertaken by schools %∫ delivery undertaken at overseas campuses of Australian VET institutions

Activity reported in this publication includes training within the following funding sources:

%∫ government funded ( *11 *, *13 * and *15 * funding, AVETMIS Standard) %∫ domestic fee-for-service ( *20 * funding, AVETMIS Standard) %∫ international fee-for-service delivery within Australia ( *30 * funding, AVETMIS Standard)

p38 annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009

Box 2

Changes to previously published data Some of the data in this publication differs from data reported in previous years due to the following reasons:

%∫ Previously, *government funded * activity has been defined by Commonwealth recurrent funding (that is activity funded through the NA along with some Commonwealth specific funding and State and Territory funding for training delivery. From 2009 it is not possible in some jurisdictions to separately and consistently identify this activity from activity related to the NP for the PPP. As a consequence, activity funded under the NP for the PPP has

been added to die previously reported government funding and reported as a whole (Commonwealth recurrent, selected Commonwealth specific, State recurrent and State specific) to obtain a comparable time series with previous years.

%∫ New South Wales agricultural colleges were unable to report data on the 2008 year in time for inclusion in last year *s report. These data are now included for 2008 activity.

%∫ Qualifications completed have been revised due to:

data quality improvements in NSW Workplace Training resulting in the removal of some qualifications completed in 2007 and 2008 data quality improvements in Queensland for 2004-2007 rectifying rite under≠ reporting of qualifications completed changes in the reporting scope for qualifications completed, which involved the removal of qualifications completed by fee-for-service students at private providers. This ensures data on qualifications completed closer aligns with data in the student and VET activity' tables. Data has been backdated for the years

2005 to 2008.

Due to die start of the introduction of the Tasmania Tomorrow initiative, 2009 data for Tasmania is not comparable witii earlier years.

%∫ Expenditure per adjusted Full Year Training Equivalent (FYTE)/hour and cost of capital are weighted using a course mix weight. This takes into account the variation among states and territories in the relative mix of high- and low-cost programs, promoting comparability of costs among jurisdictions. As die Australian Standard Classification of Occupations (ASCO) classification is no longer collected,

a new method for calculating course mix weights was adopted in 2009. To demonstrate die discrepancies which result at state/territory level from using new versus old metiiod for calculating course mix weights, two time series (2005-2008 and 2008-2009) are presented in the related tables within Section 4: Appendices.

annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009 p39

Student participation and achievement in vocational education and training This section analyses the level of participation and achievement by total reported VET students in vocational education and training.

Annual hours of delivery are not presented in this report. However, they are used in the derivation of Load Pass Rates, FYTE and Qualification Equivalents. In 2006,

all states and territories except Victoria adopted standard nominal hour values for units of competency as the basis of

Participation

calculating total annual hours of delivery. To enable comparison over time, standard nominal hour values were used to recast

the time series back to 2005 for all states and territories except Victoria. From 2007 onwards, Victorian annual hours of delivery are reported as standard nominal hour values; however due to the manner in which Victorian historical data was collected the

time series back to 2005 cannot be recast. As Victoria *s hours of delivery prior to 2007 were reported as scheduled hours, the 2007

data represents a break-in-series from data in previous years.

From 2005 to 2009, the proportion of Australians aged 15 to 64 years who participated in vocational education and training has slightly declined.

Over tliis period, the total number of vocational education and training students aged 15 to 64 years has increased by 5.0 per cent.

Figure 8: Number of total reported VET students and participation rate, _________ages 15 to 64, 2005-2009 ____________________________

1 800 T

1 600 --

1 400 --

o 1 20 0--

200 - -

1 569.9 1 596.7

1 639.0 1 649.0 1 605.4

2005 2006 2007 2008 2009

I*¶ m Cd IX

I VET students aged 15-64 Participation rate

Source: data and explanatory notes: Table A.1

p40 annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009

Since 2005, the proportion of Fee for Service * international students has more than doubled whereas the proportion of Fee for Service * domestic students has slightly declined.

In 2009, 74.7 per cent of total reported VET students were government funded.

Figure 9: Proportion of total reported VET students by funding source, 2005-2009

100 *∑

90 -

80

70

E 60

S 50

£ 40

30

20 -

10 -

73.7 74.5 74.7 73.8

2005 2006

Fee for Service - international students

2007 2008

Fee for Service - domestic students Government

2009

Source: data and explanatory notes: Table A.1

annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009 p41

From 2005 to 2009, there was a slight increase of 2.7 percentage points in the proportion of total reported VET graduates aged 15 to 19 years, whereas the proportion of those aged 40 to 64 years has declined by 2.0 percentage points.

In 2009, 28.5 per cent of total reported VET students were aged 25 to 39 years.

Figure 10: Proportion of total reported VET students by age group, 2005-2009

4 0 ≠

35-

41 Ol ro G CL

2005 2006 2007 2008 2009

1 Age 15 to 19 Age 20 to 24 Age 25 to 39 Age 40 to 64

Source data and explanatory notes: Tables A.2

p42 annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009

Disaggregating VET certificates Figure 11 below illustrates the proportions of total reported VET students undertaking training by course level. However, Certificate levels arc grouped into two broad categories:

Certificate I or II or lower and Certificate III or IV. It is therefore not evident what movement is occurring within these two categories.

In 2009, 43.6 per cent of total reported VET students were undertaking training at Certificate III or IV course level.

From 2005 to 2009, the proportion of total reported VET students undertaking training at Certificate III or IV course level has risen by 6.2 percentage points compared to Diploma and above which has increased by 1.2 percentage points over this period.

Figure 11: Proportion of total reported VET students by course level, 2005-2009

601

s *… 8

2005

Diploma and above

2006

Certificate III or IV

2007

Certificate I or II or lower

2008 2009

Other

Source: data and explanatory notes: Tables A.2

annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009 p43

In the figure below, information is provided for each of the four underlying categories: Certificate I, Certificate II, Certificate III and Certificate IV. Since 2005, the proportion of total reported VET students undertaking training at Certificate III has increased considerably from 26.5 per cent to 30.8 per cent. The increase has been much more modest for Certificate II and IV, with the proportion undertaking Certificate I declining marginally.

Figure 12: Proportion of total reported VET students who participated in vocational education and training, by course level, 2005-2009

3 0 .8

16.9

1 1.2

2005 2006 2007 2008 2009

Certificate IV&f Certificate III Certificate II Certificate I

Source: data and explanatory notes: NCVER, Vocational Education and Training Provider Collection, 2005-2009.

p44 annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009

In 2009, 74.7 per cent of total reported VET students were government funded.

In 2009, 81.8 per cent of total reported FYTE were delivered to students who were government funded.

From 2005 to 2009, the proportion of total reported FYTE delivered to Fee for Service * domestic students has remained stable whereas the proportion of Fee for Service * international students has substantially increased.

Figure 13: Proportion of total reported VET students and Full-Year Training Equivalents by funding source, 2005-2009 ____

100

90

80

70

60

50

40 -

30 -

20

10

74.5 74.7

i

73.8 74.7 84.9 84.1 83.5 82.3 81.8

2005 2008 2009 2005 2006 2006 2007 S tudents

Fee for Service *international students %† Fee for Service *domestic students

2007 2008

FYTEs

Government

2009

Note: There is a break in series for Victorian annual hours between 2006 and 2007, Care should be taken in comparing data across the two series.

Source: data and explanatory notes: Tables A.1, A.4

annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009 p45

In 2009, 49.1 per cent of total reported FYTE were delivered to students aged 25 to 64 years.

From 2005 to 2009, the proportion of total reported FYTE delivered to students in this age group had risen by 2.9 percentage points.

In 2009, 55.4 per cent of total reported VET students were aged 25 to 64 years.

Figure 14: Proportion of total reported VET students and Full-Year Training __________Equivalents by age group, 2005-2009 ____________________

*… CD

53

100

90

80

70

60

50

40

30

20

17.4 174 17? 170 17 4 21.5 21.7 21.7 21.4 21.6

24.4 26.8 27.0 27.1 27.1 32.3 31.8 31.0 30.4 29.4 10 -

0 \_______,_______*Æ’ _______*Æ’ _______ _______________*Æ’ _______ ________t_______• ______

2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 I 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009

Students FYTEs

*ì I Age 40 to 64 ! Age 25 to 39 Age 20 to 24 Age 15 to 19

Note: There is a break in series for Victorian annual hours between 2006 and 20G7. Care should be taken in comparing data across the two series.

Source data and explanatory notes: Tables A.2, A.4

p46 annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009

In 2009, 55.3 per cent of total reported VET students were undertaking training at Certificate III and above course levels.

In 2009, 75.8 per cent of total reported FYTE were delivered to students at Certificate III and above course levels.

From 2005 to 2009, the proportion of total reported FYTE delivered at Certificate III and above course levels has decreased by 5.1 percentage points.

Figure 15: Proportion of total reported VET students and Full-Year Training __________Equivalents by course level, 2005-2009______________________

100 *∑

90 -

80 .

70

g 60 .

re 50 -|

1 1 40

30 -

20

10 -

0

30.7 28.0 26.8 25.8 22.1

19.6 19.3

9.1

18.6

9.1

17.4

9.3

2005 2008 2006 2007

Students

Diploma and above S3 Certificate III or IV

2009 I 2005 2006 2007

FYTEs

Certificate I or II or lower Other

2008

23.4

52.4

16.7

7.4

2009

Note: There is a break in series for Victorian annual hours between 2006 and 2007. Care should be taken in comparing data across the two series.

Source data and explanatory notes: Tables A.2, A.4

annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009 p47

Participation by gender

In 2009, 56.8 per cent of total reported FYTE delivered to male students were delivered to male students aged 15 to 24 years.

In contrast, 44.9 per cent of total reported FYTE delivered to female students were delivered to female students in this age group.

Figure 16: Proportion of total reported VET Full-Year Training Equivalents undertaken by male and female students by age group, 2005-2009

1

100

90

80

70

60

50

40

30

20

10

0

16.1 ^^∑ 1 6 .2 ^^∑ 1 6 .7 25.3 25.7 26.4 26.9 26.8

24.0 24.4 25.0 25.9 26.4

24.1 24.6 24.9 24.8 24.6

35.5 34.9 33.9 33.2 32.2

2005 2006 2007 2008

Male students

Age 40 to 64 W Age 25 to 39 Age 20 to 24

26.8 ^^∑ 2 7 .2 ^^∑ 2 7 .4 27.8 28.3

18.8 18.6 18.4

29.0 28.5 27.9 27.5

2009 | 2005 ' 2006 ' 2007 * 2008

Female students

Age 15 to 19

18.4

26.5

2009

Note: There is a break in series for Victorian annual hours between 2006 and 2007. Care should be taken in comparing data across the two series.

Source data and explanatory notes: Table B.3

p48 annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009

In 2009,similar proportions of total reported FYTE were delivered to male and female students at Certificate III and above course levels, 75.7 per cent and 76.2 per cent respectively.

From 2005 to 2009, proportions of total reported FYTE delivered at these course levels have increased for both male and female students, by 4.7 percentage points and 5.9 percentage points respectively.

Proportions of total reported FYTE delivered a Certificate I or II or lower have declined for both male and female students over this period.

Figure 17: Proportion of total reported VET Full-Year Training Equivalents undertaken by male and female students by course level, 2005-2009

100

90 %†

80

70

g 60

0) !" 50

t g 40 Q-30

20

10

0

16.9

7.4

19.4

10.3

18.8

9.6

18.9

9.1

18.0

9.6

16.4

7.4

2 0 0 5 2 0 0 6 2 0 0 7 2 0 0 8 2 0 0 9 | 2 0 0 5 2 0 0 6 2 0 0 7 2 0 0 8 2 0 0 9

Male students Female students

" Diploma and above B Certificate III or IV Certificate I or II or lower Other

Note: There is a break in series for Victorian annual hours between 2006 and 2007. Care should be taken in comparing data across the two series.

Source data and explanatory notes: Table B.3

annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009 p49

Courses undertaken by male and female students

Figure 18 Below illustrates the proportions of courses undertaken by male and female students by fields of education

In 2009, the largest proportions of courses undertaken by male students were in the fields of Engineering and related Technologies (28.8 per cent), Architecture and Building (13.1 per cent) and Management and Commerce (12.9 per cent). In comparison, female students undertook 26.3 per cent of courses in the field of Management and Commerce,

16.2 per cent in Society and Culture and 13.7 per cent in Food, Hospitality and Personal Services.

Figure 18: Proportion of male and female students in total reported vocational education and training by courses undertaken in each field of education, 2009

s

I

Natural and Physical Science

Information Technology

Engineering and related Technologies

Architecture and Building

Agriculture, Environment and related studies

Management Commerce

Society and Culture

Creative Arts

Food, Hospitality and Personal Services

Mixed field programs

12.9

13 3

Male students

Percentage (%)

Female students

Source data and explanatory notes: MOVER, Vocational Education and Training Provider Collection, 2005-2009

p50 annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009

VET in Schools VET in Schools, as adopted by the Ministerial Council for Education, Early Childhood Development and Youth

Affairs (MCEECDYA), is defined as a program/s undertaken as part of a student *s senior secondary certificate that provides credit towards a nationally recognised

VET qualification.

The VET in Schools arrangement offers two main options. Students can undertake school-based apprenticeships and traineeships or VET subjects and courses. The latter is referred to as *other VET in

Schools programs *.

In 2008, there were 220 000 VET in Schools students, which represented 41.0 per cent of all school students

undertaking a senior secondary certificate1. Around 25 700 of these were school-based apprentices and trainees2 (11.7 per cent) and 194 200 were students enrolled

in other VET in Schools programs (88.3 percent).

Table G: VET in Schools student qualification level

VET in Schools students 171 700 174 800

By Qualification Level [%]

Certificate IV or higher 0.9 0.9 1.2

Certificate III 13.8 14.8 18.3

Certificate II 64.1 63.4 57,0

Certificate I 19.7 18.0 19.6

Other3 1.6 2.9 3.8

Source data and explanatory notes: Australian vocational education and training statistics: VET in Schools 2006, 2007, 2008 INCVERI

1 Data on school students undertaking a senior secondary certificate were obtained from the beard of studies in each state or territory.

2 Students who undertook at least one module/unit of competency in a school-based apprenticeship and traineeship during 2008.

3 Other * includes secondary education, non-award courses, statement of attainment, bridging and enabling courses, subject only (no qualification) and those not elsewhere classified.

annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009 p51

Student achievement

From 2005 to 2009, Load Pass Rates for total reported VET students of all age groups have increased.

The largest increase of 2.5 percentage points was for students aged 25 to 39 years.

Figure 19: Load Pass Rates for total reported VET students by age group, 2005-2009

1s

100 *ä

77.5 77.6 79.3 79.6 78.8 79.3 81.1 81.1

Age 15 to 19 Age 20 to 24 Age 25 to 39 Age 40 to 64

%† 2005 %† 2006 %† 2007 2008

Source data and explanatory notes: Table A.6

2009

p52 annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009

In 2009, total reported VET students undertaking training at Certifieate III or IV course levels achieved the highest Load Pass Rates.

From 2005 to 2009, Load Pass Rates for Certificate I or II or lower have risen by 2.2 percentage points followed by a 2 percentage points increase in Diploma and above course level.

Figure 20: Load Pass Rates for total reported VET students by course level, 2005-2009

Diploma and above Certificate III or IVCertificate I or II or lower Other

%† 2005 %† 2006 %† 2007 2008 2009

Source data and explanatory notes: Table A.6

annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009 p53

Recognition of Prior Learning Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL) is a key feature of competency based vocational education. RPL is assessed on previous experience and learning prior to study that has not been formally assessed. It can lead to a full qualification in the VET sector.

In 2009, the proportion of total reported VET students who were awarded RPL in at least one enrolment was 5.5 per cent. This represents 93 100 students. Since 2005, the number of total reported VET students with an RPL outcome has increased by 65.9 per cent.

All types of providers in the VET sector award RPL. In 2009, 5.95 per cent of students in publicly funded TAPE were awarded RPL.

A greater proportion of RPL is awarded at the higher level AQF qualifications. The highest proportion of RPL awarded (29.9 per cent of students) occurred in the

Graduate Diploma courses.

As illustrated in Table 7 below, from 2005 to 2009, a greater proportion of students in the older age groups were awarded RPL with the highest proportion being for students aged 40 to 49 years. In contrast,

the smallest proportion of RPL granted occurred in the age groups

Table 7: Proportion of total reported VET students with RPL by age groups, 2005-2009

14 years and under 0.1 0.3 0.6 0.3 0.8

15 to 19 years 1.8 1.5 1.5 1.8 2.2

20 to 24 years 3.6 3.8 3.6 4.0 4.9

25 to 29 years 4.3 4.5 4.6 5.3 6.5

30 to 39 years 4.3 4.8 5.0 6.1 7.4

40 to 49 years 4.5 4.9 5.3 6.5 8.2

50 to 59 years 4.0 4.4 4.8 6.0 7.8

60 to 64 years 2.2 2.4 3.1 3.9 5.5

65 years and over 0.7 0.8 1.0 1.4 2.8

Not known 0.9 1.0 1.3 2.7 3.4

Total 3.4 3.5 3.7 4.4 5.5

Note: Recognition of prior learning represents students who achieved an RPL - granted result in at least one enrolment in the collection year.

For national reporting, RPL does not include any additional training at the unit of competency or module level.

Source data and explanatory notes: NCVER, Vocational Education and Training Provider Collection, 2005-2C09,

p54 annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009

From 2005 to 2008, numbers of qualifications completed by total reported VET students have substantially increased for all age groups. The largest increase was in the number of qualifications completed by students aged from 40 to 64 years (21.6 per cent).

From 2005 to 2008, numbers of qualifications completed by students aged 15 to 24 and 25 to 64 have risen for both age groups, by 14.7 per cent and 20.4 per cent respectively.

Figure 21: Number of qualifications completed by total reported VET students ______by age group, ages 15 to 64, 2005-2008 _____________ ____

4UU.UUU *∑

350.000 -

1*À 300,000 - 1*©-I 250,000 -J 200,000 -

I ´ 150,000 - O 100.000 -

50,000 -

0

294,973

72,772

82.452

68.415

71,334

2 0 0 5

290,321

70,670

81.032

68.001

70,618

2 00 6

317,390

79.075

88,346

76,179

73,790

2 00 7

347,077

88,504

98,313

79,822

80,438

2 00 8

H Age 40 to 64 I Age 25 to 39 Age 20 to 24 Age 15 to 19

Note: Data for qualifications completed in 2009 are not presented in this report because of lags in reporting qualification completions.

Source data and explanatory notes: Table A.8

annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009 p55

The number of qualifications completed by total reported VET students increased from 297 960 in 2005 to 351 559 in 2008.

The proportions of qualifications completed at Certificate III and above course levels have remained stable.

Figure 22: Number of qualifications completed by total reported VET students by course level, 2005-2008

*Ã¥ *¶ 5 *©.E !

4UU.UUU *∑

350.000

300.000 -

250.000

200.000 ∑

150.000 -

100.000 -

50,000 -

0 - -

297,960

42,028

169,580

86,352

2005

293,343

87,901

2006

320,541

47.006

182.103

91,432

2007

351,559

48,968

205.839

96,752

2008

%† Diploma and above l I Certificate III or IV Certificate I or II or lower

Note: Data for qualifications completed in 2009 are not presented in this report because of lags in reporting qualification completions.

Source data and explanatory notes: Table A.8

p56 annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009

Increasing qualification completions at Diploma level and above Under the direction of the then MCVTE, in March 2007 the NSOC established targets for increasing qualification completions

at the Diploma level and above. The target established by the NSOC was for qualification completions at Diploma level and above to increase by an average of 2 per cent per annum to the extent possible within funding contributions for each

state and territory during the period of the

Commonwealth-State Training Funding Agreements that were in effect until 2008.

Under the current NASWD, all jurisdictions are committed to the national target to double the number of higher qualifications completions (Diploma and Advanced diploma) between 2009 and 2020.

Table 8: Qualifications completed at Diploma level and above by jurisdiction, 2003-20081

New South Wales 12 608 12214 12 979 13 530 13 786 13717 1.8

Victoria 12 397 12 245 13 587 12 471 14612 14 768 3.8

Queensland 4 640 4819 6121 7 353 7 857 8 832 18.1

Western Australia 4 165 3 800 3 377 3 533 3 805 4 001 -0.8

South Australia3 000 2 568 3 564 3 694 4 408 4 796 12.0

Tasmania785 568 690 1 009 954 1 320 13.6

Northern Territory 110 176 106 127 122 158 8.7

Australian Capital Territory 1 4191 297 1 604 1 381 1 462 1 376 -0.8

Source data and explanatory notes: NCVER, Vocational Education and Training Provider Collection, 2D03-2008.

1 Data for qualifications completed in 2009 are not presented in this report because of lags in reporting qualification completions.

2 Average annual growth rate between the base year and 2008. The base year for all states and territories was 2003, except ACT, the base year for which was 2004.

annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009 p57

In 2009, the largest numbers of Qualification Equivalents completed by total reported VET students were at Certificate III course level in the fields of Management and Commerce (52 559.2), Engineering and related Technologies (42 540.4) and Society and Culture (36 558.6).

Figure 23: Number of Qualification Equivalents completed by total reported VET students by course level, by field of education, 2009

ß 0

3

1

2005 2006 2007 2008 2009

Source data and explanatory notes: Table A.9

Apprentices and trainees Apprentices and trainees are a critical part of the vocational education and training sector. Figure 24 below provides information on apprentice and trainee commencements, completions and cancellations/ withdrawals

for the period 1999 to 2009. From December quarter 1999 to December quarter 2009, the number of completions has increased from 21 032 to 40 755.

p58 annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009

Figure 24: Apprentice and trainee commencements, completions and cancellations/withdrawals, seasonally adjusted, by quarter, 1999-2009

* *¶ c <0

4? o'

Commencements

Completion

/ / #

*üª

Cancellation/withdrawals

Source data and explanatory notes: Table A.9

Figure 25 below indicates that trades commencements marginally increased from June quarter to December quarter 2009. Similarly, non-trade commencements increased in the last three quarters of 2009.

Figure 25: Trade and non-trade commencements, seasonally adjusted, __________by quarter, 1999-2009 ___ ___

s s

Non-trade

Source data and explanatory notes: NCVER, Apprentice and Trainee Collection, 1999-2909.

annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009 p59

Student outcomes This section monitors employment and further study outcomes for individual students after completing vocational education and training, and measures student satisfaction with this training.

Data for this measure are collected via the annual Student Outcomes Survey. From 2005, the survey covered government funded students (TAPE, private and community education providers), as well as those training on a fee-for-service basis

(TAPE and some private and community education providers). The Student Outcomes Survey captures training outcomes for students who:

%∫ completed their vocational training at a TAPE institute or other government provider (such as university and agricultural colleges)

%∫ completed their training with other registered training providers, including government funded private and community education providers; or %∫ undertook VET that was government

funded (Agreement and specific purpose), or was delivered on a fee-for- service basis.

The information on student outcomes is structured around:

%∫ graduates * those who complete full qualifications; and

%∫ module completers * those who complete less than a full qualification and then leave the VET system.

Sampling variability The Student Outcomes Survey was undertaken as a stratified, randomly selected sample, with survey responses weighted to population benchmarks. As the estimates from the Student Outcomes Survey are

based on information provided by a sample rather than a population, they are subject to sampling variability; that is they may differ from the estimates that would have been produced if all graduates or

module completers had been included and responded to the survey. By convention, a 95 per cent confidence interval is applied in judging the reliability of survey estimates. Tliis means that, if the survey were repeated, there is a 95 per cent chance that the new results obtained would be within a width of plus or minus two standard errors. Within the figures in this section, 95 per cent confidence interval widths are presented as error bars on the charts. For example, in Figure 26, graduates aged 15 to

19 years who improved their employment circumstances after training in 2009 has an estimate of 52.7 per cent with error bars at 51.5 per cent and 53.9 per cent, reflecting a confidence interval width of ±

1.2 percentage points. This means that if the survey were repeated there is a 95 per cent chance that the new results would be between 51.5 per cent and 53.9 per cent.

In addition, 95 per cent confidence intervals can be calculated for the difference between two independent proportions by using the following formula:

(pl- p 2)±2yl(SEl)2 +(SE2y-

where P\ and Pi are the estimated proportions and and ^2 are the standard errors for respective proportions.

p60 annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009

SE = 1/2 of the 95 per cent confidence interval for the respective proportion.

If the interval contains zero, then there is insufficient evidence at the 5 per cent significance level to reject the null hypothesis. It can then be concluded that there is no statistical difference between the two proportions. If the interval does not contain zero, the difference between the two proportions can be said to be

significantly different at the 5 per cent level. For example, in Figure 26, the 95 per cent confidence interval for the difference between the graduates who improved

their employment circumstances in 2009 aged 15 to 19 years and those aged 20 to 24 years evaluates to (-16.2, -13.0). This confidence interval does not contain zero so the two proportions can be said to be significantly different at the 5 per cent level.

Employment and/or further study after training

From 2005 to 2009, proportions of total reported VET graduates who improved their employment circumstances after training have declined for all age groups, noting that these changes are subject to sampling variability.

The largest decrease was for graduates aged 15 to 19 years (6.4 percentage points).

Figure 26: Proportion of total reported VET graduates and module completers who improved their employment circumstances after training by _____ age group, 2005-2009 _____________ ___________________________

100 -|

90 "

Source data and explanatory notes: Table A. 13

annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009

In 2009, the net change in employment from before to after training was positive for total reported VET graduates for all age groups.

The highest net change in employment was for graduates aged between 15 and 19 (8.6 percentage points).

Figure 27: Proportion of total reported VET graduates and module completers __________who were employed before and after training by age group, 2009

*… *√> co

Employed before trainingEmployed after training

Source data and explanatory notes: Table A. 13

p62 annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009

Satisfaction with VET

From 2005 to 2009, proportions of total reported VET graduates who achieved their main reason for training have slightly increased for all age groups, except graduates aged 40+ years, noting that these changes are subject to sampling variability.

Figure 28: Proportion of total reported VET graduates and module completers who achieved their main reason for training by age __________group, 2005-2009 _________________________

0) acc

100 -

90 "

80 -

70 "

60 -

50 -

40 "

30 "

20 "

10 -

0 -

| Module Completers [Module Completers Graduates [Module Completers Graduates Graduates Graduates [Module Completers

Age 15 to 19 Age 20 to 24 Age 25 to 39 Age 40+

%† 2005 %† 2006 %† 2007 %† 2008 2009

Source data and explanatory notes: Table A.13

annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009

Across all student groups, from 2005 to 2009 the highest increase (3.1 percentage points) in the proportion of total reported VET graduates who were satisfied with the overall quality of their training was for graduates aged 15 to 19, noting that these changes are subject to sampling variability.

Figure 29: Proportion of total reported VET graduates and module completers who were satisfied with the overall quality of training by age group, 2005-2009

Source data and explanatory notes: Table A.13

p64 annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009

Outcomes from the Productivity Places Program The PPP was introduced by die Australian Government in April 2008 as part of its Skilling Australia for the Future initiative.

In 2008, the program was designed to raise die skill levels and employability of people who were not working but looking for work (job seekers), by funding training in areas of skill shortages at Certificate II, Certificate

III, Certificate IV and Diploma levels.

During 2008, 23 692 students completed one or more courses with funding from die PPP. Of PPP graduates 96.6 per cent completed courses at Certificate II and III.

To provide a measure of effectiveness of die PPP, it would be best to have a control group of similar students who did not take part in the program. However, no obvious control group exists because PPP participants are purposefully selected.

Therefore, comparisons are made to VET graduates who were not employed before their training derived from the 2009 NCVER Student Outcomes Survey.

Compared with VET graduates not employed before training, a higher proportion of PPP graduates were aged 25 years or older (78.8 per cent

compared with 48.6 per cent); had a disability (20.7 per cent compared with 16.0 per cent); spoke a language other than English at home (34.3 per cent compared with 26.8 per cent)

Table 9: Employment and further study outcomes, 2009

VET graduates not employed

2008 PPP graduates, % before training, %

Employed after training 46.6

Nat employed after training 53.4

Unemployed 39.1

Not in the labour force 12.0

Employed or in further study after training 60.8

Enrolled∑ in further study after training 25.5

Studying at University 2.4

Studying at TAPE Institute 8.3

Studying at private provider or other registered provider 14.2

42.7

57.3

27.3

29.0

67.8

39.2

6.4

24.2

8.4

Source data and explanatory notes: Australian vocational education and training statistics: Outcomes from the Productivity Places Program

INCVER).

The Productivity Places Program Information Management System (PIMS) was used as the sampling frame for the Productivity Places Program Survey. Survey responses were weighted to population benchmarks from the respective collections.

The Productivity Places Program Survey covered graduates who were awarded a qualification in 2008 with funding from the Productivity Places Program. In 2008, all PPP graduates were job seekers A job seeker is a person aged 15 years or over who is not currently working

but is seeking or intending to seek paid employment or self-employment after completing the qualification.

annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009 p65

Employer engagement and satisfaction with VET This section explores the proportion of Australian employers who are engaged in and are satisfied that vocational education

and training meets the skills needs of their workforce.

Data for this measure are collected via the biennial Survey of Employer Use and Views of the VET System, which collects information on the various ways employers meet their skill needs. This may include hiring staff with vocational qualifications, employing apprentices and trainees, or providing staff with nationally recognised and unaccredited training.

The survey focuses on employer engagement with VET system and how they make the choices they do with regard to meeting their skill needs. Employers are

asked about their satisfaction with the VET system. The results relate to employers * training experiences in the 12 months

preceding their interview.

The survey was first conducted in 2005. This section provides the findings from the surveys conducted in 2005, 2007 and 2009.

An employer *s skill needs can be met by either recruiting staff who already hold the desired skills, or by up-skilling existing employees. For analysis, employers in the survey are distinguished by size, from

*small * employers with under 10 employees, to *medium * employers, and *large * employers with over 99 employees.

Sampling variability The Survey of Employer Use and Views of the VET System was undertaken as a stratified, randomly selected sample, with survey responses weighted to population benchmarks. As the estimates from the Survey of Employer Use and Views of the VET System are based on

information provided by a sample rather than a population, they are subject to sampling variability; that is, they may differ from the estimates that would have been produced if all employers had been included and responded to the survey. By convention, a 95 per cent confidence interval is applied in judging the reliability of survey estimates. This means that, if' the survey were repeated, there is a 95 per cent chance that the new results obtained would be within a width of plus or minus two standard errors. Within the figures in this section, 95 per cent confidence interval widths are presented as error bars on the charts. For example, in Figure 30, employer engagement with apprenticeships and traineeships in 2009 has an estimate of 30.6 per cent with error bars at 28.6 per cent and 32.6 per cent, reflecting a confidence interval width of ±2.0 percentage points. This means that if the survey were repeated

there is a 95 per cent chance that the new results would be between 28.6 per cent and 32.6 per cent.

In addition, 95 per cent confidence intervals can be calculated for the difference between two independent proportions by using the following formula:

(p, - p 1)±2yl(SEJ2 +(SE2)2

where P\ and Pi are the estimated proportions and and ^E2 are the standard errors for respective proportions.

pBB annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009

SE = 1/2 of the 95 per cent confidence interval for the respective proportion.

If the interval contains zero, then there is insufficient evidence at the 5 per cent significance level to reject the null hypothesis. It can then be concluded that

rl ie re is no statistical difference between die two proportions. If the interval does not contain zero, the difference between die two proportions can be said to be significantiy different at die 5 per cent level. For example, in Figure 26, the 95 per cent confidence interval for the difference

between the graduates who improved their employment circumstances in 2009

aged 15 to 19 years and those aged 20 to 24 years evaluates to (-16.2, -13.0). This confidence interval does not contain zero so the two proportions can be said to be significantly different at the 5 per cent level.

Employer engagement with VET Employers were asked:

%∫ whether, in the past 12 months, they had at least one apprentice/trainee, provided their staff with other nationally recognised training, or had jobs that required formal vocational qualifications.

In 2009 compared to 2005, engagement with apprenticeships and traineeships and other nationally recognised training has increased marginally, noting that this change is subject to sampling variability.

The proportion of employers that had staff with formal vocational qualifications as a job requirement has declined.

Figure 30: Proportion of employers who engage with the VET system by type __________of engagement with training, 5005, 2007 and 2009 ___________

Apprenticeships/ traineeships

12005 %† 2007 2009

Other nationally recognised training

Source data and explanatory notes: Tables A.15, A. 16

Formal vocational qualification

annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009 p67

In 2009 compared to 2005, there has been a large increase (14 percentage points) in the proportion of large employers who engaged with apprenticeships and traineeships, noting that this change is subject to sampling variability.

In 2009 compared to 2007, there has been a significant decline (6 percentage points) in the proportion of medium employers who engage with apprenticeships and traineeships, noting that this change is subject to sampling variability.

In 2009 compared to 2005, the proportion of small employers that had staff with formal vocational qualifications as a job requirement has declined (2.8 percentage points), noting that this change is subject to sampling variability.

Figure 31: Proportion of employers who engage with the VET system by type of engagement with training, by employer size, 2005, 2007 and 2009

I Apprenticeships/] Other | Formal

traineeships nationally vocational

recognised qualification training

Small employers (1 to 9 employees)

%† 2005 %† 2007 %† 2009

Other nationally recognised training

Medium employers (10-99 employees)

Ap prenticeshi ps/j O ther traineeships nationally recognised training Large employers (100 or more

Formal vocational qualification

employees) I

Source data and explanatory notes: Tables A. 15, A.1B

p68 annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009

In 2009, Construction had the highest proportion of employers with apprenticeships and traineeships (63.1 per cent), noting that this percentage is subject to sampling variability.

Mining had the largest proportion of employers (43.5 per cent) that engaged in other nationally recognised training, noting that this percentage is subject to sampling variability.

Education had the largest proportion of employers (57.6 per cent) with formal vocational qualification as a job requirement, noting that this percentage is subject to sampling variability.

Figure 32: Proportion of employers who engage with the VET system by ________industry type, 2009 _______________________

Agriculture, Forestry and Fishing

Mining

Manufacturing

Electricity, Gas and Water Supply

Construction

Wholesale Trade

Retail Trade

Accommodation, Cafes and Restaurants

Transport and Storage

Communication Services

Finance and Insurance

Property and Business Services

Government, Administration and Defence

Educalion

Health and Community Services

Cultural and Recreational Services

Personal and Other Services

0 10 20 30

Apprenticeships/traineeships 1

40 50 60 70 80 90 100

Percentage (%)

Other nationally organised training Formal vocational qualification

The relative standard error for this figure is more than 25%.

Source data and explanatory notes: Tables A.15, A.16

annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009 p69

Employer satisfaction with VET The survey asked those employers who engaged in an aspect of vocational education and training:

%∫ whether they felt very satisfied, satisfied, neither satisfied nor dissatisfied, dissatisfied, or very dissatisfied with the aspect of the VET system they engaged in as a way of meeting their skill needs.

In 2009 compared to 2005, employer satisfaction with VET as a way of meeting their skill needs has increased across all types of engagement with die highest increase being for the proportion of employers that had staff with formal vocational qualifications

as a job requirement (6.6 percentage points), noting that this change is subject to sampling variability.

Figure 33: Proportion of employers engaged with an aspect of VET who were satisfied with VET as a way of meeting their skill needs, by type of ________ engagement with training, 2005, 2007 and 200 9 ____

*¶ G8 rj I I L∑.

Apprenticeships/ traineeships Other nationally recognised training Formal vocational qualification

%† 2005 %† 2007 %† 2009

Source data and explanatory notes: Tables A.17, A.18

p70 annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009

In 2009 compared to 2005, satisfaction for small employers who engaged with formal vocational education as a job requirement has notably improved (8.7 percentage points), whereas satisfaction for large employers has declined (5.1 percentage points), noting that

these changes are subject to sampling variability.

In 2009 compared to 2005, satisfaction with apprenticeships/ traineeships for both small and large employers has increased, with the highest increase being for large employers (6.2 percentage points), noting that these changes are subject to sampling variability.

Figure 34: Proportion of employers engaged with an aspect of VET who were satisfied with VET as a way of meeting their skill needs, by type of engagement with training, by employer size, 2005, 2007 and 2009

Other nationally recognised training

Small employers (1 to 9 employees)

2005 %† 2007 %† 2009

Other nationally recognised training

Medium employers (10-99 employees)

Other | Formal

nationally vocational recognised qualification training

Large employers (100 or more employees)

Source data and explanatory notes: Tables A.17, A,18

annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009

Satisfaction with aspects of the VET system in the last 12 months varied considerably across industry types.

Figure 35: Proportion of employers engaged with an aspect of VET who were satisfied with VET as a way of meeting their skill needs, by industry _______ type, 2009_______________________

Agriculture, Forestry and Fishing

Mining

Manufacturing

Electricity, Gas and Water Supply

Construction

Wholesale Trade

Retail Trade

Accommodation, Cafes and Restaurants

Transport and Storage

Communication Services

* Finance and Insurance

Property and Business Services

Government, Administration and Defence

Education

Health and Community Services

Cultural and Recreational Services

Personal and Other Services

!

0 10 20

I Apprenticeships/traineeships *

) 4 0 5 0 6 0

Percentage (%)

Other nationally organised training

7 0 8 0 9 0 1 0 0

Formal vocational qualification

* The relative standard error for this figure is more than 25%.

Source data and explanatory notes: Table A. 17. A. 18

P72 annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009

Relatively high proportions of employers who were dissatisfied with all aspects of VET that they had engaged in were present in Accommodation, Cafes and Restaurants (12.8 percent), noting that this percentage is subject to sampling variability.

Figure 36: Satisfaction level of employers with all aspects of VET that they were engaged in, by industry type, 2009

Agriculture, Forestry and Fishing

Mining

Manufacturing

Electricity, Gas and Water Supply

Construction

Wholesale Trade

Retail Trade

Accommodation, Cafes and Restaurants

Transport and Storage

^ Communication Services n .

o £ Finance and Insurance Property and Business Services

Government, Administration and Defence

Education

Flealth and Community Services

Cultural and Recreational Services

Personal and Other Services

0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100

Percentage (%)

I Dissatisfied with all aspects of VET enganged in %† Satisfied with all aspects of VET enganged in

* The relative standard error for this figure is more than 25%.

** Estimate is based on an unweighted count of less than 5.

Source data and explanatory notes: Tables A.19, A.20

annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009 p73

VET system efficiency This section assesses the efficiency of the vocational education and training system. Two measures used are:

%∫ expenditure per annual hour and per FYTE %∫ cost of capital per adjusted annual hour and per FYTE

Although tills year die scope of this report has been broadened to reporting primarily on total reported VET activity, information covering total government expenditure and total recurrent government expenditure is also presented hi this section.

For the purposes of this report, government recurrent expenditure was defined as being equivalent to the recurrent funds provided by the Commonwealth, state and

territory governments, but not including funding from Commonwealth administered programs. In contrast, total government expenditure was defined as being equivalent to the recurrent funds provided by the Commonwealth, state and territory governments, including funding from Commonwealth administered programs.

Information on total expenditure is presented consistent with broadening of scope of this report and is defined as the total expenses from all funding sources, government and non-government, as

reported by states and territories in the annual national Finance collection.

To maintain consistency with other sections of this report, expenditure per FYTE and cost of capital per FYTE efficiency measures have been introduced in this year *s report.

Expenditure per annual hour and cost of capital per annual hour measures are retained in this year *s report to maintain a

historical link with previous reports.

Expenditure per adjusted FYTE/hour and cost of capital are weighted using a course mix weight. This takes into account the variation among states and territories in the

relative mix of high- and low-cost programs, promoting comparability of costs among jurisdictions. As the ASCO classification

is no longer collected, a new method for calculating course mix weights was adopted in 2009. To demonstrate the discrepancies which result at state/territory level from using new versus old method for calculating course mix weights, two time series (2005≠ 2008 and 2008-2009) are presented in the related tables within Section 4: Appendices. For more information, please refer to the technical paper describing the old and new methods for calculating course mix weights available from the NCVER website.

Annual hours of delivery are not presented in this report. However, they are used in the derivation of Load Pass Rates, FYTE and Qualification Equivalents. In 2006,

all states and territories except Victoria adopted standard nominal hour values for units of competency as the basis of calculating total annual hours of delivery. To enable comparison over time, standard

nominal hour values were used to recast the time series back to 2005 for all states and territories except Victoria. From 2007 onwards, Victorian annual hours of delivery are reported as standard nominal hour values; however due to the manner in which Victorian historical data was collected the time series back to 2005 cannot be recast. As Victoria *s hours of delivery prior to 2007 were reported as scheduled hours, the 2007 data represents a break-in-series from data in previous years.

p74 annual national rep ort of the australian vocational education and training system 2009

A set of endnotes is also included which provide detailed information on any definitions, caveats and technical issues associated with the data.

In 2009, the total expenditure per FYTE was $10 677 nationally. Expenditure per FYTE ranged from $9 673 in Victoria to $22 360 in Northern Territory.

National expenditure per FYTE has decreased from $11 264 to $10 677 since 2008.

Figure 37: Total expenditure per Full-Year Training Equivalent by state/ _________ territory ($/FYTE, 2009 prices), 2008-2009 _____________

20 000-

15 000-

u- 10 000-

5 000-

0-]_I New Victoria Queensland South Western Tasmania Northern Australian Australian

South Wales Australia Australia Territory Capital Territory

%† 2008 2009

Source data and explanatory notes: Tables A.21

Note: There is a break in series for Victorian annual hours between 2006 and 2007. Care should be taken in comparing data across the two series.

annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2Q09 p75

Nationally, die cost of capital per FYTE in 2009 was $1 294.

In 2009, the cost of capital per FYTE ranged from $1 067 in Victoria to $2 994 in the Australian Capital Territory.

Figure 38: Cost of capital per Full-Year Training Equivalent by state/territory, 2009

vl

£ *… 3 55

Australia

Australian Capital Territory

Northern Territory

Tasmania

Western Australia

South Australia

Queensland

Victoria

New South Wales

500 1000 1500 2000 2500 3000 3500

Source data and explanatory notes: Tables *î.22

$ per FYTE

p76 annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009

Disadvantage in VET

This section considers participation and outcomes for three specific groups: Indigenous, students with a disability and

students with a language background other than English. It also presents data classified by socio-economic status (as measured by Socio-Economic Indexes for Areas),

geographical remoteness (as measured by the AES Accessibility/ Remoteness Index of Australia) and highest level of prior educational attainment with the aim of looking at the relationship between these aspects of disadvantage/advantage and the various indicators of participation and outcomes.

To illustrate trends in participation, achievement and outcomes for these student groups, a figure for each of these aspects was selected based on its ability to depict the trends in this area. Thus, key statements included in this section describe trends from this figure as well as other trends, data for which can be found in tables in Appendices A and B.

Annual hours of delivery are not presented in this report. However, they are used in the derivation of Load Pass Rates, FYTE and Qualification Equivalents. In 2006, all states and territories except Victoria adopted standard nominal hour values for units of competency as the basis of

calculating total annual hours of delivery. To enable comparison over time, standard nominal hour values were used to recast the time series back to 2005 for all states

and territories except Victoria. From 2007 onwards, Victorian annual hours of delivery are reported as standard nominal hour values; however due to the manner in which Victorian historical data was collected the time series back to 2005 cannot be recast. As Victoria *s hours of delivery prior to 2007

were reported as scheduled hours, the 2007 data represents a break-in-series from data in previous years.

Most comparisons relating to Student outcomes included in this section are subject to sampling variability.

Participation in VET

Students in different groups as a proportion of total reported VET students Indigenous, students with a disability', students with a language background other than English:

%∫ From 2005 to 2009, the largest increase across these groups was 2.6 percentage points in the proportion of students who speak a language other than English at home as a proportion of total reported VET students (Figure 40).

%∫ Over this period, the proportion of Indigenous students as a proportion of total reported VET students has increased by 0.6 percentage points (Figure 39).

Other groups:

From 2005 to 2009, some trends in the highest level of prior educational attainment group were observed.

By highest level of prior educational attainment

%∫ Across all course levels of prior educational attainment, the largest increase was for students who had Certificate III or IV (3.7 percentage points) and Diploma and above (2.6 percentage points) as their highest level of prior educational attainment (Figure 40).

annual national rep ort of the australian vocational and technical education system 2009 P77

Figure 39: Students in disadvantaged groups as a proportion of total reported VET students, 2005-2009

15-

G1 n I

4.3 4.4

5.9 5.9

Indigenous students

%† 2005 %† 2006 2007

Source data and explanatory notes: Table B.1

Students with a disability

2008 2009

Students who speak a language

other than English at home

Figure 40: Students as a proportion of total reported VET students, by ________ highest level of prior educational attainment, 2005-2009

*√*π tfl s v*Ø

3 0 ≠

25 '

2 0 ≠

15-

10≠

5 ∑

0-

Year 10 and below Year 11 and Year 12 Certificate III or IV Diploma and above

Certificate I or II

%† 2005 %† 2006 . I 2007 2008 2009

Source data and explanatory notes: Table B.1

p78 annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009

Full-Year Training Equivalents (FYTEs) From 2005 to 2009, the number of FYTEs undertaken by total reported VET students has risen by 21.2 per cent (Figure 41).

Full-Year Training Equivalents by student groups Indigenous, students with a disability, students with a language background other than English:

%∫ Across all groups, numbers of Full-Year Training Equivalents undertaken by students have increased (Table B.3).

%∫ The largest increase was for students with a language background other than English (45.4 per cent), followed by Indigenous students (18.1 per cent)

(Table B.3).

Other groups:

Over this period, some trends for groups which include the highest level of prior educational attainment, geographical

remoteness and socio-economic status were observed.

By highest level of prior educational attainment

%∫ Across all levels of prior educational attainment, the largest increases were in the numbers of FYTEs undertaken by students who had Certificate III or FV and Diploma and above as their highest level of prior educational attainment, 65.0 per cent and 63.2 per cent

(Figure 41).

By geographical remoteness

%∫ Numbers of FYTEs undertaken by students have substantially increased across all areas with the smallest increase being for students in remote and very remote areas (8.3 per cent) and the largest increase being for students in inner regional areas (21.1 per cent) (Table B.3).

By socio-economic status

%∫ From 2006 to 2009, numbers of FYTEs undertaken by students have grown across all quintiles (Table B.3).

annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009

Figure 41: Number of Full-Year Training Equivalents undertaken by total reported VET students and students by highest level of prior educational attainment, 2005-2009

700

Total VET students Year 10 and below Year 11 and Certificate I or II Year 12 Certificate III or IV Diploma and above

%† 2005 %† 2006 2007

Source date and explanatory notes: Table B.3

2008 2009

Figure 42: Load Pass Rates for total reported VET students and students in ________disadvantaged groups, 2005-2009

100

90 -I

80

70

E 60

!" 50

1 1 40 30

20

10

0

Total VET students

S 5 to to

CO ∞!

8 ∞

Indigenous students

%† 2005 %† 2006 I 2007

Source data and explanatory notes: Table B.5

2008

Students with a disability

2009

Students who speak a language

other than English at home

p80 annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009

Student Achievement

Load Pass Rates From 2005 to 2009, Load Pass Rates for total reported VET students have risen by 1.7 percentage points (Figure 42).

Load Pass Rates by student groups Indigenous, students with a disability, students with a language background other than English:

%∫ Load Pass Rates increased for students in all of these groups (Figure 42).

%∫ The largest increase in Load Pass Rates was for Indigenous students (4.1 percentage points) (Figure. 42).

%∫ Indigenous students have achieved the largest increase in Load Pass Rates at Diploma and above (4.4 percentage points) and Certificate I or II or lower course levels (5.9 percentage points) (Table B.5).

Other groups:

Over tills period, some trends for groups which include geographical remoteness and socio-economic status were observed.

By geographical remoteness

%∫ Load Pass Rates have risen across all areas, with the highest increase of 4.3 percentage points being for students in remote and very remote areas

(Table B.5)

%∫ The smallest increase in Load Pass Rates was for students in major cities (1.4 percentage points) (Table B.5)

%∫ Across all areas, Load Pass Rates for students in remote and very remote areas have risen most markedly across all course levels (Table B.5).

%∫ Across all areas, Load Pass Rates at Diploma and above and Certificate III or IV course levels for students in remote and very remote areas have risen most markedly, 5.0 percentage points and 3.4 percentage points respectively (Table B.5).

%∫ In contrast, across all areas, students in major cities have achieved the smallest increases in Load Pass Rates at Diploma and above and Certificate III or IV course levels, 1.8 percentage points and 1.1 percentage points respectively (Table B.5).

%∫ In comparison, Load Pass Rates for total reported VET students at Diploma and above and Certificate III or IV course levels have increased by 2.0 percentage points and 1.2 percentage points respectively (Table B.5).

By socio-economic status

%∫ From 2006 to 2009, Load Pass Rates have slightly increased across all quintiles (Table B.5).

annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009 p81

Figure 43: Number of qualifications completed by total reported VET students and students in disadvantaged groups, 2005-2008 ______________

400 *∑

350 -

300 -

250 -

Total VET students Indigenous students

%† 2005 %† 2006 %† 2007 2008

Source data and explanatory notes: Table B.7

Qualifications completed From 2005 to 2008, the number of qualifications by total reported VHT students has risen by 18.0 per cent (Figure 43).

Qualifications completed by student groups Indigenous, students with a disability, students with a language background other than English:

%∫ Qualifications completed by students across these groups have increased (Figure 43).

The largest increases in the numbers of qualifications completed were for Indigenous students (36.7 per cent) and students with a language background other than English (24.1 per cent) (Figure 43).

%∫ Of the total reported number of qualifications completed by each of the three student groups, students with a language background other English have

CO CT> CO CO

4 $ 8 8

Students with a disability Students who speak a language

other than English at home

consistently had the largest proportions at Certificate III or FV and Diploma and above course levels. In contrast, Indigenous students and those with

a disability have consistently had the highest proportions at Certificate I or II or lower (Table B.7).

Other groups:

Over this period, some trends for groups which include geographical remoteness and socio-economic status were observed.

By geographical remoteness

%∫ Numbers of qualifications completed have substantially increased across all areas with the largest increase being for students in remote and very remote areas

(38.7 per cent) (Table B.7).

%∫ Numbers of qualifications completed by students in major cities have been consistently higher compared to other areas (Table B.7).

p82 annual national re p o rt of the australian vocational education and training system 2009

%∫ The proportion of qualifications completed at Diploma and above course level has been consistently higher for students in major cities compared to other areas (Table B.7).

%∫ In comparison, the largest proportion of qualifications at Certificate I or II or lower was completed by students in remote and very remote areas over this period (Table B.7).

%∫ Across all areas, proportions of qualifications completed at Certificate I or II or lower have slightly declined. The proportion of qualifications completed at this course level for total reported VET graduates has also decreased (Table B.7).

By socio-economic status

%∫ From 2006 to 2008, numbers of qualifications completed have risen across all quintiles with the largest increases being for students in Quintile

3 (29.9 per cent) followed by Quintile 1 (most disadvantaged) (28.4 per cent). The number of qualifications completed by total reported VET students has increased by 19.8 per cent over that period (Table B.7).

%∫ The proportion of qualifications completed at Diploma and above course level by students in the least disadvantaged areas (Quintile 5) has

been consistently higher compared to other quintiles (Table B.7).

%∫ The proportion of qualifications completed by students in the most disadvantaged areas (Quintile 1) at Certificate I or II or lower course level has been consistently higher compared

to other quintiles (Table B.7).

Student outcomes

Employment after training

Graduates who were employed after training From 2005 to 2009, die proportion of all graduates who were employed after training has decreased by 1.5 percentage points. In contrast, from 2008 to 2009,

the proportion of all graduates who were employed after training has decreased by 2.9 percentage points (Figure 44).

Employment outcomes for student groups Indigenous, graduates with a disability, graduates who speak a language other than English at home:

%∫ From 2005 to 2009, across all groups, proportions of graduates who were employed after training have declined (Figure 44).

%∫ Over this period, the largest decreases were for graduates with a disability and graduates who speak a language other than English at home, 2.8 percentage points and 2.7 percentage points respectively (Figure 44).

Other groups:

Some trends for groups which include the highest level of prior educational attainment, geographical remoteness and socio-economic status were observed.

annual national re p o rt of the australian vocational education and training system 2009

Figure 44: Proportion of total reported VET graduates and graduates in disadvantaged groups who were employed after training, 2005-2009

*… cn rC

All graduates Indigenous graduates

%† 2005 %† 2006 I 2007 2008

Source data and explanatory notes: Tables A.11, B.12, B 14, B.16

Graduates with a disability Graduates who speak a language

other than English at home

2009

By highest level of prior educational attainment

%∫ From 2005 to 2009, proportions of graduates who were employed after training have declined across all course levels with the smallest decreases being for graduates who had Diploma and above (1.2 percentage points) and

Certificate III or IV (0.2 percentage points) as their highest level of prior educational attainment (Table B.18).

%∫ From 2008 to 2009, across all course levels, proportions of graduates who were employed after training have declined with the largest decreases

being for graduates who had Year 11 and Certificate I or II (4 percentage points) and Diploma and above (3.7 percentage points) as their highest level of prior educational attainment (Table B.18).

By geographical remoteness

%∫ Front 2005 to 2009, proportions of graduates across all areas who were employed after training have decreased (Table B.22).

%∫ Over this period, the largest decrease was for graduates in major cities (2.1 percentage points) (Table B.22).

%∫ From 2008 to 2009, proportions of graduates across all areas who were employed after training have decreased, except for remote and very remote areas where there was a slight increase (Table B.22).

%∫ Over this period, the largest decrease was for graduates in major cities (3.7 percentage points) (Table B.22).

p84 annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009

Figure 45: Difference in proportion employed from before to after training for total reported VET graduates and graduates by highest level of prior educational attainment, 2005-2009

Io CL

Total graduates Year 10 and below

I 2005 %† 2006 2007

Year 11 and Certificate I or II

2008

Year 12 Certificate III or IV Diploma and above

2009

Source data and explanatory notes: Tables A11, B.18

By socio-economic status

%∫ From 2007 to 2009, across all quintiles, proportions of graduates who were employed after training have declined (Table B.20).

%∫ The largest decrease was for graduates in the most disadvantaged areas (5.7 percentage points) (Quintile 1) and the smallest decrease was for

graduates in the least disadvantaged areas (2.9 percentage points) (Quintile 5) compared to 3.3 percentage points decline for all graduates (Table B.20).

Difference in the proportion of graduates employed from before training to after In 2009, the net increase in employment

for all graduates was 3.0 percentage points (Figure 45).

Employment outcomes for student groups Indigenous, graduates with a disability, graduates who speak a language other than English at home:

%∫ Across all groups, the net change in employment from before to after training was considerably smaller compared to the previous year (Tables B.12, B.14, B.16), %∫ The lowest net change in employment

was for graduates who speak a language other than English at home (1.5 percentage points) (Table B.16).

Other groups:

In 2009, some trends for groups which include the highest level of prior educational attainment, geographical remoteness and socio-economic status were observed.

annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009 p85

%∫ The net change in employment from before to after training was considerably smaller compared to the previous year across all course levels of prior

educational attainment (Figure 43).

%∫ The net change in employment was negative for graduates who had Diploma and above and Certificate III or IV as their highest level of prior educational attainment, 0.7 percentage points and -0.6 percentage points respectively (Figure 43). This means that less graduates who had these course levels as their highest level of prior educational attainment were employed after training than before training.

By geographical remoteness

%∫ Across all areas, the net change in employment from before to after training was considerably smaller compared to the previous year (Table B.22).

%∫ The lowest net change in employment was for graduates in remote and very remote areas (1.8 percentage points) (Table B.22).

By socio-economic status

%∫ Across all quintiles, the net change in employment from before to after training was considerably smaller compared to the previous year (Table B.20).

%∫ The lowest net change in employment was for graduates in the most disadvantaged areas (2 percentage points) (Quintile 1), compared to

a 2.5 percentage points change for graduates in the least disadvantaged areas (Quintile 5) (Table B.20).

By highest level of prior educational attainment G raduates who improved their employment circumstances after

training From 2005 to 2009, the proportion of all graduates who improved their employment circumstances after training has decreased by 3.7 percentage points (Figure 46).

Employment outcomes for student groups Indigenous, graduates with a disability, graduates who speak a language other than English at home:

%∫ Across these groups, the proportion of Indigenous graduates who improved their employment circumstances after training has declined by the smallest amount (1.2 percentage points) (Figure 46).

Other groups:

Over this period, some trends for groups which include the highest level of prior educational attainment, geographical remoteness and socio-economic status were

observed.

By highest level of prior educational attainment

> Across all course levels, the largest decreases in proportions of graduates who improved their employment circumstances after training were for graduates who had Year 11 and Certificate I or II (4.7 percentage points), Diploma and above (4.1 percentage points) and Year 10 and below (4 percentage points) as their highest level of prior educational attainment (Table B.18).

p86 annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009

Figure 46: Proportion of total reported VET graduates and graduates in disadvantaged groups who improved their employment circumstances after training, 20Q5-2Q09 _______________

100 -

90 -

80 -

All graduates Indigenous graduates

%† 2005 %† 2006 2007 2008

Source data and explanatory notes: Tables A.11, *í.1*û, B,14, B.16

Byjjeojjt4aphical remoteness

%∫ Across all areas, the largest decreases were for graduates in remote and very remote areas (5.7 percentage points) and major cities (4.2 percentage points)

(TableB.22).

By socio-economic status

%∫ From 2007 to 2009, proportions of graduates who improved their employment circumstances after training have declined across all quintiles, with the smallest decrease of 1.5 percentage points being for graduates in the least disadvantaged areas (Quintile 5) compared to 2.2 percentage points decrease for all graduates (Table B.20).

Graduates with a disability Graduates who speak a language other than English at home

2009

annual national re p o rt of the australian vocational education and training system 2009 p87

Figure 47: Proportion of total reported VET graduates and graduates by ABS Accessibility/ Remoteness Index who achieved their main reason ________ for training, 2005-2009__________________ _________ __________

All graduates Major cities Inner regional areas Outer regional areas Remote and

very remote areas

%† 2005 %† 2006 2007

Source data and explanatory notes: Tables A11, 8.22

2008 2009

Satisfaction with VET

G raduates who achieved their main reason for training From 2005 to 2009, the proportion of all graduates who achieved their main reason

for training has increased by 0.4 percentage points. In contrast, from 2008 to 2009, the proportion of all graduates who achieved

their main reason for training has decreased by 1.5 percentage points (Figure 47).

Satisfaction by student groups Indigenous graduates, graduates with a disability, graduates who speak a

language other than English at home:

%∫ From 2008 to 2009, proportions of graduates who achieved their main reason for training have declined across all groups, except for graduates with a disability (a slight increase of

0.1 percentage points) (Tables B.12, B.14, B.16).

%∫ Over this period, die largest decrease was for Indigenous graduates (3.4 percentage points) (Table B.12).

Other groups:

Some trends for groups which include the highest level of prior educational attainment, geographical remoteness and socio-economic status were observed.

By highest level of prior educational attainment

%∫ From 2005 to 2009, across all course levels, proportions of graduates who achieved their main reason for training have increased, except for graduates with the highest level of prior educational attainment at Year 11 and Certificate I or II where tiierc was no change over

tills period (Table B.18).

p88 annual national rep ort of the australian vocational education and training system 2009

%∫ Over this period, the largest increase (1.7 percentage points) was for graduates who had Certificate III or IV as their highest level of prior educational attainment (Table B.18).

%∫ From 2008 to 2009, proportions of graduates across all course levels who achieved their main reason for training have declined. The smallest decreases were for graduates who had Certificate

III or IV (0.7 percentage points) and Diploma and above (0.8 percentage points) as their highest level of prior educational attainment (Table B.18).

By jjeojjr ∑apbicnl 1 ∑emoten ess

%∫ From 2005 to 2009, the proportion of graduates in remote and very remote areas who achieved their main reason for training has been consistentiy higher than for graduates in other areas. This group has risen most markedly (3.1 percentage points) compared to a slight decline of 0.6 percentage points for graduates in major cities over this period (Figure 47).

%∫ From 2008 to 2009, across all areas, proportions of graduates who achieved their main reason for training have decreased with the largest decline of 2.3 percentage points being for graduates in major cities (Figure 47).

By socio-economic status

%∫ From 2008 to 2009, across all quintiles, proportions of graduates who achieved their main reason for training have declined. The largest decrease was for graduates in the least disadvantaged areas

(2.6 percentage points) (Quintile 5) and the smallest decrease was for graduates in the most disadvantaged areas

(0.7 percentage points) (Quintile 1) (Table B.20).

G raduates who were satisfied with the overall quality of training From 2005 to 2009, die proportion of all graduates who were satisfied with the overall quality of their training has increased by 2 percentage points (Figure 48).

Satisfaction by student groups

Indigenous, graduates with a disability, graduates who speak a language other than English at home:

%∫ Proportions of graduates who were satisfied with the overall quality of their training have increased across all groups (Figure 48).

%∫ The largest increase of 5.7 percentage points was for Indigenous graduates (Figure 48).

Other groups:

Over this period, some trends for groups which include the highest level of prior educational attainment and geographical remoteness were observed.

annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009 pB9

%∫ Across all course levels, proportions of graduates who were satisfied with the overall quality of training have increased (Table B.18).

%∫ The largest increase of 3.1 percentage points was for graduates who had Diploma and above as their highest level of prior educational attainment

(Table B.18).

By highest level of prior educational attainment By geographical remoteness %∫ Across all areas, proportions of graduates

who were satisfied with the overall quality of training have increased (Table B.22).

%∫ The largest increase was for graduates in remote and very remote areas (2.7 percentage points) compared to the 2.0 percentage points increase for graduates in major cities (Table B.22).

Figure 48: Proportion of total reported VET graduates and graduates in disadvantaged groups who were satisfied with the overall quality of __________training, 2005-2009 _________________________________________

All graduates Indigenous graduates

%† 2005 %† 2006 I 2007 2008

Source data and explanatory notes: Tables A. 11, B.12, B.14, B.16

88 0 88.0 87.1

Graduates with a disability

2009

Graduates who speak a language

other than English at home

p90 annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 20G9

Commonwealth, State and Territory achievements in VET " ∑ ;

. . . .

Australian Government

DEEWR represents the Australian Government as the lead agency responsible for the national training system. During 2009 it continued to work closely with the jurisdiction governments, industry and other stakeholders to ensure a high quality', responsive training system. DEEWR also had an active role in the implementation of various measures under the NASWD.

A major aspect of this work has been aimed at the improvement of accountability and reporting within the national training system. The introduction of a National VET

Regulator and amendment of the AQTF are two key initiatives within this context.

Other programs operating under the NASWD include:

%∫ Productivity Places Program (PPP); %∫ VET FEE-HELP; %∫ Workplace English Language and Literacy Program (WELL);

%∫ Language, Literacy and Numeracy Program (LLNP);

%∫ Targeting Skills Needs in Regions Program (TSNR);

%∫ Australian Apprenticeships Access Program; %∫ Workforce Innovation Program; %∫ Industry Skills Councils (ISCs); %∫ Training Packages; and %∫ WorldSkills Australia;

These arc discussed in the following section.

National Vet Regulator During 2009, negotiations between Ministers were held around the future of

national regulation for die VET system. In April 2009, COAG endorsed the need for stronger and more cohesive national regulatory arrangements for VET, including in-principle support for a national regulatory body to oversee registration of providers and accreditation of VET qualifications and courses. Consultations and negotiations were held during the

year with state and territory governments and key stakeholders. In December, COAG agreed to establish a new national regulator for the VET sector and a new Standards Council. The new regulator will be responsible for the registration and audit of registered training providers and the accreditation of courses. It will be a Commonwealth statutory authority and all jurisdictions, other than Western Australia and Victoria, have agreed to

refer powers. The regulator will regulate all providers with international students or multi-jurisdictional activity, including in non referring states. Western Australia and Victoria have agreed to introduce mirror legislation to ensure a high level of national consistency'.

The decision also endorsed the establishment of a national Standards Council to provide advice to the MCTEE on national standards for regulation.

The details of these arrangements will be negotiated in the first half of 2010 and are expected to commence in 2011.

p92 annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009

Australian Quality Training Framework During 2009, the Commonwealth worked with the states and territories to achieve endorsement of amendments to the AQTF

to strengthen the regulatory requirements underpinning the VET sector. The amendments introduced strengthened

conditions and standards for both initial registration of new training providers entering the market and continuing registration of ongoing providers. This will

ensure that only training providers likely to deliver quality' outcomes are admitted to the VET market; and only training providers that deliver to required standards are

permitted to continue in operation.

Productivity Places Program Under the Skilling Australia for the Future initiative, the Australian Government funds the PPP which will deliver 711 000 training places over five years in areas of priority' for Industry to ensure that Australian workers develop the skills they need. These training places are being delivered in an industry- driven system, ensuring that the training is more responsive to the needs of businesses and participants. Of these places, 392 000 training places will be allocated to existing

workers wanting to gain or upgrade their skills, and 312 000 (including 20 000 structural adjustment places) will be allocated to job seekers.

Highlights - Major Developments

The Australian Government delivered the PPP until June 2009. State and territory governments have progressively assumed responsibility' for delivery of mainstream job seeker and existing worker places through 2009. This is in accordance with

the CO AG * negotiated NP Agreement for PPP from 2009 to 2012, which was signed by seven state and territory governments, with the Victorian Government signing a separate agreement. The Australian Government maintained responsibility' for the Structural Adjustment Places (SAP) and for training under the New Enterprise Incentive Scheme (NEIS). In 2009, under Australian Government administration,

59 420 job seekers had commenced training and 43 034 had completed training, including SAP and NEIS participants.

VET FEE-HELP The VET FEE-HELP Assistance Scheme was introduced in 2008 to provide a strong financial underpinning to help more Australians gain essential skills through VET. VET FEE-HELP is an extension of the higher education FEE-HELP

arrangements, and is part of the Higher Education Loan Program (HELP).

VET FEE-HELP assists eligible full fee≠ paying students who are enrolled in a VET accredited Diploma, Advanced Diploma, Graduate Certificate or Graduate Diploma course through a VET provider (an RTO approved to offer VET FEE-HELP to its students) to pay for all or part of their tuition fees. The Australian Government extended VET FEE-HELP assistance to certain state government-subsidised Diploma and Advanced Diploma students from 1 July 2009.

A HELP debt is repaid through the tax system once a student reaches the minimum income threshold level for repayment,

which for 2009-10 is $43 150. Students can borrow up to the FEE-HELP limit over their lifetime. The FEE-HELP limit

annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009 p93

in 2009 was $83 313 for most courses and $104 142 for medicine, dentistry and veterinary science courses that lead to initial registration as practitioners in those fields.

The FEE-HELP limit is indexed each year. There is a 20 per cent VET FEE-HELP loan fee that applies for all eligible Hill fee-paying students. As part of the 2009 extension of VET FEE-HELP assistance, eligible state government-subsidised students are not required to pay the loan fee. The FEE HELP limit does not include the loan fee.

VET FEE-HELP Assistance for Victorian Government Subsidised Students

In 2009, the Commonwealth supported the implementation of the Victorian Government *s VET sector reforms as outlined in Securing Jobs For Your Future - Skills for Victoria. Since July 2009, VET FEE-HELP assistance has been available to Victorian Government-subsidised students enrolled with an approved VET provider and studying at the VET Diploma and Advanced Diploma level to pay for all or

part of their tuition fees. In addition, these students are not required to pay the VET FEE-HELP 20 per cent loan fee.

Support for Australian Apprentices The Commonwealth Government continued delivery of key initiatives, begun

in response to the global recession in 2008, to strengthen the skills base, to secure jobs and to continue the training of apprentices and trainees ensuring that their skills were relevant to the needs of industry.

Initiatives included the Securing Apprenticeships and Traineeships initiative, which assisted out-of-trade Australian

Apprentices to remain connected to die workforce and maintain the value of their investment in training through successful completion of their qualifications. This

initiative was also delivered through RTOs initiative, allowing Australian Apprentices who had been made redundant to maintain the value of their investment in training by allowing them to complete the off-the-job component of their training arrangements.

Other key achievements included:

%∫ launching proposals to streamline existing financial incentives under the Australian Apprenticeships Incentives Program to reduce the administrative burden for employers while retaining valuable support for employers, apprentices and

trainees; and

%∫ supporting the ISCs to expand their capacity to help businesses identify the training and development needs of their workforce.

Workplace English Language and Literacy Program The WELL Program encourages employers to invest in training by subsidising up to 75 per cent of the cost of providing workers with English LLN skills, to

help them to meet the demands of their employment. During 2009, approximately 12 000 employees were trained including approximately 5 per cent Indigenous participants and 36 per cent from a NESB.

In 2009 WELL eligibility was extended to include pre-employment Indigenous Employment Program participants with an LEN need.

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Language, Literacy and Numeracy Program The LLNP aims to help job seekers improve

their language, literacy and numeracy skills. It provides three levels of English language training (initial, basic and advanced) and two levels of literacy and numeracy training (basic and advanced). Face to face services are available from more than 300 locations across Australia and services are also available by distance education anywhere in Australia.

During 2009, 38 066 job seekers were referred for professional assessment of their LLN skills and 19 728 commenced training in theprogram.

Complementary training is an optional training service which allows more flexibility to create courses that are parallel to the delivery of the mainstream Program and is intended to target disadvantaged clients. There were five complementary training initiatives approved in 2009. These

initiatives provide language, literacy and numeracy training that is contextualised to enhance clients * employability in local labour markets. Approved courses include training contextualised to kitchen operations; hospitality; children *s services; and business.

Another initiative of the LLNP is the Advanced Vocationally-Oriented Courses (AVOC). These courses focus on addressing the demand in vocational or industry

areas by delivering training to clients specific to these areas. There were two AVOC approved in 2009 which were delivered in New South Wales and provided vocational training in Hospitality and

Children *s Services.

Targeting Skills Needs in Regions Program (TSNR) The COAG Skills Package * Regional Initiatives program (known as die Targeting Skills Needs in Regions program * $2.5 million in 2009) aims to identify and support the development of practical,

flexible and integrated strategies, which improve the supply of skilled labour to industries in regions of strategic importance

in the Australian economy.

The program guidelines require that projects focus on one or more impediments to addressing regional skills needs. An example of such impediments is *low levels of educational attainment and employment for Indigenous people in rural and remote communities *.

Of 28 projects active during 2009:

%∫ three were aimed exclusively at Indigenous participants;

%∫ a further ten specifically sought to attract and include Indigenous participants who in some cases comprised the majority;

%∫ one project also specifically targeted participants with disabilities; %∫ one project targeted women from culturally and linguistically diverse

backgrounds.

annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009 p95

Youth Attainment and Transitions 2009 saw the development of, negotiation and final agreement of the National Partnership Agreement on Youth Attainment and Transitions. The NP was signed by First Ministers on 2 July 2009. The NP aims to increase the educational engagement and attainment of young people and to improve their transition to post school education, training and employment through immediate, concerted action supported by broader long term reform.

The need for immediate, concerted action was due to the challenges presented by the Global Financial Crisis, and for this reason the NP includes the Compact with Young Australians, which promotes young people *s participation in education and training, providing protection from the anticipated

tighter labour market and ensuring they would have the qualifications needed to take up the jobs as the economy recovered.

Australian Apprenticeships A ccess Program The Access Program provides vulnerable job seekers who experience barriers to skilled employment with pre-vocational

training and support to help them obtain and successfully participate in an Australian Apprenticeship or traineeship, or achieve a training or employment outcome.

Eligible groups for the Access Program include Indigenous Australians, people with disability and vulnerable young job

seekers - including at-risk Year 12 school leavers and those who left school prior to completing Year 12.

The Access Program provides participants with a unique suite of pre-vocational

training on an Australian Apprenticeship pathway and individualised job search and post-placement support.

During the 2009 calendar year 12 226 vulnerable job seekers participated in the Access Program. Of these participants around 5 per cent identified as Indigenous Australians and 2.6 per cent identified

as having disability. As these categories are self-identified it is possible that more participants were Indigenous or had a disability than identified as such.

In addition 78 per cent of Access Program participants in 2009 were female.

Over 40 per cent of program participants achieve a positive outcome, obtaining an Australian Apprenticeship, full or part time employment or taking up further education

and training. Approximately 57 per cent of outcomes achieved are in Australian Apprenticeships. In recognition of these successful program outcomes, a 10 per cent increase in paid participant outcomes

under the program (44 per cent up from 40 per cent) was announced as part of a suite of Program enhancements in the May

2009 Australian Government Budget.

Workforce Innovation Program (WIP) The Workforce Innovation Program (WIP) provides funding support for industry led

pilot projects that address current and future workforce and skills development needs. Small grant funding of approximately $5.7m was available for projects in 2009-10 that covered a wide range on industry and community needs.

Projects during 2009 addressed issues such as attracting new workers, retaining and redeploying current workers and upskilling,

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particularly with skills for environmental sustainability and emerging technologies.

Key lessons learnt from projects include: the importance of taking a whole of workforce development approach and not just focussing on one element (such as training), and working in collaboration with other local businesses, service providers and community organisations.

Projects that have directly addressed disadvantaged groups include:

%∫ *Indigenous Training in the Marine Industry *, which developed processes to increase the attraction and training of Indigenous Australians for the marine

industry on the North Coast of New South Wales and South-East Queensland;

%∫ *National Disability Services Workforce Management *, which piloted new workforce management strategies to improve staff attraction and retention in

the non-government disability services sector; and

%∫ *Moving Women in Forestry *, which looked at barriers and opportunities for mobility for women working in the forest, wood, paper and timber industry.

Although not specifically targeting any social group, several WIP projects were conducted in regional areas and included participants

from low socio-economic backgrounds or with low English language skills.

Industry Skills Councils The Australian Government funds eleven ISC to develop and support the implementation of training packages and

to provide advice to Government, Skills Australia and Industry about workforce development and skills needs.

Through the Skilling Australia for the Future policy, the role of ISCs in the training system and in workforce development has been strengthened and expanded. This strengthened and expanded role was reflected in funding agreements with ISCs for the period April 2008 to June 2011.

In December 2009, the COAG endorsed a new Green Skills Agreement that will deliver skills for sustainability in the Australian training system. ISCs are working towards embedding skills for sustainability into all Training Packages by the end of 2010.

During November 2009, the Hon Julia Gillard MP, Minister for Education, announced that the government would co-fund training places for businesses under the Enterprise Based Productivity Places Program (EBPPP). It was further announced that ISCs would have a central role in EBPPP. ISCs have worked with small, medium and large business, national professional associations and industry

bodies to support them in developing proposals for funding under EBPPP. It is anticipated that successful proposals for funding will be announced in early 2010.

Training Packages

The final report from the Joint NQC/ COAG Skills and Workforce Development Subgroup Steering Committee on VET Products for the 21st Century was accepted

by the NQC in April 2009. In June 2009 the MCVTE endorsed the policy framework from the VET Products for the 21st Century report which was developed

through extensive national consultations with VET stakeholders.

annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009 p97

Key aspects of the framework are:

%∫ Reaffirmation of a single organising framework for VET qualifications comprised of Training Packages and accredited courses.

%∫ A revision of the definition of *competency * to embody the ability to transfer and apply skills and knowledge to new situations and environments.

%∫ A restructure and streamlining of Training Packages including separating tlae performance standards from guidance and supporting information.

%∫ A full review of packaging rules as applied in Training Packages, and the process for developing and approving Accredited Courses, to ensure maximum

flexibility and consistency.

%∫ Establishment of a joint working group of the NQC and the Australian Qualifications Framework Council to investigate the introduction of a national credit system.

%∫ A stronger focus in VET products on preparatory and enabling qualifications, and LLN requirements.

MCVTE also agreed that:

%∫ The NQC conducts a review jointly with NVEAC on how best to ensure that equity needs are addressed in the policy framework for VET Products for the 21st Century.

%∫ The outcomes of the review of packaging rules and the process for developing and approving Accredited Courses be presented as part of a high level report

to COAG.

%∫ The recommendation that it to be made mandatory for crown copyright state accredited courses to be publically available on the NTIS is subject to the scoping of its impact.

The NQC has established an Action Group, tire Framework Implementation Action Group, to put effect to the recommendations in the final report.

More information about this Action Group can be found on the NQC website, http: / /www.nqc. tvetaustralia.com.au/ about_nqc/action_groups / framework_ implementation

At its meeting in December 2009, the NQC agreed to changes for the rules on the content of Training Package qualifications and the ways an individual learner or an employer can choose which units are

*packaged * together as qualifications. These changes are pursuant to the VET Products for the 21st Century report, and respond

to requests from industry, employers and learners for more choice and greater flexibility within qualifications. The changes will be implemented throughout 2010.

Training Package Processes The NQC commissioned consultants to conduct an independent evaluation of the policy for the development and

endorsement of Training Packages as defined by the Training Package Development and Endorsement Process 2008. The policy, designed to enable better responsiveness to industry priorities for new and updated skills and to give ISCs greater responsibility and accountability for the final product, was progressively implemented during 2008.

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The evaluation found that the majority of views were positive about the policy and process. Most stakeholders indicated that some improvement can be made by clarifying roles, policy interpretations and processes, and by developing a common

understanding of these. They also considered that, with consistent application, the process is achieving greater levels of trust, which will continue to deliver systemic benefits for the development of Training Packages.

At its September 2009 meeting, the Council endorsed all twenty-six recommendations in the consultants * final report. Council also endorsed one additional recommendation designed to support improved version control and ready

market access to an authorised endorsed product until the replacement for the NTIS is in place. The NQC also endorsed an action plan for implementing the recommendations of die report.

A copy of the consultants * final report is available on the NQC website at http ://www.nqc.tvetaustralia.com.au / nqc_publications.

WorldSkills Australia WorldSkills Australia is a national organisation, supported by governments, employers and volunteers, which organises

regional and national sId 11s competitions that challenge young people to achieve world standards in a range of skills and industries.

In October 2009, the Worldskills International Competition was held in Calgary with 51 countries competing. The 2009 Team Australia - Skillaroos sent 26 competitors in 24 trade areas. At the completion of the competition Australia won two gold, five silver and five bronze

medals, maintaining their 5th place ranking on the global stage.

2009 Medallists

Gold Heh-Nian (James) Sun Restaurant Service

Gold S Best in Nation Jessie-Lee Gladwel! Beauty Therapy

Silver Andrew Arthur Manufacturing Team Challenge

Silver Kyle Butler Manufacturing Team Challenge

Silver Luke Davies Manufacturing Team Challenge

Silver Nick Davies IT Software Applications

Silver Tyson Knight Plumbing

BronzeDaniel Jones Web Design

BronzeDaniel Karanges Sheetmetal Technology

Bronze Joshua Harris Welding

Bronze Nigel Croke Bricklaying

BronzePeter Steinweiss Wall & Floor Tiling

annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009 p99

Medallions of Excellence [top ten placing) were awarded to the following competitors:

Aaron Samphier Autobody Repair

Benjamin Dean Industrial Control

Gavin Press Electrical Installations

Kyle French Painting & Decorating

Megan Kuhn Ladies/Mens Hairdressing

Melissa Guiney Graphic Design Technology

Michael Welshman Cabinetmaking

Mitchell Edwards Joinery

Nash Mason Refrigeration

Nenad DjuricCooking

Perrin BounaAutomobile Technology

Stacey Pitman Floristry

p100 annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009

New South Wales

New South Wales is committed to ensuring that the NSW training system is flexible and responsive in supporting economic growth and skills development, particularly for

disadvantaged learners.

In 2009, new apprenticeship areas were opened up to competitive arrangements and additional price incentives were introduced to encourage on-the-job flexible training delivery and a greater take-up of

apprenticeships and traineeships in priority industries, at higher qualification levels, in small businesses, and in rural and remote

areas of New South Wales. The new incentives contributed to an eight per cent increase in commencements both in regional areas and in small businesses.

To tackle the impact of the Global Financial Crisis, the NSW Government allocated $7 million over two years from 2009 to support a range of services to

assist businesses and their employees to better manage the structural transition from downsizing or closing. Elements of the Retrenched Workers Program include information and advice, skills assessment and Recognition of Prior Learning, recognised skills training, and strategies for businesses- at-rislc. Tills program supports the COAG Compact for Retrenched Workers.

In 2009, the NSW Government also introduced the Green Skills Strategy, which aligns with national Green Skills objectives, to build the capability of our workforce for

a sustainable economy. Initiatives under the Strategy include:

%∫ Green Skills Business Guide * to provide information, advice and case studies of successful business outcomes from employers giving green skills training to their workforce

%∫ Green Small Business Incentives * $5 million over two years targeting managers and supervisors in businesses with up to 20 employees in a wide range of industries %∫ Energy Efficiency Training for Trades and

Professionals Program - a $20 million program over four years to provide green skills and sustainability competency training

to tradespeople and professionals.

TAPE NSW Institutes also developed new green skills programs, such as GSmart for the tourism and hospitality industry and the Statement of Attainment in Sustainability

Solutions for sales staff at Bunnings Hardware.

New South Wales continued to broaden pathways for school students through VET in Schools programs. As part of their NSW Higher School Certificate 55 159 students enrolled in one or more VET courses. In 2009, Trade Schools were opened at Jamison

High School, and at Sutherland, Griffith and Shellharbour TAPE sites, bringing the number of Trades Schools to 13.

TAPE NSW Institutes continued to provide personalised training to specific target groups to help individuals overcome barriers to VET, foster social inclusion and increase participation in the workforce. TAPE NSW Institutes also developed innovative solutions to workforce needs, including customised workplace training programs and flexible training options to meet the changing needs of industry and employers in die state, national and global environment. Their innovation and commitment to training

is recognised. At the 2009 NSW Training Awards, TAPE NSW *- Western Sydney Institute was awarded Large Training Provider

of the Year and TAPE NSW *- Northern Sydney Institute won the inaugural Stills for Sustainability award.

annual national report of the australian vocational and technical education system 2009 |)1 D 1

Victoria

On 1 July 2009, the implementation of Victoria *s skills reforms commenced. This reform is a fundamental change to the way

government subsidised training is funded in Victoria, moving from a supply driven to a demand driven training system.

This user-focused system maximises opportunities for training through:

%∫ unlimited access to government subsidised foundation level training in order to improve the literacy, numeracy and work preparation skills of Victorians;

%∫ the introduction of Victorian Training Guarantee, an entitlement to a government subsidised place in recognised training;

%∫ provision of income contingent loans for students in government subsidised training;

%∫ increased contestability of government funding, enabling registered providers to compete for students; and %∫ provision of more choice and flexibility

for students when choosing where and when they access government subsidised training.

The Victorian Training Guarantee is being progressively implemented over four years. The first stage was the move to demand driven funding for Diplomas and Advanced

Diplomas and for students referred through the Skills for Growth program, from 1 July 2009.

Skills for Growth provides workforce development support to enterprises with up to 200 employees. By the end of November 2009, over 1300 small to medium enterprises were registered for the Skills for

Growth program and resulted in more than 350 placements into training.

The NCVER. publication Employers * Use and Views of the 1GET System 2009 shows that Victorian employers continued to engage with the VET system above the national average.

A reported 88 per cent who used nationally recognised training were satisfied that the training provided employees with the skills they required. This is up from 82 per cent

in 2007.

During 2009, almost 76 000 young people aged 15-19 years undertook government subsidised training. There were also increased enrolments in higher qualification levels, and apprentice and trainee completions in Victoria represented nearly a

third of all completions nationally.

In June 2009, the Victorian Government also released the $15.4 million A Stronger ACFE - Delivering Skills for Victoria statement which articulates a strong vision for the ACE sector in the context

of a contestable training market. This will ensure the ACE sector continues to assist in reducing the gaps in foundation skills levels across the community.

Other achievements in 2009 include:

%∫ an Industry Experts as Teachers program to encourage those with recent industry experience to transition into VET teaching; and %∫ initiatives such as the Apprenticeship/

Traineeship Completion Bonus program and provision of support services to encourage employment and retention of apprentices and trainees.

p102 annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009

A key policy objective of the VET system in Queensland is to drive a responsive skills system through strong industry leadership that increases die productivity, participation and social inclusion of all Queenslanders.

In late 2009, tire Department of Education and Training (DET) Indigenous VET Initiatives unit delivered a series of *Closing the Gap * workshops in three locations around tire State. The aim of these workshops was to discuss how *Closing the

Gap * priorities translate into public funded VET activity in Queensland. Stakeholders from TATE Institutes, Indigenous registered training organisations, the

Department of Employment, Economic Development and Innovation (DEEDI) and DEEWR joined a team of DET representatives from regional and central offices. The group discussed linking training with industry in their particular regions, to ensure that training was both relevant to and increased employment opportunities for Indigenous Queenslanders.

A cornerstone of Queensland *s VET system is its focus on industry leadership to ensure industry embraces the opportunities available through VET, and increases its investment in upskilling its workforce. Based on industry demand,

PPP funding during 2009 was allocated across a broad range of industries including automotive, building and construction, manufacturing and engineering, energy and

telecommunications, primary industries, tourism and hospitality, health and community services, transport and logistics, sport and recreation, business and property services, and information technology.

Queensland, directly and through brokers, worked with enterprises and peak industry bodies to contract their selected registered

training organisations to deliver high level qualifications to their existing workers. These included Queensland Bus Industry Council, Queensland Trucking Association, Australian Furniture Removals Association, Accor Hotel Group, Pharmacy Guild of Australia, Tjapukai Aboriginal Cultural

Park, Agforce Queensland, Ergon, Youthcare, Parmalat, Global Manufacturing Group and many others. Under a range of strategies, DET allocated approximately

$72 million in 2009 for new PPP activity, providing training places for 15 788 job seekers and 7 673 existing workers.

During 2009, 16 303 unemployed and disadvantaged Queenslanders were assisted with customised employment and training assistance under Skilling Queenslanders

for Work, including the PPP. Skilling Queenslanders for Work is an on-going initiative which targets priority population groups including retrenched workers. This assistance included training in skills sets and full qualifications to 9 709 participants. Twelve months after program participation,

71 per cent of participants assisted under Skilling Queenslanders for Work were in employment, in training or a combination of both. For the 2009 calendar year, 2 992 participants were approved to be assisted

by DEEDI under this program at a cost of $8.05 million.

DET implemented a Disability Skilling Action Plan in 2009. Achievement highlights included the improvement of central data capability to enhance the monitoring of participation and success oi

annual national report of the australian vocational and technical education system 2009 p103

people with a disability in publicly funded VET. Advice to, and capacity for private VET providers to support people with a disability were also improved. A live remote

interpreting capacity in TAPE Queensland for deaf or hard of hearing students was developed. Regional communities of

practice helped to link professionals across education, training and human services sectors and to develop localised unique solutions to overcoming barriers for individual students.

A total of $16.8 million over three years was allocated through die Skilling Queenslanders for Work initiative to provide almost 6 000 job seeker training

places. Projects were developed at regional and community level and aligned to employment opportunities available in local communities. The program also provided

wrap-around services such as language, literacy and numeracy training and employment support.

Under Queensland *s Strategic Purchasing Program, DET resourced a range of on≠ going programs which targeted specific population groups. This represented a

total funding commitment in 2009 of approximately $6.5 million and included:

%∫ The Disability High Support Needs Program, funding community-based training organisations to deliver vocational training and employment

assistance to people with a disability; %∫ The Youth in Detention program, in partnership with the Department of Communities and Queensland

Health, providing education and training programs to young people in Queensland *s youth detention centres;

%∫ The Adult Prisoners program, in partnership with DEEDI and Queensland Corrective Services, providing training programs to equip

offenders with skills to assist them to reintegrate into the community and obtain employment upon release; %∫ A mentoring program for women

undertaking a trade apprenticeship in plumbing; and

%∫ Indigenous programs, delivering training in creative arts and Children *s Services qualifications to workers in remote areas of Far North Queensland under the

Children *s Services Skilling Plan.

Under the Apprentice and Trainee Safety Net Package ($20 million in funding) employers were encouraged to

take on apprentices and trainees whose employment was affected by the economic downturn. Additional hinds were provided to Group Training to support out-of≠ trade apprentices. A pre-apprenticeship skilling pathway was implemented to provide flexible entry and exit points for prospective apprentices, and to provide suitable workplace assessment processes and simulated work environments.

The NP on TAPE Fee Waivers for Childcare Qualifications was implemented in 2009. The program was highly successful with TAPE enrolments in Diploma and Advanced Diploma Childcare qualifications increasing from a total of 2 061 in 2008 to 4 659 in 2009.

pi 04 annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009

South Australia

In response to A Skills Strategy for South Australia *s Future, a South Australian Government initiative aimed at providing a demand-driven, responsive and

flexible VET System in South Australia, throughout 2009 the Department of Further Education, Employment, Science and Technology prepared its Strategic Resource Allocation Plan (SRAP). The central purpose of this plan is to allocate VET funding as a targeted response to the skill needs of South Australian industry. The SRAP also addresses a wider range of issues arising from national agreements and South Australian government policy decisions,

taking into account regional needs and the requirement to improve outcomes for equity groups.

In 2009 a review was initiated of South Australia Works, a major initiative of the Government of South Australia, which links people with skills and jobs through a range of learning, training and work programs. The review examined the program *s effectiveness and identified new strategic directions within a changed economic and

policy environment. In 2009, $35.7 million of funding (including $5.5 million leveraged from Australian and other State Government Agencies) was provided to South Australia Works, with over 32 000 people participating in the program. Of these, 16 700 people participated in work programs, with 8,400 gaining employment, and another 15 400 people participating in learning, skills development and training programs.

In 2009, the South Australian and Commonwealth Governments provided $17.7 million in new funding through the PPP to support more than 6 800 training places to update or upgrade the

skills of existing workers and an additional $8 million to provide over 3 600 places to assist jobseekers acquire skills and gain

lasting employment.

South Australia Works Adult Community Education Program supported over 11 000 adults to access a range of general adult community education and/or language, literacy and numeracy learning

and training opportunities. Adults experiencing difficulty accessing formal education, training and employment participated in:

%∫ Community Learning Multi-literacy projects, focused on non-formal, non- accredited learning and the development of essential skills; and %∫ Community Transition projects, focused

on development of foundation skills, and providing vocational pathways from non- accredited training through to further

education, training and/or employment.

In 2009 the South Australian and Commonwealth Governments committed more than $70 million to upgrade TAFE SA facilities, including construction of the new $9.4 million Victor Harbor campus. There were also significant upgrades at other metropolitan and regional campuses. This provided students with modern facilities that reflect industry standards to sufficiently equip them with the skills and training required to succeed in die labour market.

In 2009 the Industry Partnership Program, a joint industry and government partnership program, supporting training and employment at the business and enterprise level across priority industry sectors and skill demand areas, committed significant funding to Industry Skills Boards,

annual national report of the australian vocational and technical education system 2009 p105

supporting 11 initiatives. This commitment was matched by industry contributions to manage workforce development programs that created industry-led and

demand driven employment and training opportunities for unemployed and under≠ employed people.

In 2009 the PPP prioritised training proposals providing training in high demand, high skill occupation areas. Strongly innovative, flexible training partnerships between training providers and enterprises were prioritised to ensure existing workers were effectively upskilled to respond to new economic opportunities, and job seekers gained better access to skilled jobs in areas experiencing significant demand and growth.

p106 annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009

Western Australia

During die economic downturn, Western Australia made a significant investment in training services to maximise skills development, skills recognition and

employment opportunities for the community through a responsive training system.

In 2009 a number of major initiatives identified in TrainingWA: Planning for the future 2009-2018 TrainingWA plan were implemented. The focus of the TrainingWA plan is to maximise the development of skills as well as training and employment outcomes for all Western Australians. These initiatives focus on achieving the objectives of the NASWD. Some of the initiatives implemented include:

%∫ improved recognition of prior learning services to allow people to have their skills and experience formally recognised; %∫ the funding of a new7 state-wide network

of 14 Workforce Development Centres which will commence operations in 2010; %∫ the introduction of course fee

exemptions to encourage unemployed people to undertake training; %∫ the introduction of a range of initiatives to help employers retain apprentices

and trainees during the downturn, including the Securing Out of Trade Apprentices Initiative; %∫ a rebate on workers compensation premiums for employers of apprentices; and %∫ a critical support unit to assist businesses and individuals affected by the economic downturn.

These initiatives and other planned activities will ensure that the current and future supply of skills provided by the training system responds to meet changing labour market demand. The TrainingWA plan

also outlines strategies which will provide opportunities for disadvantaged people to enter and participate in the workforce by

overcoming barriers.

The participation of Indigenous people in skilled employment, particularly at local and regional levels is of importance for the State. The Training Together-Working

Together committee was established in September 2009 as a sub-committee of the State Training Board. Members include employers, registered training organisations

and government agencies who will lead the initiative. The committee will strengthen opportunities that enhance Indigenous

involvement in training and employment, as well as Government decision malting.

In October 2009, the Department of Training and Workforce Development was established to ensure that skills and workforce development is focused on

maximising the State *s future economic growth. The Department is currently developing a Workforce Development Plan, which will guide workforce policy and training delivery consistent with the

needs of the economy to increase the State *s long-term labour market efficiency and productivity.

A number of challenges exist for the State, including:

%∫ ensuring training meets industry needs and promoting the involvement of industry in the training system;

%∫ improving student retention and achievement;

p107 annual national report of the australian vocational and technical education system 2009

%∫ addressing die specific needs and issues of regional communities to support regional development in Western Australia; %∫ supporting the improvement of skills

development and employment of Indigenous people; and

%∫ ensuring sufficient investment and/or access to required training infrastructure, equipment and learning resources.

p108 annual national report of the austraiian vocational education and training system 2009

The Tasmanian Skills Strategy guides investment to match Tasmania *s skills needs. The Strategy focuses on four key themes: increasing opportunity; a better system for clients; workforce development; and skills for

the future. In 2009, the following initiatives began implementation of the Strategy:

%∫ The establishment of a Skills Hotline to answer the questions of employers, learners and service providers about the training system.

%∫ The funding of Innovative Partnerships between Industry and training provider

%∫ Continuation of the PPP with the funding of an additional 1 150 training places for existing workers and 1 000 training places for job seekers.

The Skilling Tasmania Industry Policy, supports the Tasmanian Skills Strategy through responding to industry advice on the skill development needs of industry and what industry expects from the training system. Implementation commenced in 2009 and included the following activities:

%∫ The development of a Skills Response Decision Framework and Tool which provides up to date information and data to guide program priorities by industry

sector and occupation.

%∫ Partnering with industry bodies on skills planning and skills development activities, including through the development of Industry Skills Plans, and through

Innovative Partnerships, a program that is based on industry ownership of skills solutions. To date, pilot Innovative Partnerships projects have been funded with the tourism and mining industries and a Skills Plan has been developed in partnership with tire Dairy Industry.

%∫ Reviewing Tasmania *s competitive purchasing arrangements for training delivery, to ensure they are providing the results that industry needs.

Work commenced on an Adult Literacy and Action Plan in 2009 which aims: *For young people and adults to have the literacy skills they need to hilly participate in their family life, the community, learning and employment *. The Action Plan will be implemented through 3 Strategies:

1. The establishment of an informal community and workplace network of adult literacy support.

2. The establishment of a state wide team of coordinators supported by a pool of trained volunteers to drive the Adult Literacy Network.

3. The development of key indicators to measure improvements in adult literacy support and outcomes.

The Tasmanian Government is equipping learners with skills for lifetime participation in employment and the community and acknowledges that different groups need

different approaches. The Qualifications and Skills for Tasmania Tomorrow reforms were introduced in 2009 to provide greater post Year 10 options through three

organisations. The Tasmanian Academy focuses on academic learning for Year 11 and 12 students seeking university entrance. The Tasmanian Polytechnic focuses on applied learning, with a vocational pathway. The Tasmanian Skills Institute focuses works with employers and employees, including apprentices, trainees and cadets,

to provide training that improves the skill levels in Tasmania *s workforce and meets industry demand.

annual national report of the australian vocational and technical education system 2009 p109

In 2009, the Tasmanian Government began promoting a strategic approach to workforce development with industry. This included work on improving whole-of-government approaches to

skills development that better integrated industry needs, including responding to retrenchments and business downsizing.

Tasmania launched Phase III of the PPP in 2009 which encouraged partnerships between training providers and employers, and promoted the value of workforce development activities in helping to address skills shortages. Over 1 000 job seeker and

1 150 existing worker places were allocated across a wide range of qualifications and main regions of the State.

In 2009, the Tasmanian Government signalled its intention to spend more on skills that support Tasmania *s innovation and infrastructure policies, and Social

Inclusion Strategy and spend less on skills that do not have a vocational outcome. Three initiatives of the Tasmanian Stills Institute demonstrate this intent:

%∫ Develop expertise and capability to meet the workforce skill needs of the National Broadband Project.

%∫ Build Tourism and Hospitality skills in conjunction with resort and industry operators in guiding and visitor experience areas.

%∫ Continue and grow involvement with the dairy industry and further develop links with the Tasmanian Institute of Agricultural Research.

p110 annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009

Northern Territory

Key Achievements A number of key achievements were realised during 2009, despite the challenges faced in delivering training in the Northern Territory due to isolation and the demographics of the population.

%∫ Train Safe NT, in conjunction with the Northern Territory Horticultural Association, received funding under the Buildskills Program to deliver

horticulture training to fruit and vegetables growers. The objectives of the program were to improve the efficiency and application of chemical use, to

improve chainsaw safety and to provide freshcare accreditation for growers.

Of the 50 participants enrolled in the program, 48 completed and received a statement of attainment for units of

competency achieved. Outcomes of the program also include:

greater access to markets and increased income; access to and safer application and use of chemicals and pesticides; and completion of job safety assessments and identification of hazards and reduction of risks.

%∫ Charles Darwin University developed a *Taste a Trade * program in response to the ongoing skills shortages being experienced in trade occupations. The Department of Education and Training provided pre-employment program funding to Charles Darwin University to deliver the training. The target group was school students in the Darwin area in Years 8 to 12.

As the name suggests, the objective of *Taste a Trade * was to introduce

approximately 160 students to a number of introductory competencies in trade occupations to provide a pathway into Certificate 111 level qualifications.

The program outcomes were:

%∫ students learnt how to handle hand and power tools safely while making models they built from plans; and

%∫ students cut, assembled, joined, painted and finished their models.

On completion of the program, the students * models were checked and marked against the competencies, then

they were permitted to take their models home to put on display!

%∫ The Defence Indigenous Development Program was designed to provide young Indigenous Territorians with the education, training, life skills

and confidence to secure and sustain continuous employment and be role models within their communities. The pilot program ran from May

to December 2009 with the VET being conducted by Charles Darwin University and the military training by NORFORCE. Whilst undertaking basic military training, par ticipants also completed competencies from the Certificate II in Rural Operations; undertook language, literacy and numeracy training; and participated in personal development and pre≠ employment activities.

Twenty participants commenced the program and numbers soon stabilised to a core group of ten who graduated in December. All ten participants are currently serving with NORFORCE and all gained employment with

other organisations.

p111 annual national report of the australian vocational and technical education system 2009

%∫ EcoTraining Australia was awarded 25 places under the PPP - 15 for job seekers in the Certificate II in Tourism and 10 for existing workers in the

Certificate III in Tourism. The response to advertising for the program saw 57 applications being received for the 25 places,

The outcomes of the training include:

five job seekers gaining full-time employment;

%∫ one job seeker activity looting for employment; %∫ seven job seekers continuing their training in 2010 - two of which have

confirmed employment on completion of their qualification; and t 10 existing workers returned to work with old or new employers.

The success of the program can be attributed to the relationships established between EcoTraining Australia, employers and Job Services Australia providers.

Challenges The Northern Territory faces a number of challenges in the delivery of VET. These challenges vary, depending on such things

as location, the time of year and other activities that are happening more broadly across the Territory. Some of our main

challenges are outlined below.

%∫ The Northern Territory *s demographic presents a significant challenge in that over 30 per cent of die population are Indigenous and approximately 60 per cent of these live in remote communities. Literacy and numeracy

levels among the Indigenous population, particularly those in remote areas, are relatively low, making achievement of vocational education and training outcomes for this group more difficult

to attain.

%∫ The remoteness of some communities makes the delivery of VET difficult, if not impossible during the wet season, when roads are flooded and communities are isolated due to heavy monsoonal downpours.

%∫ There are limited sustainable job opportunities for people living in remote areas of the Northern Territory. Many small communities simply do not have a strong economic base and while training might be able to be delivered to provide the Indigenous people with stills, they do not necessarily then gain employment unless they wish to leave their community.

%∫ The high cost of delivering training in remote areas is an impediment to continuous service delivery.

%∫ A small student market in regional and remote areas, and even in some of the larger urban centres of the Territory, sometimes makes training delivery an unviable option for many registered training organisations.

%∫ Still shortages are still very evident in the Northern Territory, particularly in most trade and a number of professional occupations. A high demand for skilled labour is expected to continue and with the Territory currently experiencing nearly record low unemployment rates, finding suitably skilled workers is problematic for businesses.

p112 annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009

Australian Capital Territory

Key Achievements In the first half of 2009, there was an increase of 2.7 per cent in the number of apprentices and trainees in training in the ACT (compared with a national decrease of 2.4 per cent), and the ACT achieved the highest percentage in the nation of VET graduates into employment or further study.

The Priorities Support Program (PSP) is a program that addresses disadvantages and achieves equitable outcomes for those who are most disadvantaged in the VET sector.

In 2009, 66 per cent of PSP enrolments were for Certificate III or higher. Funding was also provided for twenty-two ACE programs.

Phase III of the PPP exceeded targets for approved places in 2009, This included management of jobseeker places and an expanded program for existing workers.

A program was implemented for school teachers and industry consultants to work together to develop practical curriculum and support materials to assist schools in providing learning to students, to better prepare them for post school learning and employment. The resources are now applied

in the delivery of numeracy programs in high schools and colleges.

A new purchasing model for User Choice funding was implemented to include incentive payments for RTOs training

Australian Apprentices who are mature age workers, people with no previous qualification, Indigenous Australians, people with a disability or employees in small business (less than 20 employees).

Two major consultation forums (Let *s Talk VET and Directions *09) were organised

and attended by stakeholder groups, including ISCs, school teachers and RTOs, to enable direct engagement and an improved understanding of the role of ISCs.

An apprenticeship advisory service and O ut of Trade Register * were launched with a dedicated phone line and email address to support employers and apprentices during

die economic downturn. The advisory service has provided assistance to local apprentices whose training contract has

been or is at risk of being cancelled and also helps employers in need of skilled workers to connect with these apprentices.

The ACT Annual Vocational Education and Training Priorities 2010 document was prepared during 2009, in consultation with industry and through commissioned

research, to identify training priorities for workforce development in the ACT in 2010, and to inform the ACT Skills in Demand List.

Accelerated Australian Apprenticeships programs have been introduced by the CIT in Commercial Cookery and Hairdressing. These programs reduce the traditional 4-year apprenticeship training contract

to two years, by delivering 6-month full≠ time training before starting die formal apprenticeship arrangements.

Funding was provided for 100 AS BAs to be employed in ACT schools and the central office of the Department of Education and Training, through established group training arrangements, in areas such as Administration, ICT and Sport and Recreation. Students joined the AS BA network, a forum to connect die AS BAs and provide professional development and networking opportunities.

annual national report of the australian vocational and technical education system 2009 p113

Seven student finalists and four organisational finalists represented the ACT at the Australian Training Awards held in Canberra on 19 November 2009, the strongest contingent ever for the ACT.

Challenges for 2010 Skills shortages remain an issue for the ACT, especially as the economy recovers. A major challenge for the ACT, like all

states and territories, is working more closely with industry to find innovative workforce development solutions that will result in improved labour market participation and productivity.

p1 14 annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009

Appendix A: Key Indicators Data Tables

Student participation and achievement in vocational education and training This section analyses the level of

participation and achievement by total reported VET students in vocational education and training.

Annual hours of delivery are not presented in this report. However, they are used in the derivation of Load Pass Rates, FYTE and Qualification Equivalents. In 2006,

all states and territories except Victoria adopted standard nominal hour values for units of competency as the basis of calculating total annual hours of delivery. To enable comparison over time, standard nominal hour values were used to recast

the time series back to 2005 for all states and territories except Victoria. From 2007 onwards, Victorian annual hours of delivery are reported as standard nominal hour- values; however due to the manner in which Victorian historical data was collected the

time series back to 2005 cannot be recast. As Victoria *s hours of delivery prior to 2007 were reported as scheduled hours, the 2007

data represents a break-in-series from data in previous years.

Student Outcomes This section provides data on the extent to which an individual *s vocational

circumstances improve after successful participation in Australia *s national vocational education and training system.

Data for tills measure are collected via the annual Student Outcomes Survey. From 2005, the survey covered government funded students (TAPE, private and

community education providers), as well as those training on a fee-for-service basis (TAFE and some private and community education providers). The Student Outcomes Survey captures training outcomes for students who:

%∫ completed their vocational training at a TAFE institute or other government provider (such as university and agricultural colleges)

%∫ completed their training with other registered training providers, including government funded private and community education providers

%∫ undertook VET that was government funded (Agreement and specific purpose), or was delivered on a fee-for- service basis.

The information on student outcomes is structured around:

%∫ graduates * those who complete frill qualifications, and %∫ module completers * those who complete less than a full qualification and

then leave the VET system.

p116 annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009

Employer engagement and satisfaction with VET The tables presented in this section describe the proportion of Australian employers who have adopted vocational education and training to meet the skill needs of their workforce. It further measures the proportion of Australian employers who are satisfied that vocational education and training meets the skills needs of

their workforce.

An employer is considered to be engaged with the VET system if they have used a particular way of meeting skill needs in the last 12 months (having jobs requiring

vocational qualifications; employing staff undertaking an apprenticeship or traineeship; or providing staff with nationally recognised training).

Of employers who are engaged with the VET system, an employer is satisfied with the particular way of meeting skill needs

used in the last 12 months if they report being either satisfied or very satisfied that die training provided the required skills.

The sample was stratified by state/territory, industry of employer and size of employer (small, medium, large) and data can only be provided by one of these variables at a time; i.e. state by industry tables are not available.

Sampling variability Both, the Student Outcomes Survey and the Survey of Employer Use and View's of the VET System, were undertaken as a stratified, randomly selected sample, with survey responses weighted to population

benchmarks. As the estimates from the Student Outcomes Survey are based on information provided by a sample rather

than a population, they are subject to sampling variability; that is they may differ from the estimates that would have been produced if all graduates or module completers had been included and responded to the survey. Similarly, the estimates from the Survey of Employer Use and Views of the VET System may differ from the estimates that would have been produced if all employers had been included and responded to the survey.

By convention, a 95 per cent confidence interval is applied in judging the reliability of survey estimates. This means that, if the survey were repeated, there is a 95 per cent chance that the new results obtained would be within a width of plus or minus

two standard errors. Within the tables in this section, 95 per cent confidence interval widths are presented in columns labelled *± *.

For example, in Table A. 13, graduates aged 15 to 19 years who improved their employment circumstances after training in 2009 has an estimate of 52.7 per cent with error bars at 51.5 per cent and 53.9 per cent, reflecting a confidence interval width of ±1.2 percentage points. This means that if the survey were repeated there is a 95 per cent chance that the new results would be

between 51.5 per cent and 53.9 per cent.

Similarly, in Tables A. 15 and A. 16, employer engagement with apprenticeships and traineeships in 2009 has an estimate of 30.6 per cent with error bars at 28.6 per cent and 32.6 per cent, reflecting a confidence interval width of +2.0 percentage points. This means that if the survey were repeated there is a 95 per cent chance that the new' results would be between 28.6 per cent and

32.6 per cent.

annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009 p117

In addition, 95 per cent confidence intervals can be calculated for the difference between two independent proportions bv using the following formula:

(pi - p 2)± 2,J(SE [)2 + (SE 2)2

where P i and P 2 are the estimated proportions and and $E2 are qlc standard errors for respective proportions.

SE =1/2 of the 95 per cent confidence interval for the respective proportion.

If the interval contains zero, then there is insufficient evidence at the 5 per cent significance level to reject the null

hypothesis. It can then be concluded that there is no statistical difference between the two proportions. If the interval does not contain zero, the difference between the two proportions can be said to be significantly different at the 5 per cent level. For example, in Table A. 13, the 95 per cent confidence interval for the difference between the graduates who improved their employment circumstances in 2009 aged 15 to 19 years and those aged 20 to 24 years evaluates to (-16.2, -13.0). This confidence interval does not contain zero so the two proportions can be said to be significantly different at the 5 per cent level.

VET system efficiency This section assesses die efficiency of the vocational education and training system. Two measures used are:

%∫ expenditure per annual hour and per FYTE

%∫ cost of capital per adjusted annual hour and per FYTE

Although this year the scope of this report has been broadened to reporting primarily on total reported VET activity, information

covering total government expenditure and total recurrent government expenditure is also presented in this section.

For the purposes of this report, government recurrent expenditure was defined as being equivalent to the recurrent funds provided by the Commonwealth, state and territory governments, but not including

funding from Commonwealth administered programs. In contrast, total government expenditure was defined as being equivalent to the recurrent funds provided by the

Commonwealth, state and territory governments, including funding from Commonwealth administered programs.

Information on total expenditure is presented consistent with broadening of scope of this report and is defined as the total expenses from all funding sources, government and non-government, as

reported by states and territories in the annual national Finance collection.

To maintain consistency with other sections of this report, expenditure per FYTE and cost of capital per FYTE efficiency measures have been introduced in this year *s report. Expenditure per annual

hour and cost of capital per annual hour measures are retained in this year *s report for transparency.

Expenditure per adjusted FYTE/hour and cost of capital are weighted using a course mix weight. This takes into account

the variation among states and territories in the relative mix of high- and low-cost programs, promoting comparability of

costs among jurisdictions. As the ASCO classification is no longer collected, a new method for calculating course mix weights was adopted in 2009. To demonstrate the discrepancies which result at state/territory

p1 18 annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009

Table A, 1: The number of Australians who participate in vocational education and training each year _________ ____ ______

Total reported VET Students', 2005 to 2009

1Total VET students' ( *0001 1 650.8 1 676.0 1 665.0 1 699.7 1 706.7Annual growth (%) 1.5 -0.7 2.1 0.4Growth since 2004 1%) 1.5 0.9 3.0 3.4Australian Papulation - age 15 to 64 *ì 000) 13 735.2 13 954.8 14 224.6 14 474.0 14 772.5Total VET Students - Age 15-64 (*Ã¥00) 1 569.9 1 596.7 1 605.4 1 639.0 1 649.0Participation Rate - Age 15 to 64 (%) 11.4 11.4 11.3 11.3 11.2By Funding Source ( *000)Government8 1 216.7 1 247.9 1 243.7 1 253.9 1 274.3Fee for service - Domestic Students9 412.6 403.4 3B6.7 406.1 383.8Fee for service - International Students10 21.4 24.7 34.4 39.3 47.6By Funding source (% )Governement8 73.7 74.5 74.7 73.8 74.7Fee for service - Domestic Students9 25.%° 24.1 23.2 23.9 22.5Fee for service - International Students10 1.3 1.5 2.1 2.3 2.8Total100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0Source: NCVER, Vocational Education and Training Provider Collection, 2005-2009: Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS), Population by Age and Sex, Australian States and Territories Jun 2009, cat. no. 3201,0.See also endnotes as referenced in the table, which can be found at the end of Appendix A, for detailed information on any caveats and technical issues associated with the data presented in this table.level from using new versus old method for calculating course mix weights, two time series (2005-2008 and 2008-2009) are presented in the tables within this section.For more information, please refer to the technical paper describing the old and new methods for calculating course mix weights available from the NCVER website.A set of endnotes is also included which provide detailed information on any definitions, caveats and technical issues associated with the data.annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009 p119

Total reported VET Students', 2005 to 2009

Table A.S: The number of total reported VET students who participate in vocational education and training each year, by age and course level

%†

Total UET Students (*Ã¥00) 1 650.8 1 676.0 1 665.0 1 699.7 1 706.7

Annual growth (%) 1.5 -0.7 2.1 0.4

Growth since 2005 (%) 1.5 0.9 3.0 3.4

Proportion (% )

By Age Group" (%)

Age 15 to 19 24.4 26.B27.0 27.1 27.1

Age 20 to 24 17.4 17.4 17.2 17.0 17.4

Age 25 to 39 29.3 28.4 28.1 28.2 28.5

Age 40 to 64 28.9 27.5 27.7 27.7 26.9

Total100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

By Course Level12 (%)

Diploma and above 10.5 10.0 10.0 10.1 11.7

Certificate III or IV 37.4 38.3 40.0 41.8 43.6

Certificate 1 or II or lower13 21.4 23.8 23.2 22.3 22.6

Other14 30.7 28.0 26.8 25.8 22.1

Total 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

Numbers ( *0001

By Age Group f'000)

Age 15 to 19 382.5 427.9 433.2 443.8 447.4

Age 20 to 24 273.0 277.1 275.6 279.4 287.4

Age 25 to 39 460.3 452.9 451.9 462.6 469.9

Age 40 to B4 454.0 438.8 444.7 453.2 444.3

By Course Level12 (*Ã¥00)

Diploma and above 173.1 167.7 166.0 172.1 200.0

Certificate III or IV 616.8 641.2 665.5 710.3 744.3

Certificate 1 or II or lower13 353.6 398.3 387.1 378.7 386.0

Other14 507.2 468.9 446.5 438.7 376.4

Source: NCVER, Vocational Education and Training Provider Collection, 2005-20C9,

See also endnotes as referenced in the table, which can be found at the end of Appendix A, for detailed information on any caveats and technical issues associated with the data presented in this table.

p120 annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009

Government8 funded VET students', 2005 to 2009

Table A.3: The number of government funded students who participate in ___vocational education and training each year, by age and course level

Government funded UET students (*Ã¥001 1 216.7 1 247.9 1 243.7 1 253.9 1 274.3

Annual growth (%) 2.6 -0.3 0.8 1.6

Growth since 2005 [%) 2.6 2.2 3.1 4.7

Proportion (% )

By Age Group" (%)

Age 15 to 19 27.6 30.7 31.4 31.9 31.5

Age 20 to 24 18.B18.6 18.2 17.8 17.9

Age 25 to 39 27.6 26.3 26.0 26.0 26.4

Age 40 to 64 26.0 24.4 24.4 24.2 24.2

Total 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

By Course Level12 (%)

Diploma and above 12.0 11.2 11.1 11.0 12.2

Certificate III or IV 43.7 44.3 45.6 47.6 49.1

Certificate 1 or II or lower13 23.9 26.1 26.7 25.4 24.8

Other14 20.5 18.4 16.6 15.9 13.9

Total100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

Numbers (*å*ü*ü)

By Age Group (*å*ü*ü)

Age 15 to 19 320.0 364.2 376.8 385.3 388.5

Age 20 to 24 217.9 221.1 218.1 215.5 220.5

Age 25 to 39 319.6 312.5 312.2 314.7 324.8

Age 40 to 64 300.7 289.4 292,6 293.1 298.0

By Course Level12 f'000)

Diploma and above145.7 140.2 138.0 138.4 156.0

Certificate III or IV 531.3 552.4 566.9 596.8 625.9

Certificate 1 or II or lower13 290.7 325.9 332.1 318.8 315.4

Other14 249.0 229.4 206.8 199.8 176.9

Source: NCVER, Vocational Education and Training Provider Collection, 2005-2009.

See also endnotes as referenced in the table, which can be found at the end of Appendix A, for detailed information on any caveats and technical issues associated with the data presented in this table.

annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009 p 121

Table A.4: The number of Full-Year Training Equivalents (FYTE) undertaken in vocational education and training each year, by age and course level

Total repotted VET FYTE1-15∑16, 2005 to 2009

1

Total reported FVTE ( *ODD) 502.8 516.8 541.8 568.4 609.6

Annual growth (%] 2.8 4.8 4.9 7.3

Growth since 2005 [%) 2.8 7.8 13.0 21.2

Proportion 1% )

By Funding Source (%)

Government8 84.9 84.1 83.5 82.3 81.8

Fee for Service * Domestic Students9 11.6 12.1 11.7 12.1 11.7

Fee for Service + International Students!" 3.4 3.8 4.8 5.6 6.5

Total 10D.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

By Age Group" (%)

Age 15 to 19 32.3 31.8 31.0 30.4 29.4

Age 20 to 24 21.5 21.7 21.7 21.4 21.6

Age 25 to 39 25.4 25.8 26.2 26.8 27.4

Age 40 to 64 20.8 20.8 21.1 21.4 21.7

Total100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

By Course Level12 (%)

Diploma and above22.7 22.2 21.8 21.8 23.4

Certificate III or IV 48.0 49.4 50.6 51.5 52.4

Certificate 1 or II or lower13 19.6 19.3 18.6 17.4 16.7

Other14 9.7 9.1 9.1 9.3 7.4

Total 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

Numbers ( *0001

By Funding Source (*Ã¥00)

Government8 427.0 434.5 452.3 467.6 498.5

Fee for Service - Domestic Students9 58.5 62.6 63.5 687 71.4

Fee for Service - International Students!" 17.3 19.7 26.0 32.1 39.8

By Age Group *ì000)

Age 15 to 19 159.7 161.4 165.2 170.2 176.6

Age 20 to 24 106.2 110.2 115.9 119.9 129.6

Age 25 to 39 125.4 138.9 139.7 149.9 164.5

Age 40 to 64 102.6 105.7 112.8 119.5 130.2

By Course Level *2 ('%°%°%°)

Diploma and above 114.0 114.7 118.1 123.7 142.8

Certificate III or IV 241.2 255.1 274.1 292.5 319.7

Certificate I or II or lower13 98.6 99.7 100.5 99.1 101.8

Other14 49.0 47.2 49.1 53.0 45.3

Source: NCVER, Vocational Education and Training Provider Collection, 5005-2009.

See also endnotes as referenced in the table, which can be found at the end of Appendix A, for detailed information on any caveats and technical issues associated with the data presented in this table.

p 1 22 annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009

Table A.5: The number of Full-Year Training Equivalents (FYTE) undertaken in government funded vocational education and training each year, by age and course level

Government funded VET FYTE1 *15'16, 2005 to 2009

Government funded FYTE (*Ã¥00) 427.0 434.5 452.3 467.6 498.5

Annual growth (%) 1.8 4.1 3.4 6.6

Growth since 2005 [%) 1.8 5.9 9.5 16.7

Proportion (% 1

By Age Group *1 (%)

Age 15 to 19 34.3 33.9 33.5 33.3 32.4

Age 20 to 24 21.4 21.6 21.4 20.9 20.6

Age 25 to 39 24.3 24.6 24.8 25.1 25.6

Age 40 to 64 20.0 19.9 20.3 20.7 21.4

Total100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

By Course Level12 [%)

Diploma and above 22.0 21.4 21.0 20.5 21.8

Certificate 111 or IV 49.6 51.2 52,1 53.8 54.7

Certificate 1 or II or lower13 19.8 19.3 19.1 17.9 17.3

Other *4 8.6 8.1 7.7 7.8 6.2

Total 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

Numbers ( *000)

By Age Group *ì000)

Age 15 to 19 144.0 145.0 149.0 153.3 159.2

Age 20 to 24 89.8 92.1 95.4 96.0 101.4

Age 25 to 39 102.1 105.1 110.4 115.6 125.5

Age 40 to 64 83.8 85.2 90.5 95.1 104.9

By Course Level12 (*Ã¥00)

Diploma and above93.9 92.8 95.2 95.9 108.4

Certificate III or IV 211.8 222.6 235.7 251.5 272,8

Certificate 1 or II or lower13 84.4 83.7 86.5 83.9 86.3

Other14 36.9 35.4 35.0 36.3 30.9

Source: NCVER, Vocational Education and Training Provider Collection, 2005-2009. See also endnotes as referenced in the table, which can be found at the end of Appendix A, for detailed information on any caveats and technical issues associated with the data presented in this table,

annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009 p123

Table A.6: The rate of successfully completed VET student activity undertaken each year, by age and course level_________________________

Load Pass Rate16,17 for Total reported VET students1, 2005 to 2009

Load Pass Rate (% ) 78.9 79.2 79.4 80.1 80.6

Annual growth (%) 0.3 0.3 0.9 0.5

Growth since 2005 (%) 0.3 0.8 1.8 2.1

By Age Group'' (%)

Age 15 to 19 77.5 77.8 77.4 78.1 77.9

Age 20 to 24 79.3 79.B80.0 80.8 81.2

Age 25 to 39 78.8 79.3 80.1 80.7 81.3

Age 40 to 64 81.1 81.1 81.3 81.8 82.8

By Course Level12 (*Ã¥00)

Diploma and above 79.5 79.5 79.7 80.9 81.5

Certificate III or IV 81.4 81.4 81.6 82.5 82.6

Certificate 1 or II or lower13 71.9 73.0 73.3 73.2 74.1

Other14 79.0 78.8 78.2 77.3 78.2

Source: NCVER, Vocational Education and Training Provider Collection, 2005-2009. See also endnotes as referenced in the table, which can be found at the end of Appendix A, for detailed information on any caveats and technical issues associated with the data presented in this table.

Table A.7: The rate of successfully completed VET student activity undertaken by government funded VET students each year, by age and course level Load Pass Rate16-17 for government funded VET students1, 2005 to 2009

Load Pass Rate (%1 78.0 78.3 78.5 79.4 79.8

Annual growth (%) 0,3 0.3 1.1 0.6

Growth since 2005 (%) 0.3 0.6 1.7 2.3

By Age Group" (%)

Age 15 to 19 77.0 77.1 76.8 77.6 77.4

Age 20 to 24 78.5 78.9 79.5 80.3 80.5

Age 25 to 39 77.6 78.1 78.8 79.8 80.5

Age 40 to 64 79.8 79.9 80.1 80.8 82.2

By Course Level12 (*Ã¥00)

Diploma and above 77.9 77.B78.2 79.5 80.0

Certificate III or IV 80.8 80.9 81.1 82.1 82.1

Certificate 1 or II or lower13 71.5 72.4 72.8 73.0 74.3

Other14 76.5 75.9 74.8 73.5 72.4

Source: NCVER, Vocational Education and Training Provider Collection, 2005-2009. See also endnotes as referenced in the table, which can be found at the end of Appendix A, for detailed information on any caveats and technical issues associated with the data presented in this table.

annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009

Table A.8: The number of qualifications completed each year by students in vocational education and training

Qualifications completed18-19 *20 *21 by total reported VET students', 2005 to 2008

Qualifications completed t'0 0 0] 298.0 293.3 320.5 351.6

Annual growth (%) -1.5 9.3 9.7

Growth since 2005 (%) -1.5 7.6 18.0

By Age Group1 * (*Ã¥001

Age 15 to 19 71.3 70.6 73.8 80.4

Age 20 to 24 68.4 68.0 76.2 79.8

Age 25 to 39 82.5 81.0 88.3 98.3

Age 40 to 64 72.8 70.7 79.1 88.5

Total295.0 290.3 317.4 347.1

By Course Level121%)

Diploma and above 14.1 14.7 14.7 13.9

Certificate III or IV 56.9 55.3 56.8 58.6

Certificate 1 or II or lower13 29.0 30.0 28.5 27.5

Total 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

By Field of Education [%)

Natural and Physical Sciences 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5

Information Technology 4.0 3.4 2.9 2.3

Engineering and related Technologies 14.2 15.8 15.9 15.9

Architecture and Building 4.1 4.8 5.0 5,5

Agriculture, Environmental and related studies 4.1 4.0 3.7 3.7

Health 3.5 3.8 4.0 4.5

Education 5.6 3.7 5.0 5.1

Management and Commerce28.9 27.8 287 29.1

Society and Culture 16.8 18.3 15.8 15.6

Creative Arts 3.4 3.4 2.9 2.7

Food, Hospitality and Personal Services 9.2 9.1 9.1 9.1

Mixed Field programs 5.5 5.4 6.4 6.1

Total 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

Source: NCVER, Vocational Education and Training Provider Collection, 2005-2009. See also endnotes as referenced in the table, which can be found at the end of Appendix A, for detailed information on any caveats and technical issues associated with the data presented in this table.

annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009 p125

Table A.9: The number of Qualification Equivalents completed by students in ____ vocational education and training ____ __ __

Qualification Equivalents16 *22 completed by Total reported VET students *, 2005 to 2009

All fields of Education by course level

Diploma and above 52 828.9 53 289.5 57 157.1 61 475.9 70 223.9

Certificate IV 65 980.565 716.9 74 693.8 76 937.3 92 998.6

Certificate III 154 022.6 163 442.3 181 380.2 200 061.6 210 498.7

Certificate II 95 288.7 96 929.6 103 436.3 107 814.0 114 048.5

Certificate I 48 229.3 48 443.0 53 253.9 50 216.6 50 004.5

Natural and Physical Sciences by course level

Diploma and above 744.5 653.2 600.7 620.5 660.5

Certificate IV 488.1 599.3 660.6 704.5 714.4

Certificate III 739.4 644.4 809.9 1 096.1 1 108.2

Certificate II 53.0 65.2 70.2 84.2 64.7

Certificate I 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0

Inform ation Technology by course level

Diploma and above3167.0 2 952.3 2 523.6 2 341.1 2 335.7

Certificate IV 3 489.0 2 997.5 3 287.8 3 534.2 3 766.6

Certificate III 3 923.9 4 150.6 4 699,5 4 746.0 4 967.0

Certificate II 6 493.0 4 598.3 1 502.7 864.3 422.0

Certificate I 132.8 184.7 209.4 0.0 0.0

Engineering and related Technologies by course level

Diploma and above 5 095.8 4 547.9 5 665.5 5 913.9 6 560.9

Certificate IV 2 045.3 2 334.1 2 878.8 3 131.5 3 378.5

Certificate 111 28 434.3 32 166.1 36160.6 39 513.2 42 540.4

Certificate II 16 916.6 19 679.7 18 972.3 19 052.9 23 076.1

Certificate I 11 605.4 12 904.6 11 948.6 10133.4 7 805.6

Architecture and Building by course level

Diploma and above 1 969.7 1 956.3 2112.3 2 108.6 2 227.7

Certificate IV 2 129.1 2123.7 2192.0 2 280.6 2 688.8

Certificate III 12 465.9 13 767.0 15 514.8 18144.4 18 664.8

Certificate II 1 994.8 2 446.7 2 794.3 2 B59.2 3 080.3

Certificate I 4 646.2 3 699.1 3 568.1 4 649.9 5 855.1

Source: NCVER, Vocational Education and Training Provider Collection, 2005-20139. See also endnotes as referenced in the table, which can be found at the end of Appendix A, for detailed information on any caveats and technical issues associated with the data presented in this table.

This table continues on the next page.

p1 26 annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009

Table A.9 (continued)

A griculture, Environmental and related studies by course level

Diploma and above 1 337.0 1 245.2 1 339.4 1 530.7 1 644.9

Certificate IV 2 316.0 2 222.7 2 314.9 2 493.4 2 519.4

Certificate III 9 318.8 9 344.8 9 910.8 10 518.0 12 080.4

Certificate II 8 360.2 7 999.0 7 050.2 6 851.8 7 658.7

Certificate 1 1 523.1 1 401.1 1 534.8 1 458.1 1 619.4

Health by course level

Diploma and above2116.0 2 459.5 3 016.7 3 463.2 4 347.8

Certificate IV 3 904.1 4 252.1 5 093.3 5 624.7 7 234.1

Certificate III 2166.3 2192.2 2 636.1 3 651.2 5 324.9

Certificate II 1 594.7 1 745.8 2 226.1 3 225.8 4192.2

Certificate 1 65.7 18.1 27.4 66.1 77.4

Education by course level

Diploma and above 535.1 432.3 517.0 760.4 989.0

Certificate IV 10 858.2 7 973.1 12 222.4 12 930.8 14 730.0

Certificate III 1 938.62 490.5 2 415.1 2 580.9 3 096.3

Certificate II 59.3 50.9 18.8 80.3 61.4

Certificate 1 904.4 457.6 689.2 777.1 1 094.9

M anagem ent and Commerce by course level

Diploma and above23 222.1 23 808.5 26 267.7 28 281.6 30 224.0

Certificate IV 22 873.7 23 688.8 25 904.0 26 204.2 31 625.2

Certificate III 45 950.9 45 913.5 50 712.1 57 807.6 52 559.2

Certificate II 24 971.3 25416.0 31 889.5 36 068.3 34 045.0

Certificate 1 9 707.1 10452.5 12 813.9 11 111.2 9 555.0

Society and Culture by course level

Diploma and above 9 554.1 10 383.4 10 422.9 11 757.315 227.0

Certificate IV 9 593.1 10 585.7 10 688.9 10 543.013 735.0

Certificate III 28 274.3 30 443.4 31 284.7 32 887.4 36 558.6

Certificate II 7 604.5 7 464.3 6 643.2 6 123.6 6 460.8

Certificate 1 3 605.6 4 692.5 2 806.2 2 589.3 2 546.2

Source: NCVER, Vocational Education and Training Provider Collection, 2005-2009. See also endnotes as referenced in the table, which can be found at the end of Appendix A, for detailed information on any caveats and technical issues associated with the data presented in this table.

This table continues on the next page.

annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009 p127

Table A. 9 (continued)

1

Creative Arts by course level

Diploma and above4 587.3 4 284.5 4 018.4 3 967.2 5 036.0

Certificate IV 3 955.3 4 291.0 4 295.3 4 257.2 5 905.6

Certificate III 2 824.9 2 933.3 3 096.1 3 036.6 4 056.5

Certificate II 2 968.92 634.7 2 373.0 2 561.4 2 990.2

Certificate 1 907.0 920.8 861.6 792.1 772.8

Food, Hospitality and Personal Services by course leuel

Diploma and above322.9 351.2 386.8 409.0 611.7

Certificate IV 1 818.2 1 943.8 2 049.4 2 240.8 2 676.2

Certificate III 12 339.8 13 189.1 14 882.5 16 833.8 18 255.3

Certificate II 12 562.8 12811.1 13 700.2 14 607.1 14 207.2

Certificate 1 2 654.8 1 796.32 033.1 2 012.1 2146.0

Source: NCVER, Vocational Education and Training Provider Collection, 2005-2009. See also endnotes as referenced in the table, which can be found at the end of Appendix A, for detailed information on any caveats and technical issues associated with the data presented in this table.

Table A.10: The number of Qualification Equivalents completed by students in ______ government funded vocational education and training ___________

Qualification Equivalents16,22 completed by government funded VET students1, 2005 to 2009

All Fields of Education by course level

Diploma and above 42 334.9 41 678.5 44 471.2 45 908.8 51 014.4

Certificate IV 51 164.1 51 251.3 54 886.7 56 467.7 69 495.9

Certificate III 138 306.8 146 346.B 160 667.8 177 467.6 185 093.6

Certificate II 80 722.3 79 578.2 86 667.2 89 304.5 95 886.5

Certificate I 40 801.9 41 768.9 48 410.8 44 836.7 44 201.8

Natural and Physical Sciences by course level

Diploma and above 686.5 613.1 556.5 546.7 590.2

Certificate IV 444.9 528.4 579.2 611.0 585.9

Certificate III 656.3 543.9 620.7 760.3 763.4

Certificate II 52.9 65.2 67.9 79.8 64.3

Certificate I 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0

Inform ation Technology by course level

Source: NCVER, Vocational Education and Training Provider Collection, 2005-2009. See also endnotes as referenced in the table, which can be found at the end of Appendix A, for detailed information on any caveats and technical issues associated with the data presented in this table.

This table continues on the next page.

p 1 28 annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009

Table A.10 (continued]

Diploma and above 2 725.8 2 519.5 2189.6 2 042.7 1 969.2

Certificate IV 3 270.5 2 757.5 2 976.1 3144.3 3 346.5

Certificate III 3 342.9 3 113.0 3 541.1 3 962.8 4 285.6

Certificate II 5 457.1 3 802.0 1 016.9 431.2 409.1

Certificate I 132.5 184.5 209.2 0.0 0.0

Engineering and related Technologies by course level

Diploma and above3 923.9 3 602 8 4 610.1 4 659.1 4 391.2

Certificate IV 1 763.2 1 958.9 2 319.62 513.8 2 662.1

Certificate III 26 178.3 29 682.5 32 645.0 35 789.9 38 308.5

Certificate II 13 188.9 14 331.5 14 232.4 14 813.3 18 528.8

Certificate I 10 253.D 11 755.1 11 199.4 9 472.8 7 218.0

A rchitecture and Building by course level

Diploma and above1 802.1 1 809.5 1 895.6 1 918.4 1 991.3

Certificate IV 1 802.5 1 855.1 1 853.7 1 890.7 2160.3

Certificate III 12 124.7 13 209.4 14 761.5 17 172.1 17 468.5

Certificate II 1 643.1 1 984.2 2 259.72 296.1 2 451.2

Certificate I 4 486.6 3 472.6 3 303.4 3 936.8 5 224.2

Agriculture, Environmental and related studies by course level

Diploma and above 1 236.2 1 120.8 1 201.1 1 225.4 1 332.9

Certificate IV 2 198.6 2 094.9 2 178.2 2 297.2 2199.3

Certificate III 8 130.0 8 314.5 8 728.5 8 999.7 10 400.1

Certificate II 7 364.0 6 614.7 6 212.45 987.9 6 607.8

Certificate I 1 133.2 1 131.9 1 464.3 1 375.4 1 471.8

Health by course level

Diploma and above1 366.8 1 581.8 1 958.0 2 328.0 2 901.4

Certificate IV 3 473.3 3 653.7 4 223.8 4 660.9 5 930.8

Certificate III 1 940.4 1 912.8 2 231.7 3168.2 4 577.7

Certificate II 1 526.1 1 687.8 2 109.6 2 951.2 3 352.4

Certificate I 65.7 18.1 27.2 65.7 77.4

Education by course level

Diploma and above358.4 221.7 347.2 476.4 675.2

Certificate IV 5711.6 3 367.8 5119.9 5 671.0 7 314.0

Certificate III 1 611.9 2 128.42 091.4 2 365.5 2 796.2

Certificate II 59.0 48.1 18.6 80.3 61.4

Certificate I 880.9 350.1 683.4 775.7 1 084.1

Source: NCVER, Vocational Education and Training Provider Collection, 2005-2009. See also endnotes as referenced in the table, which can be found at the end of Appendix A, for detailed information on any caveats and technical issues associated with the data presented in this table.

This table continues on the next page.

p129 annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009

Table A.10 (continued)

1

Managem ent and Commerce by course level

Diploma and above 16 914.9 16 573.8 18 230.3 18 633.0 19 673.5

Certificate IV 17311.7 18 296.8 19 007.1 19 134.4 23 606.9

Certificate III 42 5Q2.9 42 851.8 47 238.7 54 287.2 48 707.4

Certificate II 23 075.4 22 852.1 28 844.2 31 295.7 30 145.6

Certificate 1 7 344.6 B 833.5 12 188.0 10 547 5 9153.7

Society and Culture by course level

Diploma and above8 603.7 9 229.8 9 264.5 9 858.8 12 205.6

Certificate IV 7 854.9 8 866.0 8 416.88 348.2 10 950.2

Certificate III 24 437.2 26 225.7 26 881.8 28158,2 31 476.9

Certificate II 5 673.6 5 688.4 4 983.1 5 016.8 5 346.8

Certificate 1 3 146.7 4 200.2 2 654.1 2 218.2 2 183.4

Creative Arts by course level

Diploma and above 4 316.8 4 057.7 3 777.0 3 745.3 4 672.2

Certificate IV 3 743.6 4 078.8 4 044.3 3 989.5 5 514.3

Certificate III 2 583.0 2 705.1 2 828.32 802.4 3 616.1

Certificate II 2 830.2 2 487.5 2 274.3 2 456.8 2 824.8

Certificate 1 905.0 861.2 814.8 775.2 761.5

Food, Hospitality and Personal Services by course level

Diploma and above 234.3 171.1 193.5 192.5 274.3

Certificate IV 1 311.9 1 294.5 1 321.7 1 419.9 1 657.3

Certificate III 10 885.7 11 344.8 12 542.4 13 760.1 14 759.7

Certificate II 10 329.2 10 482.6 10 999.3 11 141.4 11 615.7

Certificate 1 2 384.7 1 552.6 1 909.0 1 896.4 2 006.1

Source; NCVER, Vocational Education and Training Provider Collection, 2005-2009, See also endnotes as referenced in the table, which can be found at the end of Appendix A, for detailed information on any caveats and technical issues associated with the data presented in this table,

p130 annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009

Total reported VET23, 2005 to 200925

Table A. 11: Employment and further study outcomes after completing VET

UET Graduates26

Employed after training23 (%) 79.3 0.6 79.6 0.9 81.1 0.5 80.7 0.8 77.8 0.5

Difference in proportion employed from beforeÆ training to after (% points] 6.5 6.9 7.0 6.7 3.0

Improvement in employment circumstance after training!" (%] 63.5 0.7 62.4 1.0 62.0 0.6 62.9 0.9 59.8 0.5

Employed or in further study after training28∑3' (%) 88.7 0.4 87.8 0.7 89.2 0.4 89.1 0.6 87.6 0.3

Achieved main reason for undertaking training33 (%) 86.0 0.5 86.5 0.7 86.7 0.4 87.9 0.6 86.4 0.4

Satisfied with overall quality of training341%)

Module Com pleters *

87.1 0.5 88.1 0.7 88.8 0.4 89.0 0.6 89.1 0.3

Employed after training28 (%) 75.9 1.0 74.6 1.4 74.3 1.0 76.9 1.3 74.1 0.9

Difference in proportion employed from before29 training to after (% points) 1.5 0.9 0.6 1.9 -1.7

improvement in employment circumstance after training30 (%) 49.4 1.1 46.8 1.6 44.0 1.1 46.4 1.5 44.1 1.0

Employed or in further study after training28∑3132 [%) 78.5 0.6 78.5 1.3 77.8 0.7 79.3 1.3 77.1 0.7

Achieved main reason for undertaking training33 (%) 82.8 0.8 81.6 1.1 80.4 0.8 82.0 1.1 82.0 0.7

Satisfied with overall quality of training34 (%) 85.0 0.8 84.7 1.1 83.8 0.8 85.5 1.0 84.6 0.7

± - 95% confidence interval Source: NCVER, Student Outcomes Surveys, 2005-2009. See also endnotes as referenced in the table, which can be found at the end of Appendix A, for detailed information on any caveats and technical issues associated with the data presented in this table.

annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009 p131

Government funded TAPE24, 2005 to 200925

Table A. 12: Employment and further study outcomes after completing VET

2005 2006 2007 2008 2009

m %† m a ESIa %†a a m mUET Graduates26Employed after training!" (%) 76.5 0.6 77.4 1.1 78.8 0.6 78.2 1.074.7 0.5Difference in proportion employed from before29 training to after (% points] 7.4 7.7 7.4 7.4 3.5Improvement in employment circumstance after training30^ ) 63.0 0.7 61.6 1.3 61.6 0.7 62.2 1.2 58.6 0.6Employed or in further study after training28∑3 Wo) 87.8 0.5 86.7 0.9 88.3 0.5 88.5 0.8 86.4 0.4Achieved main reason for undertaking training33^ ) 84,2 0.5 84.9 0.9 85.4 0.5 86.7 0.8 84.5 0.5Satisfied with overall quality of training34^ ]Module Com pleters *88.0 0.5 88.2 0.989.00.4 89.1 0.7 89.2 0.4Employed after training2a(%) 66.3 1.2 67.5 2.3 66.8 1.2 68.1 2.3 63.0 1.2Difference in proportion employed from before29 training to after(% points) 4.0 1.6 3.1 2.9 -0.5Improvement in employment circumstance after training30^ ) 45.6 1.3 43.8 2.4 41.6 1.3 44.5 2.3 39.6 1.2Employed or in further study after training28∑31 "32f%) 68.0 1.2 69.7 2.3 68.4 1.2 69.2 2.3 65.1 1.2Achieved main reason for undertaking training33^ ) 72.8 1.1 71.0 2.2 70.1 1.2 73.7 2.1 72.1 1.1Satisfied with overall quality of training34f%) 79.3 1.0 80.0 1.8 78.9 1.1 79.9 1.9 79.5 1.0± - 95% confidence intervalSource: MOVER, Student Outcomes Surveys, 2005-2009.See also endnotes as referenced in the table, which can be found at the end of Appendix A, for detailed information on any caveats and technical issues associated with the data presented in this table. p132 annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009

Table A. 13: Employment and further study outcomes after completing VET, age groups. People aged 15-19 years, 20-24 years, 25-39 __________years, 40+ years______________________________ ____________

Total reported VET25, 2005 to 200925

15 - 1 9 Year-olds

VET Graduates26

Employed after training26 (%) 71.3 1.5 72.1 2.3 71.4 1.3 71.4 2.0 68.1 1.1

Difference in proportion employed from before29 training to after (% points] 15.0 15.2 13.7 12.7 8.6

Improvement in employment circumstance after training30 (%) 59.1 1.6 58.4 2.5 56.7 1.4 57.7 2.2 52.7 1.2

Employed or in further study after training28∑3' (%) 85.6 1,1 84.7 1.8 84.1 1.0 85.1 1.7 83.3 0.9

Achieved main reason for undertaking training33 f%) 83.4 1.1 84.4 1.8 83.2 1.0 86.8 1.4 84.90.8 Satisfied with overall quality of training34 [%]

Module Com pleters27

87.0 1.1 87.5 1.6 89.3 0.8 90.91.2 90.1 0.7

Employed after training28 (%) 57.2 2.6 60.6 4.1 57.6 2.7 59.2 4.1 55.6 2.4

Difference in proportion employed from before29 training to after l% points) 8.9 7.8 6.9 5.4 3.7

Improvement in employment circumstance after training30 (%) 41.2 2.4 44.5 4.3 40.3 2.6 40.4 4.0 37.7 2.3

Employed or in further study after training2831∑32 [%) 61.7 2.3 64.3 4.0 61.0 2.3 61.7 4.1 59.0 2.2

Achieved main reason for undertaking training33 (%) 73.3 2.1 70.0 3.9 69.3 2.4 68.7 3.7 70.6 2.2

Satisfied with overall quality of training34 (%)

20 - 24 Year-olds

VET Graduates26

79.7 2.0 79.9 3.2 78.3 1.9 80.2 3.1 80.3 1.9

Employed after training28 (%) 83.0 1.2 83.1 1.985.6 1.0 83.3 1.7 80.7 1.0

Difference in proportion employed from before29 training to after 1% points] 8.7 8.9 9.4 7.2 3.3

Improvement in employment circumstance after training30 (%) 70.6 1.4 71.0 2.1 71.7 1.2 71.4 2.0 67.3 1.1

Employed or in further study after training2831 (%) 92.0 0.8 91.0 1.3 92.7 0.7 92.4 1.2 90.2 0.7

Achieved main reason for undertaking training33 (%] 87.4 0.9 88.4 1.4 88.9 0.8 90.2 1.3 88.0 0.8

Satisfied with overall quality of training34 (%) 86.7 1.1 86.6 1.5 87.5 0.9 88.4 1.3 88.3 0.8

± - 95% confidence interval Source: NCVER, Student Outcomes Surveys, 2005-2009. See also endnotes as referenced in the table, which can be found at the end of Appendix A, for detailed information on any caveats and technical issues associated with the data presented in this table.

This table continues on the next page.

annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009 p133

Table A. 13 (continued)

M odule Completers27

Employed after training88 (%] 75.9 2.4 77.1 4.1 77.4 2.3 78.53.4 74.9 2.3

Difference in proportion employed from before29 training to after (% points) 0.2 -1.8 1.3 2.7 -3.7

Improvement in employment circumstance after training30 (%) 52.3 2.8 51,5 4.5 52.0 2.9 53.24.1 45.1 2.5

Employed or in further study after training28,31∑32 (%) 79.9 2.0 79.7 4.1 79.4 2.081.0 3.3 78.1 2.1

Achieved main reason for undertaking training33 (%) 77.1 2.1 76.2 3.6 75.2 2.3 79.8 3.3 77.4 2.1

Satisfied with overall quality of training34 (%) 79.5 2.1 80.9 3.3 79.4 2.2 79.5 3.4 80.3 2.0

25 - 39 Year-olds

UET Graduates26

Employed after training28 (%) 81.1 1.1 81.3 1.6 83.9 0.9 83.9 1.4 80.4 0.9

Difference in proportion employed from before89 training to after (% points) 2.9 3.1 4.1 4.0 0.3

Improvement in employment circumstance after training30 [%) 63.7 1.4 63.3 2.0 63.1 1.2 65.9 1.8 62.0 1.1

Employed or in further study after training28,31 (%) 89.2 0.8 88.1 1.4 90.7 0.6 91.2 1.1 88.7 0.7

Achieved main reason for undertaking training33 (%) 85.8 0.9 86.8 1.4 87.8 0.8 87.4 1.3 86.6 0.7

Satisfied with overall quality of training34 (%)

M odule Completers27

86.7 1.1 88.3 1.3 88.6 0.8 88.7 1.3 88.9 0.7

Employed after training28 [%) 81.8 1.5 80.2 2.4 80.1 1.8 81.12.3 80.5 1.4

Difference in proportion employed from before29 training to after (% points) 0.4 -0.7 -0.2 1.4 -3.0

Improvement in employment circumstance after training30 (%) 51.4 1.9 48.4 2.9 46.4 2.049.2 2.8 48.3 1.8

Employed or in further study after training28 31 33 (%) 83.3 1.1 82.2 2.3 82.5 1.3 82.3 2.3 81.5 1.2 Achieved main reason for undertaking training33 (%) 82.9 1.2 82.2 2.1 80.7 1.6 83.0 2.282.6 1.3 Satisfied with overall quality of training34 [%)

4 0 + Year-olds

UET Graduates26

85.1 1.3 85.6 2.0 84.9 1.4 86.61.9 85.4 1.3

Employed after training28 (%) 79.3 1.4 79.9 1.5 80.7 1.081.8 1.3 79.4 0.8

Difference in proportion employed from before29 training to after (% points) 3.3 3.9 3.8 4.8 1.5

Improvement in employment circumstance after training30 (%) 60.2 1.5 58.0 1.9 56.8 1.2 58.0 1.756.6 1.0

Employed or in further study after training88,31 (%) 87.3 0.7 87.0 1.3 88.1 0.6 87.71.1 87.2 0.6 Achieved main reason for undertaking training33 (%) 86.3 0.9 85.9 1.386.5 0.9 87.3 1.1 85.9 0.7 Satisfied with overall quality of training34 (%) 87.6 0.9 89.3 1.389.8 0.7 88.5 1.0 89.3 0.6

± - 95% confidence interval Source: NCVER, Student Outcomes Surveys, 2005-9009. See also endnotes as referenced in the table, which can be found at the end of Appendix A, for detailed information on any caveats and technical issues associated with the data presented in this table.

This table continues on the next page.

p134 annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009

Table A. 13 (continued)

Module Com pleters *

Employed after training28 (%) 76.3 1.6 73.3 2.2 74.1 1.7 78.0 1.9 75.0 1.4

Difference in proportion employed from before29 training to after (% points) 0.5 1.0 -0.6 1.2 -1.6

Improvement in employment circumstance after training30 f%) 49.1 1.8 45.1 2.3 41.6 1.7 44.8 2.2 43.4 1.5

Employed or in further study after training28∑31'32 (%) 79.6 0.9 79.5 2.0 78.9 1.0 81.8 1.8 79.3 0.9

Achieved main reason for undertaking training33 (%) 86.0 1.2 84.5 1.684.0 1.3 85.1 1.6 85.5 1.1

Satisfied with overall quality of training34 (%] 87.6 1.2 86.2 1.6 85.5 1.3 87.7 1.4 86.2 1.1

± - 95% confidence interval Source: NCVER, Student Outcomes Surveys, 2005-2009. See also endnotes as referenced in the table, which can be found at the end of Appendix A, for detailed information on any caveats and technical issues associated with the data presented in this table.

Table A.14: Employment and further study outcomes after completing VET, age groups. People aged 15-19 years, 20-24 years, 25-39 years, ___________40+ years____________________________________________________

Government funded TAPE24, 2005 to 2009 2d

1 5 - 1 9 Year-olds

UET Graduates26

Employed after training28 (%) 70.8 1.6 71.5 2.9 69.9 1.6 70.2 2.6 67.0 1.3

Difference in proportion employed from before23 training to after [% points) 14.3 16.8 13.3 12.5 9.6

Improvement in employment circumstance after training30 (%) 58.9 1.7 57.6 3.1 55.7 1.6 57.3 2.7 50.6

1.3

Employed or in further study after training28∑31 (%) 86.8 1.3 85.1 2.3 84.31.3 84.9 2.1 83.1 1.1

Achieved main reason for undertaking training33 [%) 82.6 1.3 83.0 2.4 82.21.2 86.1 1.8 83.6 1.0

Satisfied with overall quality of training34 f%)

Module Com pleters27

87.6 1.1 88.3 2.0 90.4 0.9 90.8 1.4 90.0 0.8

Employed after training28 (%) 55.8 3.0 60.1 5.1 56.4 3.0 57.9 5.2 54.9 2.7

Difference in proportion employed from before29 training to after (% points) 11.5 10.7 7.3 6.8 4.9

Improvement in employment circumstance after training30 (%) 40.5 2.9 45.9 5.3 39.7 2.9 41.5 5.1 37.6

2.5

± - 95% confidence interval Source: NCVER, Student Outcomes Surveys, 2005-2009. See also endnotes as referenced in the table, which can be found at the end of Appendix A, for detailed information on any caveats and technical issues associated with the data presented in this table.

This table continues on the next page.

annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009 p135

Table A. 14 (continued)

Employed or in further study after training28∑3'∑32 [%) 58.7 3.0 62.2 5.1 58.8 3.0 59.1 5.257.9 2.7

Achieved main reason for undertaking training33 (%) 69.5 2.7 66.6 5.0 64.6 2.9 66.74.8 67.9 2.5

Satisfied with overall quality of training34 (%) 74.9 2.7 76.5 4.3 74.2 2.6 75.9 4.3 77.8 2.4

20 - 24 Year-olds

UET Graduates"6

Employed after training28 (%) 81.9 1.2 82.3 2.3 84.5 1.0 82.3 1.9 80.0 1.1

Difference in proportion employed from before29 training to after (% points) 9.6 10.0 10.2 8.2 4.9

Improvement in employment circumstance after 1.2

training30 (%) 70.2 1.4 70.0 2.5 71.6 1.3 70.2 2.3 67.1

Employed or in further study after training283' [%) 91.9 0.9 90.9 1.6 92.4 0.8 92.71.3 89.9 0.8

Achieved main reason for undertaking training33 (%) 86.2 1.1 87.0 1.7 87.8 0.9 88.9 1.5 86.6 0.9

Satisfied with overall quality of training34 (%) 87.4 1.0 87.0 1.7 87.7 0.9 88.3 1.5 88.6 0.8

Module Completers *

Employed after training23 (%) 72.0 3.0 69.2 5.9 73.4 2.9 71.95.0 68.7 3.2

Difference in proportion employed from before29 training to after (% points) 2.7 -3.1 3.3 0.4 -3.4

Improvement in employment circumstance after 3.2

training30 (%) 50.9 3.3 46.9 5.9 48.9 3.3 50.0 5.6 43.4

Employed or in further study after training23∑3'∑32 (%) 75.4 2.9 73.0 5.8 75.4 2.9 74.7 4.9 72.5 3.1

Achieved main reason for undertaking training33 [%) 67.9 3.1 72.6 4.8 66.1 3.2 73.3 5.0 71.4 2.9

Satisfied with overall quality of training34 [%) 72.8 3.0 77.4 4.5 73.9 3.0 74.5 4.9 75.3 2.8

25 - 39 Year-olds

UET Graduates"6

Employed after training28 (%) 76.7 1.2 78.0 2.0 80.3 1.1 81.0 1.8 76.6 1.0

Difference in proportion employed from before29 training to after (% points) 3.4 3.2 3,8 4.5 -0,1

Improvement in employment circumstance after 1.2

training30 (%) 62.8 1.4 61.5 2.4 62.1 1.3 64.9 2.3 60.7

Employed or in further study after training28∑31 (%) 87.1 1.0 86.3 1.8 89.3 0.9 90.0 1.4 87.0 0.9 Achieved main reason for undertaking training33 (%) 83.6 1.1 85.0 1.8 85.4 1.0 86.0 1.6 84.0 0.9 Satisfied with overall quality of training34 (%) 88.5 0.9 88.0 1.6 88.6 0.9 89.2 1.5 88.9 0.8 M odule Completers *

Employed after training28 (%) 70.6 2.3 70.5 4.4 70.9 2.4 71.3 4.4 68.1 2.4

Difference in proportion employed from before20 training to after (% points) 0.9 -1.4 2.8 1.7 -3.3

± - 95% confidence interval Source: NCVER, Student Outcomes Surveys, 2005-2909, See also endnotes as referenced in the table, which can be found at the end of Appendix A, for detailed information on any caveats and technical issues associated with the data presented in this table.

This table continues on the next page.

p136 annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009

Table A.14 (continued)

Improvement in employment circumstance after training30 (%) 45.7 2.441.4 4.6 42.8 2.6 47.64.7 42.7

2.4

Employed or in further study after training28∑3'∑32 (%] 71.B2.3 73.3 4.3 72.5 2.4 71.8 4.4 69.8 2.4

Achieved main reason for undertaking training33 [%) 71 .%° 2.2 70.7 4.3 68.8 2.5 78.3 4.0 71.6 2.3

Satisfied with overall quality of training34 [%]

40+ Year-olds

UET Graduates26

60.6 1.9 83.6 3.2 79.5 2.1 80.2 3.8 BO.5 2.0

Employed after training28 (%) 74.8 1.1 76.2 2.0 77.2 1.0 77.6 1.8 73.51.0

Difference in proportion employed from before29 training to after (% points) 4.6 3.7 4.4 5.8 1.1

Improvement in employment circumstance after training30 (%) 58.3 1.2 56.8 2.4 54.91.2 58.2 2.2 54.0

1.1

Employed or in further study after training28-31 [%) 85.0 0.9 84.4 1.8 85.7 0.9 85.7 1.5 84.6 0.8

Achieved main reason for undertaking training33 (%) 83.8 0.9 84.0 1.7 85.1 0.9 85.6 1.5 83.60.8

Satisfied with overall quality of training34 (%)

Module Com pleters *

88.5 0.8 89.2 1.8 89.9 0.7 88.B1.4 89.4 0.7

Employed after training20 i%) 66.2 1.8 68.8 4.0 85.8 1.9 89.6 3.8 61.8 1.9

Difference in proportion employed from before29 training to after 1% points) 2.8 1.9 1.4 2,8 -0.4

Improvement in employment circumstance after training30 (%) 46.1 1.943.0 4.2 38,6 2.0 40.9 4.0 36.8

1,9

Employed or in further study after training28-31∑32 [%] 67.0 1.8 69.3 4.0 670 1.9 70.1 3.8 63.0 1.9

Achieved main reason for undertaking training33 [%) 78.3 1.5 72.5 3.8 75,5 1.7 76.0 3.575.6 1.7

Satisfied with overall quality of training34 1%) 83.9 1.4 80.0 3.4 83,4 1.5 84.9 2.7 81.8 1.5

± - 95% confidence interval Source: NCVER, Student Outcomes Surveys, 2005-2009. See also endnotes as referenced in the table, which can be found at the end of Appendix A, for detailed information on any caveats and technical issues associated with the data presented in this table.

annual national rep ort of the australian vocational education and training system 2009 p137

p138

Table A. 15: Employer engagement with VET

*… d 3C5L3*… cto' 3DJ_ 1 CDT3O3I 5'Qj_CDIa>C=L55" s' mcnCD3ru %° O CO Percentage of employers engaged, 2005, 2007, 2009

Had employees Had employees with

Employers engaged undertaking Had arranged or formal vocational

with VET in the last apprenticeships/ provided nationally qualification as a job 12 months35 traineeships36 recognised training37 requirement33

2005 2007 2009 I 2005 2007 2009 I 2005 2007 2009 I 2005 2007 2009 11

Employers engaged with VET in the past 12 months 57.1 54.0 56.7 28.2 29.1 30.6 24.1 22.1 26.1 35.0 33.3 34.2

Employers engaged with UET in the past 12 months by industry

Agriculture, Forestry and Fishing 38.8 28.5 27.0 16.6 CD

4^

9.4 21.8 11.7* 17.0 18,3 12.7* 9.7

Mining 67.4 82.7 62.9 23.4* 53.6* 29.4*38.8* 63.4 43.5 42.0 38.5* 48.9

Manufacturing 59.2 59.1 64.4 35.4 36.3 43.2 16.5 16.5 23.4 42.4 42.2 40.4

Electricity, Gas and Water Supply 93.5 34.7* 35.8* 77.3 18.4* CO

ru *

38.5* 18.8* 20.3* 67.5 23.0*23.9*

Construction 73.B77.6 79.0 46.5 59.7 63.1 29.7 27.0 22.0 33.0 40.8 41.6

Wholesale Trade38.2 42.0 43.0 13.7ª 8.2* 17.1* 11.8* 13.2* 24.9 27.4 30.3 17.4*

Retail Trade52.2 43.9 52.8 34.6 26.6 35.7 16.0 16.7 24.1 28.2 23.8 29.7

Accommodation, Cafes and Restaurants 48.0 48.9 41.8 32.3 35.9 26.9 19.9 18.121.6 30.3 23.2 23.8

Transport and Storage 42.0 47.9 40.6 20.0 21.2 17.0* 16.3 30.3 30.6 27.7 26.4 16.3*

Communication Services 42.4* 39.5 33.5 11.3* 21.1 22.4* 12.7* 14.4* 16.5* 27.4* 21.3 14.0*

Finance and Insurance 62.0 67.6 63.4 21.9 21.3* 18.2 38.1 39.2 38.6 41.3 53.045.8

Property and Business Services 63.3 50.5 55.4 19.0* 19.3 16.4 34.8 22.0 27.6 39.2 34.8 35.9

Government, Administration and Defence 73.0 88.8 75.5 52.7 59.0 47.4 53.7 54.1 36.1* 53.8 76.1 49.4

Education 70.3 63.6 70.2 20.5 29.5 17.1 38.0 31.8 41.958.7 53.1 57.6

Health and Community Services 57.5 58.6 62.0 21.9 29.7 27.7 22.7 24.8 40.5 47.0 37.0 45.1

Cultural and Recreational Services 56.8 45.0 46.5 17.3 22.1 21.2 26,5 26.1 24.5 32.3 20.1 24.6

Personal and Other Services 68.9 70.7 67.1 30.3 42.4 38.1 25.0* 18.8* 24.5 44.2 55.6 49.4

Employers engaged with UET in the past 12 months by em ployer size

Small employers [1 to 9 employees) 51.7 45.7 49.1 24.3 22.2 25.6 18.7 15.9 19.6 30.0 26.6 27.2

Medium employers (10 to 99 employees) 72.8 75.1 74.6 39.7 47.1 41.1 39.1 36.4 39.7 49.5 49.4 50.4

Large employers (100 or more employees) 94.8 95.1 96.7 54.3 62.2 68.3 70,1 64.2 78.4 75.2 76.8 77.0

11 The estimate has a relative standard error greater than 25% and therefore should be used with caution. Source: NCVER, Survey of Employer Use and Views of the VET System, 2005-2009. See also endnotes as referenced in the table, which can be found at the end of Appendix A, for detailed information on any caveats and technical issues associated with the data presented in this table.

p139

95% Confidence intervals

Table A. 16: Employer engagement with VET

Q)33CQJ_ 3Q) rt∑ o' 3m *3 (D T3OsCO3I.2.I05cn*ì*Ã¥ OoCD

Had employees Had employees with

Employers engaged undertaking Had arranged or formal vocational

with VET in the last apprenticeships/ provided nationally qualification as a job 12 months35 traineeships36 recognised training37 requirement38

2005 2007 2009 I 2005 2007 2009 I 2005 2007 2009 I 2005 2007 2009

Employers engaged with VET in the past 12 months

Employers engaged with VET in the past 12 months by industry

Agriculture, Forestry and Fishing 7.9

Mining

Manufacturing

Electricity, Gas and Water Supply

Construction

Wholesale Trade

Retail Trade

Accommodation, Cafes and Restaurants

Transport and Storage

Communication Services

Finance and Insurance

Property and Business Services

Government, Administration and Defence

Education

Health and Community Services

Cultural and Recreational Services

Personal and Other Services 11 A

Employers engaged with VET in the past 12 months by em ployer size

Small employers [1 to 9 employees! 3,6 3.4 2.7

Medium employers (10 to 99 employees) 5.2 4.5 3.6

Large employers [100 or more employees) 4,4 2.8 2.0

5.7 4.7 4.5 6.7 6.2 5.8 6.1 6.8 4.1

15.4 34.4 14.4 19.3 27.5 15.3 17.8 29.4 15.6

9.8 7.7 8.1 7.2 4.9 6.6 10.3 8.2 8.0

17.6 18.7 7.8 24.0 18.8 19.1 22.8 22.2 19.4

10.0 9.6 5.9 9.2 8.5 4.9 9.6 9.8 6.0

7.0 6.1 8.6 6.7 7.1 10.2 10.2 12.7 9.7

7.5 5.5 6.3 5.3 4.7 5.6 7.1 5.5 6.2

9.1 9.4 7.9 7.5 7.3 7.2 9.1 8.3 7,3

8.4 7.6 9.1 7.2 8.2 11.4 10.5 8.2 8.6

11.2 9.3 15.7 8.8 8.7 11.9 20.8 9.0 9.0

9.9 12.9 6.8 11.2 15.2 10.0 12.1 16.4 10.7

9.5 5.7 4.1 12.3 5.6 5.1 12.7 6.8 5.5

19.5 15.7 21.1 19.7 15.0 18.4 19.9 10.4 21.2

6.6 14.0 7.3 8.8 11.7 12.4 9.1 14.4 12.5

6.7 10.2 9.2 6.4 9.2 10.7 9.3 10.7 10.1

7.3 10.3 7.9 11.5 11.1 8.7 11.8 8.7 9.8

12.5 13.1 8.8 12.4 10.6 7.4 13.4 13.4 9.3

2.9 2.8 2.3 2.8 2.5 2.2 3.4 3.1 2.5

5.7 5.3 4.2 5.8 5.1 4.3 5.8 5.3 4,2

15.3 11.5 10.6 11.8 11.4 6.4 11.7 7.2 7.3

8.7 6.7

14.0 14.5 14.4

10.3 8.5 7.7

6.0 29.9 24.8

8.5 8.3 5.0

11.0 13.2 12.1

7.8 6.5 6.6

10.0 10.4 9.0

10.9 8.8 12.0

24.3 11.7 16.2

12.3 15.3 10.9

12.2 7.3 5.6

25.2 8.4 20.4

8.2 14.7 11.7

9.2 11.2 10.6

11.9 12.9 11.5

12.2 8.9

± - 95% confidence interval * The estimate has a relative standard error greater than 25% and therefore should be used with caution. Source; NCVER, Survey of Employer Use and Views of the VET System, 2005-2009. See also endnotes as referenced in the table, which can be found at the end of Appendix A, for detailed information on any caveats and technical issues associated with

the data presented in this table.

Percentage of employers satisfied, 2005, 2007, 2009

Table A. 17: Employer satisfaction with aspects of VET

Satisfaction with

Satisfaction with formal vocational

Satisfaction with national recognised qualifications as a job apprentices/ trainees training40 requirement

m i B o m B

m Ef WM

Employers satisfied39 with VET 79.1 83.2 80.3 80.5 85.8 80.8 83.4

Satisfied employers39 by industry

Agriculture, Forestry and Fishing 82.7 79.9 80.7 78.8 59.0 62.6 81.1 88.9 68.6

Mining 94.7 98.5 95.3 51.3* 95.5 97.1 94.7 66.6 90.0

Manufacturing 81.4 84.6 84.8 89.2 93.2 88.6 79.0 78.8 84.3

Electricity, Gas and Water Supply 85.6 93.7 87.0 72.9 *93.0 21.9* 83.9 84.5 80.1

Construction 79.0 83.4 84.6 69.0 77.1 92.7 65.4 89.8 84.7

Wholesale Trade 72.5 97.1 79.0 78.1 87.2 96.7 75.1 86.9 98.4

Retail Trade 69.1 84.9 83.8 90.7 81.4 80.2 71.5 78.8 68.0

Accommodation, Cafes and Restaurants 83.3 78.1 65.4 82.6 92.0 89.3 81.8 75.2 86.9

Transport and Storage 69.3 84.4 67.6 84.8 76.7 88.6 71.7 73.0 91.4

Communication Services 97.1 90.0 94.7 74.4 81.9 97.7 46.4* 60.4 82.8

Finance and Insurance 80.6 83.4 78.5 83.9 80.9 91.7 84.0 75.3 88.4

Property and Business Services 87.5 87.9 82.0 77.5 73.7 79.9 79.1 77.7 84.7

Government, Administration and Defence 90.4 90.2 96.2 82.8 91.6 95.5 90.1 86.5 94.9

Education 88.1 85.8 86.7 78.7 80.0 86.7 78.2 91.4 89.1

Health and Community Services 82.8 73.9 94.8 87.2 93.6 93.0 86.2 90.7 87.6

Cultural and Recreational Services 86.1 76.6 67.2 79.8 92.7 95.9 65.2 82.7 85.2

Personal and Other Services 79.5 79.2 85.2 77.0 58.7* 82.6 77.9 67.2 82.0

Satisfied" employers by employer size

Small employers i1 to 9 employees] 76.4 84.8 82.3 78.2 75.8 84.2 73.9 81.5 82.6

Medium employers [10 to 99 employees) 84.3 80.6 83.7 83.2 86.2 88.4 81.5 79.8 85.0

Large employers [100 or more employees)83.3 86.8 89.5 85.6 82.0 85.2 86.7 80.2 81.6

* The estimate has a relative standard error greater than 25% and therefore should be used with caution. Source: MOVER, Survey of Employer Use and Views of the VET System, 2005-2009. See also endnotes as referenced in the table, which can be found at the end of Appendix A, for detailed information on any caveats and technical issues associated with the data presented in this table.

p140 annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009

95% Confidence intervals

Table A. 18: Employer satisfaction with aspects of VET

Satisfaction with

Satisfaction with formal vocational

Satisfaction with national recognised qualifications as a job apprentices/ trainees training40 requirement

2005 2007 2009 I 2005 2007 2009 I 2005 2007 2009

Employers satisfied39 with VET

Satisfied employers33 by industry

4.8 3.9 3.1 5.1 5.0 3.3 4.6 3.8 3.0

Agriculture, Forestry and Fishing 12.7 21.6 18.1 13.0 28.7 19.5 13.9 10.3 23.2

Mining 7.1 2.5 5.5 35.5 6.6 3.4 5.1 22.612.2

Manufacturing 11.2 8.8 8.2 9.4 5.0 9.4 11.0 9.59.3

Electricity, Gas and Water Supply 22.1 7.6 22.4 37.8 8.2 22.7 23.5 14.8 29.8

Construction 12.6 9.3 5.5 17.9 16.6 5.9 17.7 6.5 7.3

Wholesale Trade 26.3 4.9 23.5 21.9 13.8 3.9 20.3 17.5 2.5

Retail Trade13.5 7.2 8.0 8.2 11.7 11.7 13.7 10.8 12.2

Accommodation, Cafes and Restaurants 11.5 14.5 18.0 19.3 10.2 11.4 15.3 17.3 9.3

Transport and Storage 22.8 9.6 28.5 13.1 19.0 16.5 20.8 20.7 6.7

Communication Services 3.3 10.8 7.226.7 20.8 4.0 39.1 23.1 22.6

Finance and Insurance17.2 25.4 16.5 10.6 20.0 7.2 10.8 21.3 8.0

Property and Business Services 20.3 9.6 11.1 20.3 13.3 9.4 20.1 10.2 6.7

Government, Administration and Defence5.8 6.7 3.5 8.4 5.5 3.6 5.1 7.5 4.2

Education 8.4 16.1 14.3 11.6 23.4 14.8 10.0 6.5 8.0

Health and Community Services 13.7 20.4 4.6 7.3 5.0 8.1 7.1 7.1 8.9

Cultural and Recreational Services 10.3 22.2 20.4 22.2 6.1 4.8 25.0 20.0 19.5

Personal and Other Services 17.2 14.9 10.2 22.2 29.9 12.4 15.1 16.5 9.6

Satisfied39 employers by employer size

Small employers (1 to 9 employees) 6.6 5.4 4.2 7.4 7.8 4.9 6.5 5.1 4.3

Medium employers [10 to 99 employees) 6.4 6.4 4.9 7.0 6.1 4.6 5.2 6.3 4.3

Large employers (1 DO or more employees) 9.4 5.4 5.0 8.8 17.2 10.7 8.0 13.8 11.6

± - 95% confidence interval * The estimate has a relative standard error greater than 25% and therefore should be used with caution. Source: MOVER, Survey of Employer Use and Views of the VET System, 2005-2009. See also endnotes as referenced in the table, which can be found at the end of Appendix A, for detailed information on any caveats and technical issues associated with the data presented in this table.

annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009 p141

Percentage of employers satisfied, 2005, 2007, 2009

Table A. 19: Employer overall satisfaction with the VET system

All employers engaged with VET35 71.1 21.2 7.7 73.9 21.1 5.0 77.9 16.2 5.8

All employers engaged with VET35 by industry

Agriculture, Forestry and Fishing 75.3 17.3s 7.4s 73.4 15.8s 10.8 s 66.3 23.8s 9.9 s

Mining 66.9 12.9 s 74.5 20.7* 4.8 s 89.9 10.1* 0.0

Manufacturing 72.0 22.6 5.4 s 76.7 18.7 4.6 s 78.3 157 6.0 s

Electricity, Gas and Water Supply 69.7 30.3s** 76.7 22.2* 40.8 s 17.4s *3

Construction 63.5 25.1 11,4 s 77.4 15.9* 6.8s 80.0 146 5.4 s

Wholesale Trade 67.5 18.7* 13.7 s 82.9 17.1s 0.0 88.3 8.0s -x~x-

Retail Trade67.2 27.6 5.2 s 73.8 20.3 5.9s 71.6 22.2 6.1s

Accommodation, Cafes and Restaurants 79.3 12.8 s 7.8 s 73.8 24.4 s ** 69.1 18.0 s 12.8 s

Transport and Storage72.8 15.4 s 11,7 s 70.3 27.7 2.0s 82.9 15.6 s -X--S

Communication Services 57.9- 10.3 s 31,8 s 67.3 32.7s 0.0 85.2 11.2 s-X--X-

Finance and Insurance 83.0 12.6 s 4.4 s 70.6 24.2 s 76.9 20.1

Property and Business Services 69.8 26.7s-x-x- 71.4 24.6 3.9s 78.3 13.0 8.7s

Government, Administration and Defence 76.6 23.4 0.0 80.1 19.9 0.0 90.8 9.1s XX

Education 70.5 25.0 4.5 s 77.5 22.2* 39 78.7 20.3s -X--X-

Health and Community Services 78.3 18.9 2.8 s 74.1 25.2 s 0.7 s 84.5 14.0* 1.5*

Cultural and Recreational Services 68.9 10.0 s 21.1s 82.6 13.1s 4.3 s 74.3 25.4s XX

Persona! and Other Services 71.0 17.3 s 11.6 s 60.3 21,3s 18.4 s 78.8 17.8 3.4*

All employers engaged with VET35 by employer size

Small employers (1 to 9 employees)

69.9 21.6 8.5 74.9 19.3 5.9 78.5 14.8 6.7

Medium employers [10 to 99 employees)

73.1 20.3 6.6s 73.1 23.7 3.1s 77.5 17.8 4.6s

Large employers [100 or more employees) 78.1 21.0 0.9s 67.1 26.2 6.6s 73.0 25.2 1.8 s

Source: NCVER, Survey of Employer Use and Views of the VET System, 2005-2009. See also endnotes as referenced in the table, which can be found at the end of Appendix A, for detailed information on any caveats and technical issues associated with the data presented in this table.

p142 annual national rep ort of the australian vocational education and training system 2009

Table A.20: Employer overall satisfaction with the VET system

95% Confidence intervals

All employers engaged with VET35 3.8 3.4 2.3 3.4 3.2 1.6 2.5 2.1 1.5

All employers engaged with UET35 by industry

Agriculture, Forestry and Fishing 10.0 8.5 6.3 16.0 11.6 12.7 14.3 12.6 9.9

Mining 27.8 8.8 X X 25.7 22.0 8.2 9.9 9.9 0.0

Manufacturing 10.4 9.2 5.5 8.3 7.3 4.9 7.9 7.0 4.3

Electricity, Gas and Water Supply 24.1 24.1 X X 19.1 18.6 X X 33.3 23.9 x-x-

Construction 11.8 10.4 8.5 9.2 8.3 4.6 5.5 4.8 3.3

Wholesale Trade17.2 12.7 14.5 13.7 13.7 0.0 10.4 8.0 X X

Retail Trade10.4 10.1 4.0 8.0 7.4 4.2 8.3 7.7 4.7

Accommodation, Cafes and Restaurants 11.9 9.2 8.7 12.4 12.5X X 13.3 9.8 11.7

Transport and Storage14.9 11.7 11.3 12.8 12.9 2.2 13.7 13.5X X

Communication Services 32.4 10.9 35.6 16.2 16.2 0.0 13.4 11.9X X

Finance and Insurance8.5 7.1 4.8 18.6 17.9 as 9.5 68X X

Property and Business Services 16.2 15.7 X-X 9.2 8.5 4.1 6.3 4.5 4.8

Government, Administration and Defence 7.7 7.7 0.0 8.4 8.4 0.0 5.4 5.3X X

Education 9.7 9.1 4.5 14.0 14.0 11.1 11.0X X

Health and Community Services 8.3 7.9 2.713.4 13.4 0.7 8.4 8.4 1.4

Cultural and Recreational Services 17.6 6.5 18.0 12.2 11.2 5.5 14.5 14.5

X X

Personal and Other Services 13.6 10.6 9.3 14.5 13.1 12.0 8.4 7.8 3.8

All employers engaged with UET35 by em ployer size

Small employers (1 to 9 employees) 5.0 4.5 2.9 4.5 4.2 2.2 3.3 2.8 2.1

Medium employers [10 to 99 employees) 5.6 4.7 3.85.5 5.4 2.0 4.1 3.6 2.3

Large employers *† 00 or more employees) 8.6 8.4 0.7 13.6 11.8 11.5 10.1 10.1 2.0

± - 95% confidence interval Source: NCVER, Survey of Employer Use and Views of the VET System, 2005-2009. See also endnotes as referenced in the table, which can be found at the end of Appendix A, for detailed information on any caveats and technical issues associated with the data presented in this table.

annual national re p o rt of the australian vocational education and training system 2009 p143

Table A.21: Vocational education and training efficiency

Total expenditure43 per adjusted hour46,47 *48 and Full-Year Training Equivalent (FYTE)15, 2005 to 2009

Expenditure per adjusted FYTE ($/FYTE, 2009 prices) 12328 11945 11524 11264 11264 10677

Annual change f%) -3.1 -3.5 -2.3 -5.2

Expenditure per adjusted hour [$/hour, 2009 prices) 17.12 16.59 16.01 15.65 15.65

14.83

Annua! change (%) -3.1 -3.5 -2.3 -5.2

Invalid enrolment rate (%) 2.15 2.85 2.11 2.49 2.49 2.03

Expenditure per adjusted FYTE by State/Territory ($/FYTE, 2009 prices)

New South Wales 12B46 12344 11759 10975 10834 10161

Victoria 11092 10913 10093 10502 10354 9673

Queensland 11887 11338 11979 11705 12049 11500

South Australia14462 14276 13180 12632 12692 12035

Western Australia 12407 11549 11586 11159 11506 10919

Tasmania 12266 12141 11065 10717 11064 12816

Northern Territory 24363 22961 24259 24417 23631 22360

Australian Capital Territory

Annual change {% )

15063 14286 14689 15164 15263 14585

New South Wales -2.4 -4.7 -6.7 -6.2

Victoria -1.6 -7.5 4.1 -6.6

Queensland -4.6 5.6 -2.3 -4.6

South Australia -1.3 -7.7 -4.2 -5.2

Western Australia -6.9 0.3 -3.7 -5.1

Tasmania -1.0 -8.9 -3.1 15.8

Northern Territory -5.8 5.7 0.7 -5.4

Australian Capital Territory -5.2 2.8 3.2 -4.4

Expenditure per adjusted hour by State/Territory ($/hour, 2009 prices)

New South Wales 17.56 17.14 16.33 15.24 15.05 14.11

Victoria 15.41 15.16 14.02 14.59 14.38 13.43

Queensland 16.51 15.75 16.64 16.26 16.73 15.97

South Australia 20.09 19.83 18.31 17.54 17.63 16.71

Western Australia 17.23 16.04 16.09 15.50 15.98 15.17

Tasmania 17.04 16.86 15.37 14.88 15.37 17.80

Northern Territory 33.84 31.89 33.69 33.91 32.82 31.06

Australian Capital Territory 20,92 19.84 20.40 21.06 21.20 20.26

Source: NCVER, Australian vocational education and training statistics-financial information, 2005-2009, unpublished. See also endnotes as referenced in the table, which can be found at the end of Appendix A, for detailed information on any caveats and technical issues associated with the data presented in this table.

This table continues on the next page.

p144 annua! national rep o rt of the australian vocational education and training system 2009

Table A.21 (continued)

With course mix weights With course mix weights

calculated using the old method47 calculated using the new method47

2005 2006 2007 2008 2008 2009

Annual change (% )

New South Wales -2.4 -4.7 -6.7 -6.2

Victoria -1.6 -7.5 4.1 -6.6

Queensland -4.6 5.6 -2.3 -4.6

South Australia -1.3 -7.7 -4.2 -5.2

Western Australia -6.9 0.3 -3.7 -5.1

Tasmania -1.0 -8.9 -3.1 15.8

Northern Territory -5.8 5.7 0.7 -5.4

Australian Capital Territory -5.2 2.8 3.2 -4.4

Source: NCVER, Australian vocational education and training statistics-financial information, 2005-2009, unpublished. See also endnotes as referenced in the table, which can be found at the end of Appendix A, for detailed information on any caveats and technical issues associated with the data presented in this table.

Course mix weights Expenditure per adjusted FYTE/hour and cost of capital are weighted using a course mix weight. This takes into account the variation among states and territories in the relative mix of high- and low-cost programs, promoting comparability of costs among jurisdictions. In 2009, a new method for calculating course mix weights was adopted.

Under the new method, course mix weights are derived from a set of cost relativities by subject field of education rather than industry. The table above presents two time series:

%∫ 2005-08 - Course mix weights calculated using the old method have been applied to Total expenditure per adjusted hour and FYTE.

%∫ 2008-09 - Course mix weights calculated using the new method have been applied to Total expenditure per adjusted hour and FYTE,

To demonstrate the discrepancies which result at the state/territory level from using the new versus the old method, 2008 is provided as a common year. That is, the old series ends in 2008, and the new series begins in 2008.

For detailed information on the two different methods for calculating course mix weights, see endnotes, which can be found at the end of Appendix A.

annual national rep ort of the australian vocational education and training system 2009 p145

p146

Total expenditure, 2009 Table A. 2 2 : Cost of Capital per Vocational Output

*… 3 3 C m_ 3

Physical non-current assets at nominal value

Land $m 565.6B2 629.B12 485.562 155.790 278.352 16.272 9.528 245.595 2386.573

*… et Buildings $m 2386.5B2 1678.192 958.561 434.184 669.183 204.330 154.776 95.072 6580.880 O3DJ Plant, equipment and motor vehicles $m74.571 122.819 290.081 26.705 36.542 8.097 2.532 6.190 567.537n Other $m 2.564 16.838 68.849 11,849 5.509 4.431 5.348 17.001 132.389TJ o Total$m 3029.379 2447.661 1 8 03.053 628.528 989 .5 8 6 233.130 172.184 363.858 9667.3 7 9s Capital charge49 % B.Q 8.0 8.0 8.0 8.0 8.0 8.0 8.0 8.0CDDJCost of capital Land $m45.253 50.385 38.845 12.463 22.268 1.302 0.762 19.648 190.926 *…s Buildings $m190.927 134.255 76.685 34.735 53.535 16.346 12.382 7.606 526.470m3 Plant, equipment and motor vehicles$m 5.966 9.826 23.206 2.136 2.923 0.648 0.203 0.495 45.403Oso'Other $m0.205 1.347 5.508 0.948 0.4410,3540.428 1.360 10.591 Total$m 242.350 195.813 1 4 4 .2 4 4 50.282 79.167 18.658 13.775 29.109 773.390Adjusted FYTE *546 191149 183899 94792 38461 61588 12040 6049 9904 597881 CD1" QJ.Adjusted hours46hours m137.627 132.40768.25027.69244.343 8.669 4.356 7.131430.474 Course mix weight50 index 0.993 0.998 1.014 0.996 1.009 1.009 1.018 0.982 1.000 sOCLCost of capital per adjusted FYTE15 S1 Land $ 238.50 274.50 404.09 325.46 358.29 107.16 123.79 2020.75 319.34DJ_ o" Buildings $ 1006.26 731.42 797.73 907.05 861.35 1345.67 2010.94 782.25 880.56S ' Plant, equipment and motor vehicles $ 31.44 53.53 241.41 55.79 47.04 53.32 32.90 50.93 75.94 CO CD Other $ 1.08 7.34 57.30 24.75 7.09 29.18 69.48 139.88 17.71 ire' 3 Total 2009 $ 127 7.2 8 1 0 6 6.7 9 1 5 0 0.5 4 1313.05 1273.77 1535.34 2237.11 2993.82 1293.55 *ì*Ã¥ %° Total 2008 $ 1318.93 1 0 7 3.0 6 1562.42 1128.93 15 3 0.3 5 1336.40 2232.11 3287.53 1331.27CD Cost of capital per adjusted hour51Land $ 0.33 0.38 0.56 0.45 0.50 0.15 0.17 2.81 0.44Buildings $ 1.40 1.02 1.11 1.26 1.20 1.87 2.79 1.09 1.22Plant, equipment and motor vehicles $ 0.04 0.07 0.34 0.08 0.07 0.07 0.05 0.07 0.11Other $ 0.00 0.01 0.08 0.03 0.01 0.04 0.10 0.19 0.02Total 2009 $ 1.77 1.48 2.08 1.82 1.77 2.13 3.11 4.16 1.80Total 2008 $ 1.83 1.49 2.17 1.57 2.13 1.86 3.10 4.57 1.85Source: MOVER, Australian vocational education and training statistics: Financial information, 2008-2009, draft - unpublished.See also endnotes as referenced in the table, which can be found at the end of Appendix A, for detailed information on any caveats and technical issues associated with the data presented in this table.

Table A.23: Vocational education and training efficiency

Government recurrent expenditure44 per publicly funded adjusted hour46∑47∑48 and FYTE15, 2005-2009

With course mix weights With course mix weights

calculated using the old method47 calculated using the new method47

I ESDI

Expenditure per adjusted FYTE ($/FYTE, 2009 prices) 10851 10588 10248 9874 9874 9663

Annual change (%) -2.4 -3.2 -3.7 -2.1

Expenditure per adjusted hour [$/hour, 2009 prices) 15.07 14.71 14.23 13.71 13.71 13.42

Annual change (%) -2.4 -3.2 -3.7 -2.1

Invalid enrolment rate (%) 2.12 2.83 2.10 2.46 2.46 2.01

Expenditure per adjusted FYTE by State/Territory (S/FYTE, 2009 prices!

New South Wales 10536 10565 9913 9440 9275 9049

Victoria9839 9702 9148 9072 8976 8519

Queensland 11244 10380 11218 11194 11547 11624

South Australia11744 12242 11659 10493 10493 10720

Western Australia 11876 11165 10813 9758 10101 9753

Tasmania 11394 11232 11029 10654 11048 11830

Northern Territory 20046 16677 15916 16412 15962 15084

Australian Capital Territory

Annual change (% )

12603 11761 11600 12042 12091 11053

New South Wales 0.3 -6.2 -4.8 -2.4

Victoria -1.4 -5.7 -0.8 -5.1

Queensland -7.7 8.1 -0.2 0.7

South Australia 4.2 -4.8 -10.0 2.2

Western Australia -6.0 -3.2 -9.8 -3.4

Tasmania -1.4 -1.8 -3.4 7.1

Northern Territory -16.8 -4.6 3.1 -5.5

Australian Capital Territory -6.7 -1.4 3.8 -8.6

Expenditure per adjusted hour by State/Territory ($/hour, 2009 prices!

New South Wales 14.63 14.67 13.77 13.11 12.86 12.57

Victoria 13.67 13.48 12.71 12.60 12.47 11.83

Queensland 15.62 14.42 15.58 15.55 16.04 16.14

South Australia16.31 17.00 16.19 14.57 14.57 14.89

Western Australia 16.49 15.51 15.02 13.55 14.03 13.55

Tasmania 15.82 15.60 15.32 14.80 15.34 16.43

Northern Territory 27.84 23.16 22.10 22.79 22.17 20.95

Australian Capital Territory 17.50 16.33 16.11 16.72 16.79 15.35

Source: NCVER, Australian vocational education and training statistics-financial information, 2005-2009, unpublished. See also endnotes as referenced in the table, which can be found at the end of Appendix A, for detailed information on any caveats and technical issoes associated with the data presented in this table.

This table continues on the next page.

annual national report of the australian vocational edocation and training system 2009 p147

Table A,23 (continued)

With course mix weights With course mix weights

calculated using the old method47 calculated using the new method47

1 *í*ê*†*§*À*ä B

Annual change (% )

New South Wales 0.3 -6.2 -4.0 -2.4

Victoria -1.4 -5.7 -0.8 -5.1

Queensland -7.7 8.1 -0.2 0.7

South Australia 4.2 -4.8 -10.0 2.2

Western Australia -6.0 -3.2 -9.8 -3.4

Tasmania -1.4 -1.8 -3.4 7.1

Northern Territory -16.B-4.6 3.1 -5.5

Australian Capital Territory -6.7 -1.4 3.8 -8.6

Source: NCVER, Australian vocational education and training statistics-financial information, 2005-2009, unpublished. See also endnotes as referenced in the table, which can be found at the end of Appendix A, for detailed information on any caveats and technical issues associated with the data presented in this table.

P148 annual national re p o rt of the australian vocational education and training system 2009

p149

03 3 3C0J_303r+ o' 3Q3_1 CD"3 OsCDcn3IgIcn*ì*ü OO CD Government recurrent expenditure, 2009

Table A.24: Cost of Capital per Vocational Output

Physical non-current assets at nominal value

Land $m 565,662 629.B12 485.562 155.790 276.352 16.272 9.528 245.595 2386,573

Buildings $m2386.582 1678.192 958.561 434.184 669.183 204.330 154.776 95.072 6580.880

Plant, equipment and motor vehicles $m74.571 122.819 290.081 26.705 36.542 8.097 2.532 6.190 567.537

Other $m2.564 16.838 68.849 11.849 5.509 4.431 5.348 17.001 132.389

Total $m 3029.379 2447.661 1803.053 628.528 989.586 233.130 172.184 363.858 9667.379

Capital charge49 % 8.0 8.0 8.0 8.0 8.0 8.0 8.0 8.0 8.0

Cost of capital

Land $m 45.253 50.385 38.845 12.463 22.268 1.302 0.762 19.648 190.926

Buildings $m190.927 134.255 76.685 34.735 53.535 16.346 12.382 7.606 526.470

Plant, equipment and motor vehicles$m 5.966 9.826 23.206 2.136 2.923 0.648 0.203 0.495 45.403

Other $m 0.205 1.347 5.508 0.948 0.441 0.354 0.428 1.360 10.591

Total$m 242.350 135.813 1 4 4 .2 4 4 50.282 79.167 18.650 13.775 29.109 773.390

Adjusted FYTE15∑46 191149 183899 94792 38461 61588 12040 6049 9904 597881

Adjusted hours46 hours m137.627 132.407 68.250 27.692 44.343 8.669 4.356 7.131 430.474

Course mix weight50 index 0.993 0.998 1.014 0.996 1.009 1.009 1.018 0.982 1.000

Cost of capital per adjusted FYTE1S,S1

Land $ 301.17 397.53 530.73 436.99 444.14 144.45 143.98 2536.12 423.44

Buildings $ 1270.66 1059.25 1047.73 1217.90 1067.75 1813.84 2338.88 981.75 1167.63

Plant, equipment and motor vehicles $ 39.70 77.52 317.07 74.91 58.31 71.88 38.26 63.92 100.70

Other $ 1.37 10.63 75.25 33.24 8,79 39.33 80.82 175.56 23.49

Total 2003 $ 1612.83 1544.33 1 3 7 0.7 8 1763.04 1 5 7 8.9 9 2069.49 2601.94 3757.35 171 5.2 6

Total 2008 $ 1550.77 1513.53 1388.09 1414.22 1892.83 17 8 7.0 0 2538.99 3910.20 1690.65

Cost of capital per adjusted hour51

Land $ 0.42 0.55 0.74 0.61 0.62 0.20 0.20 3.52 0.59

Buildings $ 1.76 1.47 1.46 1.69 1.48 2.52 3.25 1.36 1.62

Plant, equipment and motor vehicles$ 0.06 0.11 0.44 0.10 0.08 0.10 0.05 0.09 0.14

Other $ 0.00 0.01 0.10 0.05 0.01 0.05 0.11 0.24 0.03

Total 2003 $ 2.24 2.15 2.74 2.45 2.19 2.87 3.61 5.22 2.38

Total 2008 $ 2.15 2.10 2.76 1.96 2.63 2.48 3.53 5.43 2.35

Source: N.CVER, Australian vocational education and training statistics: Financial information, 2008-2009, draft - unpublished. See also endnotes as referenced in the table, which can be found at the end of Appendix A, for detailed information on any caveats and technical issues associated with the data presented in this table.

Table A.25: Vocational education and training efficiency

Total government expenditure45 per publicly funded adjusted hour46,47,48 and Full-Year Training Equivalent (FYTE)15, 2005-2009

With course mix weights With course mix weights

calculated using the old method47 calculated using the new method47

I

Expenditure per adjusted FYTE ($/FYTE, 2009 prices) 11020 10748 10045 9649 9649 9583

Annual change (%) -2.5 -6.5 -3.9 -0.7

Expenditure per adjusted hour C$/hour, 2009 prices) 15.31 14.93 13.95 13.40 13.40 13.31

Annual change (%) -2.5 -6.5 -3.9 -0.7

Invalid enrolment rate (%) 2.12 2.83 2.09 2.45 2.45 2.01

Expenditure per adjusted FVTE by State/Territory (S/FYTE, 2009 prices)

New South Wales 10552 10588 9588 9085 8929 8697

Victoria 9882 9742 8903 8819 8726 8610

Queensland 11816 10850 11520 11399 11761 11919

South Australia 11911 12321 11367 10153 10171 10224

Western Australia 11980 11303 10017 9032 9316 9633

Tasmania 11441 11276 10936 10345 10760 11115

Northern Territory 23259 20093 18845 20502 19777 18217

Australian Capital Territory

Annual change (% )

12652 11798 11515 11889 11960 10851

New South Wales 0.3 -9.4 -5.2 -2.6

Victoria -1.4 -8.6 -0.9 -1.3

Queensland -8.2 6.2 -1.1 1.3

South Australia 3.4 -7.7 -10.7 0.5

Western Australia -5.6 -11.4 -9.8 3.4

Tasmania -1.4 -3.0 -5.4 3.9

Northern Territory -13.6 -6.2 8.8 -7.9

Australian Capital Territory -6.7 -2.4 3.2 -9.3

Expenditure per adjusted hour by State/Territory (S/hour, 2009 prices)

New South Wales 14.66 14.71 13.32 12.62 12.40 12.08

Victoria 13.73 13.53 12.37 12.25 12.12 11.96

Queensland 16.41 15.07 16.00 15.83 16.33 16.55

South Australia 1654 17.11 15.79 14.10 14.13 14.20

Western Australia 16.64 15.70 13.91 12.54 12.94 13.38

Tasmania 15.89 15.66 15.19 14.37 14.86 15.44

Northern Territory 32.30 27.91 26.17 28,47 27.47 25.30

Australian Capital Territory 17.57 16.39 15.99 16.51 16.61 15.07

Source: NCVER, Australian vocational education and training statistics-financial information, 2005-2009, unpublished. See also endnotes as referenced in the table, which can be found at the end of Appendix A, for detailed information on any caveats and technical issues associated with the data presented in this table.

This table continues on the next page.

p 1 50 annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009

Table A.25 (continued]

Annual change (% )

New South Wales 0.3 -9.4 -5.2 -2.6

Victoria -1.4 -8.6 -0.9 -1.3

Queensland -8.2 6.2 -1.1 1.3

South Australia3.4 -7.7 -10.7 0.5

Western Australia -5.6 -11.4 -9.8 3.4

Tasmania-1.4 -3.0 -5.4 3.9

Northern Territory -13.6 -6.2 8.8 -7.9

Australian Capital Territory -6.7-2.4 3.2 -9.3

Source: NCVER, Australian vocational education and training statistics-financial information, 2005-2009, unpublished. See also endnotes as referenced in the table, which can be found at the end of Appendix A, for detailed information on any caveats and technical issues associated with the data presented in this table.

annual national re p o rt of the australian vocational education and training system 2009 p151

p152 annual

Total government expenditure, 2009

Table A.26: Cost of Capital per Vocational Output

i 2 . %°3

Ed m co 5_ *… 3 O

s ß Q3_

3 ro CD CD CD

Item Unit NSW Vic Old SA WA Tas NT ACT Aust Physical non-current assets at nominal value

Land $m565.662 629.812 485.562 155.790 278.352 16.272 9.528 245.595 2388.573

Buildings $m2386.582 1678.192 958.561 434.184 669.183 204.330 154.776 95.072 6580.880

Plant, equipment and motor vehicles $m74.571 122.819 290.081 26.705 36.542 8.097 2.532 6.190 567.537

Other $m2.564 16.838 68.849 11.849 5.509 4.431 5.348 17.001 132.389

Total 5m 3029.3 7 9 2447.661 1 8 03.053 628.528 989.586 233.130 1 7 2 .1 8 4 363.858 9 6 67.379

Capital charge49 % 8.0 8.0 8.0 8.0 8.0 8.0 8.0 8.0 8.0

Cast of capital

Land $m 45.253 50.385 38.845 12.463 22.268 1.302 0.762 19.648 190.926

Buildings $m190.927 134.255 76.685 34.735 53.535 16.346 12.382 7.606 526.470

Plant, equipment and motor vehicles $m5.966 9.826 23.206 2.136 2.923 0.648 0.203 0.495 45.403

Other $m 0.205 1.347 5.508 0.948 0.441 0.354 0.428 1.360 10.591

Total $m 242.350 195.813 144.244 50.282 79.167 18 .65 0 1 3 .77 5 29.109 773.3 9 0

Adjusted FYTE15∑45 168341 134099 75002 32403 55035 10066 5607 8440 488993

Adjusted hours48 hours m121.205 96.551 54.001 23.330 39.625 7.247 4.037 6.077 352.075

Course mix weight50 index 0.988 1.000 1.021 0.999 1.009 1.004 1.019 0.986 1.000

Cost of capital per adjusted FYTE15,51

Land $ 271.97 375.87 507.49 385.10 401.05 128.78 133.40 2361.95 390.45

Buildings $ 1147.47 1001.55 1001.85 1073.26 964.17 1617.12 2166.93 914.331078.64

Plant, equipment and motor vehicles $ 35.85 73.30 303.18 66.01 52.65 64.08 35.45 59.53 92.85

Other $ 1.23 10.05 71.96 29.29 7.94 35.07 74.87 163.50 21.66

Total 2009 $ 14 5 6.5 3 1460.77 188 4.4 8 1553.65 1425.81 1845.05 24 1 0.6 5 3499.31 158 1.6 0

Total 2008 $ 14 9 0.3 3 1461.57 1928.17 1344.77 1706.08 1719.12 23 8 3.7 9 3861.20 161 7.6 3

Cost of capital per adjusted hour51

Land $ 0.38 0.52 0.70 0,53 0.56 0.18 0.19 3.28 0.54

Buildings $ 1.59 1.39 1.39 1.49 1.34 2.25 3.01 1.27 1.50

Plant, equipment and motor vehicles $ 0.05 0.10 0.42 0,09 0.07 0.09 0.05 0.08 0.13

Other $ 0.00 0.01 0.10 0.04 0.01 0.05 0.10 0.23 0.03

Total 2009 $ 2.02 2.03 2.62 2.16 1.98 2.56 3.35 4.86 2.20

Total 2008 $ 2.07 2.03 2.68 1.87 2.37 2.39 3.31 5.36 2.25

Source: MOVER, Australian vocational education and training statistics: Financial information, 2008-2009, draft - unpublished. See also endnotes as referenced in the table, which can be found at the end of Appendix A, for detailed information on any caveats and technical issues associated with the data presented in this table.

p153

*… 3 C*… 3 03 rt o' 3 03

1 CD 13 O

3

m CL

ro 3 *ì*ü oo CD

Table A.27: Agreed values equivalent to Qualifications by Field of Education and AQF Level

Graduate Diploma720 720 720 720 720 720 720 720 720 720 720 720

Professional Specialist qualification at Graduate Diploma Level720 720 720 720 720 720 720 720 720 720 720

720

Graduate Certificate360 360 360 360 360 360 360 320 360 360 360 360

Professional Specialist qualification at Graduate Certificate Level360 360 360 360 360 360 360 360 360 360 360

360

Bachelor Degree (Hons) 720 720 720 720 720 720 720 720 720 720 720 720

Bachelor Degree (Pass) 2160 2160 2160 2160 2160 2160 2160 2160 2160 2660 2160 2160

Advanced Diploma 1440 1820 1480 2020 1440 830 1440 1200 1230 1630 1440 1440

Associate Degree1440 1440 1440 1440 1440 1440 1440 1440 1440 1440 1440 1440

Diploma1440 1150 910 1580 1300 1330 510 680 1030 1480 1660 1000

Certificate IV 790 920 1180 780 530 820 320 430 770 780 1080 570

Certificate III 500 480 860 860 640 540 400 380 540 570 820 360

Certificate II 360 370 390 640 490 250 460 350 360 380 420 340

Certificate 1 240 240 250 210 180 240 340 150 360 230 170 360

Appendix A * Endnotes Information about student participation in Australia's vocational education and training system is gathered annually through a national data collection. The collection is undertaken under a national standard (AVETMISS) where all RTOs who receive public

funding for the provision of training to students are required to provide detailed information about the students that they have trained. Under current arrangements, private RTOs are required only to provide details of the students that they have trained using

hinds sourced from direct government VET funding. On the other hand, publicly owned training providers (such as TAPE) are required to report information on all of their students

and from all funding sources (i.e. including fee-for-service training). As a consequence, the information reported here significantly understates the total

number of students who participate each year in recognised training under the auspices of the AQTF. For example,

the national collection currently misses out those who train in enterprise-based RTOs (without direct government VET funding) and those paying fee-for- service to private training providers.

2. In 2006 New South Wales reported activity for workplace learning and the NSW AMES Skillmax Program for the first time.

3. In 2007 the decline in student numbers in New South Wales can be partly attributed to new and better defined exclusions from reporting scopes. New South Wales excluded subcontracted VET activity for 2600 students, 29 200

subject enrolments and 892 100 nominal hours. In addition, 3400 students, 47 300 subject enrolments and 1 706 600 nominal hours were excluded because it was activity' undertaken at overseas campuses.

4. Data from the New South Wales agricultural colleges were unable to be reported for 2008 at the time of the release of the 2008 Annual National Report. This data has subsequently been included for reporting.

5. Victoria submitted one consolidated submission for 2009 activity', in place of the three previous submissions (TAPE, ACE and Private Providers). As a consequence of the way some adult and community' education and private registered training organisations are scoped, there may be some slight reporting differences in 2009 compared

to previous years.

6. Data from the Workers Education Association of South Australia were unable to be reported for inclusion in the 2009 National VET Provider Collection.

In 2008 WEA reported 6397 students, 7993 subject enrolments and 135 312 nationally agreed nominal hours and 188 full-time training equivalents.

Data from Tasmania for 2009 is not necessarily comparable with previous years due to changes in training arrangements implemented in the Tasmania Tomorrow initiatives. These initiatives included senior secondary colleges and TAPE being replaced by

the Tasmanian Academy, the Tasmanian Polytechnic and the Skills Institute.

8. Major funding source indicates the highest funding source for students, assigned in the following order:

p154 annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009

Government; Fee for Service * International Students; Fee for Service * Domestic Students. Government funded activity is based on major funding source codes 01, 02, 11,

13, 15. It excludes activity funded by private and overseas providers, students enrolled in fee-for-service activity, overseas full-fee paying

activity, recreational, leisure and personal enrichment programs, and

any credit transfer activity. Vocational education and training delivered in schools, where the delivery has been undertaken by schools is also excluded.

In previous publications, government funded activity was based only on major funding source codes 01 and 11.

Due to this redefinition, all measures of government funded activity have changed. The magnitude of change can

be summarised as follows:

Number of students 1,197.5 1,252.2

FYTEs 446.7 466.9

9. Fee for service * Domestic Student funding is based on major funding source codes 03 and 20.

10. Fee for service * International Student funding is based on major funding source codes 04 and 30.

11. Age group percentages are based on 15-64 year olds.

12. *Course level * denotes the highest qualification attempted by a student in a reporting year.

13. *Certificate I, II or lower * includes Certificate I, II, and Senior Secondary.

14. O ther * includes training programs that do not directly lead to a qualification. That is, non award courses, subject only enrolments and miscellaneous education.

15. FYTEs express training activity in terms of equivalent full-time students. A FYTE of one represents the activity of

a student who is training on a full-time basis for one year. FYTEs are based on annual hours of training (720 hours = 1 FYTE). FYTEs in efficiency tables A.21-A.26 (and the corresponding state/territory tables) are based on

adjusted annual hours (please refer to endnote 46).

16. In 2007, Victoria adopted end-date reporting and standard nominal hour values for common units of competency as the basis of calculating total hours of delivery. Previous years continue to be reported as scheduled hours. Consequently, this represents a break-in-series for Victorian and Australian hours.

17. Load Pass Rate is the ratio of hours/ FYTEs attributed to students who gained competencies/passed assessment in an assessable module or unit of competency to all students who

p155 annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009

were assessed and eidier passed, failed or withdrew. Note that previously published figures have changed due to the implementation of nationally consistent nominal hour values (see endnote 16). The calculation is based

(20 (Competency achieved/pass) + 50, 51 (Recognition of prior learning - granted)) xlOO (20 (Competency

achieved/pass) + 50, 51 (Recognition of prior learning - granted) + 30 (Competency not achieved/fail) + 40 (Withdrawn)) 18. Final qualifications completed data

for 2009 are not available. Only preliminary data is available from the 2009 national provider collection.

19. In 2009 NCVER changed the reporting scope for qualifications completed and backdated it to all previous years. Consequently, data in this publication may not match previously published data. This affects all previous years.

20. Due to improvements in data quality, Queensland has submitted additional qualifications completed between 2004 and 2007 rectifying the underreporting oi qualifications previously identified over this period. This affects both Queensland and Australia reporting.

2 1. Improvements in data quality resulted in the removal of some qualifications completed for NSW Workplace Training in 2007 and 2008. This

affects both New South Wales and Australian reporting.

on the annual hours/FYTEs for each assessable module or unit of competency and includes competencies achieved/ units passed through recognition

of prior learning. Load Pass Rate is calculated using the following formula:

22. Qualification Equivalents (QEs) expresses skill outputs in terms of equivalent qualifications within each AQF level and Field of Education.

QEs are based on the training activity (annual hours) associated with completions of modules and units of competency, divided by an agreed value of training activity representing a qualification. Please refer to table A.27 for a list of these agreed values.

23. Total reported VET covers students from all provider types and funding sources. Note, 2005 included some students undertaking training with private providers that was delivered on a fee-for-service basis.

24. 'TAFE government funded students' are students from a TAFE institute undertaking VET funded by commonwealth/state recurrent or specific funding. Since 2005 students from other government providers, such as agricultural colleges, are also included.

25. All non-respondents have been excluded from the analysis. The sample was designed to provide state/territory level reporting in 2006 and 2008,

and state/territory and institute level reporting in 2005, 2007 and 2009. A

[20 (Competency achieved/pass] + 50, 51 (Recognition of prior lesrning - granted)! x100

(20 (Competency achieved/pess) + 50, 51 (Recognition of prior learning - granted) + 30 (Competency not achieved/fail) + 40 (Withdrawn)!

p156 annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009

larger sample is required in the institute level reporting years to provide reliable institute estimates. Therefore, sample sizes in 2005, 2007 and 2009 were

larger than in 2006 and 2008.

26. The term 'graduate1 refers to students who are reported as completing all requirements for a qualification and students who self-identify as completing all requirements.

27. The term 'module completer1 refers to students who successfully completed part of a qualification and then left the VET system. It is important to note

that, at the time of sample selection, insufficient information was available to identify " actual" module completers. Instead, a sample of potential module

completers was chosen which includes continuing students and graduates. The exact status of respondents is determined at the time of the survey through the information provided on the survey form.

28. Employed after training is determined by asking respondents 'Did you have a job of any kind at creference date>?' 29. Employed prior to training is

determined by asking respondents 'Did you have a job at any time during the six months before undertaking the training shown on the front of the form?1 30. Improved employment circumstances

is employment status changing from not employed before training to employed after training OR employed at a higher skill level after training OR received a job-related benefit. From

2007, change in skill level was derived using the Australian and New Zealand Standard Classification of Occupations

(ANZSCO 2006). Skill level for prior years was derived using the Australian Standard Classification of Occupations (ASCO 1997).

31. These questions are not asked of students from community education providers. Therefore, the percentage reported represents tire proportion of graduates or module completers, respectively, excluding those from community education providers.

32. For module completers, the only further study included is university study as, by definition, module completers have left the VET system.

33. Includes students who fully or partly achieved their main reason for undertaking the training.

34. 'Satisfied with the overall quality of training' was rated as 'agree' or 'strongly agree' on a 5-point scale to the statement: 'Overall, I was satisfied with the quality of this training'.

35. Engaged with VET system: if has had employees undertaking an apprenticeship or traineeship or has provided nationally recognised training in the last 12 months or if had employees with formal vocational qualification as a requirement of their job.

36. Engagement with apprenticeships/ traineeships: Had employees undertaking an apprenticeship or traineeship in the last 12 months.

37. Engagement with nationally recognised training: Organisation arranged or provided nationally recognised training to employees over the past

12 months.

p157 annua! national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009

38 Engagement with formal vocational qualifications: Had employees in the last 12 months with a formal vocational qualification that was a requirement of their job.

39 Satisfied is a rating of 'satisfied' or 'very satisfied1.

40 Nationally recognised training is defined as nationally recognised training other than as part of an apprenticeship or traineeship. For the purposes of this survey, employers with apprenticeships and traineeships are reported separately.

41. Satisfaction with the VET system: satisfaction with apprentices and trainees, nationally recognised training and formal vocational qualifications as

a job requirement. If satisfied with all aspects engaged with, satisfied with all; if dissatisfied with all aspects engaged with, dissatisfied with all; if mixture of satisfied/dissatisfied/neutral/can't say,

not fully satisfied or dissatisfied.

Dissatisfied is a rating of 'dissatisfied' or 'very dissatisfied'.

Total expenditure is the total expenses from all funding sources, government and non government, as reported by States and Territories in the Income Statements provided to NCVER in the annual AVETMISS finance collection

(net of VET in Schools grants and subsidies). Each year's expenditure has been adjusted to 2009 prices using the

GDP Chain Price index yearly measure relative to die 2009 base year index set as 1.000.

44 Government recurrent expenditure is deemed as being equivalent to the recurrent funds provided by the Commonwealth, and State

and Territory governments, but not including funding from Commonwealth administered programs. The expenditure reflects expenditures sourced from ongoing,

base recurrent funding. It is calculated by adding the following AVETMISS financial statements revenue items for the government recurrent payments received by states and territories: Commonwealth National Agreement revenue (net of VET in Schools revenues), State Recurrent revenue and revenues for VET expenses and liabilities of state/territory training departments

undertaken by another department or agency but required to be reported in the financial accounts of the training

department. The latter are recorded as Assumption of Liabilities in the AVETMISS financial statements. Each year's expenditure has been adjusted to 2009 prices using the GDP Chain Price index yearly measure relative to the 2009

base year index set as 1.000.

43 Total government expenditure is deemed as being equivalent to the recurrent hinds provided by the Commonwealth, and State and Territory governments, including funding from Commonwealth administered programs. It is calculated by adding the following AVETMISS financial statements revenue items for the

government recurrent payments received by states and territories: Commonwealth National Agreement revenue (net of VET in Schools revenues), State Recurrent revenue, Commonwealth Administered Programs revenues and

revenues for VET expenses and liabilities of state/territory training departments undertaken by another department or

p158 annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009

agency but required to be reported in the financial accounts of the training department. The latter are recorded as Assumption of Liabilities in the AVETMISS financial statements. Each year's expenditure has been adjusted to 2009 prices using the GDP Chain Price index yearly measure relative to the 2009 base year index set as 1.000.

46. Adjusted annual hours are determined by applying the invalid enrolment rate (see endnote 48 below) to all annual hours, excluding hours related to Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL). The full annual hours for Recognition of Prior Learning are then added.

47 Expenditure per annual hour or FYTE is weighted to recognise the different proportions of relatively more expensive and less expensive training programs that occur in jurisdictions. Tables A.21, A.23, A.25, and the corresponding state/territory tables, present two

methods of calculating these course mix weightings. Under the 'old method', course mix weights are derived by applying a set of cost relativities by funding industry to a tabulation of

annual hours by funding industry and state/territory. The funding scope of these annual hours is consistent with

the scope of the expenditure data. Under the 'new method', a new set of cost relativities by subject field of education is derived from the old set of cost relativities, based on a tabulation of annual hours ('total government' scope) by funding industry and subject field of education at the Australia level in 2008. This new set of cost relativities is then applied to tabulations of annual hours by subject field of education and state/territory to derive the new course

mix weightings. Once again, the funding scope of the annual hours is consistent with the scope of the expenditure data. The reference value for all measures

is 1.000 for Australia and a weighting greater than 1.000 indicates that the state or territory is offering relatively more expensive programs compared to

the national profile.

48. NCVER is contracted by DEEVVR to report on the accuracy and reliability of the total number of vocational education and training course enrolments and the associated total number of annual hours. A random sampling methodology is

used to determine the overall level of reported enrolments that are invalidly reported. Invalid enrolments are those student enrolments reported in the VET

Provider Collection as participating in a module or unit of competency but for which the auditors were not supplied sufficient evidence to confirm that

the student had participated in that enrolment within the reporting year.

The proportion of invalid enrolments has been derived from data provided by TAPE providers. An invalid enrolment rate is calculated and used to adjust the

reported annual hours in the Annual National Report. Adjustments are made by DEEVVR based on formal advice provided by NCVER auditors. Such advice has been endorsed by each State and Territory. While the actual hours are used for calculating the

total expenditure, total government expenditure and government recurrent expenditure measures, the same invalid enrolment rates have been used for

these measures as it was not possible to calculate distinct rates for the first two measures in 2005-09.

annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009 p159

49 Capital charge rate is applied at a nominal 8 per cent for each jurisdiction, although the actual rate may vary across jurisdictions. The basis

for the 8 per cent capital charge is discussed in Chapter 5, page 31 of the Report on Government Services 2010 published by the Steering Committee for the Review of Government Service Provision.

50 Course mix weights used in this table are derived under the 'new method' (see endnote 47 above).

51 The cost of capital per adjusted annual hour or FYTE reflects the opportunity cost of government assets that could otherwise be used to provide other services or to retire debt. The cost of capital per adjusted annual hour or FYTE is the cost of capital multiplied by the course mix weight divided by the adjusted annual hours or FYTTL

p160 annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009

Appendix B: Disadvantage in VET

This section considers participation and outcomes for three specific groups: Indigenous, students with a disability and

students with a language background other than English. It also presents data classified by socio-economic status (as measured by Socio-Economic Indexes for Areas), geographical remoteness (as measured by the ABS Accessibility'/Remoteness Index of Australia) and highest level of prior educational attainment with the aim of looking at the relationship between these aspects of disadvantage/advantage and the various indicators of participation and outcomes.

Data relating to female and male students is also included in this section for completeness. Figures relating

to participation of female and male students are included in the Section 2: Key Indicators.

Annual hours of delivery are not presented in this report. However, they are used in the derivation of Load Pass Rates, FYTEs and Qualification Equivalents. In 2006,

all states and territories except Victoria adopted standard nominal hour values for units of competency as the basis of

calculating total annual hours of delivery. To enable comparison over time, standard nominal hour values were used to recast the time series back to 2005 for all states

and territories except Victoria. From 2007 onwards, Victorian annual hours of delivery are reported as standard nominal hour values; however due to the manner in which Victorian historical data was collected the

time series back to 2005 cannot be recast. As Victoria *s hours of delivery prior to 2007 were reported as scheduled hours, the 2007

data represents a break-in-series from data in previous years.

Most comparisons relating to Student outcomes included in this section are subject to sampling variability'.

annual national report of the australian vocational and technical education system 2009 p161

Table B.1: The number of students who participate in vocational education and training each year by student groups____________ ________________

Total reported VET students1, 2005 to 2009

1

Total VET Students (*Ã¥00) 1 65D.8 1 676.D 1 665.0 1 699.7 1 706.7

Female students ('%°%°%°) 794.7 795.7 794.2 807.6 805.6

Female students (%) 48.1 47.5 47.7 47.5 47.2

Male students ('0001 851.9 878.2 868.0 889.9 896.2

Male students (%) 51.6 52.4 52.1 52.4 52.5

Indigenous Students8 (*Ã¥00) 62.9 67.8 70.9 73.9 74.8

Indigenous Students (%) 3.8 4.0 4.3 4.3 4.4

People with a disability9 ('0001 96.9 102.4 102.1 99.5 100.9

People with a disability [%] 5.9 6.1 6.1 5.9 5.9

People with a language background other than English10 ['000) 203.6 219.5 230.7 248.1 254.3

People with a language background other than English (%) 12.3 13.1 13.9 14.6 14.9

Educational attainm ent11 (*Ã¥00)

Year 10 and below 371.6 414.8 424.3 437.4 426.2

Year 11 and Certificate I or II 162.8 188.0 193.0 204.8 205.2

Year 12 366.7 361.0 364.8 379.5 382.6

Certificate III or IV 157.6172.9 185.7 204.3 226.0

Diploma and above160.2 163.1 176.5 196.7 209.2

Educational attainm ent (% )

Year 10 and below 22.5 24.8 25.5 25.7 25.0

Year 11 and Certificate I or II 9.911.2 11.6 12.0 12.0

Year 12 22.2 21.5 21.9 22.3 22.4

Certificate III or IV 9.5 10.3 11.212.0 13.2

Diploma and above 9.7 9.7 18.6 11.6 12.3

SEIFA Index of relative Socio-economic Disadvantage12∑13 (*Ã¥00)

Quintile 1 (Most disadvantaged) 230.3 252.0 257.5 252.5

Quintile 2 377.2 400.0 482.9 402.9

Quintile 3 323.6 345.9 355.5 352.8

Quintile 4 320.9 337.9 348.0 347.6

Quintile 5 (Least disadvantaged) 239.3 251.0 254.8 254.7

SEIFA Index of relative Socio-economic Disadvantage (% )

Quintile 1 (Most disadvantaged] 13.7 15.1 15.2 14.8

Quintile 2 22.5 24.0 23.7 23.6

Quintile 3 19.3 20.8 20.9 20.7

Quintile 4 19.1 20.3 20.5 20.4

Source: NCVER, Vocational Education and Training Provider Collection, 2005-2009, See also endnotes as referenced in the table, which can be found at the end of Appendix B, for detailed information on any caveats and technical issues associated with the data presented in this table.

p162

This table continues on the next page.

annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009

Table B.1 (continued)

Quintile 5 (Least disadvantaged] 14.315.1 15.0 14.9

ABS Accessibility / Remoteness Index of Australia14 t'0 0 0 )

Major cities 898.0 909.8 891.6 914.9 917.7

Inner regional area380.4 387.5 38B.9 400.3 394.9

Outer regional area248.8 252.8 251.4 252.2 249.9

Remote and very remote73.3 77.7 79.6 78.0 75.9

ABS Accessibility / Remoteness Index of Australia (% )

Major cities 54.4 54.3 53.5 53.8 53.8

Inner regional area23.0 23.1 23.2 23.5 23.1

Outer regional area 15.1 15.1 15.1 14.8 14.6

Remote and very remote4.4 4.6 4.8 4.6 4.4

Source: NCVER, Vocational Education and Training Provider Collection, 2005-2009, See also endnotes as referenced in the table, which can be found at the end of Appendix B, for detailed information on any caveats and technical issues associated with the data presented in this table.

Table B.2: The number of government funded students who participate in _ ___ vocational education and training each year by student groups Government15 funded VET students1, 2005 to 2009

Government funded VET students ['%°%°%°] 1 216.7 1 247.9 1 243.7 1 253.9 1 274.3

Female students (*Ã¥80) 611.6 622.3 615.0 615.8 619.1

Female students {%) 50.3 49.9 49.4 49.1 48.6

Male students (*Ã¥00) 602.1 623.9 626.5 63B.5 651.1

Male students (%) 49.5 50.8 50.4 50.8 51.1

Indigenous Students8 FOOD] 57.4 62.1 64.8 66.9 67.7

Indigenous Students (%] 4.7 5.0 5.2 5.3 5.3

People with a disability9 ('%°%°%°) 84.4 89.3 89.7 86.9 88.1

People with a disability [%) 6.9 7.2 7.2 6.9 6.9

People with a language background other than English10 (*å*ü*ü) 160.7 171.8 176.3 184.6 181.2

People with a language background other than English (%)

Educational attainm ent11 I'OOO)

13.2 13.8 14.2 14.7 14.2

Year 10 and below 298.7 348.8 354.4 362.9 354.0

Year 11 and Certificate I or II 130.4 154.6 162.6 171.3 171.0

Year 12 304.4 298.1 29B.7 303.3 304.7

Certificate III or IV 117.5 125.7135.5 145.8 163.9

Diploma and above113.3 114.3 119.1 128.9 135.0

Source: NCVER, Vocational Education and Training Provider Collection, 2005-2009. See also endnotes as referenced in the table, which can be found at the end of Appendix B, for detailed information on any caveats and technical issues associated with the data presented in this table.

This table continues on the next page.

p163 annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009

Table B.2 [continued)

1

Educational attainm ent (% )

Year 10 and below 24.6 27.3 28.5 28.9 27.8

Year 11 and Certificate I or II 10.7 12.4 13.1 13.7 13.4

Year 12 25.0 23.9 24.0 24.2 23.9

Certificate III or IV 9.7 10.1 10.9 11.6 12.9

Diploma and above 9.3 9.2 9.6 10.3 10.6

SEIFA Index of relative Socio-economic Disadvantage12∑13 (ODD)

Quintile 1 (Most disadvantaged) 179.3 199.1 200.5 200.5

Quintile 2 287.6 310.3 306.4 312.5

Quintile 3 239.7 264.1 270.2 269.8

Quintile 4 236.2 251.0 256.4 263.6

Quintile 5 (Least disadvantaged) 176.5 188.5 189.8 192.6

SEIFA Index of relative Socio-economic Disadvantage (% )

Quintile 1 (Most disadvantaged) 14.4 16.0 16.0 15.7

Quintile 2 23.0 24.9 24.4 24.5

Quintile 3 19.2 21.2 21.5 21.2

Quintile 4 18.9 20.2 20.4 20.7

Quintile 5 (Least disadvantaged) 14.1 15.2 15.1 15.1

ABS Accessibility / Remoteness Index of Australia14 ( *ODD)

Major cities 679.8 699.3 689.6 701.0 715.9

Inner regional area 276.2 285.0 288.3 295.3 298.1

Outer regional area187.7 192.8 191.0 188.6 188.3

Remote and very remote57.5 59.3 60.7 58.4 57.7

ABS Accessibility / Remoteness Index of Australia (% )

Major cities 55.9 56.0 55.4 55.9 56.2

Inner regional area22.7 22.8 23.2 23.5 23.4

Outer regional area15.4 15.5 15.4 15.0 14.8

Remote and very remote4.7 4.8 4.9 4.7 4.5

Source: NCVER, Vocational Education and Training Provider Collection, 2005-2009. See also endnotes as referenced in the table, which can be found at the end of Appendix B, for detailed information on any caveats and technical issues associated with the data presented in this table.

p164 annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009

Table B.3: The number of Full-Year Training Equivalents (FYTE) undertaken in ___ vocational education and training each year by student groups Total reported VET FYTE1 *16∑17 2005 to 2009

Total FYTE

Number of FYTE I'OOO) 502.8 516.8 541.8 568.4 609.6

Annual growth (%] 2.8 4.8 4.9 7.3

Growth since 2005 (%) 2.8 7.8 13.0 21.2

FYTE per Student * Total FYTE0.30 0.31 0.33 0.33 0.36

Female students

Number of FYTE (*Ã¥00) 247.6 252.8 265.1 276.1 297.8

Annual growth (%] 2.1 4.9 4.2 7.8

Growth since 2005 [%) 2.1 7.1 11.5 20.3

FYTE per Student * Female students 0.31 0.32 0.33 0.34 0.37

Female students * By Age Group26 (% )

Age 15 to 19 29.0 28.5 27.9 27.5 26.5

Age 20 to 24 18.8 18.6 18.4 17.9 18.4

Age 25 to 39 26.8 27.2 27.4 27.8 28.3

Age 40 to 64 25.3 25.7 26.4 26.9 26.8

Total 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

Female students * By Course Level19 (% )

Diploma and above 24.9 24.7 24.4 24.5 27.2

Certificate III or IV 45.4 47.0 47.7 47.9 49.0

Certificate I or II or lower20 19.4 18.8 18.9 18.0 16.4

Other31 10.3 9.6 9.1 9.6 7.4

Total 100.0 100.0 100,0 100.0 100.0

M ale students

Number of FYTE ('0001 254.8 263.6 276.3 291.8 310.9

Annual growth (%) 3.4 4.8 5.6 6.5

Growth since 2005 (%) 3.4 8.4 14.5 22.0

FYTE per Student * Male students 0.30 0.30 0.32 0.33 0.35

M ale students * By Age Group26 (% )

Age 15 to 19 35.5 34,9 33.9 33.2 32.2

Age 20 to 24 24.1 24.6 24.9 24.8 24.6

Age 25 to 39 24.0 24.4 25.0 25.9 26.4

Age 40 to 64 16.3 16.1 16.1 16.2 16.7

Total 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

Source: NCVER, Vocational Education and Training Provider Collection, 2005-2009. See also endnotes as referenced in the table, which can be found at the end of Appendix B, for detailed information on any caveats and technical issues associated with the data presented in this table.

This table continues on the next page.

annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009 p165

Table B.3 (continued)

M ale students * By Course Level19 (% )

Diploma and above

Certificate 111 or IV

Certificate I or II or lower *

Other31

Total

Indigenous Students8

Number of FYTE (*Ã¥00)

Annual growth [%)

Growth since 2005 (%)

FYTE per Student * Indigenous Students

People with a disability3

Number of FYTE *ì000)

Annual growth [%]

Growth since 2005 [%)

FYTE per Student - People with a disability

People with a language background other than English10

Number of FYTE ( %°%°%°)

Annual growth [%)

Growth since 2005 [%)

FYTE per Student- * People with a language background other than English

Educational attainm ent11

Year 10 and below

Number of FYTE ('0001

Annual growth (%)

Growth since 2005 (%]

FYTE per Student * Year 10 and below

Year 11 and C ertificate I or II

Number of FYTE (*Ã¥00)

Annual growth (%)

Growth since 2005 (%)

FYTE per Student * Year 11 and Certificate I or II

Year 12

Number of FYTE (*Ã¥00)

Annual growth [%)

Growth since 2005 (%)

FYTE per Student * Year 12

20.6 19.8 19.4 19.2 19.9

50.4 51.7 53.4 54.8 55.8

19.7 19.8 18.2 16.9 16.9

9.2 8.7 9.0 9.0 7.4

100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

19.3 19.9 20.5 22.0 22.8

2.8 3.2 7.5 3.6

2.8 6.0 14.0 18.1

0.31 0.29 0.29 0.30 0.31

34.9 37.4 37.2 37.7 39.3

7.4 -0.5 1.3 4.1

7.4 6.8 8.2 12.6

0.36 0.37 0.36 0.38 0.39

87.4 94.6 106.2 115.9 127.0

8.3 12.2 9.1 9.6

8.3 21.6 32.7 45.4

0.43 0.43 0.46 0.47

0.50

108.8 115.9 123.1 130.6 132.9

6.5 6.3 6.1 1.7

6.5 13.2 20.1 22.2

0.29 0.28 0.29 0.30 0.31

52.7 56.7 60.7 66.2 69.5

7.5 7.1 9.1 5.0

7.5 15.1 25.5 31.9

0.32 0.30 0.31 0.32 0.34

146.0 146.0 154.3 159.4 168.8

-0.0 5.7 3.4 5.9

-0.0 5.7 9.2 15.6

0.40 . 0.40 0.42 0.42 0.44

Source; NCVER, Vocational Education and Training Provider Collection, 2005-2009. See also endnotes as referenced in the table, which can be found at the end of Appendix B, for detailed information on any caveats and technical issues associated with the data presented in this table. This table continues on the next page.

p16B annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009

Table B.3 (continued)

C ertificate III or IV

Number of FYTE ('%°%°%°)

Annual growth (%]

Growth since 2005 i%)

FYTE per Student * Certificate III or IV

Diploma and above

Number of FYTE (*Ã¥00)

Annual growth 1%)

Growth since 2005 i%]

FYTE per Student * Diploma and above

SEIFA Index of relative Socio-economic Disadvantage12∑13 f'OOO)

Quintile 1 (M ost disadvantaged)

Number of FYTE (*å00*™

Annual growth (%)

Growth since 200B (%)

FYTE per Student * Quintile 1

Quintile 2

Number of FYTE (*Ã¥00)

Annual growth (%)

Growth since 2006 (%)

FYTE per Student * Quintile 2

Quintile 3

Number of FYTE ['000)

Annual growth (%)

Growth since 2006 (%)

FYTE per Student * Quintile 3

Quintile 4

Number of FYTE FOOD]

Annual growth (%]

Growth since 2006 (%)

FYTE per Student * Quintile 4

Quintile 5 (Least disadvantaged)

Number of FYTE FOOD)

56.5 62.2 71.0 79.2 93.2

10.2 14.2 11.5 17.6

10.2 25.8 40.3 65.0

%°.36 0.36 0.38 0.39 0.41

47.5 51.3 58.2 67.8 77.5

8.1 13.3 16.5 143

8.1 22.5 42.8 63.3

0.30 0.31 0.33 0.34 0.37

68.2 77.8 81.1 84.1

14.1 4.2 3.7

14.1 18.9 23.3

0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3

108.8 119.6 123.1 131.0

9.9 2.9 6.4

9.9 13.1 20.4

0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3

97.1 108.2 114.6 121.5

11.4 5.9 6.0

11.4 18.0 25.1

0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3

101.5 111.2 116.4 124.4

9.6 4.7 6.8

9.6 14.7 22.6

0.3 0.3 0.3 0.4

79.2 87.0 89.5 95.2

9.9 2.8 6.4

9.9 13.0 20.2

0.3 0.3 0.4 0.4

Annual growth [%)

Growth since 2006 (%)

FYTE per Student * Quintile 5

Source: NCVER, Vocational Education and Training Provider Collection, 2005-2009. See also endnotes as referenced in the table, which can be found at the end of Appendix B, for detailed information on any caveats and technical issues associated with the data presented in this table.

This table continues on the next page.

p167 annual national report of the austraiisn vocational education and training system 2009

Table B.3 (continued)

ABS Accessibility / Remoteness Index of Australia *

M ajor cities

Number of FYTE (*Ã¥00)

Annual growth [%)

Growth since 2005 [%)

FYTE per Student * Maior cities

Inner regional area

Number of FYTE (*Ã¥00)

Annual growth (%]

Growth since 2005 (%)

FYTE per Student * Inner regional area

Outer regional area

Number of FYTE (*Ã¥00)

Annual growth (%]

Growth since 2005 (%]

FYTE per Student * Outer regional area

Remote and very remote

Number of FYTE (*Ã¥00)

Annual growth (%)

Growth since 2005 [%)

FYTE per Student * Remote and very remote

293.3 300.0 314.1 326.5 348.5

2.3 4.7 3.9 6.8

2.3 7.1 11.3 1B.B

0.3 0.3 0.4 0.4 0.4

106.0 110.2 114.7 121.4 128.4

3.9 4.0 5.8 5.8

3.9 8.1 14.5 21.1

0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3

61.6 62.8 64.4 66.B 69.8

1.9 2.6 3.8 4.6

1.9 4.6 8.5 13.4

0.2 0.2 0.3 0.3 0.3

17.0 17.4 17.9 18.2 18.4

2.3 2.6 1.8 1.3

2.3 5.0 6.9 8.3

0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2

Source: NEVER, Vocational Education and Training Provider Collection, 2005-2009, See also endnotes as referenced in the table, which can be found at the end of Appendix B, for detailed information on any caveats and technical issues associated with the data presented in this table.

p168 annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009

Table B.4: The number of Full-Year Training Equivalents (FYTE) undertaken in government funded vocational education and training each year by _______student groups __ __

Government15 funded VET FYTE116-17 2005 to 2009

Government funded FYTE

Number of FYTE (*Ã¥00) 427.0 434.5452.3 467.6 498.5

Annual growth (%) 1.8 4.1 3.4 6.6

Growth since 2005 [%) 1.8 5.9 9.5 16.7

FYTE per Student - * Total FYTE 0.35 0.35 0.36 0.37 0.39

Female students

Number of FYTE (ODD) 213.0 216.1 224.5 230.1 245.9

Annual growth (%) 1.4 3.9 2.5 6.9

Growth since 2005 (%) 1.4 5.4 8.0 15.4

FYTE per Student * Female students 0.35 0.350.36 0.37 0.40

Female students * By Age Group26 (% )

Age 15 to 19 30.3 29.9 29.7 29.6 28.9

Age 20 to 24 18.4 18.2 17.9 17.1 17.2

Age 25 to 39 26.1 26.4 26.3 26.4 26.8

Age 40 to 64 25.2 25.6 26.1 26.8 27.2

Total100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

Female students * By Course Level18 (% )

Diploma and above24.3 23.9 23.7 23.5 25.9

Certificate III or IV 46.4 48.0 48.4 49.3 50.4

Certificate I or II or lower20 19.8 19.1 19.5 18.5 17.0

Other21 9.6 9.1 8.3 8.7 6.7

Total100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

M ale students

Number of FYTE ['000) 213.7 218.1 227.5 237.1 251.8

Annual growth (%) 2.1 4.3 4.2 6.2

Growth since 2005 (%) 2.1 6.5 11.0 17.8

FYTE per Student * Male students 0.35 0.35 0.360.37 0.39

M ale students * By Age Group26 (% )

Age 15 to 19 38.3 37.9 37.2 36.9 35.9

Age 20 to 24 24.4 24.9 24.9 24.5 24.0

Age 25 to 39 22.5 22.8 23.3 23.9 24.4

Age 40 to 64 14.7 14.4 14.6 14.7 15.7

Total100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

Source: NCVER, Vocational Education and Training Provider Collection, 2005-2009. See also endnotes as referenced in the table, which can be found at the end of Appendix B, for detailed information on any caveats and technical issues associated with the data presented in this table.

This table continues on the next page.

p169 annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009

Table B.4 (continued)

M ale students * By Course Level *3 1%)

Diploma and above

Certificate III or IV

Certificate I or II or lower20

Other2'

Total

Indigenous Students8

Number of FYTE (*Ã¥00)

Annual growth (%)

Growth since 2005 (%)

FYTE per Student * Indigenous Students

People with a disability9

Number of FYTE COCO)

Annual growth E%)

Growth since 2005 (%)

FYTE per Student - People with a disability

People with a language background other than English * *

Number ofPiTE f *000)

Annual growth (%)

Growth since 2005 (%)

FYTE per Student * People with a language background other than English

Educational attainm ent *

Year 10 and below

Number of FYTE (TOO)

Annual growth (%)

Growth since 2005 (%)

FYTE per Student * Year 10 and below

Year 11 and C ertificate I or II

Number of FYTE (TOO)

Annual growth (%)

Growth since 2005 (%)

FYTE per Student * Year 11 and Certificate I or II

Year 12

Number of FYTE (*Ã¥00)

Annual growth (%)

Growth since 2005 (%)

FYTE per Student * Year 12

19.7 18.9 18.4 17.6 17.8

52.9 54.5 55.8 58.2 59.0

19.8 19.5 18.7 17.4 17.6

7.B7.2 7.1 6.9 5.6

100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

18.4 18.9 19.4 20.7 21.4

2.7 2.9 6.5 3.6

2.7 5.6 12.5 16.5

0.32 0.30 0.30 0.31 0.32

31.9 34.3 34.4 34.7 36.1

7.5 0.1 0.8 4.1

7.5 7.7 8.6 13.1

0.38 0.38 0.38 0.40 0.41

67.4 71.0 77.6 82.1 85.2

5.3 9.4 5.8 3.8

5.3 15.2 21.9 26.5

0.42 0.41 0.44 0.44

0.47

95.8 102.4 109.3 115.3 117.0

6.9 6.6 5.5 1.5

6.9 14.0 20.4 22.1

0.32 0.30 0.31 0.32 0.33

46.6 50.0 54.3 59.4 61.9

7.5 8.6 9.3 4.3

7.5 16.7 27.5 33.0

0.36 0.32 0.33 0.35 0.36

130.6 129.4 134.8 137.0 142.6

%†0.9 4.2 1.6 4.1

-0.9 3.2 4.9 9.2

0.43 0.43 0.45 0.45 0.47

Source: NCVER, Vocational Education and Training Provider Collection, 2005-2009. See also endnotes as referenced in the table, which can be found at the end of Appendix B, for detailed information on any caveats and technical issues associated with the data presented in this table. This table continues on the next page.

p170 annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009

Table B.4 (continued)

Certificate 111 or IV

Number of FYTE ['000)

Annuel growth (%)

Growth since 2005 (%)

FYTE per Student * Certificate III or IV

Diploma and above

Number of FYTE *ì*ü*ü*ü)

Annual growth (%)

Growth since 2005 [%)

FYTE per Student * Diploma and above

SEIFfl Index of relative Socio-economic Disadvantage12∑13 ['ODD)

Quintile 1 (M ost disadvantaged)

Number of FYTE (*Ã¥00)

Annual growth (%)

Growth since 2006 (%)

FYTE per Student * Quintile 1

Quintile 2

Number of FYTE *ô*å00)

Annual growth [%)

Growth since 2006 (%)

FYTE per Student * Quintile 2

Quintile 3

Number of FYTE (*Ã¥00)

Annual growth (%)

Growth since 2006 [%)

FYTE per Student * Quintile 3

Quintile 4

Number of FYTE (*Ã¥00)

Annual growth [%)

Growth since 2006 [%)

FYTE per Student * Quintile 4

Quintile 5 (Least disadvantaged)

Number of FYTE (*Ã¥00)

49.2 53.1 60.6 67.2 78.8

7.9 14.1 10.8 17.2

7.9 23.2 36.5 60.0

0.42 0.42 0.45 0.46 0.48

38.4 40.1 44.7 51.1 56.1

4.2 11.6 14.4 9.7

4.2 16.3 33.1 45.9

0.34 0.35 0.38 0.40 0.42

60.1 68.7 70.8 73.9

14.3 3.1 4.4

14.3 17.B23.0

0.3 0.3 0.4 0.4

96.0 105.8 108.1 115.5

10.3 2.2 6.9

10.3 12.6 20.3

0.3 0.3 0.4 0.4

84.5 94.8 100.2 106.6

12.2 5.7 6.4

12.2 18.5 26.1

0.4 0.4 0.4 0.4

88.2 96.9 100.9 108.4

9.9 4.0 7.4

9.9 14.3 22.8

0.4 0.4 0,4 0.4

69.9 77.1 78.7 83.6

10.4 2.0 6.3

10.4 12.6 19.7

0.4 0.4 0.4 0.4

Annual growth (%)

Growth sioce 2006 (%)

FYTE per Student * Quintile 5

Source: MOVER, Vocational Education and Training Provider Collection, 2005-2009. See also endnotes as referenced in the table, which can be found at the end of Appendix B, for detailed information on any caveats and technical issues associated with the data presented in this table.

This table continues on the next page.

annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009 p171

Table B.4 [continued)

ABS Accessibility / Remoteness Index of Australia1'1

M ajor cities

Number of FYTE ('%°%°%°)

Annual growth (%)

Growth since 2005 (%)

FYTE per Student * Major cities

Inner regional area

Number of FYTE *ì000)

Annual growth (%)

Growth since 2005 (%)

FYTE per Student - Inner regional area

Outer regional area

Number of FYTE (TOO)

Annual growth (%)

Growth since 2005 (%)

FYTE per Student - Outer regional area

Remote and very rem ote

Number of FYTE (TOO)

262.4 266.9 278.7 288.0 307.7

1.7 4.4 3.3 6.8

1.7 6.2 9.8 17.2

0.4 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.4

91.7 94.7 98.7 104.1 111.4

3.2 4.3 5.4 7.0

3.2 7.7 13.5 21.5

0.3 0.3 0.3 0.4 0.4

54.0 54.9 56.2 57.6 60.5

1.7 2.4 2.5 5.0

1.7 4.1 6.7 12.0

0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3

15.1 15.1 15.9 15.9 16.2

-0.0 5.2 -0.4 1.9

-0.0 5.2 4.9 6.9

0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3

Annual growth (%)

Growth since 2005 (%)

FYTE per Student - Remote and very remote

Source: NCVER, Vocational Education and Training Provider Collection, 2005-2009. See also endnotes as referenced in the table, which can be found at the end of Appendix B, for detailed information on any caveats and technical issues associated with the data presented in this table.

p172 annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009

Table B.5: The rate of successfully completed VET student activity undertaken __ ___ each year by student groups and course level

Load Pass Rate1718 for Total reported VET students1, 2005 to 2009

Total VET students * Load Pass Rate (% ) 78.9 79.2 79.4 80.1 80.6

By Course Level19 (%)

Diploma and above79.5 79.5 79.7 80.9 81.5

Certificate III or IV 81.4 81.481.6 82.5 82.6

Certificate 1 or II or lower20 71.9 73.0 73.3 73.2 74.1

Other31 79.0 78.6 78.2 77.3 76.2

Female students * Load Pass Rate 1%) 78.7 78.7 79.1 79.8 80.3

By Course Level19 (%)

Diploma and above 82.1 82.5 82.3 83.3 83.6

Certificate III or IV 80.1 79.7 80.2 81.5 81.7

Certificate 1 or II or lower20 70.7 71.4 72.4 72.1 72.7

Other21 78.1 77.3 76.8 75.0 74.1

M ale students * Load Pass Rate (% ) 79.1 79.6 79.8 80.5 80.8

By Course Level19 (%)

Diploma and above76.3 75.9 76.5 78.0 78.9

Certificate III or IV 82.5 82.9 82.8 83.483.4

Certificate 1 or II or lower20 73.0 74.5 74.1 74.3 75.4

Other21 79.9 80.0 79.6 79.6 78.0

Indigenous Students8 * Load Pass Rate (% ) 66.8 66.6 67.8 69.8 70.9

By Course Level18 (%)

Diploma and above73.4 71.6 73.8 77.7 77.8

Certificate III or IV 71.7 70.3 72.2 73.2 73.8

Certificate I or II or lower20 60.6 61.4 61.5 64.8 66.5

Other21 65.5 65.9 67.0 65.2 66.5

People with a disability9 * Load Pass Rate (% ) 70.9 70.2 69.4 70.4 71.3

By Course Level19 [%)

Diploma and above73.6 72.9 72.9 72.8 73.7

Certificate III or IV 73.1 72.5 71.272.7 73.5

Certificate 1 or II or lower20 65.3 64.8 64.5 66.0 67.2

Other21 73.4 71.7 70.1 69.7 68.4

Source: MOVER, Vocational Education and Training Provider Collection, 2005-2009. See also endnotes as referenced in the table, which can be found at the end of Appendix B, for detailed information on any caveats and technical issues associated with the data presented in this table.

This table continues on the next page.

annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009 p173

Table B.5 (continued)

I

People with a language background other than English10 *

Load Pass Rate (% ) 73.1 73.6 74.4 74.5 75.1

By Course Level19 (%)

Diploma and above 77.8 77.7 78.1 79.5 80.6

Certificate III or IV 74.5 75.D 75.9 76.7 76.8

Certificate 1 or II or lower20 62.9 64.6 66.3 62.6 63.6

Other21 73.7 73.5 72.4 72.4 70.4

SEIFA Index of relative Socio-economic Disadvantage1'∑13

Quintile 1 (Most disadvantaged) Load Pass Rate (%) 76.9 77.1 77.9 78.2

By Course Level19 1%)

Diploma and above 75.6 76.1 77.5 7B.9

Certificate III or IV 80.3 80,6 81.6 B1.5

Certificate 1 or II or lower20 71.5 71.6 71.5 72.1

Other21 76.3 75.0 75.3 73.1

Quintile 2 Load Pass Rate [%) 79.4 79.5 80.0 80.4

By Course Level19 (%)

Diploma and above 78.8 78.5 79.7 79.9

Certificate III or IV 82.0 82.2 B2.7 82.8

Certificate 1 or II or lower20 73.7 73.9 74.0 75.0

Other21 79.4 78.1 77.6 76,3

Quintile 3 Load Pass Rate (%) 79.4 79.3 80.0 80.5

By Course Level19 (%)

Diploma and above 78.5 78.9 79.9 81.0

Certificate III or IV 81.7 81.7 82.8 82.8

Certificate I or II or lower20 73.5 72.9 72.5 73.8

Other21 80.4 79.9 78.6 77.8

Quintile 4 Load Pass Rate (%) 79.9 80.0 80.5 81.2

By Course Level19 [%)

Diploma and above79.3 79.6 80.8 81.0

Certificate III or IV 82.2 82.1 82,8 83.4

Certificate 1 or II or lower20 74.4 74.1 74.1 75.2

Other21 78.7 78.4 76.2 75.0

Source: MOVER, Vocational Education and Training Provider Collection, 2005-2009. See also endnotes as referenced in the table, which can be found at the end of Appendix B, for detailed information on any caveats and technical issues associated with the data presented in this table.

This table continues on the next page.

p174 annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009

Table B.5 (continued)

Quintile 5 (Least disadvantaged) Load Pass Rate (%) 79.6 79.6 80.4 80.5

By Course Level19 (%)

Diploma and above 79.5 80.0 81.4 81.7

Certificate III or IV 80.9 81.0 81.9 81.5

Certificate 1 or II or lower20 74.873.8 73.9 75.0

Other31 79.7 79.2 77.4 76.8

ABS Accessibility / Remoteness Index of Australia1'1

Major cities Load Pass Rate (%) 77.5 77.7 78.0 78.5 78.9

By Course Level19 (%)

Diploma and above 78.1 78.0 78.1 79.4 79.9

Certificate III or IV 79.8 79.8 80.1 80.980.9

Certificate 1 or II or lower20 70.6 71.5 72.2 71.4 72.6

Other31 77.D 77.3 76.6 74.9 73.5

Inner regional area Load Pass Rate (%] 80.080.3 80.3 81.1 81.9

By Course Level19 (%)

Diploma and above79.4 80.1 80.2 81.1 81.4

Certificate III or IV 82.6 82.8 82.7 83.4 84.1

Certificate 1 or II or lower30 73.2 74.0 74.1 74.9 76.1

Other21 82,0 80.6 80.3 80.1 79.2

Outer regional area Load Pass Rate [%) 81.5 81.8 82.5 83.5 83.6

By Course Level19 (%)

Diploma and above81.4 81.5 83.4 83.8 84.5

Certificate III or IV 84.5 84.5 85.3 86.086.1

Certificate 1 or II or lower20 74.576.4 75.9 77.1 76.9

Other21 81.9 802 79.8 80.9 79.1

Remote and very remote Load Pass Rate (%) 79.2 80.7 81.1 82.283.5

By Course Level19 [%)

Diploma and above84.3 81.5 85.6 87.7 89.3

Certificate 111 or IV 84.0 85.0 85.8 87.2 87.4

Certificate 1 or II or lower20 70.9 73.8 72.0 72.9 74.8

Other21 77.7 79.8 80.3 78.2 80.3

Source: MOVER, Vocational Education and Training Provider Collection, 2005-2009. See also endnotes as referenced in the table, which can be found at the end of Appendix B, for detailed information on any caveats and technical issues associated with the data presented in this table.

annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009 p 1 75

Table B.6: The rate of successfully completed VET student activity undertaken by government funded VET students each year by student groups and course level

Load Pass Rate1718 for government Rinded VET students1, 2005 to 2009

Government funded VET students * Load Pass Rate (% ) 78.0 78.3 78.5 79.4 79.8

By Course Level'9 (%)

Diploma and above 77.9 77.8 78.2 79.5 80.0

Certificate III or IV 80.8 80.9 81.1 B2.1 82.1

Certificate I or II or lower20 71.5 72.4 72.8 73.0 74.3

Other2' 76.5 75.9 74.8 73.5 72.4

Female students * Load Pass Rate (% ) 77.9 77.9 78.1 79.0 79.6

By Course Level19 (%)

Diploma and above 80.7 81.0 80.8 82.0 82.2

Certificate III or IV 79.5 79.1 79.5 80.9 81.2

Certificate 1 or II or lower!"70.6 71.3 72.4 72.3 73.2

Other21 77.0 75.9 74.7 72.7 72.3

M ale students * Load Pass Rate (% ) 78.1 78.6 78.9 79.7 80.0

By Course Level'9 [%)

Diploma and above74.3 73.7 74.9 76.3 76.9

Certificate III or IV 81.9 82.5 82.5 83.0 82.9

Certificate 1 or II or lower20 72.4 73.5 73.2 73.7 75.3

Other21 76.0 75.8 74.9 74.5 72.5

Indigenous Students8 * Load Pass Rate 1%) 66.2 66.0 67.0 68.9 70.2

By Course Level19 (%)

Diploma and above72.8 70.8 72.6 75.5 76.4

Certificate III or IV 71.0 69.8 71.672.5 73.3

Certificate 1 or II or lower *60.2 61.1 61.0 64.2 66.2

Other21 64.7 64.4 65.4 63.8 64.7

People with a disability9 * Load Pass Rate (% ) 70.3 69.7 6B.6 69.9 70.6

By Course Level13 (%)

Diploma and above 72.4 71.7 71.7 71.8 72.6

Certificate III or IV 72.6 72.1 70.6 72.2 72.8

Certificate 1 or II or lower20 64.8 64.6 63.8 66.0 66.7

Other2' 72.7 70.9 69.0 68.5 67.5

Source: NCVER, Vocational Education and Training Provider Collection, 2005-2009. See also endnotes as referenced in the table, which can be found at the end of Appendix 8, for detailed information on any caveats and technical issues associated with the data presented in this table.

This table continues on the next page.

p176 annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009

Table B. 6 (continued)

I

People with a language background other than English10 *

Load Pass Rate (% )

71.9 72.2 72.9 72.7 73.0

By Course Level'9 (%)

Diploma and above 74.2 73.5 73.9 75.2 76.2

Certificate III or IV 73.6 74.0 75.1 75.4 75.1

Certificate I or II or lower20 65.1 66.7 68.1 64.8 66.0

Other31 73.1 73.1 71.5 71.7 69.7

SEIFfl Index of relative Socio-economic Disadvantage18,13

Quintile 1 (Most disadvantaged] Load Pass Rate (%] 76.5 76.5 77.6 78.1

By Course Level'9 (%]

Diploma and above74.4 75.0 76.5 77.9 78.9

Certificate III or IV 79.9 79.9 81.181.0 81.5

Certificate I or II or lower20 72.0 72.1 72.7 73.3 72.1

Other21 74.2 72.6 72.6 71.8 73.1

Quintile 2 Load Pass Rate (%) 78.7 78.7 79.3 79.7

By Course Level *9 (%)

Diploma and above77.9 77.6 79.0 79.1

Certificate III or IV 81.4 81.6 82.1 82.3

Certificate 1 or II or lower20 73.0 73.4 73.4 74.7

Other21 77.0 75.6 74.7 73.4

Quintile 3 Load Pass Rate (%) 78.5 78.3 79.2 79.8

By Course Level19 (%)

Diploma and above 77.5 78.1 79.2 80.4

Certificate III or IV 81.1 81.1 82.4 82.4

Certificate 1 or II or lower20 72.5 71.8 71.5 73.3

Other2' 76.5 75.2 74.1 71.4

Quintile 4 Load Pass Rate (%) 79.2 79.3 80.180.8

By Course Level19 (%]

Diploma and above 78.5 79.0 80.2 80.5

Certificate III or IV 81.8 81.7 82.6 83.1

Certificate 1 or II or lower20 73.3 73.3 73.8 75.3

Other2' 75.9 74.8 72.2 71.6

Source: NCVER, Vocational Education and Training Provider Collection, 2005-2009. See also endnotes as referenced in the table, which can be found at the end of Appendix B, for detailed information on any caveats and technical issues associated with the data presented in this table.

This table continues on the next page.

annual national report of the austraiian vocational education and training system 2009 p1 77

Table B.6 (continued)

Quintile 5 (Least disadvantaged) Load Pass Rate (%) 79.2 79.2 80.2 80.3

By Course Level19 (%)

Diploma and above78.8 79.4 80.9 81.2

Certificate III or IV 80.9 80.6 81.8 81.2

Certificate 1 or II or lower20 74.6 73.9 74.6 76.0

Other21 77.3 76.3 73.5 74.1

ABS Accessibility / Remoteness Index of Australia14

Major cities Load Pass Rate (%) 77.1 77.2 77.578.1 78.6

By Course Level19 (%)

Diploma and above 77.4 77.2 77.5 78.8 79.4

Certificate III or IV 79.4 79.4 79.6 80.6 80.4

Certificate 1 or II or lower20 70.B71.3 72.2 71.6 73.2

Other21 75.6 75.4 73.9 71.9 71.1

Inner regional area Load Pass Rate (%) 79.1 79.5 79.4 80.4 81.2

By Course Level19 (%]

Diploma and above78.5 79,1 79.2 80.6 80.7

Certificate III or IV 82.1 82.4 82.183.0 83.7

Certificate 1 or II or lower20 72.2 72.9 73.0 74.1 75.7

Other21 78.1 76.4 75.9 75.6 73.6

Outer regional area Load Pass Rate (%] 80.5 80.8 81.6 82.7 82.8

By Course Level19 (%)

Diploma and above 80.2 80.1 B2.0 82.9 83.9

Certificate III or IV 83.8 83.8 84.7 85.6 85.5

Certificate 1 or II or lower20 73.9 75.2 75.3 76.4 76.4

Other21 78.7 77.0 76.7 77.2 75.4

Remote and very remote Load Pass Rate f%) 78.1 79.5 80.281.5 82.9

By Course Level19 [%)

Diploma and above 83.3 79.8 85.3 87.0 89.4

Certificate III or IV 83.3 84.3 85.2 86.9 87.3

Certificate 1 or II or lower20 70.3 72.7 71.5 72.2 74.1

Other21 73.7 75.4 77.0 74.8 76.7

Source: NCVER, Vocational Education and Training Provider Collection, 2005-2009. See also endnotes as referenced in the table, which can be found at the end of Appendix B, for detailed information on any caveats and technical issues associated with the data presented in this table.

annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009

Table B.7: The number of qualifications completed by students in vocational __________education and training each year by student groups

Qualifications completed22,23 *24,25 by Total reported VET students1, 2005 to 2008

Total VET students1

Qualifications completed *ì000) 298.0293.3 320.5 351.6

Annual growth (%) -1.5 9.3 9.7

Growth since 2005 (%) -1.5 7.6 18.0

By Course Level19 (%)

Diploma and above14.1 14.7 14.7 13.9

Certificate III or IV 56.9 55.3 56.8 58.6

Certificate 1 or II or lower20 29.0 30.0 28.5 27.5

Total1 00.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

Female Students

Qualifications completed (*Ã¥00) 163.7158.7 173.3 188.8

Annual growth [%) -3.0 9.2 8.9

Growth since 2005 [%) -3.0 5.8 15.3

By Course Level19 (%)

Diploma and above14.4 15.3 15.4 14.5

Certificate III or IV 57.5 56.4 56.8 58.1

Certificate 1 or II or lower50 28.1 28.3 27.8 27.3

Total100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

M ale Students

Qualifications completed (*Ã¥00) 134.1 134.4 147.1 162.4

Annua! growth (%] 0.3 9.4 10.4

Growth since 20C5 (%) 0.3 97 21.1

By Course Level19 (%]

Diploma and above13.7 14.0 13.8 13.2

Certificate III or IV 56.2 54.0 56.9 59.0

Certificate 1 or II or lower20 30.1 32.0 29.3 27.7

Total100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

Indigenous Students8

Qualifications completed (*Ã¥00) 7.9 B.3 9.410.8

Annual growth (%) 5.1 13.4 15.3

Growth since 2005 [%) 5.1 19.2 37.5

By Course Level19 (%]

Diploma and above6.3 6.3 5.8 6.4

Certificate III or IV 46.1 44.2 43.8 46.1

Certificate 1 or II or lower20 47.5 49.4 50.3 47.5

Total100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

Source: NCVER, Vocational Education and Training Provider Collection, 2005-2009. See also endnotes as referenced in the table, which can be found at the end of Appendix B, for detailed information on any caveats and technical issues associated with the data presented in this table. This table continues on the next page.

annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009 p179

Table B.7 (continued)

People with a disability3

Qualifications completed f'OOO)

Annual growth [%)

Growth since 2005 [%)

By Course Level19 (%)

Diploma and above

Certificate III or IV

Certificate I or II or lower20

Total

People with a language background other than English10

Qualifications completed (*Ã¥00)

Annual growth (%)

Growth since 2005 (%)

By Course Level19 (%)

Diploma and above

Certificate III or IV

Certificate I or II or lower20

Total

SEIFfl Index of relative Socio-economic Disadvantage12∑13

Quintile 1 (Most disadvantaged]

Qualifications completed (*Ã¥00)

Annual growth (%)

Growth since 200B (%)

By Course Level19 (%)

Diploma and above

Certificate III or IV

Certificate I or II or lower20

Total

Quintile 2

Qualifications completed (*Ã¥00)

Annual growth (%)

Growth since 2006 (%)

By Course Level19 (%)

Diploma and above

Certificate III or IV

Certificate I or II or lower20

Total

14.9 16.1 16.3 17.4

8.0 1.0 6.6

8.0 9.0 16.2

10.B11.0 9.9 10.0

46.6 45.5 44.7 46.8

42.6 43.5 45.4 43.2

100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

47.8 47.9 53.6 59.3

0.3 11.9 10.6

0.3 12.2 24.0

19.2 20.7 20.8 19.5

50.6 49.1 49.7 52.1

30.2 30.2 29.5 28.4

100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

38.6 43.6 49.5

12.9 13.7

12.9 28.4

10.6 10.4 10.0

52.4 53.1 54.1

37.0 36.4 35.9

100.0 100.0 100.0

64.0 71.1 79.2

11.1 11.4

11.1 23.8

11.1 10.5 10.4

55.4 58.2 60.1

33.5 31.2 29.5

100.0 100.0 100.0

Source: NCVER Vocational Education and Training Provider Collection, 2005-2009. See also endnotes as referenced in the table, which can be found at the end of Appendix B, for detailed information on any caveats and technical issues associated with the data presented in this table.

This table continues on the next page.

p180 annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009

Table B.7 (continued)

Quintile 3

Qualifications completed I'QOO)

Annual growth (%)

Growth since 2006 (%)

By Course Level13 (%]

Diploma and above

Certificate III or IV

Certificate I or II or lower20

Total

Quintile 4

Qualifications completed COCO]

Annual growth (%)

Growth since 2006 (%)

By Course Level19 (%)

Diploma and above

Certificate III or IV

Certificate I or II or lower20

Total

Quintile 5 [Least disadvantaged)

Qualifications completed (ODD)

Annual growth (%)

Growth since 2006 (%)

By Course Level19 (%)

Diploma and above

Certificate III or IV

Certificate I or II or lower20

Total

ABS Accessibility / Remoteness Index of Australia *

Major cities

Qualifications completed (*Ã¥00)

Annual growth [%)

Growth since 2005 [%)

By Course Level'5 (%]

Diploma and above

Certificate III or IV

Certificate I or II or lower30

Total

55.5 64.6 72.1

16.5 11.5

16.5 29.9

11.9 11.4 11.3

56.8 57.9 59.5

31.3 30.7 29.1

100.0 100.0 100.0

58.6 65.7 72.4

12.1 10.1

12.1 23.5

15.5 15.0 14.1

56.7 58.5 60.2

27.8 26.4 25.7

100.0 100.0 100.0

44.7 52.4 54.3

17.1 3.7

17.1 21.4

19.2 19.2 17.9

57.2 57.9 60.1

23.7 22.9 22.0

100.0 100.0 100.0

171.2 166.1 179.1 194.2

-3.0 7.8 8.5

-3.0 4.6 13.5

15.9 16.6 16.4 15.1

57.3 55.8 56.9 58.6

26.7 27.6 26.7 26.2

100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

Source: NCVER, Vocational Education and Training Provider Collection, 2005-2009. See also endnotes as referenced in the table, which can be found at the end of Appendix B, for detailed information on any caveats and technical issues associated with the data presented in this table.

This table continues on the next page.

annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009 p181

Table B.7 [continued)

Inner regional area

Qualifications completed f *000] 65.0 65.3 71.2 79.3

Annual growth (%) 0.5 9.1 11.3

Growth since 2005 (%) 0.5 9.6 21.9

By Course Level19 (%)

Diploma and above9.4 10.5 10.0 10.6

Certificate III or IV 58.7 57.5 59.7 60.1

Certificate 1 or II or lower50 31.8 31.9 30.2 29.4

Total100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

Outer regional area

Qualifications completed COOO) 37.5 37.0 40.9 46.5

Annual growth (%) -1.5 10.7 13.6

Growth since 2005 (%) -1.5 9.0 23.9

By Course Level19 (%)

Diploma and above6.7 6.7 6.9 7.2

Certificate III or IV 57.9 55.0 57.9 60.3

Certificate 1 or II or lower20 35.4 38.3 35.2 32.5

Total100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

Remote and very remote

Qualifications completed (*å*ü*ü) 9.1 9.6 10.4 12.6

Annual growth (%) 6.1 7.4 21.7

Growth since 2005 (%) 6.1 13.9 38.7

By Course Level19 (%)

Diploma and above 7.2 6.1 6.4 6.3

Certificate III or IV 52.3 46.8 48.8 54.7

Certificate 1 or II or lower50 40.5 47.1 44.8 39.0

Total100.0 1 0 0.0 100.0 100.0

Source: NCVER, Vocational Education and Training Provider Collection, 2005-2009. See also endnotes as referenced in the table, which can be found at the end of Appendix B, for detailed information on any caveats and technical issues associated with the data presented in this table.

p182 annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009

Total reported VET27, 2005 to 20092y

Table B.8: Employment and further study outcomes after completing VET, for female students ___ __

Female students

VET Graduates30

Employed after training33 (%] 76.4

Difference in proportion employed from before33 training to after (% points) 6.6

Improvement in employment circumstance after training34 (%) 61.1

Employed or in further study after training32∑35 (%) 87.1

Achieved main reason for undertaking training37 (%) 85.4

Satisfied with overall quality of training38 (%) 87.1

M odule Completers31

Employed after training32 [%) 70.2

Difference in proportion employed from before33 training to after (% points) 1.5

Improvement in employment circumstance after training34 (%) 43.9

Employed or in further study after training32,33∑38 (%) 73.2

Achieved main reason for undertaking training37 (%) 80.7

Satisfied with overall quality of training38 (%) 84.8

0.9 76.6 1.3 77.3 0.8 78.0 1.1 75.4 0.7

6.9 7.0 7.1 3.0

1.0 59.1 1.4 58.9 0.9 60.1 1.3 56.1

0.7

0.6 86.4 1.0 87.4 0.5 87.9 0.9 86.4 0.5

0.6 85.1 1.0 85.4 0.7 87.1 0.9 85.1 0.6

0.7 87.8 1.0 89.1 0.589.0 0.8 89.0 0.5

1.6 71.1 2.1 69.9 1.5 73.4 1.8 70.6 1.4

1.7 0.8 2.3 -0.8

1.8 42.9 2.2 39.6 1.6 43.6 2.0 39.9

1.4

1.0 74.5 2.0 72.9 1.0 75.8 1.9 73.7 1.0

1.2 80.2 1.6 78.5 1.3 79.1 1.6 80.8 1.1

1.1 83.8 1.6 82.8 1.2 83.1 1.5 83.9 1.1

± - 95% confidence interval Source: MOVER, Student Outcomes Surveys, 2005-2009. See also endnotes as referenced in the table, which can be found at the end of Appendix 8, for detailed information on any caveats and technical issues associated with the data presented in this table.

annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009 p183

Table B.9: Employment and further study outcomes after completing VET, for female students

Government funded TAPE28, 2005 to 200929

Female students

Graduates30

Employed after training32 (%] 72.9 0.8 73.8 1.6 74.4 0.8 74.4 1.4 71.2 0.7

Difference in proportion employed from before33 training to after (% points) 6.9 7.3 6.9 6.9 3.1

Improvement in employment circumstance after training34 (%] 59.1 0.9 57.7 1.7 57.2 0.9 58.1 1.6 53.2

0.8

Employed or in further study after training32 35 (%) 85.7 0.7 85.1 1.3 86.3 0.6 86.8 1.1 84.8 0.6

Achieved main reason for undertaking training37 (%) 83.1 0.7 83.2 1.3 84.1 0.7 85.3 1.1 82.8 0.6

Satisfied with overall quality of training38 (%) 88.2 0.6 87.8 1.2 89.4 0.5 88.9 0.9 89.4 0.5

Module Completers31

Employed after training32 (%) 62.8 1.6 65.4 3.3 63.9 1.6 66.1 3.0 61.0 1.6

Difference in proportion employed from before33 training to after (% points! 4.0 3.1 3.9 1.4 0.4

improvement in employment circumstance after training34 (%) 41.2 1.6 40.0 3.4 38.7 1.6 41.2 3.0 36.8

1.6

Employed or in further study after training33 35∑38 (%) 64.6 1.5 67.5 3.3 65.6 1.6 67.3 3.0 63.2 1.6

Achieved main reason for undertaking training37 (%) 71.5 1.4 69.3 3.0 70.4 1.571.0 2.7 72.4 1.4

Satisfied with overall quality of training38 (%)78.9 1.3 79.3 2.5 78.9 1.3 78.7 2.6 80.3 1.3

± - 95% confidence interval Source: NEVER, Student Outcomes Surveys, 2005-2009. See also endnotes as referenced in the table, which can be found at the end of Appendix B, for detailed information on any caveats and technical issues associated with the data presented in this table.

p184 annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009

Total reported VET27, 2005 to 200929

Table B, 10: Employment and further study outcomes after completing VET, for __________ male students ________________________________

M ale students

VET Graduates3 *

Employed after training32 (%) 82.3 0.9 82.6 1.2 84.6 0.7 83.6 1.1 80.3 0.7

Difference in proportion employed from before33 training to after (% points! 6.4 6.7 7.1 6.4 2.9

Improvement in employment circumstance after training34 (%! 65.8 1.1 65.6 1.5 64.9 0.9 65.8 1.4 63.5

0.8

Employed or in further study after training32∑35 (%) 90.2 0.6 89.1 1.0 90.9 0.5 90.4 0.9 88.70.5

Achieved main reason for undertaking training37 f%) 86.4 0.7 87.8 1.0 88.1 0.6 88.70.9 87.6 0.5

Satisfied with overall quality of training38 [%] 87.0 0.8 88.3 1.0 88.6 0.6 88.9 0.9 89.2 0.5

Module Com pleters31

Employed after training32 (%) 80.7 1.2 77.9 1.9 78.5 1.3 80.0 1.7 77.3 1.2

Difference in proportion employed from before33 training to after [% points) 1.5 0.0 0.3 1.4 -2.3

Improvement in employment circumstance after training34 (%) 54.0 1.5 50.52.2 47.9 1.5 49.0 2.1 47,9

1.3

Employed or in further study after training32∑35∑38 (%) 82.4 0.9 81.5 1.7 81.6 1.0 82.0 1.7 79.6 0.9

Achieved main reason for undertaking training37 (%) 84.5 1.0 82.9 1.6 82.3 1.1 84.7 1.5 83.0 1.0

Satisfied with overall quality of training38 (%) 85.3 1.1 85.5 1.5 84.8 1.1 87.8 1.3 85.2 0.9

± - 95% confidence interval Source: NCVER, Student Outcomes Surveys, 2005-2009. See also endnotes as referenced in the table, which can be found at the end of Appendix B, for detailed information on any caveats and technical issues associated with the data presented in this table.

p185 annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009

Government funded TAPE28, 2005 to 200929

Table B.11: Employment and further study outcomes after completing VET, for male students

M ale students

Graduates30

Employed after training32 (%) 80.2 0.9 80.9 1.6 82.9 0.8 82.0 1.4 78.3 0.8

Difference in proportion employed from before33 training to after f% points) 7.9 8 0 7.9 7.9 3.9

Improvement in employment circumstance after training34 (%) 66.9 1.1 65.5 1.9 65.7 1.0 66.4 1.7 64.0

0.9

Employed or in further study after training32 35 (%) 89.9 0.7 88.3 1.4 90.1 0.7 90.2 1.1 88.0 0.7 Achieved main reason for undertaking training37 (%) 85.3 0.8 86.6 1.4 86.7 0.7 88.0 1.2 86.1 0.7 Satisfied with overall quality of training38 (%) 87.9 0.7 88.5 1.2 88.7 0.7 89.4 1.1 88.9 0.6 Module Completers3 *

Employed after training32 (%) 69.9 1.8 69.7 3.3 70.1 1.9 70.3 3.4 65.2 1.8

Difference in proportion employed from before33 training to after (% points) 4.1 0.0 2.3 4.4 -1.4

Improvement in employment circumstance after training34 t%) 50.2 2.0 47.6 3.5 44.8 2.1 48.0 3.6 42.4

1.8

Employed or in further study after training32∑35∑38 (%) 71.5 1.8 72.0 3.3 71.7 1.9 71.3 3.4 67.1 1.8 Achieved main reason for undertaking training37 (%) 74.1 1.7 72.7 3.2 69.8 1.9 76.7 3.2 71.9 1.7 Satisfied with overall quality of training38 [%)79.7 1.6 80.7 2.8 79.0 1.7 81.1 2.8 78.6 1.6

+ - 95% confidence interval Source: NCVER, Student Outcomes Surveys, 2005-2009. See also endnotes as referenced in the table, which can be found at the end of Appendix B, for detailed information on any caveats and technical issues associated with the data presented in this table.

p186 annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009

Total reported VET27, 2005 to 200929

Table B.12: Employment and further study outcomes after completing VET, for ________ Indigenous students ________________________

Indigenous students

VET Graduates30

Employed after trainingÆ (%) 68.5 3.8 66.1 5.9 72.4 3.4 70.8 5.2 67.1 3.3

Difference in proportion employed from before33 training to after (% points) 6.2 7.0 9.1 9.4 2.1

Improvement in employment circumstance after training34 (%) 57.5 4.1 54.7 6.0 57.3 3.9 59.8 5.9 56.3 3.4

Employed or in further study after training33-35 [%) 81.2 3.4 77.6 5.7 82.6 2.9 77.9 4.9 80.2 2.5

Achieved main reason for undertaking training37 (%) 86.7 3.0 88.2 4.1 86.9 2.9 90.4 3.4 87.0 2.6

Satisfied with overall quality of training38 (%) 86.4 3.6 94.8 2.0 88.7 3.0 90.3 3.7 92.1 1.6

Module Completers31

Employed after training33 (%) 53.4 6.2 54.1 10.4 59.0 5.3 59.7 10.1 53.8 5.6

Difference in proportion employed from before33 training to after (% points) 2.3 -3.0 1.8 0.3 -1.4

Improvement in employment circumstance after training34 (%) 40.7 6.0 37.8 9.5 37.1 5.2 38.0 9.4 36.6 5.0

Employed or in further study after training35-35 35 (%) 54.9 5.3 54.9 10.5 59.5 5.0 61.4 10.1 58.4 5.3

Achieved main reason for undertaking training37 (%) 73.0 5.1 67.1 9.8 74.5 4.4 73.9 9.169.5 5.4

Satisfied with overall quality of training38 (%) 86.4 3.3 85.6 6.6 83.0 3.8 85.7 8.1 82.8 4.4

± - 95% confidence interval Source: NCVER, Student Outcomes Surveys, 2005-2009. See also endnotes as referenced in the table, which can be found at the end of Appendix B, for detailed information on any caveats and technical issues associated with the data presented in this table.

annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009 p187

Government funded TAPE28, 2005 to 20092y

Table B.13: Employment and further study outcomes after completing VET, for _______ Indigenous students _________________________________________

Indigenous students

Graduates3"

Employed after training32 (%) 64.3 4.3 63.6 7.2 69.1 4.063.7 6.7 63.9 3.6

Difference in proportion employed from before training to after (% points) 9.2 6.4 7.9 6.3 4.2

Improvement in employment circumstance after training34 [%) 56.3 4.4 52.5 7.3 55.4 4.255.1 7.2 51.8 3.7

Employed or in further study after training32∑35 (%) 80.7 3.7 77.1 6.8 81.9 3.573.8 6.3 79.3 3.0

Achieved main reason for undertaking training37 [%) 86.5 3.1 88.5 5.1 87.1 2.6 91.8 2.9 87.8 2.4

Satisfied with overall quality of training38 (%) 89.8 2.7 94,6 2.6 90.8 2.5 90.7 4.0 92.0 2.0

Module Completers31

Employed after training32 [%) 49.7 6.9 42.7 12.3 49.6 6.5 50.7 13.8 48.6 6.9

Difference in proportion employed from before33 training to after E% points) 4.4 4.7 2.8 -4.5 1.9

Improvement in employment circumstance after training34 [%) 40.0 6.9 26.3 9.7 31.2 6.0 37.6 12.8 32.1 5.9

Employed or in further study after training32∑33∑36 [%) 50.1 7.0 44.6 12.5 50.6 6.5 51.1 13.9 49.8 6.9

Achieved main reason for undertaking training37 [%) 70.2 6.2 61.1 12.6 68.2 6.0 78.0 11.5 63.2 7.1

Satisfied with overall quality of training38 (%) 83.2 4.7 83.9 8.8 76.5 5.7 85.3 11.3 78.5 5.9

± - 95% confidence interval Source: NCVER, Student Outcomes Surveys, 2005-2099. See also endnotes as referenced in the table, which can be found at the end of Appendix B, for detailed information on any caveats and technical issues associated with the data presented in this table.

p188 annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009

Table B.14: Employment and further study outcomes after completing VET, for ___________students with a disability_______________ _____ ___ __ ___

Total reported VET27, 2005 to 200929

%†HI HI IB m

People with a disability

VET Graduates30

Employed after training32 [%] 58.6 2.4 60.4 3.5 58.8 2.1 57.6 3.4 55.8 1.9

Difference in proportion employed from before33 training to after (% points) 4.9 7.4 5.5 6.6 2.7

Improvement in employment circumstance after training34 (%) 47.2 2.6 48.6 3.5 46.1 2.1 44.2 3.4 42.9 1.9

Employed or in further study after training32∑35 [%) 74.7 1.9 72.0 3,3 75.5 1.7 73.0 3.1 74.6 1.6

Achieved main reason for undertaking training37 (%) 80.6 1.8 80.2 2.8 81.3 1.5 79.7 2.7 79.8 1.6

Satisfied with overall quality of training38 [%) 85.7 1.8 89.2 2.2 88.0 1.2 88.0 2.0 87.1 1.4

Module Completers31

Employed after training35 (%) 53.0 3.1 49.0 4.8 50.0 3.1 51.4 4.7 46.3 2.8

Difference in proportion employed from before33 training to after (% points) 0.4 -0.9 -2.1 1.2 -2.5

Improvement in employment circumstance after training34 (%) 38.6 3.2 32.9 4.5 29.0 2.6 33.9 4.5 28.7 2.6

Employed or in further study after training35∑35∑36 (%) 54.5 2.3 52.2 4.9 53.2 2.5 53.6 4.9 48.9 2.4

Achieved main reason for undertaking training37 f%) 75.3 2.4 72.3 4.2 69.5 2.8 73.0 4.2 72.1 2.5

Satisfied with overall quality of training38 f%)82.2 1.9 81.2 3.6 80.6 2.2 83.4 3.3 78.8 2.3

± - 95% confidence interval Source: NCVER, Student Outcomes Surveys, 2005-2009. See also endnotes as referenced in the table, which can be found at the end of Appendix B, for detailed information on any caveats and technical issues associated with the data presented in this table.

annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009 p189

Government funded TAPE28, 2005 to 200929

Table B.15: Employment and further study outcomes after completing VET, for ___________ students with a disability _____________________________________

.jiSSto H39

HB HHH HHPeople with a disability Graduates3"Employed after training32 [%] 53.7 2.4 55.8 4.3 54.1 2.3 53.5 4.1 50.3 2.2Difference in proportion employed from before33 training to after [% points) 5.1 6.4 4.6 7.4 2.4Improvement in employment circumstance after training34 (%) 44.5 2.3 45.2 4.2 42.8 2.3 41.9 4.0 39.7 2.1Employed or in further study after training32 35 (%) 74.3 2.1 69.6 4.2 73.8 2.1 71.5 3.8 73.9 2.0Achieved main reason for undertaking training37 (%) 79.7 1.9 78.2 3.6 79.1 1.8 78.2 3.3 78.9 1.7Satisfied with overall quality of training38 (%) 87.6 1.5 89.6 2.6 88.3 1.4 88.5 2.2 87.4 1.4Module Completers31Employed after training32 (%) 41.8 3.2 44.3 6.6 43.2 3.3 45.36.5 37.4 3.DDifference in proportion employed from before33 training to after [% points) 2.1 -1.6 1.5 2.3 -1.6Improvement in employment circumstance after training34 (%) 29.4 3.0 31.0 6.1 26.6 2.9 32.96.1 24.1 2.6Employed or in further study after training32∑35 36 (%) 43.9 3.2 46.7 6.7 45.3 3.4 45.9 6.5 39.3 3.1Achieved main reason for undertaking training37 [%) 68.1 3.0 61.6 6.5 62.9 3.3 66.3 6.3 66.3 3.1Satisfied with overall quality of training38 (%)75.1 2.9 79.5 4.9 76.4 2.9 79.5 5.2 75.3 2.8± - 95% confidence intervalSource: NCVER, Student Outcomes Surveys, 2995-20G9.See also endnotes as referenced in the table, which can be found at the end of Appendix B, for detailed information on any caveats and technical issues associated with the data presented in this table. p190 annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009

Table B.16: Employment and further study outcomes after completing VET, for __________ people who speak a language other than English at home

Total reported VET27, 2005 to 200929

BIOB IOBIOB *ô*ü*ô nPeople who speak a language other than English at homeVET Graduates30Employed after training32 [%] 67.8 1.7 68.0 2.4 70.5 1.5 68.5 2.1 65.1 1.2Difference in proportion employed from before33 training to after (% points] 7.9 8.0 8.6 6.1 1,5Improvement in employment circumstance after training34 (%] 56.0 1.8 55.8 2.6 55.6 1.6 55.1 2.3 51.91.3Employed or in further study after training32 35 (%) 83.7 1.2 81.7 2.1 84.6 1.1 84.0 1.780.4 1.0Achieved main reason for undertaking training37 (%) 83.4 1.3 84.2 1.8 84.3 1.1 84.4 1.7 81.7 1.0Satisfied with overall quality of training381%) 88.9 1.1 88.5 1.7 88.7 1.1 87.9 1.6 89.5 0.8M odule Com pleters31Employed after training32 (%) 66.7 2.8 66.2 3.8 65.7 2.4 71.4 3.3 64.9 2.0Difference in proportion employed from before33 training to after f% points) 3.9 2.1 2.2 4.1 -1.3Improvement in employment circumstance after training34 (%) 48.0 2.7 47.0 4.0 45.1 2.4 47.9 3.6 43.32.1Employed or in further study after training32 35∑36 (%) 70.6 2.1 69.1 3.7 68.4 2.072.4 3.4 67.3 1.9Achieved main reason for undertaking training37 (%) 77.9 2.1 77.5 3.1 75.1 2.0 77.8 2.9 76.0 1.9Satisfied with overall quality of training38 (%)79.8 2.0 84.4 2.6 81.6 2.0 84.6 2.5 83.6 1.6± - 95% confidence intervalSource: NCVER, Student Outcomes Surveys, 2005-2009,See also endnotes as referenced in the table, which can be found at the end of Appendix B, for detailed information on any caveats and technical issues associated with the data presented in this table, annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009 p191

Table B.17: Employment and further study outcomes after completing VET, for ___________ people who speak a language other than English at home __

Government funded TAPE28, 2005 to 200929

People who speak a language other than English at home

Graduates30

Employed after training32 (%) 64.5 1.8 64.4 2.9 67.9 1.6 66.0 2.6 60.2 1.4

Difference in proportion employed from before33 training to after [% points] 7.6 9.0 8.9 8.4 2.1

Improvement in employment circumstance after training34 (%] 53.5 1.9 53.2 3.1 54.0 1.7 53.8 2.7 48.1

1.5

Employed or in further study after training33∑35 [%) 83.2 1.4 80.3 2.6 83.5 1.384.3 2.0 79.3 1.2

Achieved main reason for undertaking training371%) 80.9 1.5 81.6 2.3 82.2 1.3 82.9 2.1 79.1 1.2

Satisfied with overall quality of training38 [%] 88.9 1.2 88.2 2.0 89.0 1.1 88.1 1.8 89.5 0.9

M odule Com pleters31

Employed after training33 (%) 60.4 3.1 59.6 5.4 58.4 2.9 80.7 5.4 54.0 2.8

Difference in proportion employed from before33 training to after [% points] 8.1 4.7 4.0 2.0 -1.1

Improvement in employment circumstance after training34 (%) 46.7 3.1 43.1 5.8 41.3 3.042.6 5.3 37.3

2.6

Employed or in further study after training32∑3336 1%) 62.1 3.1 62.8 5.4 60.2 2.962.6 5.3 56.8 2.8

Achieved main reason for undertaking training37 (%) 72.1 2.7 71.1 4.8 66.3 2.8 73.8 4.5 71.4 2.5

Satisfied with overall quality of training38 (%)75.7 2.8 81.7 3.9 78.8 2.4 81.44.1 81.1 2.2

± - 95% confidence interval Source: MOVER, Student Outcomes Surveys, 2005-2009. See also endnotes as referenced in the table, which can be found at the end of Appendix B, for detailed information on any caveats and technical issues associated with the data presented in this table,

p192 annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009

Table B.18: Employment and further study outcomes after completing VET, by education attainment

Total reported VET27, 2005 to 200929

Educational Attainment

Year 10 and belouv

VET Graduates30

Employed after training32 (%) 72.2 1.9 72.8 2.5 73.5 1.6 73.1 2.270.1 1.4

Difference in proportion employed from before33 training to after (% points) 10.8 11.4 12.3 10.4 8.0

Improvement in employment circumstance after training34 (%) 57.9 2.0 56.0 2.8 57.0 1.8 55.2 2.5 53.91.5

Employed or in further study after training32∑33 E%) 82.6 1.3 80.9 2.2 82.8 1.1 82.3 2.0 81.6 1.1

Achieved main reason for undertaking training37 (%) 85.9 1.3 86.2 1.9 86.7 1.3 88.7 1.5 87.11.0

Satisfied with overall quality of training38 [%)

Module Completers31

88.7 1.3 88.9 2.0 90.7 1.0 91.4 1.4 90.5 0.9

Employed after training32 (%) 58.5 2.9 59.9 3.9 60.0 2.9 64.1 3.7 56.4 2.7

Difference in proportion employed from before33 training to after (% points) 3.4 2.7 1.3 3.9 -0.1

Improvement in employment circumstance after training34 (%) 38.9 2.9 38.8 3.9 37.5 3.0 37.9 3.7 35.0 2.7

Employed or in further study after training32∑35∑35 (%) 62.1 2.0 62.0 3.9 59.6 2.2 67.3 3.9 56.5 2.3

Achieved main reason for undertaking training37 (%) 80.6 2.2 78.5 3.1 77.5 2.4 77.1 3.177.3 2.3

Satisfied with overall quality of training38 [%)

Year 11 and C ertificate 1 or II

VET Graduates30

85.8 2.1 84.2 2.7 84,8 2.1 84.2 2.8 83.8 2.1

Employed after training35 (%) 78.0 1.4 78.6 2.1 80.1 1.2 78.2 1.9 74.2 1.2

Difference in proportion employed from before33 training to after (% points) 8.2 10.5 9.3 9.8 4.3

Improvement in employment circumstance after training34 E%) 64.3 1.6 64.3 2.4 63.9 1.5 63.5 2.3 59.6 1.3

Employed or in further study after training32∑35 (%) 87.6 1.0 87.5 1.7 88.9 0.8 88.0 1.5 85.2 0.9

Achieved main reason for undertaking training37 (%) 86.1 1.1 85.8 1.8 86.1 1.0 88.61.4 86.1 0.9

Satisfied with overall quality of training38 (%) 87.5 1.0 88.6 1.5 89.5 0.8 89.4 1.4 89.9 0.8

± - 95% confidence interval Source: NCVER, Student Outcomes Surveys, 2005-2009. See also endnotes as referenced in the table, which can be found at the end of Appendix B, for detailed information on any caveats and technical issues associated with the data presented in this table.

This table continues on the next page.

annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009 p193

Table B.18 (continued)

Module Completers31

Employed after training32 (%) 71.6 2.8 70.8 4.2 72.0 2.5 71.1 3.7 65.4 2.7

Difference in proportion employed from before33 training to after (% points) 3.4 2.5 3.9 3.8 -2.4

Improvement in employment circumstance after training34 (%) 4B.9 3.1 46.9 4.5 46.9 2.9 48.8 4.042.4 2.7

Employed or in further study after trainingÆ3535 (%) 73.3 2.1 72.3 4.2 72.4 2.1 71.1 3.8 68.9 2.2

Achieved main reason for undertaking training37 (%) 76.6 2.3 77.6 3.4 75.7 2.2 79.1 3.2 76.3 2.3

Satisfied with overall quality of training38 (%) 84.0 1.8 86.1 2.6 82.2 2.2 84.0 2.9 83.1 1.9

Year 12

VET Graduates30

Employed after trainingÆ (%) 81.8 1.5 80.2 2.1 82.4 1.3 81.4 2.0 79.0 1.2

Difference in proportion employed from before33 training to after i% points) 9.7 7.5 9.2 7.7 4.7

Improvement in employment circumstance after training34 (%) 66.1 1.8 66.3 2.4 65.2 1.6 66.3 2.4 62.61.4

Employed or in further study after trainingÆ∑35 (%) 91.3 1.0 89.4 1.7 91.5 0.8 91.0 1.5 89.6 0.8

Achieved main reason for undertaking training37 (%) 86.3 1.1 87.4 1.7 85.4 1.2 87.8 1.686.5 1.0

Satisfied with overall quality of training38 (%)

Module Completers31

87.8 1.2 86.0 1.988.0 1.0 88.9 1.5 88.6 0.9

Employed after trainingÆ (%) 74.8 3.2 70.4 4.2 74.3 3.0 73.6 3.8 72.2 2.7

Difference in proportion employed from before33 training to after (% points) 1.3 0.4 2.7 2.1 -2.0

Improvement in employment circumstance after training34 (%) 48.3 3.5 41.6 4.3 46.2 3.5 43.7 4.3 42.6 2.8

Employed or in further study after training33∑35∑38 (%) 78.5 2.0 80.4 3.6 77.9 2.2 77.2 3.9 77.6 2.0

Achieved main reason for undertaking training37 (%) 79.1 2.5 79.9 3.2 77.7 2.6 80.7 3.3 77.3 2.4

Satisfied with overall quality of training38 (%)

Certificate III or IV

VET Graduates30

83.4 2.3 83.6 3.082.4 2.5 82.7 3.3 83.4 2.1

Employed after trainingÆ (%) 83.9 1.2 84.3 2.0 85.9 1.0 85.1 1.6 83.7 0.9

Difference in proportion employed from beforeÆ training to after (% points) 1.9 1.2 2.0 1.6 -0.6

Improvement in employment circumstance after training34 (%) 66.4 1.5 64.1 2.4 64.0 1.3 66.3 2.0 63.6 1.1

Employed or in further study after training32,35 (%) 91.4 0.9 92.0 1.3 92.1 0.7 92.1 1.2 91.3 0.7 Achieved main reason for undertaking training37 (%) 85.2 1.0 87.2 1.6 88.1 0.8 87.6 1.4 86.9 0.8 Satisfied with overall quality of training381%) 87.4 1.1 88.6 1.5 88.6 0.9 89.3 1.3 89.1 0.7

± - 95% confidence interval Source: NCVER, Student Outcomes Surveys, 2005-2009. See also endnetes as referenced in the table, which can be found at the end of Appendix B, for detailed information on any

caveats and technical issues associated with the data presented in this table. This table continues on the next page.

p1 94 annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009

Table B.18 (continued)

Module Com pleters31

Employed after training32 f%) 87.B1.3 86.3 2.5 85.7 1.7 87.4 2.3 84.7 1.5

Difference in proportion employed from before33 training to after (% points) 0.2 0.0 -0.9 0.6 -3.3

Improvement in employment circumstance after training34 (%) 58.2 2.0 57.6 3.5 50.1 2.0 54.0 3.2 52.5 1.9

Employed or in further study after training32∑35 36 (%) 88.5 1.1 87.9 2.4 88.5 1.2 88.2 2.3 86.8 1.1

Achieved main reason for undertaking training37 (%) 85.3 1.4 83.4 2.5 82.4 1.6 84.9 2.3 85.4 1.3

Satisfied with overall quality of training38 (%) 86.0 1.4 87.1 2.3 84.5 1.5 88.3 2.0 87.2 1.1 Diploma and above

VET Graduates30

Employed after training32 (%) 81.3 1.4 81.3 1.9 82.6 1.2 83.8 1.6 80.1 1.0

Difference in proportion employed from before33 training to after (% points) 2.4 2.8 3.5 4.4

-0.7

Improvement in employment circumstance after training34 (%) 62.2 1.8 59.8 2.4 58.2 1.5 61.6 2.2

58.1 12

Employed or in further study after training32∑35 (%) 89.5 0.9 88.5 1.5 98.3 0.8 91.3 1.2 88.7 0.8

Achieved main reason for undertaking training37 [%) 85.3 1.2 85.4 1.7 86.8 1.0 86.9 1.5 86.1 0.8

Satisfied with overall quality of training38 (%)

Module Completers31

84.4 1.4 86.4 1.6 86.7 1.0 85.4 1.6 87.5 0.8

Employed after training32 (%) 84.8 1.6 83.9 2.3 81.7 1.8 84.8 2.1 82.7 1.4

Difference in proportion employed from before33 training to after {% points) 0.0 D.4 -0.9 0.2

-1.1

Improvement in employment circumstance after training34 [%) 50.7 2.0 47.4 3.0 45.4 2.0 47.7 2.8

45.9 1.7

Employed or in further study after training32∑35 38 [%) 87.1 1.1 86.3 2.2 84.8 1.2 86.81.9 85.0 1.1

Achieved main reason for undertaking training37 (%) 87.2 1.2 83.7 2.3 85.5 1.4 86.1 1.9 86.3 1.2

Satisfied with overall quality of training30 f%) 85.8 1.2 83.4 2.2 84.2 1.5 86.4 1.8 84.9 1.2

± - 95% confidence interval Source: NCVER, Student Outcomes Surveys, 2005-2009. See also endnotes as referenced in the table, which can be found at the end of Appendix B, for detailed information on any caveats and technical issues associated with the data presented in this table.

p195 annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009

Government funded TAPE28, 2005 to 200929

Table B.19: Employment and further study outcomes after completing VET, by ___ education attainment________________________________________

Educational Attainment

Year 10 and below

Graduates30

Employed after training32 [%] 69.0 1.8 72.1 3.2 71.5 1.7 69.6 3.0 67.4 1.6

Difference in proportion employed from before33 training to after (% points) 12.0 13.2 13.2 10.9 9.7

Improvement in employment circumstance after training34 (%) 58.2 2.057.0 3.7 56.1 1.956.0 3.2 53.4

1,7

Employed or in further study after training32∑35 (%) 81.8 1.6 80.1 3.0 81.6 1.5 80.5 2.6 80.2 1.4

Achieved main reason for undertaking training37 (%) 85.7 1.4 85.3 2.7 86.5 1.3 88.91.9 86.9 1.2

Satisfied with overall quality of training38 (%)

Module Completers3'

90.0 1.2 88.9 2.9 91.5 1.0 92.4 1.6 90.5 1.0

Employed after training32 (%) 48.2 3.0 45.6 5.9 47.5 3.2 57.3 6.0 45.6 3.2

Difference in proportion employed from before33 training to after (% points) 4.6 3.2 3.4 5.5 2.1

Improvement in employment circumstance after training34 [%) 33.8 2.8 31.1 5.2 30.8 3.0 36.3 5.7 31.3

2.9

Employed or in further study after training32∑35∑36 [%) 49.1 3.0 45.9 5.9 48.3 3.257.6 6.0 46.8 3.2

Achieved main reason for undertaking training37 (%) 74.2 2.5 67.9 5.7 67.4 3.1 69.1 5.5 69.5 3.1

Satisfied with overall quality of training38 (%)

Year 11 and C ertificate 1 or II

Graduates30

81.0 2.5 79.3 4.6 79.5 2.6 80.5 4.9 81.02.7

Employed after training32 (%) 64.1 3.2 66.3 6.3 64.4 3.2 65.5 5.6 59.4 3.0

Difference in proportion employed from before33 training to after (% points) 7.1 3.0 5.8 3.6 -1.5

Improvement in employment circumstance after training34 (%) 63.0 1.7 64.7 3.0 64.4 1.6 62.1 2.8 58.2

1.4

Employed or in further study after training32 35 (%) 86.4 1.3 87.0 2.2 88.2 1.1 86.9 2.0 83.9 1.1

Achieved main reason for undertaking training37 (%) 85.4 1.2 84.8 2.3 84.9 1.2 87.2 1.8 84.7 1.0

Satisfied with overall quality of training30 (%) 88.6 1.1 88.9 1.9 89.9 1.0 88.4 1.7 90.6 0.8

± - 95% confidence interval Source: NCVER, Student Outcomes Surveys, 2005-2009. See also endnotes as referenced in the table, which can be found at the end of Appendix B, for detailed information on any caveats and technical issues associated with the data presented in this table.

This table continues on the next page.

p196 annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009

Table B.19 (continued)

Module Com pleters31

Employed after training33 (%) 71.6 2.8 70.8 4.2 72.0 2.5 71.1 3.7 65.4 2.7

Difference in proportion employed from before33 training to after (∞/o points) 3.4 2.5 3.9 3.8 -2.4

Improvement in employment circumstance after training34 (%) 46,0 3.3 48.4 6.5 43.4 3.2 44.3 5.7 39.8 2.9

Employed or in further study after training323538 [%) 65.9 3.2 67.4 6.2 66.3 3.1 65.9 5.6 61.2 3,0

Achieved main reason for undertaking training37 (%1 67.4 3.1 71.3 5.4 64.8 3.1 71.0 5.1 71.6 2.7

Satisfied with overall quality of training38 (%) 77.3 2.7 81.8 4.1 78.6 2.7 76.2 4.9 79.12.5

Year 12

Graduates30

Employed after training35 (%] 79.8 1.5 78.6 2.6 80.7 1.4 79.7 2.5 77.8 1.3

Difference in proportion employed from before33 training to after (% points) 9.7 7.5 8.7 8.6 5.7

Improvement in employment circumstance after training34 (%) 65.3 1.7 64.6 2.9 64.6 1.7 64.9 2.9 62.0 1.5

Employed or in further study after training35 35 (%) 99.9 1.1 88.4 2.1 91.2 1.1 91.5 1.7 89.5 1.0

Achieved main reason for undertaking training37 (%) 84.0 1.3 85.2 2.2 84.2 1.2 87.5 1.9 84.7 1.1

Satisfied with overall quality of training38 (%)

Module Com pleters31

88.8 1.1 85.8 2.3 87.3 1.2 88.7 1.8 88.5 1.0

Employed after training32 [%) 69.4 3.4 68.4 6.0 70.7 3.2 66.6 6.1 67.8 3.2

Difference in proportion employed from before33 training to after (% points) 5.8 -1.9 6.2 3.1 1.5

Improvement in employment circumstance after training34 (%) 46.0 3.6 40.6 5.9 45.6 3.5 44.9 6.5 42.2 3.2

Employed or in further study after training35∑35 36 (%) 72.8 3.3 75.3 5,5 73.2 3.2 70.6 5.9 71.7 3.1

Achieved main reason for undertaking training37 (%) 68.3 3.3 66.2 5.7 65.8 3.4 70.0 6.067.7 3.1

Satisfied with overall quality of training33 (%) 74.0 3.1 77.2 5.174.1 3.2 75.2 5.776.2 2.9

Certificate III or IU

Graduates30

Employed after training351%) 81.2 1.3 81.6 2.6 83.0 1.2 82.1 2.1 80.4 1.1

Difference in proportion employed from before33 training to after 1% points) 2.8 2.2 2.8 2.6 0.2

Improvement in employment circumstance after training34 (%) 65.7 1.6 62.9 3.0 64.0 1.5 65.5 2.5 62.4 1.3

Employed or in further study after training32∑35 [%) 90.7 1.0 91.1 1.7 90.9 0.9 91.5 1.6 90.5 0.9

Achieved main reason for undertaking training37 (%) 83.4 1.2 85.1 2.086.3 1.0 86.0 1.8 84.3 1.1

Satisfied with overall quality of training38 [%) 88.4 1.0 88.6 1.7 88.8 1.0 89.3 1.6 89.2 0.9

± - 95% confidence interval Source: NCVER, Student Outcomes Surveys, 2005-2009, See also endnotes as referenced in the table, which can be found at the end of Appendix B, for detailed information on any caveats and technical issues associated with the data presented in this table.

This table continues on the next page.

p197 annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009

Table B.19 (continued)

M odule Completers31

Employed after training32 (%] 79.5 2.3 79.7 5.0 80.1 2.5 79.2 5.0 73.3 2.6

Difference in proportion employed from before33 training to after (% points) 1.7 2.6 2.1 1.3 -3.4

Improvement in employment circumstance after training34 (∞/o) 53.4 2.9 53.4 5.9 48.1 3.0 51.6 5.5 44.4 2.8

Employed or in further study after training32 3536 [%) 8G.7 2.3 81.4 4.9 81.3 2.4 79.7 5.0 75.2 2.4

Achieved main reason for undertaking training37 (%] 73.0 2.7 71.3 5.3 72.0 2.7 74.54.7 72.5 2.5

Satisfied with overall quality of training30 (%) 80.3 2.3 81.0 4.3 78.5 2.5 82.4 4.1 77.9 2.4

Diploma and above

Graduates30

Employed after training32 [%) 76.7 1.6 76.9 2.5 79.6 1.380.7 2.1 75.0 1.3

Difference in proportion employed from before33 training to after (% points) 3.3 3.1 4.1 5.3 -1.1

Improvement in employment circumstance after training34 (%) 60.4 1.8 57.1 2.9 57.3 1.6 60.0 2.7 55.6 1.4

Employed or in further study after training3235 (%) 87.4 1.2 86.3 2.0 88.9 1.090.2 1.5 86.6 1.0

Achieved main reason for undertaking training37 (%) 82.3 1.4 83.3 2.1 84.1 1.2 84.9 2.0 82.8 1.1

Satisfied with overall quality of training33 (%)

Module Completers31

85.2 1.3 87.1 1.9 87.0 1.1 86.71.9 87.7 0.9

Employed after training32 (%) 78.5 2.3 76.8 4.5 75.3 2.476.3 4,3 71.6 2.3

Difference in proportion employed from before33 training to after (% points) 3.2 0.6 0.3 -0.1 -1.2

Improvement in employment circumstance after training34 [%) 51.6 2.8 43.2 4.9 42.9 2.848.4 4.8 42.4 2.5

Employed or in further study after training32-35,36 (%) 79.9 2.3 79.8 4.4 77.0 2.4 77.94.2 73.4 2.3

Achieved main reason for undertaking training37 (%) 77.1 2.3 73.6 4.6 77.9 2.3 82.3 3.5 77.6 2.2

Satisfied with overall quality of training38 (%) 80.4 2.2 80.6 3.9 81.3 2.1 81.0 3.7 81.9 2.0

± - 95% confidence interval Source: MOVER, Student Outcomes Surveys, 2005-2009. See also endnotes as referenced in the table, which can be found at the end of Appendix B, for detailed information on any caveats and technical issues associated with the data presented in this table.

p198 annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009

Table B.20: Employment and further study outcomes after completing VET, by SEIFA Index of Relative Socio-Economic Disadvantage

Total reported VET27, 2005 to 200929

Quintile 1 (M ost disadvantaged)

UET Graduates30

Employed after training32 1%)

Difference in proportion employed from before33 training to after (% points]

Improvement in employment circumstance after training34 [%]

Employed or in further study after training32-35 (%)

Achieved main reason for undertaking training37 [%]

Satisfied with overall quality of training38 [%]

Module Completers31

Employed after training32 (%)

Difference in proportion employed from before33 training to after [% points]

Improvement in employment circumstance after training34 l%]

Employed or in further study after training32∑35∑36 (%)

Achieved main reason for undertaking training37 (%)

Satisfied with overall quality of training38 (%)

Quintile 2

UET Graduates30

Employed after training32 [%]

Difference in proportion employed from before33 training to after [% points]

Improvement in employment circumstance after training34 (%]

Employed or in further study after training32∑35 (%]

Achieved main reason for undertaking training37 (%)

Satisfied with overall quality of training38 (%]

75.9 1.5

7.1

57.1 1.8

86.1 1.1

86.0 1.3

90.5 0.9

67.4 2.9

-0.4

42.0 2.8

70.8 2.2

78.4 2.3

84.3 2.2

80.4 1.0

8.3

60.8 1.3

88.4 0.7

85.8 0.9

89.1 0.8

74.7 2.3 70.2 1.4

6.6 2.0

59.5 2.6 53.9 1.5

85.8 1.8 82.7 1.1

85.7 1.8 85.0 1.0

89.9 1.5 90.3 0.8

71.5 3.8 68.4 2.5

2.4 -1.9

44.7 4.0 42.7 2,5

75.1 3.9 71.8 2.1

80.9 3.3 81.2 1.9

85.7 2.8 85.0 1.7

79.2 1.8 76.9 1.1

6.9 3.4

60.5 2.0 58.8 1.2

87.2 1.5 87.1 0.7

87.5 1.4 86.1 0.9

90.0 1.2 90.1 0.7

± - 95% confidence interval Source: NCVER, Student Outcomes Surveys, 2005-2009. See also endnotes as referenced in the table, which can be found at the end of Appendix B, for detailed information on any caveats and technical issues associated with the data presented in this table.

This table continues on the next page.

annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009 p199

Table B.20 (continued)

Module Completers31

Employed after training32 (%) 74.0 2.0 76.3 2.5 72.8 1.8

Difference in proportion employed from before33 training to after (% points) 1.2 2.5 -1.3

Improvement in employment circumstance after training34 (%]

44.3 2.3 46.6 2.9 43.5 2.0

Employed or in further study after training32-35∑38 (%) 76.3 1.5 77.8 2.7 75.1 1.4

Achieved main reason for undertaking training37 (%) 79.1 1.8 84.2 2.1 81.8 1.5

Satisfied with overall quality of training38 (∞/o) 83.4 1.7 88.0 1.8 85.2 1.4

Quintile 3

VET Graduates3 *

Employed after training33 (%) 82.6 1.2 81.3 1.5 79.5 1.0

Difference in proportion employed from before33 training to after f% points) 6.7 6.4 4.2

Improvement in employment circumstance after training34 (%) 63.5 1.4 63.6 2.0 61.4

1.2

Employed or in further study after training32∑35 (%) 89.8 0.7 89.4 1.2 88.7 0.7

Achieved main reason for undertaking training37 (%) 87.5 0.9 88.3 1.3 86.6 0.8

Satisfied with overall quality of training38 [%)

Module Completers31

88.7 0.9 89.1 1.3 89.4 0.7

Employed after training32 (%) 76.7 2.2 76.5 2.7 74.3 1.9

Difference in proportion employed from before33 training to after (% points) 1.0 0.4 -2.6

Improvement in employment circumstance after training34 (%] 47.1 2.545.5 3.1 45.2

2.0

Employed or in further study after training32-35-38 (%) 79.9 1.5 78.4 2.8 77.6 1.5

Achieved main reason for undertaking training37 [%) 81.5 1.8 80.2 2.5 82.6 1.5

Satisfied with overall quality of training38 (%)

Quintile 4

VET Graduates3 *

83.6 2.0 86.7 2.1 84.8 1.5

Employed after training32 [%) 84.1 1.0 83.7 1.5 80.0 0.9

Difference in proportion employed from before33 training to after 1% points) 6,4 7.6 2.1

Improvement in employment circumstance after training34 (%) 65.0 1.3 65.1 2.0 61.5

1.1

Employed or in further study after training32∑35 (%) 90.8 0.7 91.1 1.1 88.7 0.7

Achieved main reason for undertaking training37 (%) 87.5 1.0 88.6 1.2 87.2 0.8

Satisfied with overall quality of training38 [%] 88.5 0.9 88.2 1.2 87.7 0.8

± - 95% confidence interval Source: MOVER, Student Outcomes Surveys, 2005-2009. See also endnotes as referenced in the table, which can be found at the end of Appendix B, for detailed information on any caveats and technical issues associated with the data presented in this table.

This table continues on the next page.

p200 annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009

Table B.20 (continued)

Module Completers31

Employed after training35 (%) 77.3 2.1 80.7 2.6 75.5 1.9

Difference in proportion employed from before33 training to after [% points) 0.8 1.1 -2.8

Improvement in employment circumstance after training34 (%) 45.7 2.2 47.1 3.2 44.5

2.0

Employed or in further study after training35∑35∑36 (%) 80.7 1.5 83.2 2.5 79.5 1.3

Achieved main reason for undertaking training37 (%) 79.0 1.8 83.1 2.3 81.9 1.6

Satisfied with overall quality of training33 (%) 83.6 1.6 82.6 2.5 85.0 1.5

Quintile 5 {Least disadvantaged)

UET Graduates30

Employed after training32 [%) 83.7 1.2 83.7 1.7 80.8 1.1

Difference in proportion employed from before33 training to after (% points) 6.5 6.1 2.5

Improvement in employment circumstance after training34 [%) 63.9 1.5 65.9 2.3 62.4

1.3

Employed or in further study after training32∑35 [%) 90.8 0.8 92.1 1.2 89.7 0.8

Achieved main reason for undertaking training37 (%) 86.6 1.0 88.9 1.5 86.3 0.9

Satisfied with overall quality of training33 (%)

Module Completers31

87.2 1.0 87.3 1.6 87.9 0.9

Employed after training35 [%) 75.9 2.6 79.0 3.0 78.6 2.1

Difference in proportion employed from before33 training to after (% points) 0.6 3.8 1.0

Improvement in employment circumstance after training34 [%) 41.4 2.6 47.8 3.6 44.2

2.4

Employed or in further study after training32∑35∑35 (%) 80.1 1.7 82.3 2.8 80.9 1.6

Achieved main reason for undertaking training371%) 81.9 2.0 79.5 2.9 81.7 1.9

Satisfied with overall quality of training38 (%) 82.7 1.9 82.4 2.7 82.3 1.9

± - 95% confidence interval Source: NCVER, Student Outcomes Surveys, 2005-2009. See also endnotes as referenced in the table, which can be found at the end of Appendix B, for detailed information on any caveats and technical issues associated with the data presented in this table.

annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009 p2D1

Table B.21: Employment and further study outcomes after completing VET, by ___________ SEIFA Index of Relative Socio-Economic Disadvantage _________

Government funded TAPE28, 2005 to 200929

BH HIHI HQuintile 1 (M ost disadvantaged! Graduates30Employed after training32 (%) 71.1 1.8 70.5 3.0 65.4 1.6Difference in proportion employed from before33 training to after (% points] 7.7 6.4 3.1Improvement in employment circumstance after training34 (%) 55.4 1.9 57.6 3.2 50.6 1.7Employed or in further study after training32∑351%) 84.2 1.5 84.4 2.3 80.5 1.4Achieved main reason for undertaking training37 (%) 83.9 1.4 83.8 2.3 82.9 1.2Satisfied with overall quality of training38 [%]Module Completers3190.D1.1 89.4 2.089.51.1Employed after training32 (%) 60.8 3.2 62.4 6.4 56.1 3.4Difference in proportion employed from before33 training to after [% points] 3.6 2.7 -1.6Improvement in employment circumstance after training34 (%) 39.4 3.3 41.2 6.2 37.9 3.2Employed or in further study after training32∑35 36 (%) 61.9 3.2 63.7 6.4 58.6 3.4Achieved main reason for undertaking training37 [%] 70.7 3.0 75.5 5.6 71.5 3.2Satisfied with overall quality of training38 (%]Quintile 2 Graduates3081.5 2.481.5 5.0 79.5 2.8Employed after training32 (%] 76.8 1.2 76.5 2.3 73.8 1.2 1.1Difference in proportion employed from before33 training to after (% points) 9.0 8.1 4.9Improvement in employment circumstance after training34 (%) 60.0 1.4 61.1 2.6 58.8 1.3 1.2Employed or in further study after training32∑35 (%) 86.7 1.0 B6.6 2.0 85.8 1.0 0.7Achieved main reason for undertaking training37 (%) 84.5 1.0 85.8 1.884.7 1.0 0.9Satisfied with overall quality of training36 (%] 89.5 0.8 90,8 1.4 99.4 0.8 0.7± - 95% confidence intervalSource: NCVER, Student Outcomes Surveys, 2005-2009.See also endnotes as referenced in the table, which can be found at the end of Appendix B, for detailed information on any caveats and technical issues associated with the data presented in this table.p202This table continues on the next page. annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009

Table B.21 (continued)

Module Completers31

Employed after training32 (%) 63.4 2.5 65.8 4.6 57.3 2.5

Difference in proportion employed from before33 training to after (% points! 2.7 4.9 -0.5

Improvement in employment circumstance after training34 (%) 39.0 2.5 43.9 4.734.5 2.3 Employed or in further study after training32 *35∑38 (%1 65.1 2.5 66.7 4.659.3 2.5 Achieved main reason for undertaking training37 f%! 69.6 2.4 75.5 4.0 71.6 2.3 Satisfied with overall quality of training38 (%) Quintile 3

Graduates30

79.5 2.1 81.6 3.7 80.2 2.0

Employed after training32 (%) 80.7 1.2 78.8 1.9 76.4 1.1

Difference in proportion employed from before33 training to after (% points! 6.6 7.3 4.4

Improvement in employment circumstance after training34 [%) 63.4 1.4 62.1 2.3 69.0 1.3

Employed or in further study after training32∑351%! 88.9 1.0 88.5 1.5 87.4 0.9 Achieved main reason for undertaking training37 [%) 86.2 1.0 87.6 1.5 85.0 0.9 Satisfied with overall quality of training38 (%) Module Completers31

88.8 0.9 88.7 1.6 89.4 0.8

Employed after training32 (%) 68.7 2.8 67.5 4.7 65.42.6

Difference in proportion employed from before33 training to after (% points! 4.4 0.4 -0.5

Improvement in employment circumstance after training341%) 43.4 2.9 43.7 4.942.8 2.6 Employed or in further study after training32∑55∑381%) 70.4 2.8 68.2 4.7 67.32.6 Achieved main reason for undertaking training37 (%) 69.9 2.7 69.8 4.6 72.82.4 Satisfied with overall quality of training33 (%) 79.2 2.4 81.5 3.8 79.7 2.3 Quintile 4

Graduates30

Employed after training32 (%! 82.2 1.2 82.0 1.9 77.5 1.1

Difference in proportion employed from before33 training to after E% points) 6.8 8.3 2.5

Improvement in employment circumstance after training34 (%) 64.8 1.4 64.6 2.4 60.7 1.3 Employed or in further study after training3235 (%) 99.5 D.9 90.8 1.4 88 1 0.9 Achieved main reason for undertaking training37 (%) 86.4 1.0 87.6 1.6 85.4 0.9 Satisfied with overall quality of training38 (∞/o) 88.8 1.0 88.1 1.6 87.7 0.9

± - 95% confidence interval Source: NCVER, Student Outcomes Surveys, 2005-2009. See also endnotes as referenced in the table, which can be found at the end of Appendix B, for detailed information on any caveats and technical issues associated with the data presented in this table. tg^,/g continues on the next page

annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009 p203

Table B.21 (continued)

M odule Com pleters31

Employed after training32 [%) 71.3 2.7 72.4 4.767.7 2.5

Difference in proportion employed from before33 training to after [% paints) 2.5 -2.3 -1.5

Improvement in employment circumstance after training34 (%) 42.1 2.9 46.9 5.1 40.3 2.5

Employed or in further study after training35-35∑36 (%) 72.6 2.7 74.1 4.6 69.6 2.4 Achieved main reason for undertaking training37 [%] 68.6 2.8 76.4 4.2 72.6 2.3 Satisfied with overall quality of training38 [%) 77.1 2.5 77.%° 4.4 89.3 2.0

Ouintile 5 (Least disadvantaged)

Graduates30

Employed after training32 [%) 82,5 1.4 82.D 2.2 78.5 1.3

Difference in proportion employed from before33 training to after (% points) 7.2 6.4 2.2

Improvement in employment circumstance after training34 (%) 64.3 1.7 65.0 2.7 60.9 1.5

Employed or in further study after training33∑35 (%) 90.7 1.D 91.9 1.5 89.0 1.0 Achieved main reason for undertaking training371%) 85.2 1.3 87.6 1.9 84.0 1.1 Satisfied with overall quality of training38 (%) Module Completers31

88.0 1.2 88.3 1.7 88.6 1.0

Employed after training32 (%) 71.6 3.2 73.8 5.3 71.1 2.9

Difference in proportion employed from before33 training to after (% points) 2.5 8.D 2.6

Improvement in employment circumstance after training34 (%) 44.6 3.4 46.6 5.8 44.6 3.0

Employed or in further study after training32∑35∑35 [%) 74.0 3.1 74.9 5.2 73.3 2.8 Achieved main reason for undertaking training37 (%) 70.5 3.2 70.4 5.5 72.5 2.8 Satisfied with overall quality of training38 [%) 75.1 3.0 76.3 4.7 77.2 2.5

± - 95% confidence interval Source: NCVER, Student Outcomes Surveys, 2005-2009, See also endnotes as referenced in the table, which can be found at the end of Appendix B, for detailed information on any caveats and technical issues associated with the data presented in this table.

p204 annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009

Table B.22: Employment and further study outcomes after completing VET, _________ ABS Accessibility/Remoteness Index of Australia

Total reported VET27, 2005 to 200929

M ajor cities

UET Graduates30

Employed after training32 (%) 78.0

Difference in proportion employed from before33 training to after (% points! 6.8

Improvement in employment circumstance after training34 (%) 63.1

Employed or in further study after training32∑35 [%) 88.4 Achieved main reason for undertaking training37 (%] 85.3 Satisfied with overall quality of training38 (%) 86.7 Module Com pleters31

Employed after training32 [%] 75.0

Difference in proportion employed from before33 training to after (% points) 1.7

Improvement in employment circumstance after training34 (%) 48.7

Employed or in further study after training32 35 38 (%) 77.9 Achieved main reason for undertaking training37 (%] 80.6 Satisfied with overall quality of training38 (%) 83.1 Inner regional areas

UET Graduates30

Employed after training32 (%! 80.5

Difference in proportion employed from before33 training to after (% points) 6.7

Improvement in employment circumstance after training34 (%) 63.3

Employed or in further study after training32∑33 [%) 89.1 Achieved main reason for undertaking training37 (%) 86.1 Satisfied with overall quality of training38 (%) 86.8

0.9 78.3 1.2 80.0 0.7 79.6 11 75.9 0.6

7.6 7.6 7.2 2.8

1.0 62.1 1.4 62.4 0.9 63.4 1.3 58.9 0.7

0.6 87.6 1.0 89.0 0.5 89.5 0.8 86.60.5 0.7 85.8 1.0 85.3 0.6 87.0 0.9 84.7 0.5 0.8 86.8 1.0 880 0.6 88.1 0.988.7 0.5

1.5 73.0 2.0 72.7 1.4 76.0 1.8 72.9 1.2

-0.5 0.4 2.8 -1.8

1.6 44.4 2.1 42.6 1.4 47.0 2.1 42.9 1.3

1.0 77.4 1.9 76.4 1.0 78.1 1.8 75.5 1.0 1.2 79.5 1.6 77.7 1.2 79.5 1.7 80.0 1.0 1.2 82.2 1.6 82.6 1.1 83.4 1.5 83.2 1.0

1.3 80.2 1.8 81.6 1.1 82.1 1.5 79.5 1.0

7.2 7.6 7.0 3.8

1.6 62.3 2.2 62.0 1.3 63.9 1.9 60.5

1.2

0.8 87.3 1.5 89.4 0.7 89.6 1.2 89.10.7 1.0 85.2 1.6 87.4 0.9 87.8 1.3 87.7 0.8 1.0 89.6 1.289.5 0.7 89.1 1.2 89.1 0.8

± - 95% confidence interval Source: NCVER, Student Outcomes Surveys, 2005-2009. See also endnotes as referenced in the table, which can be found at the end of Appendix 8, for detailed information on any caveats and technical issues associated with the data presented in this table.

This table continues on the next page.

annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009 p205

Table B.22 (continued)

2005 2006 2007 2008 2009

H BBB ESIBModule Completers31Employed after training32 (%] 75.6 2.0 74.5 2.8 74.6 2.1 77.42.5 74.1 1.9Difference in proportion employed from before33 training to after 1% points) 0.9 1.7 1.5 0.7 -1.5Improvement in employment circumstance after training34 (%) 49.4 2.3 48.1 3.2 44.6 2.3 45.9 2.9 44.4 2.0Employed or in further study after training3235∑36 (%) 79.1 1.3 78.0 2.8 79.0 1.4 80.5 2.5 79.1 1.3Achieved main reason for undertaking training37 (%) 84.3 1.5 82.1 2.3 80.7 1.883.3 2.1 83.0 1.5Satisfied with overall quality of training38 [%) 86.4 1.5 87.3 2.0 82.8 1.985.8 2.0 85.2 1.5Outer regional areas UET Graduates30Employed after training32 (%) 80.1 1.8 81.8 2.0 81.5 1.3 81.4 1.9 80.0 1.2Difference in proportion employed from before33 training to after (% points) 6.2 5.3 5.2 5.8 2.8Improvement in employment circumstance after training34 (%) 63.9 1.9 63.9 2.5 60.9 1.760.8 2,4 60.7 1.5Employed or in further study after training32∑35 f%) 88.6 1.0 87.91.8 89.0 0.8 87.9 1.6 88.2 0.8Achieved main reason for undertaking training37 [%) 87.1 1.0 88.2 1.7 88.6 1.1 89.1 1.6 88.2 1.0Satisfied with overall quality of training38 [%)Module Completers3188.1 1.088.71.7 89.7 1.090.7 1.3 89.50.9Employed after training32 (%) 77.8 2.0 77.0 3.2 75.9 2.6 78.5 3.1 75.5 2.1Difference in proportion employed from before33 training to after 1% points) 1.8 2.8 -0.9 2.9 -0.8Improvement in employment circumstance after training34 (%) 50.2 2.5 48.1 3.8 45.3 3.0 46.2 3.6 46.4 2.4Employed or in further study after training32∑35 36 (%) 78.8 1.4 80.8 3.0 78.7 1.8 80.7 3.2 76.8 1.7Achieved main reason for undertaking training37 [%) 85.4 1.7 84.7 2.6 85.5 1.7 84.5 2.6 84.8 1.7Satisfied with overall quality of training38 (%) 87.8 1.5 86.5 2.5 87.4 1.8 89.3 2.2 86.9 1.6Remote and very rem ote areas UET Graduates30Employed after training32 (%) 84.5 2.3 84.2 3.1 86.6 1.8 82.8 3.8 83.1 2.1Difference in proportion employed from before33 training to after (% points) 4.9 2.9 5.0 4.3 1.8Improvement in employment circumstance after training34 (%) 67.2 3.0 62.6 4.3 61.7 2.6 59.9 4.6 61.5 2.5Employed or in further study after training32∑35 (%) 89.5 1.7 90.22.6 91.3 1.3 88.0 3.1 88.6 1.5Achieved main reason for undertaking training37 (%) 89.0 1.7 92.4 1.9 91.3 1.5 92.3 2.6 92.1 1.1Satisfied with overall quality of training38 (%) 89.4 1.6 90.0 2.5 90.91.2 92.1 2.4 92.1 1.2± - 95% confidence intervalSource: MOVER, Student Outcomes Surveys, 2005-2009.See also endnotes as referenced in the table, which can be found at the end of Appendix B, for detailed information on any caveats and technical issues associated with the data presented in this table.This table continues on the next page.annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009

Table B.22 (continued)

Module Completers31

Employed after training32 (%) 75.7 4.8 82.4 5.8 78.9 3.1 75.6 5.5 78.8 3.7

Difference in proportion employed from before33 training to after (% points) -0.7 4.3 2.6 -3.0 -5.2

Improvement in employment circumstance after training34 [%) 50.9 5.1 58.7 6.8 45.8 3.9 42.4 6.1 46.0 3.6 Employed or in further study after training32∑35-38 1%) 78.1 3.0 83.4 5.5 79.0 2.6 77.8 5.4 80.8 3.3 Achieved main reason for undertaking training37 (%) 88.2 2.2 89.4 3.2 84.7 2.6 88.2 3.6 85.4 2.8 Satisfied with overall quality of training38 (%) 87.9 3.2 89.1 3.B87.0 2.1 88.9 3.7 86.3 2.4

± - 95% confidence interval Source: NCVER, Student Outcomes Surveys, 2005-2009. See also endnotes as referenced in the table, which can be found at the end of Appendix 8, for detailed information on any caveats and technical issues associated with the data presented in this table.

Table B.23: Employment and further study outcomes after completing VET, ___________ABS Accessibility/Remoteness Index of Australia _____________

Government funded TAFE28, 2005 to 20092y

M ajor cities

Graduates30

Employed after training32 (%) 74.9 0.9 75.4 1.6 77.5 0.8 77.0 1.4 72.3 0.8

Difference in proportion employed from before33 training to after (% points) 7.1 8.1 7.7 7.3 2.9

Improvement in employment circumstance after training34 (%) 61.8 1.0 60.2 1.8 61.3 1.0 61.7 1.6 56.7 0.8 Employed or in further study after training32∑35 (%) 87.6 0.7 86.6 1.2 B8.2 0.7 89.1 1.0 85.6 0.6 Achieved main reason for undertaking training37 (%) 83.1 0.8 84.2 1.2 83.5 07 85.3 1.1 82.40.6 Satisfied with overall quality of training38 (%) Module Completers31

87.8 0.7 87.4 1.3 88.4 0.6 88.61.0 88.8 0.5

Employed after training32 (%) 66.6 1.7 68.4 3.2 66.3 1.7 67.2 3.2 62.2 1.7

Difference in proportion employed from before33 training to after (% points) 5.0 1.5 2.9 3.9 -1.0

Improvement in employment circumstance after training34 [%) 46.7 1.8 45.0 3.4 42.3 1.8 444 3.3 40.1 1.6

Employed or in further study after training32∑35∑33 (%) 68.6 1.7 71.0 3.2 68.0 1.7 68.5 3.1 64.5 1.7 Achieved main reason for undertaking training37 (%) 71,2 1.6 69.5 3.0 68.1 1.771.5 2.9 70.2 1.6 Satisfied with overall quality of training38 t%) 77.5 1.5 78.5 2.6 77.3 1.578.6 2.6 78.8 14

± - 95% confidence interval Source: NCVER, Student Outcomes Surveys, 2005-2009. See also endnotes as referenced in the table, which can be found at the end of Appendix B, for detailed information on any caveats and technical issues associated with the data presented in this table.

This table continues on the next page.

annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009 \ 207

Table B.23 (continued)

Inner regional areas

Graduates30

Employed after training32 (%) 78.0 1.2 78.3 2.4 79.8 1.1 80.1 2.0 77.7 1.1

Difference in proportion employed from before33 training to after (% points) 8.4 8.1 8.2 9.3 4.9

Improvement in employment circumstance after training34 (%) 64.8 1.4 62.3 2.7 62.7 1.4 65.3 2.4 61.3 1.3

Employed or in further study after training32 35 [%) 88.2 1.0 85.9 2.1 88.5 0.9 89.0 1.6 88.1 0.9 Achieved main reason for undertaking training37 (%) 84.5 1.1 83.0 2.2 86.2 1.0 87.1 1.6 86.4 0.9 Satisfied with overall quality of training38 (%) Module Completers31

88.0 1.0 89.0 1.7 89.3 0.9 88.8 1.6 89.4 0.8

Employed after training32 (%) 66.3 2.4 63.5 5.1 67.3 2.5 69.3 4.6 63.3 2.5

Difference in proportion employed from before33 training to after (% points) 3.4 -0.8 4.7 1.8 0.0

improvement in employment circumstance after training34 (%) 45.0 2.6 39.4 4.9 39.4 2.6 46.1 4.9 39.0 2.5

Employed or in further study after training32∑35∑36 1%) 67.8 2.4 65.2 5.0 68.7 2.570.3 4.6 65.7 2.4 Achieved main reason for undertaking training37 (%) 72.7 2.3 69.1 4.769.2 2.5 74.5 4.3 73.1 2.2 Satisfied with overall quality of training38 (%) 80.4 2.0 80.1 4.0 80.6 2.177.2 4.2 79.8 2.0 Outer regional areas

Graduates30

Employed after training321%) 78.D 1.3 79.0 2.6 79.2 1.3 78.52.5 76.8 1.4

Difference in proportion employed from before33 training to after (% points) 7.4 6.8 6.5 6.3 3.9

Improvement in employment circumstance after training34 (%) 63.5 1.6

63.6 3.1 61.5 1.6 60.3 3.0 60.3 1.6

Employed or in further study after training32 35 (%) 87.8 1.1 86.2 2.3 87.5 1.1 86.7 2.0 86.5 1.1 Achieved main reason for undertaking training37 (%) 86.4 1.1 86.8 2.2 88.1 1.0 88.62.0 87.1 1.1 Satisfied with overall quality of training38 (%) Module Com pleters31

89.1 1.0 88.7 2.1 90.2 0.9 90.7 1.5 89.9 1.0

Employed after training32 (%) 64.0 2.6 68.4 5.5 67.3 3.0 69.6 5.7 62.7 3.0

Difference in proportion employed from before33 training to after (% points) 3.2

5.7 1.8 3.9 2.3

Improvement in employment circumstance after training34 (%) 42.8 2.7 42.8 6.0 42.1 3.2 43.5 5.9 38.0 2.9

Employed or in further study after training32 3536 (%) 65.5 2.6 70.6 5.3 69.33.0 70.4 5.7 64.1 3.0 Achieved main reason for undertaking training37 (%) 76.4 2.3 74.2 5.274.8 2.7 75.7 5.1 74.8 2.7 Satisfied with overall quality of training38 (%) 82.0 2.1 82.1 4.5 81.0 2.584.1 4.6 80.7 2.6

± - 95% confidence interval Source: NCVER, Student Outcomes Surveys, 2005-2009. See also endnotes as referenced in the table, which can be found at the end of Appendix B, for detailed information on any caveats and technical issues associated with the data presented in this table.

This table continues on the next page.

p208 annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009

Table B.23 (continued)

Remote and very rem ote areas

Graduates30

Employed after training32 (%) 82.4 2.3 84.4 3.6 84.5 2.1 80.4 5.1 80.8 2.3

Difference in proportion employed from before33 training to after (% points) 8.0 4.2 5.1 3.7 3.3

Improvement in employment circumstance after training34 (∞/o) 66.7 2.8 64.3 5.1 60.2 2.7 59.35.3 62.0 2.6

Employed or in further study after training32∑35 (%) 88.7 2.0 90.6 3.0 90.0 1.8 86.0 4.3 87.1 2.0 Achieved main reason for undertaking training37 E%) 88.4 1.9 92.0 2.4 91.4 1.5 92.23.0 91.1 1.4 Satisfied with overall quality of training38 (%) Module Completers31

88.3 1.8 89.6 3.1 90.7 1.4 90.9 2.8 90.4 1.6

Employed after training32 (%) 65.6 5.2 72.4 10.1 66.4 4.5 66.4 9.0 68.8 6.4 Difference in proportion employed from before33 training to after E% points) -1.9 0.6 2.9 -5.1 -5.8

Improvement in employment circumstance after training34 (%) 44.2 4.9 53.9 9.7 39.5 4.8 39.68.4 40.9 5.7

Employed or In further study after training33 35 36 (%) 66.7 5.2 72.8 10.1 67.4 4.4 67.2 9.1 70.0 6.4 Achieved main reason for undertaking training37 [%) 80.1 4.3 83.7 5.8 77.5 3.882.7 6.3 79.1 5.7 Satisfied with overall quality of training38 (%) 85.8 3.6 85.3 5.4 81.23.8 88.7 4.8 81.7 4.4

± - 95% confidence interval Source: NCVER, Student Outcomes Surveys, 2005-2009. See also endnotes as referenced in the table, which can be found at the end of Appendix B, for detailed information on any caveats and technical issues associated with the data presented in this table.

annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009 p209

Appendix B * Endnotes 1. Information about student participation in Australia's VET system is gathered annually through a national

data collection. The collection is undertaken under a national standard (AVETMISS) where all RTOs who receive public funding for the provision

of training to students are required to provide detailed information about the students that they have trained. Under current arrangements, private

RTOs are required only to provide details of the students that they have trained using hinds sourced from direct government VET funding. On the

other hand, publicly owned training providers (such as TAPE) are required to report information on all of their students and from all funding sources

(i.e. including fee-for-service training). As a consequence, the information reported here significantly understates

the total number of students who participate each year in recognised training under the auspices of the AQTF. For example, the national

collection currently misses out those who train in enterprise-based RTOs (without direct government VET funding) and those paying fee-for-

service to private training providers.

2 In 2006 New South Wales reported activity for workplace learning and the NSW AMES Skillmax Program for the first time.

3. In 2007 the decline in student numbers in New South Wales can be partly attributed to new and better defined exclusions from reporting scopes. New South Wales excluded subcontracted VET activity' for

2600 students, 29 200 subject enrolments and 892 100 nominal hours. In addition, 3400 students, 47 300 subject enrolments and 1 706 600 nominal hours were excluded

because it was activity undertaken at overseas campuses.

4. Data from the New South Wales agricultural colleges were unable to be reported for 2008 at the time of the release of the 2008 Annual National report. This data has subsequently been

included for reporting.

5. Victoria submitted one consolidated submission for 2009 activity, in place of the three previous submissions (TAPE, ACE and Private Providers). As a consequence of the way some

adult and community education and private registered training organisations are scoped, there may be some

slight reporting differences in 2009 compared to previous years.

6. Data from the Workers Education Association of South Australia were unable to be reported for inclusion in the 2009 National VET Provider

Collection. In 2008 WEA reported 6397 students, 7993 subject enrolments and 135 312 nationally agreed nominal hours and 188 full≠ time training equivalents.

7. Data from Tasmania for 2009 is not necessarily comparable with previous years due to changes in training arrangements implemented

in the Tasmania Tomorrow initiatives. These initiatives included senior secondary colleges and TAPE being

replaced by the Tasmanian Academy, the Tasmanian Polytechnic and the Skills Institute.

p210 annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 20D9

8 Indigenous students are defined as those who self-identify on enrolment forms that they are of Aboriginal and/ or Torres Strait Islander background. Not all students respond to the relevant question on the enrolment form. The non-response rate for Indigenous status for government funded students is as follows: 2005 - 13.5 per cent; 2006 -11.8 per cent; 2007 - 8.5 per cent; 2008 - 8.5 per cent; 2009 - 9.2 per cent

9 People with a disability are defined as those who self-identify on enrolment forms that they have a disability, impairment or long-term condition. Not all students respond to the relevant question on the enrolment form. The non-response rate for disability status for government funded students is as follows: 2005 - 15.4 per cent; 2006 - 16.1 per cent; 2007 -

13.7 per cent; 2008 - 12.6 per cent; 2009 - 12.8 per cent 10 People with a language background other than English are those who

self-identify on their enrolment form that they speak a language other than English at home. Not all students respond to the relevant question on the enrolment form, and the non-response rate for the question about language spoken at home for government funded students is as follows: 2005 -

16.1 per cent; 2006 - 12.8 per cent; 2007 - 8.2 per cent; 2008 - 7.7 per

cent; 2009 - 8.4 per cent 11. Educational attainment is defined as those students who self-identify on enrolment forms their previous highest

education level. Not all students respond to the relevant question on the

enrolment form. The non-response rate for educational attainment for government funded students is as follows: 2005 - 20.7 per cent; 2006 -

17,2 per cent; 2007 - 14.0 per cent; 2008 * 11.3 per cent; 2009 - 11.4 per cent 1 2. Socio-Economic Index for Area -

Index of Relative Socio-economic Disadvantage (SEIFA 2006 IRSD) is derived from ABS 2006 Census variables related to disadvantage,

such as low income, low educational attainment, unemployment, and dwellings without motor vehicles. The ABS has assigned a SEIFA 2006 IRSD score to each statistical local area

(SLA) and the distribution of scores is divided into ten equal groups (deciles). For reporting by quintiles, the deciles within Australia were first converted

to quintiles. Then, a simple matching exercise was undertaken for each student in which their postcode and

location recorded in tire VET Provider Collection were mapped to a SLA. SEIFA 2006 IRSD was not derived in the VET Provider Collection pre 2006. For more details refer to:

http://wrrnv.abs.gov.au/ websitedbs/D3310114.nsf/home/ Seifa_enbry_page 13 Postcode/location data for students

attending Northern Territory TAPE were not provided for 2006. Consequently, SEIFA 2006 IRSD

cannot be calculated for these students.

14. Access/Remoteness Index of Australia (ARLA+) was developed by the National Centre for Social Applications of Geographic Information Systems (GISCA) based on ARIA. AR1A+

annual national report of the austraiian vocational education and training system 2009 p211

is now the standard ABS endorsed measure of remoteness. It is an index of remoteness derived from measures of road distances between populated localities and service centres. These road distances are then used to generate a remoteness score for any location in Australia. ARIA+ forms the basis for the ABS *Remoteness Structure * component of the Australian Standard Geographical Classification. ARLA+ was updated in 2008 from data contained in the 2006 Census on Population and Housing. The index has been backdated to apply to all years reported in this publication. As a consequence, ARIA+ data in this publication may not match previously reported data. For more details refer to: http://gisca.adelaide.edu.

au/projects/category/aboutyaria. html

15. Government funded activity is based on major funding source codes 01, 02, 11, 13, 15. It excludes activity funded by private and overseas providers, students enrolled in fee- for-service activity, overseas full-fee paying activity, recreational, leisure and

personal enrichment programs, and any credit transfer activity. Vocational education and training delivered in schools, where the delivery has been undertaken by schools is also excluded. In previous publications, government funded activity was based only on major funding source codes 01 and 11.

Due to tins redefinition, all measures of government funded activity have changed. The magnitude of change can

be summarised as follows:

Number of students 1,197.5 1,252.2

FYTEs 446.7 466.9

16. FYTE expresses training activity in terms of equivalent full-time students. A FYTE of one represents the activity of a student who is training on a full≠ time basis for one year. FYTEs are based on annual hours of training (720 hours = 1 FYTE).

1 . In 2007, Victoria adopted end-date reporting and standard nominal hour values for common units of competency as the basis of calculating total hours of delivery. Previous years

continue to be reported as scheduled hours. Consequently, this represents a break-in-series for Victorian and Australian hours.

18. Load Pass Rate is the ratio of hours/ FYTEs attributed to students who gained competencies/passed assessment in an assessable module or unit of competency to all students who were assessed and either passed, failed or withdrew. Note that previously published figures have changed due

p212 annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009

to the implementation of nationally consistent nominal hour values (see endnote 16). The calculation

is based on die annual hours/ FYTEs for each assessable module

or unit of competency and includes competencies achieved/units passed through recognition of prior learning. Load Pass Rate is calculated using the following formula:

120 (Competency achieved/pass) + 50, 51 (Recognition of prion learning - granted)] x1Q0

(20 (Competency achieved/pass) + 50, 51 (Recognition of prior learning - granted) + 30 (Competency not achieved/fail) + 40 (Withdrawn)!

19. *Course level * denotes the highest qualification attempted by a student in a reporting year.

20. 2 *Certificate I, II or lower * includes Certificate I, II, and Senior Secondary,

Other * includes training programs that do not directly lead to a qualification. That is, non award courses, subject only enrolments and miscellaneous

education.

22 Final qualifications completed data for 2009 are not available. Only preliminary data is available from the 2009 national provider collection.

23 In 2009 NCVER changed die

reporting scope for qualifications completed and backdated it to all previous years. Consequently, data in this publication may not match previously published data. This affects all previous years.

24. Due to improvements in data quality, Queensland has submitted additional qualifications completed between 2004 and 2007 rectifying the underreporting of qualifications previously identified over this period. This affects both Queensland and Australia reporting.

25. Improvements in data quality resulted in the removal of some qualifications

completed for NSW Workplace Training in 2007 and 2008. This affects both New South Wales and Australian reporting.

26. Age group percentages are based on

15-64 year olds.

27. Total reported VET covers students from all provider types and funding sources. Note, 2005 included some students undertaking training with private providers that was delivered on a fee-for-service basis.

28. 'TAFE government funded students'

are students from a TAFE institute undertaking VET funded by commonwealth/state recurrent or specific funding. Since 2005 students from other government providers, such as agricultural colleges, are also included.

29. All non-respondents have been

excluded from the analysis. The sample was designed to provide state/territory level reporting in 2006 and 2008, and state/territory and institute lex-el reporting in 2005, 2007 and 2009. A larger sample is required in the institute lc\7cl reporting years to provide reliable institute estimates. Therefore, sample

sizes in 2005, 2007 and 2009 were larger than in 2006 and 2008.

annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009 p 21 3

30. The term 'graduate' refers to students who are reported as completing all requirements for a qualification and students who self-identify as

completing all requirements.

31. The term 'module completer' refers to students who successfully completed part of a qualification and then left the VET system. It is important to note

that, at the time of sample selection, insufficient information was available to identify "actual" module completers. Instead, a sample of potential module

completers was chosen which includes continuing students and graduates. The exact status of respondents is determined at the time of the survey

through the information provided on the survey form.

32. Employed after training is determined by asking respondents 'Did you have a job of any kind at creference date>?' 33 Employed prior to training is

determined by asking respondents *Did you have a job at any time during the six months before undertaking the training shown on the front of the form?'

34 Improved employment circumstances is employment status changing from not employed before training to employed after training OR employed at a higher skill level after training OR received a job-related benefit. From 2007, change in skill level was derived using the Australian and New Zealand Standard Classification of Occupations (ANZSCO 2006). Skill level for prior years was derived using the Australian Standard Classification of Occupations (ASCO 1997).

35. These questions are not asked of students from community education providers. Therefore, the percentage reported represents the proportion of graduates or module completers, respectively, excluding those from community education providers.

36. For module completers, the only further study included is university stud)' as, by definition, module completers have left the VET system.

37. Includes students who hilly or partly achieved their main reason for undertaking the training.

38. 'Satisfied with the overall quality of training' was rated as 'agree' or 'strongly agree' on a 5-point scale to the statement: Overall, I was satisfied with the quality of this training'.

p214 annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009

Appendix C: COAG Performance Indicators

This section provides data on a selection of outcomes and outputs included in the NASWD as follows:

1. Reporting on five outputs included in the NASWD as proxies necessary to measure progress towards the outcomes. The outputs help monitor participation and achievement in vocational education and training.

Depending on the output, data presented focuses on total reported VET or government funded students. Where possible, additional data on highest level of prior educational attainment and SEIFA - Index of

Relative Socio-economic Disadvantage is included.

2. Information on the NASWD outcome relating to assessing how well the supply of skills provided by the national training system responds to meeting changing labour market demand. The progress of this outcome is monitored by two indicators:

the proportion of graduates employed after completing training by previous employment status.

%∫ the percentage of graduates with improved employment status after training.

These performance indicators are provided in addition to more detailed data on participation, achievement and student

outcomes that are presented in the Key Indicators section of this report.

Table C.1: The number of government funded course enrolments in VET, Baseline, 2008-2009

Government10 funded Course Enrolments in VET1 CGOOI

Total1 438.9 1 489.2 1 510.1

Indigenous Students *81.9 89.9 93.3

Source: NCVER, Vocational Education and Training Provider Collection, 2005-2009. See also endnotes as referenced in the table, which can be found et the end of Appendix C, for detailed information on any caveats and technical issues associated with the data presented in this table.

Table 0.2: The number of Course completions in VET (total reported VET), Baseline, 2007-2008

Course completions18 *13'10'15 in VET1 (total reported VET students) ( *0001

Total 287.4

Indigenous Students * 7.6

320.5 9.4

351.6 10.8

Source: NCVER, Vocational Education and Training Provider Collection, 2004-2009. See also endnotes as referenced in the table, which can be found at the end of Appendix C, for detailed information on any caveats and technical issues associated with the data presented in this table.

annual national report of the australian vocational and technical education system 2009 p215

Table C.3: The number of unit/module completions in VET (government funded students), Baseline, 2008-2009

Unit/module completions in VET1 (governm ent10 funded) ( *000)

Total 7 247.7 7 821.8 8180.1

Indigenous Students'1 278.5 324.2 339.9

Source: NCVER, Vocational Education and Training Provider Collection, 2005-2009. See also endnotes as referenced in the table, which can be found at the end of Appendix C, for detailed information on any caveats and technical issues associated with the data presented in this table.

Table 0.4: The number of enrolments in higher level (Certificate III and above) ________ VET (government funded VET activity), Baseline, 2008-2009

Baseline238 20084 2009567∑9

Enrolments by Indigenous11 Australians in higher level VET1 qualifications (C ertificate III and above)

Indigenous Students1 *ú*å*ü*ü) 24.9 28.2 28.8

Source: NCVER, Vocational Education and Training Provider Collection, 2005-2009. See also endnotes as referenced in the table, which can be found at the end of Appendix C, for detailed information on any caveats and technical issues associated with the data presented in this table.

Table C.5: The proportion of graduates17 employed, unemployed and not in the _________labour force after18 completing training, 2D08-20D919 ____________

HIVET graduatesEmployed after training20 80.7 0.8 77.8 0.5Full time employment 51.4 0.9 47.9 0.5Part time employment28.7 0.9 29.0 0.5Unemployed after training 9.2 0.6 11.3 0.4Not in labour force after training 9.7 0.6 10.4 0.4Not employed (NFI) after training 0.3 0.1 0.4 0.1Source: NCVER, Student Outcomes Surveys, 2008-2009.See also endnotes as referenced in the table, which can be found at the end of Appendix C, for detailed information on any caveats and technical issues associated with the data presented in this table. p216 annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009

Table C.B: The proportion of Indigenous graduates17 employed, unemployed and _ not in the labour force after18 completing training, 2QQ8-2QQ919

*ó *† jj^^gy

Indigenous graduates

Employed after training20 70.8 5.2 67.1 3.3

Full time employment 46.2 6.1 42.7 3.3

Part time employment 23.8 5.2 22.7 3.0

Unemployed after training 18.2 4.6 18.2 2.8

Not in labour force after training 10.0 3.0 13.4 2.5

Not employed (NFI) after training

Source: NCVER, Student Outcomes Surveys, 2008-2009.

a* a# 1.2s 0.7

See also endnotes as referenced in the table, which can be found at the end of Appendix C, for detailed information on any caveats and technical issues associated with the data presented in this table.

Table C.7: The proportion of graduates17 employed, unemployed and not in the labour force after18 completing training, by SEIFA Index of Relative ___ ____Socio-economic Disadvantage, 2QQ8-2QQ919______________________

jg jg p y

H IQuintile 1 (M ost disadvantaged)Employed after training20 74.7 2.3 70.2 1.4Full time employment 47.2 2.6 44.3 1.5Part time employment 26.7 2.3 24.6 1.2Unemployed after training 12.2 1.8 15.4 1.2Not in labour force after training 12.4 1.8 13.8 1.1Not employed (NFI) after trainingQuintile 20.7* 0.4 0.60.2Employed after training20 79.2 1.8 76.9 1.1Full time employment 49.8 2.0 47.1 1.2Part time employment 28.9 1.8 28.7 1.1Unemployed after training 10.4 1.4 12.1 0.9Not in labour force after training 10.2 1.3 10.5 0.7Not employed (NFI) after training Source: NCVER, Student Outcomes Surveys, 2008-2009.0.3*0.2 0.50.2See also endnotes as referenced in the table, which can be found at the end of Appendix C, for detailed information on any caveats and technical issues associated with the data presented in this table.This table continues on the next page.annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009 p217

Table C.7 [continued)

Quintile 3

Employed after training20 81.3 1.5 79.5 1.0

Full time employment53.6 2.0 49.2 1.2

Part time employment27.0 1.8 29.4 1.1

Unemployed after training 8.2 1.1 10.1 0.7

Not in labour force after training 10.2 1.2 10.0 0.7

Not employed (NFI) after training 0.3* 0.1 0.4 0.2

Quintile 4

Employed after training20 83.7 1.5 80.0 0.9

Full time employment 53.2 2.0 49.4 1.1

Part time employment30.0 1.8 29.6 1.0

Unemployed after training 8.4 1.2 10.4 0.7

Not in labour force after training 7.8 1.0 9.3 0.7

Not employed [NFI) after training 0.1* 0.1 0.3 0.1

Quintile 5 [Least disadvantaged)

Employed after training20 83.7 1.7 80.8 1.1

Full time employment52.3 2.4 48.2 1.3

Part time employment 30.9 2.2 31.8 1.2

Unemployed after training 7.5 1.3 9.4 0.8

Not in labour force after training 8.6 1.3 9.5 0.8

Not employed [NFI) after training 0.2* 0.2 0.3 0.1

Source: NCVER, Student Outcomes Surveys, 2008-2009. See also endnotes as referenced in the table, which can be found at the end of Appendix 0, for detailed information on any caveats and technical issues associated with the data presented in this table.

p218 annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009

Table C.8: The proportion of graduates17 employed, unemployed and not in the labour force after18 completing training, by highest level of prior educational attainment, 2008-200919

H IYear 10 and belowEmployed after training30 73.1 2.2 70.1 1.4Full time employment 40.5 2.5 37.9 1.4Part time employment 32.0 2.3 31.4 1.4Unemployed after training 13.1 1.8 14.3 1.1Not in labour force after training 13.4 1.6 15.2 1.1Not employed (NFI) after training 0.4* 0.3 0.4 0.2Year 11 and Certificate I or IIEmployed after training30 78.2 1.9 74.2 1.2Full time employment 47.5 2.3 44.2 1.3Part time employment 30.1 2.1 29.4 1.2Unemployed after training 10.8 1.5 14.2 0.9Not in labour force after training 10.7 1.4 11.1 0.8Not employed (NFI) after training 0.3* 0.2 0.6 0.2Year 12Employed after training20 81.4 2.0 79.0 1.2Full time employment 49.4 2.5 44.7 1.4Part time employment 31.8 2.3 33.9 1.3Unemployed after training 9.7 1.5 10.5 0.9Not in labour force after training 8.8 1.4 10.3 0.9Not employed (NFI) after training 0.1* 0.2 0.2 0.1Certificate III or IVEmployed after training20 85.1 1.6 83.7 0.9Full time employment 61.3 2.0 57.6 1.2Part time employment 23.4 1.7 25.6 1.0Unemployed after training 7.1 1.2 8.8 0.7Not in labour force after training 7.4 1.1 7.2 0.6Not employed (NFI) after training 0.3* 0.2 0.3 0.1Diploma and aboveEmployed after training20 83.8 1.6 80.1 1.0Full time employment 55.B 2.2 52.7 1.2Part time employment 27.9 2.0 27.0 1.0Unemployed after training 7.3 1.1 10.2 0.7Not in labour force after training 8.6 1.2 9.3 0.7Not employed (NFI) after training 0.3* 0.2 0.4 0.1Source: NCVER, Student Outcomes Surveys, 2008-2009.See also endnotes as referenced in the table, which can be found at the end of Appendix C, for detailed information on any caveats and technical issues associated with the data presented in this table.annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009 p219

I

Table C.9: The proportion of graduates17 employed, unemployed and not in the labour force after18 completing training, by previous employment status21, 2008-200919

20D8 2009

% I ± I % I ±

UET graduates

Of those employed after training20

Employed prior to training22

Full time employment

Part time employment

Unemployed prior to training

Not in labour force prior to training

Not employed (NFI) prior to training

Of those employed full-tim e after training

Employed prior to training22

Full time employment

Part time employment

Unemployed prior to training

Not in labour force prior to training

Not employed (NFI) prior to training

Of those employed part-tim e after training

Employed prior to training22

Full time employment

Part time employment

Unemployed prior to training

Not in labour force prior to training

Not employed (NFI) prior to training

Of those unemployed after training

Employed prior to training22

Full time employment

Part time employment

Unemployed prior to training

Not in labour force prior to training

Not employed (NFI) prior to training

Of those not in the labour force after training

Employed prior to training22

Full time employment

Part time employment

Unemployed prior to training

Not in labour force prior to training

Not employed (NFI) prior to training

84.5 0.8 86.2 0.4

48.6 1.1 49.7 0.6

34.9 1.0 35.1 0.6

7.3 0.6 6.8 0.3

7.9 0.6 6.8 0.3

0.4 0.1 0.2 0.1

89.0 0.8 90.4 0.5

70.0 1.2 72.7 0.7

18.0 1.0 16.4 0.6

5.2 0.6 4.9 0.3

5.6 0.6 4.5 0.3

0.2* 0.1 0.2 0.1

76.8 1.5 79.8 0.9

10.6 1.1 12.4 0.7

65.5 1.7 66.4 1.0

11.0 1.2 9.8 0.7

11.7 1.1 10.2 0.6

0.5* 0.3 0.2 0.1

32.2 3.2 39.6 1.7

12.0 2.4 17.4 1.3

19.2 2.6 21.3 1.4

46.9 3.4 42.1 1.8

20.3 2.6 17.9 1.3

0.7* 0.5 0.5 0.2

28.4 2.7 30.4 1.6

11.7 1.9 12.6 1.2

14.9 2.1 17.1 1.3

9.0 1.8 11.1 1.2

61.5 3.0 57.7 1.8

1.1* 0.7 0.8 0.3

Source: NCVER, Student Outcomes Surveys, 2008-2009. See also endnotes as referenced in the table, which can be found at the end of Appendix C, for detailed information on any caveats and technical issues associated with the data presented in this table,

p220 annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009

Table C.10: The proportion of Indigenous graduates17 employed, unemployed and not in the labour force after18 completing training, by previous __________empIoyment status51, 2QQ8-2DQ919 ___________________

Indigenous graduates

Of those employed after training20

Employed prior to training58 76.5 6.2 81.6 2.9

Full time employment 49.2 7.4 47.9 4.1

Part time employment 27.1 6.2 32.1 4.2

Unemployed prior to training 10.7 3.9 11.7 2.3

Not in labour force prior to training 11.2 5.0 6.5 1.8

Not employed (NFI) prior to training se ftft 0.3* 0.2

Of those employed full-tim e after training

Employed prior to training22 83.3 6.2 B7.5 3.0

Full time employment 65.5 8.6 70.0 4.6

Part time employment 17.6 7.2 16.3 4.1

Unemployed prior to training 8.9* 4.8 8.0 2.5

Not in labour force prior to training 7.3 s 4.2 4.2 1.7

Not employed (NFI) prior to training #8∑ -ft-ft -ft* **

Of those employed part-tim e alte r training

Employed prior to training22 63.6 12.6 73.7 5.7

Full time employment 17.0* 10.9 9.2 3.4

Part time employment 46.3 12.2 63.8 6.6

Unemployed prior to training 13.4* 6.6 17.0 4.5

Not in labour force prior to training 18.9* 11.6 9.2 3.7

Not employed (NFI) prior to training #5 -X--X- -X--X- ftft

Of those unemployed after training

Employed prior to training25 23.9* 12.0 32.3 7.4

Full time employment 4.5* 3.6 11.8 4.7

Part time employment 14.6* 10.1 19,9 6.5

Unemployed prior to training 58.2 13.4 53.9 8.1

Not in labour force prior to training 14.1* 8.2 12.6 4.3

Not employed (NFI) prior to training 3.8" 4.8

-X--X- ª$

Of those not in the labour force after training

Employed prior to training25 22.1* 11.9 28.8 10.8

Full time employment CD

Ln >:<

8.8 7.5* 3.9

Part time employment 12.2* 8.9 20.0* 11.1

Unemployed prior to training 9.3* 10.8 7.2 3.4

Not in labour force prior to training 67.2 14.4 63.8 10.4

Mnf: pmnlnwfiH fMFIl nninr fn train inn X x- 5ft f t ir ft-ft

Source: NCVaER, Student Outcomes Surveys, 2008-2009. See also endnotes as referenced in the table, which can be found at the end of Appendix C, for detailed information on any caveats and technical issues associated with the data presented in this table.

annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009 p221

Table C,11: The proportion of graduates17 employed, unemployed and not in the labour force after18 completing training, by previous employment status21 and SEIFA Index of Relative Socio economic

___________Disadvantage, 2008-200919 __________________________

Quintile 1 (M ost disadvantaged)

Df those employed after training50

Employed prior to training22

Full time employment

Part time employment

Unemployed prior to training

Not in labour force prior to training

Not employed (NFI) prior to training

Of those employed full-tim e after training

Employed prior to training22

Full time employment

Part time employment

Unemployed prior to training

Not in labour force prior to training

Not employed (NFI) prior to training

Df those employed part-tim e after training

Employed prior to training22

Full time employment

Part time employment

Unemployed prior to training

Not in labour force prior to training

Not employed (NFI) prior to training

Of those unemployed after training

Employed prior to training32

Full time employment

Part time employment

Unemployed prior to training

Not in labour force prior to training

Not employed (NFI) prior to training

83.2 2.1 85.9 1.1

49.8 3.0 51.1 1.7

32.3 2.8 33.2 1.6

8.7 1.6 7.7 0.9

7.5 1.4 6,1 0.8

0.7* 0.4 0.3* 0.2

89.0 2.1 98.4 1.2

72.2 3.3 73.0 1.9

15.8 2.7 16.0 1.6

6.0 1.6 4.9 0.9

4.7 1.4 4.5 0.9

0.3* 0.4 0.2* 0.1

74.3 4.2 78.2 2.2

11.2 3.6 12.4 1.7

62.2 4.9 64.6 2.6

12.9 3.4 12.6 1.8

12.0 2.9 8.8 1.4

0.8* 0.8 0.4* 0.3

25.4 7.2 31.4 3.8

7.8* 5.0 14.8 2.5

14.4 5.3 15.4 3.1

51.3 7.8 50.8 4.3

22.6 6.6 17.9 2.B

0.7* 1.0 0.6* 0.5

Source: NCVER, Student Outcomes Surveys, 2008-2009. See also endnotes as referenced in the table, which can be found at the end of Appendix C, for detailed information on any caveats and technical issues associated with the data presented in this table.

This table continues on the next page.

p222 annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009

Table C. 11 (continued)

2008 2009

% I ± I % I ±

Of those not in the labour force after training

Employed prior to training22

Full time employment

Part time employment

Unemployed prior to training

Not in labour force prior to training

Not employed (NFI) prior to training

Quintile 2

Of those employed after training50

Employed prior to training52

Full time employment

Part time employment

Unemployed prior to training

Not in labour force prior to training

Not employed [NFI] prior to training

Of those employed full-tim e after training

Employed prior to training22

Full time employment

Part time employment

Unemployed prior to training

Not in labour force prior to training

Not employed fNFI] prior to training

Of those employed part-tim e after training

Employed prior to training22

Full time employment

Full time employment

Part time employment

Not in labour force prior to training

Not employed (NFI) prior to training

Of those unemployed after training

Employed prior to training22

Full time employment

Part time employment

Unemployed prior to training

Not in labour force prior to training

Not employed (NFI) prior to training

22.7 6.1 22.2 3.8

7.5 3.3 7.9 2.0

14.6 5.4 14.0 3.4

11.6 4.3 14.4 3.3

64.6 7.0 62.2 4.4

33 33 1.2* 0.9

83.8 1.7 84.9 1.0

47.7 2.3 49.1 1.4

34.8 2.2 34.5 1.3

8.2 1.3 8.4 0.9

7.6 1.1 6.5 0.6

0.4* 0.3 0.3 0.1

88.5 1.8 89.4 1.0

69.6 2.6 72.5 1.4

17.6 2.2 15.9 1.2

5.3 1.3 5.6 0.8

6.1 1.3 4.9 0.6

33 0.2* 0.1

76.1 3.2 78.2 2.0

10.4 2.4 11.8 1.5

64,8 3.6 65.4 2.2

13.3 2.7 12.6 1.8

9.6 2.1 9.0 1.1

0.9" 0.8 0,2* 0.1

31.3 6.5 39.7 3.8

8.6 3.3 16.7 3.0

22.0 6.0 21.7 3.1

48.2 7.0 43.4 3.9

20.0 5.4 16.2 2.5

33 ∑* 0.7* 0.5

Source: NCVER, Student Outcomes Surveys, 2008-2009, See also endnotes as referenced in the table, which can be found at the end of Appendix C, for detailed information on any caveats and technical issues associated with the data presented in this table,

This table continues on the next page.

annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009 p223

Table C.11 (continued)

Of those not in the labour force after training

Employed prior to training52

Full time employment

Part time employment

Unemployed prior to training

Not in labour force prior to training

Not employed [NFII prior to training

Quintile 3

Of those employed after trainingZO

Employed prior to training22

Full time employment

Part time employment

Unemployed prior to training

Not in labour force prior to training

Not employed (NFI) prior to training

Of those employed full-tim e after training

Employed prior to training22

Full time employment

Part time employment

Unemployed prior to training

Not in labour force prior to training

Not employed (NFI) prior to training

Of those employed part-tim e after training

Employed prior to training22

Full time employment

Part time employment

Unemployed prior to training

Not in labour force prior to training

Not employed (NFI) prior to training

Of those unemployed after training

Employed prior to training22

Full time employment

Part time employment

Unemployed prior to training

Not in labour force prior to training

Not employed (NFI) prior to training

26.0 5.7 30.9 3.6

8.6 3.6 12.8 2.7

13.0 3.5 17.0 2.8

7.5 3.6 8.6 1.7

66.2 6.3 59.7 3.8

33 ee 0.7* 0.8

84.4 1.7 85.9 1.0

50.1 2.3 50.0 1.3

32.8 2.1 34.5 1.3

6.9 1.2 6.8 0.7

8.2 1.3 7.1 0.8

0.4* 0.3 0.1* 0.1

88.3 1.7 90.0 1.0

70.1 2.6 73.2 1.5

16.8 2.1 15.4 1.3

5.2 1.2 5.2 0.7

6.3 1.3 4.6 0.7

33 33

0.1* 0.1

76.6 3.5 79.7 2.0

10.7 2.0 11.7 1.3

65.4 3.8 66.8 2.2

10.5 2.6 9.2 1.3

12.4 2.8 11.0 1.6

0.5* 0.4 33

35.4 6.7 38.5 3.5

14.4 5.6 17.5 2.6

20.8 5.1 20.8 2.9

45.7 7.0 40.7 3.8

18.3 4.5 20.2 2.8

33 33 0.5* 0.5

Source: NCVER, Student Outcomes Surveys, 2008-2009. See also endnotes as referenced in the table, which can be found at the end of Appendix C, for detailed information on any caveats and nechnical issues associated with the data presented in this table.

This table continues on the next page.

p224 annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009

Table C.11 (continued)

2008 2009

% I ± I %

Of those not in the labour force after training

Employed prior to training22

Full time employment

Part time employment

Unemployed prior to training

Not in labour force prior to training

Not employed INFI) prior to training

Quintile 4

Qf those employed after training20

Employed prior to training22

Full time employment

Part time employment

Unemployed prior to training

Not in labour force prior to training

Not employed (NFI) prior to training

Qf those employed full-tim e after training

Employed prior to training22

Full time employment

Part time employment

Unemployed prior to training

Not in labour force prior to training

Not employed (NFI) prior to training

Of those employed part-tim e after training

Employed prior to training22

Full time employment

Part time employment

Unemployed prior to training

Not in labour force prior to training

Not employed (NFI) prior to training

Of those unemployed after training

Employed prior to training22

Full time employment

Part time employment

Unemployed prior to training

Not in labour force prior to training

Not employed (NFI) prior to training

33.4 6.0 29.1 3.2

16.B5.0 12.6 2.4

15.9 4.6 15.6 2.4

8.8 3.8 11.0 2.2

56.8 6.2 59.4 3.6

1.0∑ 1.0 0.5* 0.4

84.7 1.6 87.7 0.8

45.8 2.2 49.9 1.3

38.3 2.2 36.1 1.2

6.9 1.2 5.5 0.6

8.3 1.2 6.6 0.5

0.2* 0.2 0.2* 0.1

88.9 1.8 91.4 0.9

67.0 2.7 72.7 1.4

21.2 2.4 17.3 1.2

4.7 1.3 4.4 0.6

6.2 1.3 4.1 0.6

0.2* 0.2 0.1* 0.1

77.6 2.9 81.7 1.5

8.5 1.9 12.6 1.4

68.8 3.3 67.9 1.9

10.7 2.3 7.4 1.1

11.4 2.1 10.6 1.1

ft* -5 * 0.3* 0.2

36.0 7.3 41.9 3.6

17.0 6.4 17.9 2.7

18.9 5.4 23.1 2.9

44.9 7.5 40.0 3.8

18.3 5.0 18.0 2.9

ª%†ª ft* ft*

Source: NCVER, Student Outcomes Surveys, 2008-2009. See also endnotes as referenced in the table, which can be found at the end of Appendix C, for detailed information on any caveats and technical issues associated with the data presented in this table,

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annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009 p225

Table C.11 (continued)

Of those not in the labour force after training

Employed prior to trainingÆ

Full time employment

Part time employment

Unemployed prior to training

Not in labour force prior to training

Not employed (NFI) prior to training

Quintile 5

Of those employed after training20

Employed prior to trainingÆ

Full time employment

Part time employment

Unemployed prior to training

Not in labour force prior to training

Not employed (NFI) prior to training

Of those employed full-tim e after training

Employed prior to training22

Full time employment

Part time employment

Unemployed prior to training

Not in labour force prior to training

Not employed (NFI) prior to training

Of those employed part-tim e after training

Employed prior to trainingÆ

Full time employment

Part time employment

Unemployed prior to training

Not in labour force prior to training

Not employed (NFI) prior to training

Of those unemployed after training

Employed prior to trainingÆ

Full time employment

Part time employment

Unemployed prior to training

Not in labour force prior to training

Not employed (NFI) prior to training

28.6 6.0 35.8 3.6

11.6 3.B 15.1 2.8

16.3 5.4 19.8 2.9

9.3 4.0 12.1 3.2

60.4 6.4 51.6 3.7

1.7* 1.6 0.5' 0.4

86.4 1.8 86.8 1.1

49.9 2.6 48.4 1.5

35.7 2.5 37.3 1.4

5.8 1.3 5.6 0.8

7.6 1.3 7.5 0.8

0.2* 0.2 0.2* 0.1

90.7 1.8 90.8 1.2

72.4 2.8 71.3 1.8

18.0 2.4 18.2 1.4

5.0 1.5 4.3 0.9

4.1 1.1 4.7 0.8

#ª **

79.2 3.6 81.1 2.0

11.9 2.9 14.0 1.5

65.9 4.2 66.2 2.2

7.0 2.4 7.3 1.3

13.5 2.9 11.5 1.6

** ª*

33.1 8.5 48.8 4.3

14.9* 7.3 21.3 3.7

17.2 6.0 27.0 3.8

41.3 8.9 33.0 3.9

24.6 7.5 16.0 3.3

** ir*

Source: NCVER, Student Outcomes Surveys, 2008-2009. See also endnotes as referenced in the table, which can be found at the end of Appendix C, for detailed information on any caveats and technical issues associated with the data presented in this table.

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p226 annual national report nf the australian vocational education and training system 2009

Table C,11 (continued)

8 1Of those not in the labour force after trainingEmployed prior to training22 31.8 6.6 35.7 4.2Full time employment 13.9 5.1 15.1 3.0Part time employment 16.7 4.8 20.2 3.5Unemployed prior to training 7.4* 3.8 9.8 3.BNot in labour force prior to training 58.7 7.5 53.3 4.5Not employed (NFI) prior to training -5-5 1.2* 1.2Source: NCVER, Student Outcomes Surveys, 2008-2009.See also endnotes as referenced in the table, which can be found at the end of Appendix C, for detailed information on any caveats and technical issues associated with the data presented in this table.Table C.12: The proportion of graduates17 employed, unemployed and not in the labour force after18 completing training, by previous employment status21 and highest level of prior educational attainment, 2008-200919Year 10 and belowOf those employed after training20Employed prior to training22 77.5 2.4 77.4 1.4Full time employment 37.5 2.9 37.4 1.7Part time employment 39.2 2.9 39.0 1.7Unemployed prior to training 10.0 1.7 9.9 1.1Not in labour force prior to training 11.7 1.8 12.5 1.1Not employed (NFI) prior to training 0.9* 0.6 0.2* 0.1Of those employed full-tim e after trainingEmployed prior to training22 80.2 3.2 82.3 1.7Full time employment 61.9 3.9 63.7 2.2Part time employment 17.5 2.9 17.6 1.8Unemployed prior to training 9.2 2.3 7.8 1.2Not in labour force prior to training 9.7 2.3 9.8 1.3Not employed fNFI) prior to training 0.9* 0.8 **-5-5Source: NCVER, Student Outcomes Surveys, 2008-2009.See also endnotes as referenced in the table, which can be found at the end of Appendix C, for detailed information on any caveats and technical issues associated with the data presented in this table.This table continues on the next page.annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009 p227

Table C.12 (continued)

Of those employed part-tim e after training

Employed prior to training22

Full time employment

Part time employment

Unemployed prior to training

Not in labour force prior to training

Not employed (NFI) prior to training

Of those unemployed after training

Employed prior to training22

Full time employment

Part time employment

Unemployed prior to training

Not in labour force prior to training

Not employed [NED prior to training

Of those not in the labour force after training

Employed prior to training22

Full time employment

Part time employment

Unemployed prior to training

Not in labour force prior to training

Not employed (NFI) prior to training

Year 11 and C ertificate I or II

Of those employed after training20

Employed prior to training22

Full time employment

Part time employment

Unemployed prior to training

Not in labour force prior to training

Not employed (NFI) prior to training

Of those employed full-tim e after training

Employed prior to training22

Full time employment

Part time employment

Unemployed prior to training

Not in labour force prior to training

Not employed (NFI) prior to training

74.1 3.6 72.4 2.3

6.6 2.2 6.4 1.5

67.1 3.9 65.3 2.5

11.0 2.4 12.0 1.9

14.1 2.8 15.3 1.7

0.8= 1.0 0.3=0.2

27.6 6.7 32.0 4.0

9.0=5.1 11.5 2.5

17.4 5.1 19.7 3.5

43.5 7.2 43.2 4.7

27.8 6.2 24.1 3.4

33 33 0.7=0.5

18.2 4.6 20.2 3.2

5,2=2.7 4.4 1.4

11.4 3.5 15.4 3.0

8.7 4.2 10.2 2.4

72.6 5.8 68.8 3.7

33 33 0.8=0.8

79.7 2.0 82.7 1.2

38.1 2.5 38.9 1.4

404 2.5 42.5 1.5

10.3 1.6 8.5 0.9

9.6 1.4 8.4 0.9

0.4=0.3 0.3 0.2

83.5 2.3 85.7 1.4

58.4 3.3 58.8 1.9

24.0 2.8 26.0 1.7

7.9 1.7 7.5 1.1

8.5 1.7 6.5 0.9

33 0.4=0.2

Source: NCVER, Student Outcomes Surveys, 2008-2009. See also endnotes as referenced in the table, which can be found at the end of Appendix C, for detailed information on any caveats and technical issues associated with the data presented in this table.

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p228 annua! national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009

Table C.12 (continued)

Of those employed part-tim e after training

Employed prior to training82

Full time employment

Part time employment

Unemployed prior to training

Not in labour force prior to training

Not employed CNFI) prior to training

Of those unemployed after training

Employed prior to training22

Full time employment

Part time employment

Unemployed prior to training

Not in labour force prior to training

Not employed (NFI) prior to training

Of those not in the labour force after training

Employed prior to training22

Full time employment

Part time employment

Unemployed prior to training

Not in labour force prior to training

Not employed CNFI) prior to training

Year 12

Bf those employed after training20

Employed prior to training22

Full time employment

Part time employment

Unemployed prior to training

Not in labour force prior to training

Not employed (NFI) prior to training

Of those employed full-tim e after training

Employed prior to training22

Full time employment

Part time employment

Unemployed prior to training

Not in labour force prior to training

Not employed (NFI) prior to training

74.3 3.7 78.8 2.0

B.4 2.0 9.6 1.4

(36.6 4.0 67.9 2.2

14.0 3.1 9.9 1,4

11.2 2.5 11.1 1.6

33 33

0.2* 0.2

30.9 6.8 36.4 3.4

11.3* 5.6 12.7 2.3

19.2 4.9 23.4 2.9

49.9 7.5 45.6 3.7

18.4 6.0 17.4 2.8

3 3 33

0.5* 0.4

25.8 5.8 28.3 3.6

6.5 2.9 11.5 2.9

16.6 4.6 16.2 2.6

6.4 3.0 12.9 3.0

66.4 6.3 58.4 4.0

1.4* 1.5 0.5* 0.4

82.2 2.1 82.6 1.2

37.5 2.7 37.9 1.5

44.0 2.7 43.9 1.6

7.7 1.6 8.6 1.0

9.9 1.6 8.7 0.8

** 33 0.1* 0.1

86.6 2.3 85.7 1.5

54.6 3.5 58.3 2.0

31.3 3.1 26.8 1.7

5.9 1.6 7.1 1.2

7.5 1.7 7.1 1.0

33 33 0.1* 0.1

Source: NCVER, Student Outcomes Surveys, 2008-2009. See also endnotes as referenced in the table, which can be found at the end of Appendix C, fnr detailed information on any caveats and technical issues associated with the data presented in this table.

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annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009 p229

Table C.12 (continued)

Of those employed part-tim e after training

Employed prior to training22

Full time employment

Part time employment

Unemployed prior to training

Not in labour force prior to training

Not employed (NFI) prior to training

Of those unemployed after training

Employed prior to training22

Full time employment

Part time employment

Unemployed prior to training

Not in labour force prior to training

Not employed (NFI) prior to training

Of those not in the labour force after training

Employed prior to training22

Full time employment

Part time employment

Unemployed prior to training

Not in labour force prior to training

Not employed (NFI) prior to training

Certificate III or IV

Of those employed after training20

Employed prior to training22

Full time employment

Part time employment

Unemployed prior to training

Not in labour force prior to training

Not employed (NFI) prior to training

Of those employed full-tim e after training

Employed prior to training22

Full time employment

Part time employment

Unemployed prior to training

Not in labour force prior to training

Not employed (NFI) prior to training

75.6 3.9 78.5 1.9

11.2 3.1 11.3 1.5

63.9 4.3 66.5 2.3

10.3 3.0 10.5 1.6

13.7 2.9 11.0 1.3

** ft# a aªª

37.3 8.4 44.9 4.7

10.9 4.8 17.9 4.1

25.9 7.9 26.0 3.9

43.2 8.3 34.2 4.6

19.4 6.6 20.4 3.3

** iff ** 66

35.3 7.7 41.6 4.4

10.7 4.1 14.7 2.9

23.1 7.2 26.3 4.0

10.9 5.0 10.5 3.7

52.6 8.2 46.7 4.4

** ft ft 1.2* 1.3

91.6 1.2 92.2 0.7

64.9 2.1 64.4 1.2

25.4 1.9 26.7 1.1

3.9 0.8 4.0 0.5

4.3 0.9 3.5 0.5

0.2* 0.2 0.2* 0.1

94.9 1.1 95.8 0.6

83.4 2.0 84.9 1.1

10.4 1.7 9.8 0.9

2.2 0.7 2.3 0.4

2.7 0.9 1.8 0.4

66 aa 0.1* 0.1

Source: NCVER, Student Outcomes Surveys, 2008-2009. See also endnotes as referenced in the table, which can be found at the end of Appendix C, for detailed information on any caveats and technical issues associated with the data presented in this table.

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p230 annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009

Table C.12 (continued)

Of those employed part-tim e after training

Employed prior to training85

Full time employment

Part time employment

Unemployed prior to training

Not in labour force prior to training

Not employed (NFI) prior to training

Of those unemployed after training

Employed prior to training52

Full time employment

Part time employment

Unemployed prior to training

Not in labour force prior to training

Not employed (NFI) prior to training

Of those not in the labour force after training

Employed prior to training22

Full time employment

Part time employment

Unemployed prior to training

Not in labour force prior to training

Not employed (NFI) prior to training

Diploma and above

Of those employed after training50

Employed prior to training22

Full time employment

Part time employment

Unemployed prior to training

Not in labour force prior to training

Not employed (NFI) prior to training

Of those employed full-tim e after training

Employed prior to training22

Full time employment

Part time employment

Unemployed prior to training

Not in labour force prior to training

Not employed (NFI) prior to training

83.4 2.9 84.7 1.8

17.3 3.1 18.7 1.7

65.1 3.9 65.2 2.2

8.4 2.2 7.8 1.2

7.8 2.1 7.4 1.4

´ 0.2* 0.2

38.1 8.6 46.7 4.4

14.2 5.8 24.3 3.6

21.1 7.4 22.1 3.9

44.0 8.8 39.2 4.4

18.0 5.5 13.9 2.7

0.0 0.0

36.9 7.4 40.3 4.3

19.1 5.5 21.2 3.6

17.8 6.0 18.5 3.4

8.6 3.7 10.4 2.4

52.9 7.9 48.4 4.4

1.5* 1.4 0.9* 1.0

88.2 1.7 91.8 0.7

58.8 2.4 62.0 1.3

28.8 2.2 29.0 1.2

5.9 1.3 4.5 0.5

5.6 1.1 3.6 0.5

0.2* 0.2 0.1* 0.0

93.9 1.5 95.7 0.6

83.1 2.2 85.8 1.1

10.4 1.8 9.0 0.9

3.3 1.1 2.7 0.5

2.7 0.9 1.5 0.4

VrZ-

Source: NCVER, Student Outcomes Surveys, 2008-2009. See also endnotes as referenced in the table, which can be found at the end of Appendix C, for detailed information on any caveats and technical issues associated with the data presented in this table.

This table continues on the next page.

annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009 p231

Table C.12 (continued)

Ot those employed part-tim e after training

Employed prior to training25 77.0 3.8 84.6 1.6

Full time employment 10.7 2.3 15.9 1.7

Part time employment65.6 4.0 68.1 2.1

Unemployed prior to training 11.1 3.2 7.8 1.2

Not in labour force prior to training 11.5 2.8 7.5 1.3

Not employed (NFI) prior to training X--X- ft ft 0.1* 0.1

Of those unemployed after training

Employed prior to training22 30.9 7.1 39.1 3.8

Full time employment 16.1 5.5 22.3 3.1

Part time employment 14.2 5.2 16.1 2.7

Unemployed prior to training 53.7 7.9 44.9 3.8

Not in labour force prior to training 14.6 4.5 15.6 2.5

Not employed (NFI) prior to training ftft ft ft- ftftftft

Of those not in the labour force after training

Employed prior to training22 34.2 6.9 33.0 3.8

Full time employment 21.2 6.2 18.8 3.3

Part time employment11.8 4.7 13.8 2.6

Unemployed prior to training 8.9 3.6 9.6 2.2

Not in labour force prior to training 55.2 7.2 56.6 4.0

Not employed (NFI) prior to training ft ft ft ft- 0.8* 0.7

Source: NCVER, Student Outcomes Surveys, 2008-2009. See also endnotes as referenced in the table, which can be found at the end of Appendix C, for detailed information on any caveats and technical issues associated with the data presented in this table.

p23S annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009

Table C.13: The proportion of graduates17 with improved employment status ______after training, 2QQ8-2QD919 ________ ________ ____________

ibh h h h i HI IMVET graduatesNot employed before3' training to employed after18 12.5 0.6 10.7 0.3Employed at a higher skill level after training33∑24 12.9 0.6 13.6 0.3Received a job-related benefit 58.9 1.0 55.9 0.6Total with improved employment status after training25 62.9 0.9 59:8 0.5Source: NCVER, Student Outcomes Surveys, 2008-2009.See also endnotes as referenced in the table, which can be found at the end of Appendix C, for detailed information on any caveats and technical issues associated with the data presented in this table.Table C.14: The proportion of Indigenous graduates17 with improved __ employment status after training, 20Q8-2QQ919 ____IWIndigenous VET graduatesNot employed before21 training to employed after *8 16.7 4.6 12.5 2.0Employed at a higher skill level after training23 24 9.6 3.8 10.9 2.0Received a job-related benefit 53.0 6.1 53.1 3.5Total with improved employment status after training25 59.8 5.9 56.33.4Source: NCVER, Student Outcomes Surveys, 2008-2009,See also endnotes as referenced in the table, which can be found at the end of Appendix C, for detailed information on any caveats and technical issues associated with the data presented in this table. annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009 p233

Table C.15: The proportion of graduates17 with improved employment status after training, by SEIFA Index of Relative Socio-economic Disadvantage, 50G8-500919________________________________

Quintile 1 (M ast disadvantaged)

Not employed before2 * training to employed after18

Employed at a higher skill level after training23∑24

Received a job-related benefit

Total with improved employment status after training25

Quintile 2

Not employed before21 training to employed after18

Employed at a higher skill level after training23 24

Received a job-related benefit

Total with improved employment status after training25

Quintile 3

Not employed before21 training to employed after10

Employed at a higher skill level after training23∑24

Received a job-related benefit

Total with improved employment status after training23

Quintile 4

Not employed before21 training to employed after18

Employed at a higher skill level after training23∑24

Received a job-related benefit

Total with improved employment status after training25

Quintile 5 (Least disadvantaged)

Not employed before21 training to employed after18

Employed at a higher skill level after training23 24

Received a job-related benefit

Total with improved employment status after training25

12.6 1.6 9.9 0.8

9.7 1.5 11.9 0.9

56.2 2.6 50.7 1.5

59.5 2.6 53.9 1.5

12.B1.4 11.7 0.8

11.8 1.3 12.7 0.7

56.9 2.1 54.9 1.2

60.5 2.0 58.8 1.2

12.7 1.4 11.2 0.8

12.6 1.3 12.8 0.7

59.1 2.0 57.6 1.2

63.6 2.0 61.4 1.2

12.8 1.3 9.8 0.6

14.9 1.5 15.1 0.8

60.9 2.0 57.6 1.1

65.1 2.0 61.5 1.1

11.4 1.5 10.7 0.9

15.3 1.6 15.2 0.9

61.5 2.3 57.8 1.3

65.9 2.3 62.4 1.3

Source: NCVER, Student Outcomes Surveys, 2008-2009. See also endnotes as referenced in the table, which can be found at the end of Appendix C, for detailed information on any caveats and technical issues associated with the data presented in this table.

p234 annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009

Table C.16: The proportion of graduates17 with improved employment status after training, by highest level of prior educational attainment 2008-200919

Year 10 and below

Not employed before21 training to employed after16

Employed at a higher skill level after training9324

Received a job-related benefit

Total with improved employment status after training25

Year 11 and Certificate I or II

Not employed before21 training to employed after18

Employed at a higher skill level after training23∑24

Received a job-related benefit

Total with improved employment status after training25

Year 12

Not employed before21 training to employed after18

Employed at a higher skill level after training23∑24

Received a job-related benefit

Total with improved employment status after training25

Certificate III or IV

Not employed before21 training to employed after18

Employed at a higher skill level after training23∑24

Received a job-related benefit

Total with improved employment status after training25

Diploma and aboue

Not employed before21 training to employed after18

Employed at a higher skill level after training23∑24

Received a job-related benefit

Total with improved employment status after training25

16.5 1.8 15.9 1.0

8.9 1.4 10.6 0.8

50.7 2.5 48.2 1.5

55.2 2.5 53.9 1.5

15.9 1.6 12.8 0.9

13.7 1.6 16.2 0.9

58.2 2.3 55.1 1.3

63.5 2.3 59.6 1.3

14.5 1.8 13.8 1.0

20.0 1.9 18.9 1.0

60.2 2.4 57.0 1.4

66.3 2.4 62.6 1.4

7.1 1.0 6.5 0.6

12.6 1.4 12.7 0.7

64.3 2.1 61.1 1.2

66.3 2.0 63.6 1.1

9.9 1.4 6.5 0.6

8.8 1.2 10.2 0.7

58.0 2.2 55.3 1.2

61.6 2.2 58.1 1.2

Source: NCVER, Student Outcomes Surveys, 2008-2009. See also endnotes as referenced in the table, which can be found at the end of Appendix C, for detailed information on any caveats and technical issues associated with the data presented in this table.

annual national report of the austraiian vocational education and training system 2009 p235

Appendix C * Endnotes 1. Information about student participation in Australia's vocational education and training system is

gathered annually through a national data collection. The collection is undertaken under a national standard (AVETMISS) where all RTO who

receive public funding for the provision of training to students are required to provide detailed information about the students that they have trained.

Under current arrangements, private RTOs are required only to provide details of the students that they have trained using hinds sourced from direct government VET funding. On the other hand, publicly owned training providers (such as TAPE) are required to report information on all of their students and from all funding sources (i.e. including fee-for-service training). As a consequence, the information reported here significantly understates

the total number of students who participate each year in recognised training under the auspices of the AQTF. For example, the national collection currently misses out those who train in enterprise-based RTOs (without direct government VET funding) and those paying fee-for- service to private training providers.

2. In 2006 New South Wales reported activity for workplace learning and the NSW AMES Skillmax Program for the first time.

3. In 2007 the decline in student numbers in New South Wales can be partly attributed to new and better defined exclusions from reporting scopes. New South Wales excluded

subcontracted VET activity for 2600 students, 29 200 subject enrolments and 892 100 nominal hours. In addition, 3400 students, 47 300

subject enrolments and 1 706 600 nominal hours were excluded because it was activity undertaken at overseas campuses.

4. Data from the New' South Wales agricultural colleges were unable to be reported for 2008 at the time of the release of the 2008 Annual National report. This data has subsequently been included for reporting.

5. Victoria submitted one consolidated submission for 2009 activity, in place of the three previous submissions (TAPE, ACE and Private Providers). As a consequence of the way some

adult and community education and private registered training organisations are scoped, there may be some slight reporting differences in 2009

compared to previous years.

6. Data from the Workers Education Association of South Australia were unable to be reported for inclusion in the 2009 National VET Provider

Collection. In 2008 WEA reported 6397 students, 7993 subject enrolments and 135 312 nationally agreed nominal hours and 188 full≠ time training equivalents.

7. Data from Tasmania for 2009 is not necessarily comparable with previous years due to changes in training arrangements implemented

in the Tasmania Tomorrow initiatives. These initiatives included senior secondary colleges and TAPE being

replaced by the Tasmanian Academy, the Tasmanian Polytechnic and the Skills Institute.

p236 annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009

8. All outputs data and baseline data in Appendix C differ to those previously published, as they are all related to either qualification completions or government funding. Baseline figures relate to an average of 2005-2007 for course enrolments and unit/

module completions, and 2004-2006 for course completions. For further details refer to 'Changes to previously published data1.

9. South Australia advises that in 2009 there was a change in the method of reporting course enrolments that excludes TAFE module only enrolments. Figures for 2008 and the

baseline have not been changed to reflect this new reporting method and are not comparable to those reported for 2009. If the previous reporting method is applied to the 2009 data the number of course enrolments for South

Australia would be 116 436, exceeding the baseline measure of 108 900 bv 7 536 course enrolments.

10. 1 Government funded activity is based on major funding source codes 01, 02, 11, 13, 15. It excludes activity funded by private and overseas providers, students enrolled in fee- for-service activity, overseas full-fee paying activity, recreational, leisure and personal enrichment programs, and any credit transfer activity. Vocational education and training delivered in schools, where the delivery has been undertaken by schools is also excluded.

In previous publications, government funded activity was based only on major funding source codes 01 and 11. Due to this redefinition, all measures of government funded activity have changed. The magnitude of change can be summarised as follows:

Number of students 1,197.5 1,252.2

FYTEs 446.7 466.9

11. Indigenous students are defined as those who self-identify on enrolment forms that they are of Aboriginal and/ or Torres Strait Islander background.

Not all students respond to the relevant question on the enrolment form. The non-response rate for Indigenous status

for government funded students is as follows: 2005 - 13.5 per cent; 2006 - 11.8 per cent; 2007 - 8.5

per cent; 2008 - 8.5 per cent; 2009 - 9.2 per cent

12. Final qualifications completed data for 2009 are not available. Only preliminary data is available from the 2009 national provider collection.

13. 13 In 2009 NCVERchanged the reporting scope for qualifications completed and backdated it to all previous years. Consequently, data in this publication may not match previously published data. This affects

all previous years.

annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009 p237

14. Due to improvements in data quality, Queensland has submitted additional qualifications completed between 2004 and 2007 rectifying the underreporting of qualifications previously identified over this period. This affects both Queensland and Australia reporting.

15. Improvements in data quality resulted in the removal of some qualifications completed for NSW Workplace Training in 2007 and 2008. This affects both New South Wales and Australian reporting.

16. In 2007 a section of the TAPE SA data was submitted at an element level, which resulted in an increase in enrolment numbers over the previous year. This was rectified in the 2008 data submission, and resulted in a decline in

enrolments over the previous year.

17. The term 'graduate' refers to students who are reported as completing all requirements for a qualification and students who self-identify as

completing all requirements.

18. Employed, unemployed and not in the labour force after training are determined by asking respondents 'Did you have a job of any kind at deference date>?'

19. All non-respondents have been excluded from the analysis. The sample was designed to provide state/territory level reporting in 2008, and state/ territory and institute level reporting

in 2009. A larger sample is required in the institute level reporting years to provide reliable institute estimates. Therefore, the sample size in 2009 was

larger than in 2008.

20. 'Employed after training1 includes full time employment, part time employment, or employment with working hours not stated.

21. Previous employment status is determined by asking respondents 'Did you have a job of any kind at ?'

22. 'Employed prior to training' includes full time employment, part time employment, or employment with working hours not stated.

23. A change in skill level was derived using the Australian and New Zealand Standard Classification of Occupations (ANZSCO 2006).

24. This question is not asked of students from community education providers. Therefore, the percentage reported represents the proportion of graduates

excluding those from community education providers.

25. An individual may have reported a positive response to more than one measure contributing to improved employment status after training, e.g. they may have been employed at a higher skill level after training and received at least one job-related benefit.

p238 annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009

Appendix D: State and Territory tables

State and Territory tables are available on the DEEVVR website at

http://www. dee wr. go v. au.

annual national report of the australian vocational and technical education system 2009 p239

Appendix E: Memberships during 2009 (at 30 April 2009)

Ministerial Council for Vocational and Technical Education [MCVTE]

Australian Government The Hon Julia Gillard, MP Minister for Education

New South Wales The Hon Verity Helen Firth, MLA Minister for Education and Training

Victoria The Hon Jacinta Allan, MP Minister for Skills, Education Services and Employment

Queensland The Hon Geoff Wilson MP Minister for Education, Training and the Arts

South Australia The Hon Michael O *Brien MP Minister for Employment, Training and

Further Education

Western Australia The Hon Peter Collier MLC Minister for Training

Tasmania The Hon David Bartlett, MHA Premier of Tasmania Minister for Education and Skills

Australian Capital Territory Mr Andrew Barr, MLA Minister for Education and Training

Northern Territory Hon Paul Henderson MLA Chief Minister Minister for Education and Training

National Senior Officials Committee Ms Lisa Paul Secretary

Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations Australian Government

Mr Michael Coutts-Trotter Director-General Department of Education and Training New South Wales

Mr Howard Ronaldson Secretary Department of Innovation, Industry and Regional Development Victoria

Ms Julie Grantham Acting Director-General Department of Education and Training Queensland

Dr Ruth Shean Director General Department of Training and Workforce Development Western Australia

Mr Raymond Garrand Chief Executive Department of Further Education, Employment, Science and Technology South Australia

p240 annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009

Mr John Smyth Secretary Department of Education Tasmania

Mr Gary Barnes Chief Executive Department of Education and Training Northern Territory

Dr Jim Watterston Chief Executive Department of Education and Training Australian Capital Territory

National Senior Officials Committee *Alternates Mr B Burmester Deputy Secretary

Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations Australian Capital Territory

Ms Leslie Loble Deputy Director-General Strategic Planning and Regulation Department of Education and Training New South Wales

Mr Philip Clarke Acting Deputy Secretary Department of Innovation, Industry and Regional Development Victoria

Mr R Camm Department of Education, Training and the Arts Queensland

Ms S Testrail Department of Education Services Western Australia

Dr Craig Fowler Deputy Chief Executive Department of Further Education, Employment, Science 8c Technology South Australia

Mr Mark Sayer General Manager Skills Tasmania

Mr John Hassed Deputy Chief Executive Department of Employment, Education &

Training Northern Territory

Ms J Vasey Department of Education and Training Australian Capital Territory

annual national report of the austrsiian vocational education and training system 2009 p241

National Quality Council Mr Patrick McICendry (Chair) Careers Australia Group

Mr Patrick Coleman Business Council of Australia

Ms Mary Hicks Australian Chamber of Commerce & Industry (ACCI)

Ms Michelle Bissett Australian Council of Trade Unions

Mr Craig Robertson Australian Government Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations

Ms Megan Lilly Australian Industry Group

Mr Rod Arthur Queensland Department of Education, Training and the Arts

Mr Phil Clarke Victorian Department of Innovation, Industry and Regional Development

Mr Mike Brough Tasmanian Office of Post Compulsory Education and Training

Mr Ralph Leutton National Farmers Federation

Ms Julie Moss Australian Council of Private Education and Training

Ms Virginia Simmons TAPE Directors Australia

Dr Mark Bagshaw TnnovS Consulting Group

National Industry Skills Committee Mr Bill Stoddart (Chair) Managing Director, Stoddart Metal Fabricators

Mr Allan Burgess President, Australian Dairy Farmers * Federation

Ms Michelle Bissett Australian Council of Trade Unions

Ms Linda Heron Business Council of Australia

Mr Roger Leeming Australian Industry Group

Mr Dave Murray President, Metallurgical Coal, BHP Billiton

Ms Rae Haggarty Managing Director, Flair Colour and Design

Mr Neville Sawyer AM Executive Chairman, Smart Digital Optics

Mr Stuart Wilson Managing Director, Wilson Building Constructions Pty Ltd.

p242 annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009

National Training Statistics Committee Mr John Hassed Chair Department of Employment, Education and Training Northern Territory

Ms Jenny Donovan Department of Education and Training New South Wales

Ms Wendy Timms Department of Innovation, Industry and Regional Development Victoria

Ms Pam Deakin Department of Education, Training and the Arts Queensland

Mr John Harris Department of Education and Training Western Australia

Mr Richard Osborne Department of Further Education, Employment, Science & Technology South Australia

Mr Daniel Albert Department of Education Tasmania

Mr Matthew Hardy Department of Education and Training Australian Capital Territory

Mr Neil McAuslan Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations Ms Justine Boland Australian Bureau of Statistics

Dr Tom Karmel National Centre for Vocational Education Research Mr Stephen Bolton Australian Chamber of Commerce and

Industry

annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009 p243

Appendix F: Acronyms

Acronym _________ Spelt out

AAC

ABS

ACCI

ACE

ACE

ACT

AEI

AETEO

AFB

ANR

AQF

AQTF

ASCO

ATSI

AVETMISS

AVOC

CALD

CIT

CDAG

CRC

CSASAW

CTS

OEEDI

OEEWR

DEST

DFT

EDI

ESP

FSTC

FTE

FYTE

HELP

IGA

IPROWD

IRP

Australian Apprenticeship Centre

Australian Bureau of Statistics

Australian Chamber of Commerce and Industry

Adult Community Education

Adult and Community Education

Australian Capital Territory

Australian Education International

Aboriginal Education, Training and Employment Officer

Away From Base

Annual National Report of the Australian VET system

Australian Qualifications Framework

Australian Quality Training Framework

Australian Standard Classification of Occupations

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander

Australian Vocational Education and Training Management Information Statistical Standard

Advanced Vocationally-Oriented Courses

Culturally and Linguistically Diverse

Canberra Institute of Technology

Council of Australian Governments

CDAG Reform Council

Commonwealth - State Agreement for Skilling Australia *s Workforce

Career and Transition Support

Department of Employment, Economic Development and Innovation

Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations

Department of Education, Science and Training

Department of Education and Training

Equity and Development Innovation

Employment Service Provider

Foundation Skills Taster Course

Full Time Equivalent

Full Year Training Equivalent

Higher Education Loan Program

Intergovernmental Agreement

Indigenous Police Recruitment Out West Delivery Program

Indigenous Regional Projects

p244 annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009

Acronym Spelt out

ISC

ITAS TT

ITAS VET

IVEC

JGTP

KPM

LING

LLN

LLNP

MCEEDYA

MCEETYA

MCTEE

MCVTE

NA

NASWD

NCVER

NDA

NESB

MIRA

NISC

NP

NQC

NSF

NSOC

NSW

NT

NTIS

NTSC

NVEAC

OECD

*ü*†*ï

PETP

PPP

PSP

RPL

Indigenous Tutorial Assistance Scheme - Tertiary Tuition

Indigenous Tutorial Assistance Scheme - VET

Introduction to Vocational Education Certificate

Joint Group Training Program

Key Performance Measure

Learning and Information Network Centre

Language, Literacy and Numeracy

Language, Literacy and Numeracy Program

Ministerial Council for Education, Early Childhood Development and Youth Affairs

Ministerial Council on Education, Employment, Training and Youth Affairs

Ministerial Council on Tertiary Education and Employment

Ministerial Council for Vocational and Technical Education

National Agreement

National Agreement for Skills and Workforce Development

National Centre for Vocational Education Research Ltd

National Disability Agreement

Non-English Speaking Background

National Indigenous Reform Agreement

National Industry Skills Committee

National Partnership

National Quality Council

National Skills Framework

National Senior Officials Committee

New South Wales

Northern Territory

National Training Information Service

National Training Statistics Committee

National VET Equity Advisory Council

Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development

Office of Training and Tertiary Education

Priority Education and Training Program

Productivity Places Program

Priorities Support Program

Recognition of Prior Learning

annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009 p245

Acronym Spelt out

RTO Registered training organisation

SA South Australia

SPICE Students Participating in Community Enterprises

SRA Supplementary Recurrent Assistance

SSP Specific Purpose Payments

STA State Training Authority

TAPE Technical and Further Education Institute

TIFIARRC Training Initiatives for Indigenous Adults in Regional and Remote Communities

TLCF Teaching and Learning Capital Fund

TSNR Targeting Skills Needs in Regions

"TVET Technical and Vocational Education and Training Ltd

UC User Choice

VET Vocational Education and Training

VHP VET Infrastructure for Indigenous People

VOCED International Vocationai Education and Training Research database

WA Western Australia

WELL Workplace English Language and Literacy Program

WIP Workforce Innovation Program

p246 annual national report of the australian vocational education and training system 2009