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Australian Strategic Policy Institute—Report for 2016-17


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ANNUAL REPORT2016-2017

ASPI

   Level 2 40 Macquarie Street Barton ACT 2600

  T +61 2 6270 5100

   www.aspi.org.au

   www.aspistrategist.org.au

ANNUAL REPORT2016-2017

©â€‚The Australian Strategic Policy Institute Limited 2017

This publication is subject to copyright. Except as permitted under the Copyright Act 1968, no part of it may in any form or by any means (electronic, mechanical, microcopying, photocopying, recording or otherwise) be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted without prior written permission. Enquiries should be addressed to the publishers.

First published October 2017

Published in Australia by the Australian Strategic Policy Institute

ASPI  Level 2, 40 Macquarie Street Barton ACT 2600 Australia

Tel + 61 2 6270 5100 Fax + 61 2 6273 9566 Email enquiries@aspi.org.au Web www.aspi.org.au

www.aspistrategist.org.au

ABN 77 097 369 045

ISSN 1 447 5510

Cover photos:

Myanmar: Sunrise in Bagan, ancient city located in the Mandalay Region of Burma (Myanmar) © Stefano Brozzi/SIME/imagefolk.

Ship: Chinese People’s Liberation Army Naval sailors line the decks aboard the PLA Frigate Hengshui as it arrives at the Joint Base Pearl Harbor Hickam to participate in the multi-national military exercise RIMPAC in Honolulu, Hawaii, 29 June 2016. © Hugh Gentry/Reuters.

Propane sphere: Pluto LNG onshore gas plant. Photo courtesy Woodside Energy Ltd.

Soldier: Australian Army communications system operator listens to her radio handset at the Taji Military Complex, Iraq, August 2015. Photo courtesy Department of Defence.

LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL

Senator the Hon Marise Payne

Minister for Defence

Parliament House

CANBERRA ACT 2600

Dear Minister

The Council of the Australian Strategic Policy Institute has pleasure in submitting to you the

annual report for the year ended 30 June 2017.

The report is presented to you in accordance with section 97 of the Public Governance,

Performance and Accountability Act 2013.

The report has been prepared to conform with the requirements of the Corporations Act 2001

and was approved by the Council at its meeting on 1 September 2017.

Yours sincerely

Lt Gen (Ret’d) Kenneth Gillespie AC DSC CSM

Chairman

1 September 2017

P: + 02 6270 5100 ABN 77 097 369 045 www.aspi.org.au www.aspistrategist.org.au

LEVEL 2, 40 MACQUARIE STREET, BARTON ACT 2600

CONTENTS

LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL  III

MESSAGE FROM THE ASPI CHAIRMAN AND THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR  VI

ChAPTER 1

OVERVIEW  1

Purposes 3

Staffing 17

Funding 19

ChAPTER 2

PROGRAMS  23

Defence and strategy 24

National security 25

ASPI Education 34

ChAPTER 3

PUBLICATIONS  39

Contributions to the national debate—by publication type 42

Contributions to the national debate—by selected topic 47

ChAPTER 4

EVENTS  53

ASPI International Conference 54

National security dinners 55

International strategic dialogues 55

Roundtable discussions and forums 55

ASPI public events and workshops 56

Other events 56

ChAPTER 5

CORPORATE GOVERNANCE  59

Council meeting attendance 60

Current Council members 61

Council committees 68

ChAPTER 6

FINANCIALS  71

ASPI Directors’ Report 72

ANAO Independent Audit Report 74

Statement by Directors 77

Financial Statements 78

ANNEXES

A  ASPI publications  102

B  Articles and book chapters by ASPI staff  108

C  Opinion pieces by ASPI staff  110

D  ASPI events  116

E  Key roles at international conferences  122

F  Achieving ASPI’S purposes  124

G  Index of annual report requirements  127

Acronyms and abbreviations  128

MESSAGE FROM THE ASPI CHAIRMAN AND THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

This annual report describes ASPI’s activities over the 2016-17 financial year. The institute’s core

role is to provide contestability of policy advice to the Australian Government on strategic and

defence issues. We do this by developing detailed research on key issues of policy interest to

government, parliament and the public and private sectors. ASPI also plays an important role

by offering informed commentary and policy advice on many international security issues.

In the year under review, the fight against extremist terrorist groups in the Middle East,

terrorism in Australia and abroad, sovereignty disputes in the South and East China seas

and the situation on the Korean peninsula were areas under close observation. ASPI takes

its role seriously to enlighten and inform policy thinking on these challenging international

security problems.

In 2016-17, Lt Gen (Ret’d) Kenneth Gillespie AC DSC CSM was appointed Chairman of the ASPI

Council, which is in effect the board of ASPI Pty Ltd, a wholly government-owned company.

The government also appointed Mr Jim McDowell, Ms Jane Halton AO PSM and Professor

Joan Beaumont to the Council. The Hon David Johnson was also appointed to Council as the

nominee of the Prime Minister, and the Hon Stephen Conroy was appointed as nominee of the

Leader of the Opposition. The government approved an extension of Mr Peter Jennings PSM as

Executive Director.

One measure of the institute’s success is the often very positive comments made by senior

individuals about ASPI’s work. Speaking at ASPI’s June 2017 conference on Building the

Joint and Integrated Australian Defence Force, Senator the Hon Marise Payne, Minister for

Defence, acknowledged the institute’s work ‘in leading so much of the national security

policy discussion in Australia’, while the Opposition defence spokesperson, the Hon Richard

Marles, said ‘Speaking at ASPI really does force me to test my thinking against some of the

most experienced minds in the world of Defence.’ Senator Nick Xenophon described ASPI

vi    ASPI Annual Report 2016-2017    

‘as both forum and fulcrum’ in national security debates. Immigration and Border Protection

Minister the Hon Peter Dutton said in September 2016, ‘ASPI, of course, has made an

invaluable contribution over the past 15 years to Australian public debate. They’ve been ahead

of the game.’ Defence Industry Minister the Hon Christopher Pyne said in March 2017, ‘ASPI

is important. I really value the contribution it makes to the defence debate in Australia. It

provides a different viewpoint to the orthodoxy that comes out of Defence. This is incredibly

valuable. The institute is unique: it’s focused; it doesn’t just look at international strategy but

focuses on the details of military capability development.’

ASPI was again ranked as one of the world’s best think tanks in the University of Pennsylvania’s

2016 Global Go To Think Tank Index, the annual assessment of excellence for think tank

performance around the world. Notably, ASPI improved its rank from 16th to 12th in the ‘Top

defence and national security think tanks’ category, making ASPI the highest ranked defence

and national security think tank in Australia.

In the year under review, ASPI launched a new flagship annual report, Counterterrorism

yearbook 2017, and we initiated a series of ‘Quick looks’ studies designed to provide early

analytical assessments after significant terrorist operations. We produced our 16th annual

Cost of Defence analysis of the defence budget, as well as our third Cyber maturity in the

Asia-Pacific region report, now the benchmark of national cyber performance in our region.

We also released a major study, Australia’s Cyber Security Strategy: execution and evolution, in

May 2017. ASPI inaugurated a new annual dialogue with our counterparts in Berlin, the Stiftung

Wissenschaft und Politik. We continued to grow the range of professional development

courses we offer on defence, strategy and public policy. These, along with our many other

publications, activities and events, are reported in this annual report.

   Message from the ASPI Chairman and the Executive Director    vii

ASPI seeks sponsorship from many government departments and agencies and from the

private sector. Our annual report and financial statements acknowledge these sponsoring

entities, whose support is important to our ability to expand and in recent years to address the

full gamut of national security issues that increasingly range beyond traditional defence areas.

ASPI remains independent in terms of what our staff research, write and say. Indeed, there

is no ‘ASPI’ view on any defence and security issue as such; rather, we provide a platform for

different opinions, all focused in improving the quality of policymaking on national security.

We commend this report to you.

Kenneth Gillespie

(Chairman)

Peter Jennings

(Executive Director)

viii    ASPI Annual Report 2016-2017    

PAGE INTENTIONALLY BLANK

    ix

CHAPTER

1 OVERVIEW

Established by the Australian Government in 2001, the Australian Strategic Policy Institute

(ASPI) has established itself as a trusted source of analysis and advice on defence, strategic

policy and national security to government and the public. ASPI’s constitution, charter and

corporate plan guide the institute’s focus which, as the international environment has changed

since ASPI’s establishment, has broadened from defence through to a range of other strategic

and national security areas.

Since its inception, the institute has developed into one of the leading independent research

bodies in Australia. ASPI is unique in the scope of its research, capacity, expertise and ability to

independently engage across official and public domains. The institute is recognised nationally

and internationally for its significant contributions to important policy debates.

ASPI was again ranked as one of the world’s best think tanks in the University of Pennsylvania’s

2016 Global Go To Think Tank Index, the gold standard of annual assessment of excellence

for think tank performance around the world. ASPI featured in many the notable rankings

this year:

• An ASPI publication, Cyber maturity in the Asia-Pacific region 2016 , was named as one of the

best policy reports produced by a think tank in 2016.

• We improved our rank from 16th to 12th in the ‘Top defence and national security think

tanks’ category, making it the highest ranked defence and national security think tank

in Australia.

• We maintained our rank of 27th in the ‘Top foreign policy and international affairs think

tanks’ category. This is the highest ranking for any Australian-based think tank and the

third-highest outside of the US and Europe.

• We achieved a rank of 18th for ‘Best collaboration involving two or more think tanks’, the

highest ranking of an Australian think tank.

ASPI operates out of an office in Canberra, with 31 staff at the end of June 2017. In addition,

we have two offsite staff members and some part-time Visiting Fellows located outside

of Canberra.

ASPI’s work covers all aspects of national decision-making related to Australia’s defence and

security interests and whole-of-government policy responses, with an emphasis on political,

economic and military security.

During 2016-17, the Senator the Honourable Marise Payne was the Minister for Defence,

to whom we report. We thank her for her active support of the institute and thank the

Opposition and parliament for their engagement with the institute.

2    ASPI Annual Report 2016-2017    

PURPOSES

As outlined in its constitution, ASPI’s objective is to function as a strategic policy research

centre, independent of government, providing policy-relevant research and analysis to better

inform government decisions and public understanding of strategic and defence issues.

Four specific purposes are included in ASPI’s constitution and reflected in our corporate plan.

• Conducting and publishing research on issues related to Australia’s strategic and defence

policy choices

• Preparing policy inputs on strategic and defence issues to Government, as requested by

Government, subject to funding

• Conducting a program of activities to increase understanding of strategic and defence

policy issues among Australians, and to encourage the development of expertise in topics

relevant to Australia’s strategic and defence policy choices

• Promoting international understanding of Australia’s strategic and defence

policy perspectives.

Conducting and publishing research

The institute produces a range of publications throughout the year, dealing with the spectrum

of strategic and defence policy challenges and wider national security issues. In 2016-17,

ASPI produced a total of 48 publications. Detailed information about the full range of ASPI

publications, including examples of media coverage, is in Chapter 3 and at Annex A.

All ASPI publications are available for free download from our website. We have expanded our

readership base worldwide, and there have been nearly 470,000 downloads of publications

around the world since the introduction of free PDF downloads in 2007. Each new report

attracts an average of 612 downloads; while total downloads for 2016-17 reached nearly

30,000. Figure 1 shows the cumulative total downloads from ASPI’s website since the

introduction of free PDF downloads and Figure 2 shows the total publication downloads, based

on Google Analytics, in the past four years.

   Overview    3

Figure 1: Cumulative total downloads since the introduction of free PDF  downloads in 2007

0

50,000

100,000

150,000

200,000

250,000

300,000

350,000

400,000

450,000

500,000

2016-17 2015-16 2014-15 2013-14 2012-13 2011-12 2010-11 2009-10 2008-09 2007-08

Cumulative total downloads (for all time) Figure 2: Publication downloads 2013-14 to 2016-17, based on Google Analytics

0

5,000

10,000

15,000

20,000

25,000

30,000

35,000

2016-17 2015-16 2014-15 2013-14

Downloads per year (based on Google Analytics)

4    ASPI Annual Report 2016-2017    

ASPI continues to enjoy a substantial presence in the media landscape through our blog,

The Strategist, which allows us to comment on contemporary issues in a way that is consistent

with our reputation for considered analysis. A major benefit is the ability to publish the views

of analysts and commentators on current ‘hot topics’ quickly and in their own words, rather

than through a media filter. The Strategist routinely attracts more than 2,000 unique readers a

day, and has 3,000 daily subscribers and 4,000 weekly subscribers.

The Strategist pieces have been quoted in other media reporting on numerous occasions.

The Strategist is a useful vehicle for the media to easily identify ASPI analysts with particular subject

matter expertise, so blog posts often lead to interviews. During 2016-17, there were 961 blog posts

from 237 individual authors, covering all of the major areas of ASPI’s research interests.

ASPI staff are also frequent contributors to academic journals and other external publications.

A list of selected external publications is in Annex B.

Contributing to government policy

ASPI’s contribution to government policy thinking occurs at many different levels. More

formally, the following submissions were provided during the year.

• Parliamentary Joint Committee on Intelligence and Security—inquiry into the Criminal Code

Amendment (High Risk Terrorist Offenders) Bill 2016 (submission by Ms Jacinta Carroll)

• Australian Consumer and Competition Commission—inquiry into the British American Tobacco

Australia Limited & Ors application for authorisation A91550 (submission by Dr John Coyne)

• Queensland Parliamentary Legal Affairs and Community Safety Committee—inquiry into

the Serious Organised Crime Amendment Bill 2016 (submission by Dr John Coyne)

• Parliamentary Joint Standing Committee on the National Capital and External Territories—

inquiry into the strategic importance of the Indian Ocean territories (submissions by

Mr Peter Jennings, Dr Anthony Bergin and Dr Malcolm Davis)

• 2017 Independent Intelligence Review—conducted by Michael L’Estrange and Steven

Merchant (submissions by Mr Peter Jennings and Dr Anthony Bergin)

• Joint Standing Committee on Foreign Affairs, Defence and Trade—review of the Defence

annual report (Dr Andrew Davies and Dr Mark Thomson, appearing as witnesses, and

written submissions by Dr Andrew Davies and Dr Malcolm Davis)

• Parliamentary Joint Committee on Law Enforcement—inquiry into crystal

methamphetamine (ice) (submission made by Dr John Coyne)

• Joint Standing Committee on Treaties—review of the Australia-France Treaty to facilitate

the future submarine project (Dr Andrew Davies, appearing as a witness)

• Senate Inquiry—Australian Broadcasting Corporation Amendment (Restoring Shortwave

Radio) Bill 2017 (submission by Mr Graeme Dobell).

   Overview    5

More informally, ASPI senior staff engage frequently in meetings with parliamentarians and

senior bureaucrats to discuss a range of policy options.

Defence research projects

A portion of the funds received from the Department of Defence is directed to mutually

agreed Defence-specific projects. During the year, those projects focused on :

• the Asian nuclear order

• ANZUS alliance interoperability

• future air combat capability

• future submarines: next steps

• implementation of UNHCR Resolution on Women in Defence and Security

• strategic engagement with Japan

• Defence and civil powers interaction

• Pacific island security—especially reducing militarisation of the region

• Australia - New Zealand bilateral defence ties.

Participation in government advisory committees and expert panels

Recognised for their expertise, ASPI staff have been invited to participate in a number of

Australian Government advisory committees and expert panels, which include:

• Parliamentary Joint Foreign Affairs, Defence and Trade Committee on the Trump

administration and Australia

• Defence subcommittee on Defence Industry Policy

• Shadow Justice Minister’s expert panel on illicit drugs

Level of involvement by other Australian Government entities in ASPI  research programs

While ASPI’s core funding for defence work comes from the Department of Defence, funds

from other government entities have grown significantly over the past three years. This has

allowed us to expand the National Security Program’s areas of research, to undertake specific

training programs and to deliver contracted research and analysis. The commitment of other

government agencies to funding ASPI for these programs demonstrates their confidence in our

ability to provide high-quality, independent analysis and advice.

6    ASPI Annual Report 2016-2017    

During 2016-17, we received additional funds from:

• the Attorney-General’s Department

• AUSTRAC

• the Australian Federal Police

• the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade

• the Department of Immigration and Border Protection

• Emergency Management Australia.

These funds contributed to the following research programs:

• International Cyber Policy Centre

• Strategic Policing and Law Enforcement Program

• Border Security Program

• Risk and Resilience Program

• Counter-Terrorism Policy Centre

• Better Policy and Defence Graduate programs.

Increasing understanding of and developing expertise in strategic and  defence policy

Events

ASPI reaches a range of different audiences through a program of public and invitation-only

events. During 2016-17, we conducted a total of 114 events, which included roundtable

discussions, masterclasses and seminars attended by Australian and international participants.

ASPI events made a valuable contribution to discussions about defence and national security

issues in Australia.

Details about the full range of events that ASPI organises are in Chapter 4 and Annex D.

Media commentary

ASPI continues to play an important role in the media as part of the institute’s strategy for

encouraging and informing public debate.

Every week, ASPI staff are contacted to provide comments or be interviewed for radio or

television on the full range of research program areas. This amounts to hundreds of interviews

throughout the year and reflects the standing that ASPI has established with the media as a

credible and reliable source of information on what are often very complex issues.

   Overview    7

As well as comments and interviews, a total of 84 opinion pieces by ASPI staff were published

in national and international newspapers during 2016-17. A list the opinion pieces is in

Annex C. Examples of media coverage and contributions to the national debate through our

publications is in Chapter 3.

ASPI communication channels

ASPI uses a number of different tools to communicate research and analysis to a broad

audience. In addition to the website and our blog, The Strategist, each element of our

social media presence is designed to provide a unique user experience, and each channel

complements the others.

Website and The Strategist

In 2016-17, ASPI’s website was visited 159,789 times. Australians remain the largest consumers

of our online research information and account for nearly 69% of all web visits. Table 1 shows

visits from the top 10 countries of origin.

Table 1: Visitors to the ASPI website, by country of origin, 2016-17

Country Total number: 159,789 Percentage of total

1. Australia 110,371 69.07%

2. United States 10,766 6.74%

3. France 8,812 5.51%

4. United Kingdom 2,878 1.80%

5. Canada 1,974 1.24%

6. New Zealand 1,681 1.05%

7. Singapore 1,593 1.00%

8. China 1,543 0.97%

9. India 1,493 0.93%

10. Japan 1,334 0.83%

Only around 57% of the readers of The Strategist in 2016-17 came from Australia. The top 10

countries of origin of readers differed slightly from those visiting the website (Table 2).

8    ASPI Annual Report 2016-2017    

Table 2: Visitors to The Strategist, by country of origin, 2016-17

Country Total number: 796,244 Percentage of total

1. Australia 453,319 56.93%

2. United States 113,085 14.20%

3. United Kingdom 22,773 2.86%

4. Canada 16,549 2.08%

5. Philippines 16,330 2.05%

6. Indonesia 15,835 1.99%

7. Singapore 14,447 1.81%

8. New Zealand 13,039 1.64%

9. India 11,945 1.50%

10. Malaysia 8,479 1.06%

Visits to the website increased by 14%, from 140,095 in 2015-16 to 159,789 in 2016-17. Visits to

The Strategist, grew by 13%, from 703,282 in 2015-16 to 796,244 in 2016-17.

Figure 3 shows visits to the ASPI website and The Strategist by month during the year. The spike

in visits to The Strategist in September and October can be attributed to a number of articles

published about the relatively new Filipino president, Rodrigo Duterte. Visits to The Strategist

also peaked in February following Brendan Nicholson’s two-part piece on the Joint Strike Fighter.

‘China’s imperial overreach’ was the article that attracted the most readers, in May 2017.

   Overview    9

Figure 3: Visits to the ASPI website and The Strategist, by month, 2016-17

0

10,000

20,000

30,000

40,000

50,000

60,000

70,000

80,000

90,000

JUN 2017

MAY 2017

APR 2017

MAR 2017

FEB 2017

JAN 2017

DEC 2016

NOV 2016

OCT 2016

SEP 2016

AUG 2016

JUL 2016

Website visits The Strategist blog visits

Twitter—@ASPI_org

We use Twitter to inform followers of newly released reports, articles and The Strategist pieces,

as well as to alert audiences to ASPI events and other developments. We ‘live tweet’ updates,

images and quotes to Australian and international followers in near real time during ASPI

public events. Our Twitter followers increased by 37% to 13,900 in 2016-17, compared to 10,133

in 2015-16.

Facebook

On Facebook, we post information about ASPI, internship opportunities, images, videos, event

updates, news, newly released publications and The Strategist posts. Our Facebook likes

increased to 18,004 in 2016-17, an increase of 20% from 14,983 in 2015-16.

Figure 4 shows the significant growth in the numbers of ASPI’s Twitter and Facebook followers

over the past four years.

10    ASPI Annual Report 2016-2017    

Figure 4: Twitter followers and Facebook likes, 2013-14 to 2016-17

0

2,000

4,000

6,000

8,000

10,000

12,000

14,000

16,000

18,000

20,000

2016-17 2015-16 2014-15 2013-14

Twitter followers Facebook likes

7,210

10,133

13,900

14,983

18,004

3,123

4,000

1,500

YouTube

ASPI’s YouTube channel shows videos featuring leading strategic thinkers from Australia and

abroad, as well as videos of speeches recorded at ASPI functions. Our YouTube subscribers

increased to 1,162 during 2016-17, up from 313 the previous year.

Our total video watch-time was over 325,000 minutes during the year. The number of views

continued to grow to over 60,000, an increase of 4,000 views from 2015-16. The 10 top

countries of origin of viewers are shown in Table 3.

   Overview    11

Table 3: YouTube video consumption, 2016-17

Country Watch-time Views Average view 

duration

Percentage 

of total

1. Australia 137,013 22,457 6:06 56.93%

2. United States 56,969 7,109 8:00 14.20%

3. Indonesia 14,775 8,326 1:46 2.86%

4. United Kingdom 14,395 2,460 5:51 2.08%

5. Philippines 8,825 2,096 4:12 2.05%

6. Canada 8,553 1,342 6:22 1.99%

7. New Zealand 5,525 625 8:50 1.81%

8. India 4,780 1,364 3:30 1.64%

9. Poland 4,717 517 9:07 1.50%

10. Germany 3,606 647 5:34 1.06%

Developing expertise

ASPI is committed to fostering the next generation of strategic policy thinkers and plays an

active role in professional development for government clients, particularly the Department of

Defence. This has included the Better Policy program, which involved 414 Defence participants

in 2016-17, through one program for APS and Executive level staff and another for SES level

staff. The Defence Graduates Seminar Program included our History of Australia’s Foreign

Policy professional course for graduates, in which 131 Defence participants attended a

two-week program focusing on the strategic issues facing Australia.

During the year, we also ran the Better Policy program for 299 participants from Queensland

Fire and Emergency Services in Brisbane and Townsville.

The ASPI paid internship program gives recent graduates an opportunity to contribute to

ASPI research projects and also to conduct their own research projects for future publication,

either by ASPI or independently. By attending many of ASPI’s events, they make contact with

senior officials, researchers and diplomats from Canberra and elsewhere as they begin to form

professional networks for their careers in strategic policy.

A strong field of capable applicants applies twice a year for internships. During 2016-17, ASPI

employed eight interns in two intakes for six-month placements.

12    ASPI Annual Report 2016-2017    

Interns make important contributions to research projects, publications and The Strategist and

gain hands-on experience in strategic policy development. Examples of reports, publications

and The Strategist articles contributed to by interns in 2016-17 included:

• Publication—Women, peace and security: the way forward

• The Strategist post—The month in Women, Peace and Security (the first of an ongoing

monthly series)

• Weekly wraps—Air, Land, Sea and Space (weekly posts on The Strategist)

• National security wrap (regular posts on The Strategist)

• Publication—The Cost of Defence: ASPI Defence Budget Brief 2017-2018

• Publication—Cyber maturity in the Asia-Pacific region 2016

• Publication—Why Russia is a threat to the international order.

During the year, ASPI also hosted three interns from the Australian National University (ANU)

who were completing their Masters in Strategic Studies. The interns did research for a thesis to

meet their final academic requirements, and some of the content provided the basis for posts

on The Strategist.

Promoting international understanding of Australia’s strategic and defence  policy perspectives

ASPI’s standing as a respected source of analysis is recognised both internationally and

domestically. This can be measured by our international ranking in a global index of think tanks,

being selected to co-host Track 1.5 dialogues with international institutions and government

partners on a regular basis, strengthening links with overseas think tanks through exchanges

and fellowships and being invited to speak at international conferences.

Readers from around the world are increasingly accessing our website and The Strategist, and

our counterparts in other countries help us to fostering the next generation of strategic policy

thinkers by inviting our younger staff to attend their meetings and conferences. In 2016-17, we

received invitations from:

• the Center for Strategic and International Studies

• the China Institutes of Contemporary International Relations

• the George C Marshal European Center for Security Studies

• Stiftung Wissenschaft und Politik.

   Overview    13

International ranking

ASPI has improved its ranking from 16th to 12th in the ‘Top defense and national security think

tanks’ category in the University of Pennsylvania’s 2016 Global Go To Think Tank Index, making

us the highest ranked defence and national security think tank in Australia.

We maintained our rank of 27th in the ‘Top foreign policy and international affairs think tanks’

category. This is the highest ranking for any Australian-based think tank and the third-highest

outside of the US and Europe.

Links with overseas think tanks

Our links with overseas think tanks take a number of forms. We engage formally through

hosting or co-hosting a range of Track 1.5 dialogues, exchanges or visiting fellowships,

co-writing publications and visits to the institutes. Some of the think tanks we engage

with include:

• the Heritage Foundation (US)

• the Center for New American Security (US)

• the Center for Strategic and International Studies (US)

• Institut français des relations internationales (France)

• the Foreign Policy Community of Indonesia

• the Brenthurst Foundation (South Africa)

• the Royal United Services Institute (UK)

• the Began-Sadat Center (Israel)

• the Konrad-Adenauer-Stiftung (Germany)

• Stiftung Wissenschaft und Politik (Germany)

• S. Rajaratnam School of International Studies (Singapore)

• the China International Institute for Strategic Studies

• the National Institute for Defence Studies (Japan)

• the Japan Institute for International Affairs.

14    ASPI Annual Report 2016-2017    

Visiting Fellows

Expert Visiting Fellows exchange information and engage with ASPI, deepening our

understanding of a range of domestic and international defence and national security.

In 2016-17, five Visiting Fellows were on secondment in the ASPI office:

• Paula Chadderton—AUSTRAC (December 2015-August 2016)

• Lt Colonel Ash Collingburn—Army Visiting Fellow (July-December 2016)

• Lt Colonel Micah Batt—Army Visiting Fellow (January-December 2017)

• Major Nathan Finney—US Army Visiting Fellow (June-December 2017)

• Tom Uren—Department of Defence (May 2017-May 2018).

In addition, ASPI appoints people with long and distinguished careers as Visiting Fellows. They

produce a range of written analyses, contribute to ASPI program areas and provide mentoring

for staff. The six ASPI Visiting Fellows are:

• Kim Beazley AC—Distinguished Fellow

• Stephen Loosley AM—Senior Fellow

• Stephen Merchant PSM—Visiting Fellow

• Roger Wilkins AO—Visiting Fellow

• Campbell Darby—Visiting Fellow

• Vern White—International Fellow

International dialogues

ASPI supports Australian diplomacy by conducting regular Track 1.5 and Track 2 dialogues with

international institutions and government partners. During the year, we were involved in

organising 11 international dialogues, while staff, ASPI Council members or Fellows attended

seven dialogues overseas (Table 4).

   Overview    15

Table 4: International Track 1.5 and Track 2 dialogues, 2016-17

Date Dialogue Location

Organised by ASPI

September 2016 International Cyber Policy Centre - Center for Strategic

and International Studies Dialogue

Washington DC

October 2016 Australia - New Zealand Track 1.5 Dialogue Canberra

October 2016 ASPI-BESA Beersheba Dialogue Sydney

November 2016 ASPI - Konrad-Adenauer-Stiftung Dialogue Canberra

November 2016 ASPI-FPCI Lombok Dialogue Sydney

December 2016 ASPI - Stiftung Wissenschaft und Politik Dialogue Berlin

December 2016 ASPI - China Institutes of Contemporary International

Relations Cybersecurity Dialogue

Beijing,

Singapore

February 2017 ASPI-RSIS Australia SGP Dialogue Canberra

March 2017 Australia - US - Japan Trilateral Canberra

March 2017 ASPI-CIISS Track 1.5 Dialogue Canberra

March 2017 ASPI-JIIA Australia-Japan Track 1.5 Dialogue Tokyo

Attended by ASPI representatives

July 2016 Australia-America Young Leadership Dialogue Los Angeles /

Washington DC

July 2016 Next Generation Policy Experts Network—Dialogue

and study tour

Seoul

August 2016 Australia-India Track 1.5 Defence strategic dialogue Perth

September 2016 NATO-Asia-Pacific Dialogue Tokyo

September-

October 2016

Australian American Leadership Dialogue Honolulu

October 2016 EU-Australian Leadership Dialogue Canberra

October-

November 2016

Asia-Europe Counter-Terrorism Dialogue Singapore

October 2016 2016 Civil Society Dialogue on Women, Peace and

Security

Canberra

January 2017 5th IISS Fullerton Forum: The Shangri-La Dialogue

Sherpa Meeting

Singapore

February 2017 Quadrilateral Dialogue at the Heritage Foundation Washington DC

May 2017 United Arab Emirates Ministry of Defence Dialogue on

Border Security

Abu Dhabi

16    ASPI Annual Report 2016-2017    

Invitations to speak at international conferences

ASPI’s international standing is reflected in the number of invitations that staff receive to

speak at international conferences. In 2016-17, they spoke at more than 20 international

conferences in Europe, Asia, the US, the Middle East and Australia, often with travel assistance

provided by the host institution. Further details are in Annex D.

STAFFING

At 30 June 2017, ASPI had employed 31 permanent staff, five of whom were part-time.

During the year, two new staff joined ASPI and five departed. There were also two intakes of

four interns during the year.

Figure 5 show’s our organisational structure at 30 June 2017.

   Overview    17

Figure 5: Organisational structure at 30 June 2017

Executive Director  Peter Jennings

Director - Corporate

Glen Bortolin

Human Resources  Manager

(vacant as at 30 June 2017)

Front of House and  Reception

Shantell Cunningham

Events and  Media Manager

EA to Executive Director

Karen Edwards

Assistant Events  and Media  Manager

Renee Jones

Information Manager

Jerry Cashman

Finance and  Budget Manager

Stephanie Ling

ASPI Education

Head of ASPI Education Mike Norris

Training Coordinator Janelle Chhor Ung

Director - Defence &  Strategy Programs

Andrew Davies*

Defence Strategy  & Capability

Head of Program Andrew Davies

Senior Analyst Anthony Bergin (p/t)

Senior Analyst Malcolm Davis

Researcher James Mugg

Senior Analyst Defence Economics Mark Thomson (p/t)

Senior Fellow Rod Lyon (p/t)

International Cyber  Policy Centre (ICPC)

Head of ICPC Fergus Hanson

Cybersecurity Fellow Tom Uren

The Strategist

Executive Editor Patrick Walters (p/t)

Defence Editor Brendan Nicholson

Journalist Fellow Graeme Dobell (p/t)

Analyst and Managing Editor David Lang

Editor/Researcher Amelia Long

Publications Manager

Janice Johnson

Director - National  Security Programs

(vacant as at 30 June 2017)

Counter Terrorism  Policy Centre (CTPC)

Head of CTPC Jacinta Carroll

International

Head of International Program Lisa Sharland*

Analyst Sofia Patel * and Intern

Coordinator

Research Interns

Zoe Glasson Patrick Kennedy Madeleine Nyst Sophie Qin

Strategic Policing and  Law Enforcement

Head of Strategic Policing and Law Enforcement Program (vacant as at

30 June 2017)

Financial Crime Analyst Simon Norton

Risk and Resilience

Head of Risk and Resilience Program Paul Barnes

Border Security

Head of Border Security Program John Coyne

18    ASPI Annual Report 2016-2017    

FUNDING

Department of Defence

A significant proportion of ASPI’s income comes from the Australian Government through the

Department of Defence. The funding agreement with Defence ends on 30 June 2018.

Australian Government funding remains the key enabler of ASPI operations and covers much of

our annual employee costs and operating overheads and those elements of the research and

events programs that are defined in the funding agreement.

Figure 6: Department of Defence core funding as a proportion of ASPI’s total income,  2000-01 to 2016-17

0%

20%

40%

60%

80%

100%

2016-17 2015-16 2014-15 2013-14 2012-13 2011-12 2010-11 2009-10 2008-09 2007-08 2006-07 2005-06 2004-05 2003-04 2002-03 2001-02 2000-01

2011-12

2012-13

2013-14

2016-17

2015-16

2014-15

2010-11

2009-10

2008-09

2007-08

2006-07

2005-06

2004-05

2003-04

2002-03

2001-02

2000-01

83%

76%

60%

55%

47%

50%

97%

95%

91%

87%

74%

78%

74%

78%

82% 84%

Other sources of funding

The government requires ASPI to develop funding options in addition to the Defence

funding agreement to enable the institute to grow and pursue additional research. With the

growth of ASPI’s areas of research, the percentage of income provided by Defence has been

diminishing (Figure 6). Our wider work on non-Defence national security is sustained by other

sources of funding, most notably other government entities, for contributions for specific

program areas or projects (shown as ‘partnerships and projects’ in Figure 7) and from private

sector sponsorship.

   Overview    19

Figure 7: Sources of income other than Department of Defence core funding,  2001-02 to 2016-17

$0,000

$500,000

$1,000,000

$1,500,000

$2,000,000

$2,500,000

$3,000,000

$3,500,000

$4,000,000

2016-17 2015-16 2014-15 2013-14 2012-13 2011-12 2010-11 2009-10 2008-09 2007-08 2006-07 2005-06 2004-05 2003-04 2002-03 2001-02

Other Partnerships & Projects Sponsorship

2016-17

2015-16

2014-15

2013-14

2012-13

2011-12

2010-11

2009-10

2008-09 2007-08 2006-07

2005-06

2004-05

2003-04

2002-03

2001-02

Sponsorship is also an important source of additional funding for ASPI and is the key enabler

for many events. The institute has worked hard to secure sponsors and in 2016-17 continued to

foster deeper relationships with sponsors through the corporate sponsorship program. Under

the program, ASPI seeks continuing commitments from private enterprises that share our

objectives for national security and the public debate, while unambiguously maintaining our

independence in research, publications, advice and comment.

Other additional income derives from event registration fees, Corporate Supporter Program

and interest on retained funds (‘Other’ in Figure 7).

20    ASPI Annual Report 2016-2017    

Corporate sponsors during 2016-17 were:

• .au Domain

• Boeing

• Broadspectrum

• Commonwealth Bank

• CSC Australia

• DCNS Australia

• Delegation of the European Union

• Elbit Systems of Australia Pty Ltd

• Embassy of Israel

• Engineers Australia

• Jacobs

• KPMG

• Lockheed Martin

• MBDA

• Navantia Australia

• Netherlands Embassy

• Netherlands Ministry of Foreign Affairs

• Northrup Grumman Mission Systems

• Omni

• Pratt Foundation

• Department of the Prime Minister

and Cabinet

• PwC

• RAFAEL Advanced Defence Systems

• Raytheon

• Rheinmetall

• Saab Asia Pacific

• Siemens

• Telstra

• Thales

• ThyssenKrupp

• Unisys

Members of the ASPI Corporate Supporter Program during 2016-17 were:

• Beca Pty Ltd

• The Treasury

• Broadspectrum

• International SOS

• Safran Pacific Pty Ltd

• General Atomics Australia

• CAE Australia

• CEA Technologies Pty Limited

• Taipei Economic and Cultural Office

in Australia

• Cubic Defence Australia Pty Ltd

• ViaSat

• Sea Power Centre

• Symantec Australia

• Navantia Australia

• Deakin University

• Evolution Commercial

   Overview    21

CHAPTER

2 PROGRAMS

In 2016-17, ASPI’s core work in the strategic policy field focused on broad strategic policy

settings, global and regional security environments, the operational needs of the Australian

Defence Force, the development of defence capabilities and issues associated with defence

funding and budgets. Over the years, ASPI has made nationally recognised contributions in all

those fields. They remain central to our work agenda even as ASPI expands to embrace new

programs and responsibilities.

Research staff conduct their work in program areas organised under two themes:

• Defence and Strategy

• National Security Programs.

DEFENCE AND STRATEGY

Defence, Strategy and Capability Program

Andrew Davies 

Anthony Bergin 

Malcolm Davis 

Mark Thomson 

Rod Lyon 

James Mugg

The Defence, Strategy and Capability Program analyses strategic trends and the role of military

force, including:

• how changing power relativities affect military affairs

• the role of conventional and nuclear weapons in the 21st century

• the strategic impact of economic, demographic and other trends.

It also analyses the capability of the ADF through all stages of the capability life cycle,

including by:

• identifying requirements for future capability

• analysing competing options for materiel solutions

• tracking the progress of projects in the Integrated Investment Program

• exploring issues related to ADF personnel matters, including recruitment, retention

and training

• assessing ADF capability against regional militaries.

24    ASPI Annual Report 2016-2017    

The program also analyses the management of the Department of Defence and assesses

Australia’s defence budgets and the wider range of activities required to produce and support

the ADF’s capabilities. This includes:

• defence funding over the short and long terms

• policies and capabilities of the defence industry

• project management strategies

• defence economic trends, especially as they apply to materiel.

During 2016-17, the Defence, Strategy and Capability Program produced reports that provide

a point of reference for discussions of Australia’s defence policies and capabilities. The annual

Cost of Defence budget brief has long been the ‘go to’ publication for understanding the

nation’s defence spending.

Naval shipbuilding was a major Defence and government focus in 2016-17, which was

reflected in the publication program and on The Strategist. Two Strategic Insights papers

examined the interplay between ship upgrades, service lifetimes and the proposed ‘rolling

build’ acquisition strategy. The Future Submarine program is Australia’s most expensive ever

defence acquisition, and not surprisingly it appeared in nearly 20 Strategist articles last year.

The balance of state power across the entire Indo-Pacific is shifting, which was reflected in

Strategy papers on Australia’s relationship with India and on the strategic geography ‘from

Bollywood to Hollywood’. No relationship is more important than that between the US and

China, and we took an in-depth look at their military-to-military ties.

The Defence, Strategy and Capability Program also continued to produce and commission

papers on regional and global strategic trends. Topics covered during the year included the

nuclear balance in Asia, the geopolitics of the South Pacific, how the Trump administration

might approach regional security issues, and the ongoing disputes in the South China Sea.

NATIONAL SECURITY

Six interlinked program areas combine to provide comprehensive coverage of national security

issues. A modern approach to national security must be designed to respond to major security

threats as they affect citizens, rather than just the institutions of the state.

   Programs    25

International Cyber Policy Centre

Tobias Feakin 

Fergus Hanson 

Liam Nevill 

Zoe Hawkins 

Tom Uren 

Jessica Woodall

ASPI’s International Cyber Policy Centre (ICPC) focuses on the growing importance of

cyber-related issues for broader strategic policy. ICPC brings together the various Australian

Government agencies with responsibilities for cyber issues and a range of private sector

partners and creative thinkers to help Australia create constructive cyber policies for

application at home and abroad. The centre aims to facilitate conversations between

governments, the private sector and academia across the Asia-Pacific region to increase

constructive dialogue on cyber issues and do its part to create a common understanding of

problems and possible solutions in cyberspace.

ICPC has four key aims:

• Lift the level of Australian and Asia-Pacific public understanding and debate

on cybersecurity.

• Provide a focus for developing innovative and high-quality public policy on cyber issues.

• Facilitate Track 1.5 and Track 2 dialogues on cyber issues in the Asia-Pacific region.

• Link different levels of government, business and the public in a sustained dialogue

on cybersecurity.

During 2016-17, ICPC continued to publish high-quality analyses of international and domestic

cyber policy issues and worked successfully to shape the outcome of major domestic policy

discussions through engagement with key stakeholders and public discourse. The centre also

worked with private sector and government partners to achieve positive cyber policy dialogue

and confidence-building measures in international multilateral forums.

In September 2016, ASPI and the US Center for Strategic and International Studies convened

the first annual Australia-US Cyber Security Dialogue, and in December 2016 ASPI and the

China Institutes of Contemporary International Relations (CICIR) held the second ASPI-CICIR

Cybersecurity Dialogue. These were concrete demonstrations of the important role of ICPC in

promoting and shaping Australia’s discussion of cyber policy issues and engagement.

The centre also supported the development of cyber confidence-building measures in the

region by delivering a simulation exercise in Indonesia hosted by the Coordinating Ministry

for Political, Legal and Security Affairs of Indonesia, with the support of the Government

26    ASPI Annual Report 2016-2017    

of the Netherlands. The workshop was designed and facilitated to help the Indonesian

Government develop crisis response, incident coordination, communications and industry

engagement mechanisms.

In October, ICPC hosted two events with Sir Iain Lobban, former director of the UK Government

Communications Headquarters. In November, it convened a private sector workshop on

Australia’s international cyber engagement strategy, and in June 2017 it hosted a private

roundtable of government and industry leaders with Rob Joyce, the White House cybersecurity

coordinator, and Christopher Painter, the US coordinator for cyber issues.

ICPC continued to publish high-quality analyses of key cyber policy issues throughout 2016-17.

Liam Nevill and Zoe Hawkins wrote Deterrence in cyberspace: different domain, different rules

in July 2016; Digital land power: the Australian Army’s cyber future in December 2016; and

Australia’s Cyber Security Strategy: execution and evolution in May 2017. Jessica Woodall wrote

Cyber norms and the Australian private sector in November 2016, and Zoe Hawkins wrote

Securing democracy in the Digital Age in May 2017.

An ASPI Special Report, The Australia—US Cyber Security Dialogue, was published in

March 2017. The third edition of the annual Cyber maturity in the Asia-Pacific region report

was launched in September 2016; the report has been expanded to analyse the cyber maturity

of 23 countries in our region. A policy brief, Cyber information sharing: lessons for Australia,

by Liam Nevill, was published in May 2017.

Counter-Terrorism Policy Centre

Jacinta Carroll

In 2015, ASPI established the Counter-Terrorism Policy Centre (CTPC) with the dual purpose of

elucidating the threats posed by terrorists to Australia and to the maintenance of international

peace and security, and advising, commenting and engaging with policymakers on how to best

prepare Australia for the threat that terrorists pose to our national security interests.

To achieve those goals, CTPC has worked to establish itself as the leading think tank authority

in Australia on national security, terrorism and counterterrorism. In March 2017, the centre

launched the Counterterrorism yearbook 2017, the first edition of ASPI’s latest landmark annual

publication. Duncan Lewis, Director-General of Security, launched the book at a sold-out

event at ASPI. The yearbook features a preface by Dr Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono and chapters

by 11 international authors, as well as ASPI’s Peter Jennings, Vern White, Anthony Bergin and

Jacinta Carroll. The publication has received significant coverage from media, governments,

universities and think tanks. The yearbook and an accompanying series of The Strategist

articles have featured in publications, including the Sydney Morning Herald, The Age, the

   Programs    27

Adelaide Advertiser, SBS News, ABC News (radio and TV) and the Jakarta Post. The publication

has been the subject of reviews and hosting by a range of security and defence websites,

including DFNS.net, Perspectives on Terrorism Journal (University of Leiden), Center for Security

Studies Zurich, Egmont Institute (Belgium), Real Clear Defense, and RAND. The feedback from

the Australian Government and state governments, as well as embassies and multilateral

institutions, is that the publication is featured on government intranets and is being used as a

reference in defence and foreign policy planning.

The year also saw the launch of CT Quick Looks, a new series of publications that provides a

brief overview and analysis of the policy significance of terrorist and counterterrorist incidents.

Six CT Quick Looks were produced in the year, addressing terrorist attacks such as those in

Nice, Minto and London, and counterterrorism actions, such as the CT arrests in Young and

Bankstown. CTPC will continue CT Quick Looks, broadening their focus beyond Australia and

Europe to address emerging security threats in Africa and Asia.

For the second year, ASPI hosted the ASPI - KAS Australia-Europe Counter-Terrorism Dialogue,

held in November 2016 in Canberra. The dialogue focused on countering violent extremism, an

issue that ASPI staff has commented on extensively, including in a special report by Sofia Patel

on the appeal of Islamic State to Western women. The report explores how women can be

employed in countering violent extremism structures to prevent further involvement. A third

dialogue, with a focus on emerging threats, is scheduled to be held in Berlin in September 2017.

The Army Visiting Fellow program began during the year. Lt Colonel Ashley Collingburn

undertook a five-month secondment with ASPI, working mainly with CTPC. Collingburn

has written a range of material, including a Strategy paper, After Mosul: Australia’s strategy

to counter the Islamic State and CT Quick Looks and Strategist articles. The success of this

secondment led to a 12-month placement for Lt Colonel Micah Batt, who has written on both

counterterrorism and military topics, including a number of Strategist articles and CT Quick

Looks, and is now working on research papers for publication in 2017-18. Both Fellows have

contributed significantly to ASPI dialogues and research. ASPI intends to continue the Army

Visiting Fellow program in 2018.

Working with ASPI’s Strategic Policing and Law Enforcement Program, CTPC produced a special

report entitled Detect, disrupt and deny: optimising Australia’s counterterrorism financing

system, written by Simon Norton and Paula Chadderton. This pioneering report provides an

analysis of the challenges in countering terrorism financing, progress in current initiatives and

policy recommendations for the future. CTPC is building on this by looking at Australia-China

law enforcement cooperation, public-private information sharing to mitigate financial crime,

and cybercrime.

28    ASPI Annual Report 2016-2017    

Risk and Resilience Program

Paul Barnes

The Risk and Resilience Program examines new ideas and approaches for thinking about and

managing the impacts of natural and socio-technical hazards in Australia. This work includes

developing advice and commentary; informing policy choices in Australia’s federal, state and

local governments and the private sector; and enhancing the assessment of vulnerability and

mitigation options to promote resilience in human systems. The program continues to pursue

its original key goals, which include:

• deepening national understanding of the benefits and challenges of using resilience as

a central theme in effective disaster risk reduction practice by public sector and private

sector agencies

• expanding appreciation of the need to include resilience as a base-level design factor

for critical infrastructure systems to maintain continuity of essential services and

reduce vulnerability

• promoting inclusive debate in government and communities on how to generate and

sustain community resilience in modern Australia

• enhancing capacity building in disaster management in the ASEAN region and Oceania.

A focus during the 2016-17 period has been raising the visibility and reach of the program

nationally through facilitated public dialogues on emergent topics. The following public events

were held:

• Climate Change and Natural Disasters—Insuring for Resilience 

Panellists: Karl Sullivan, General Manager Risk, Insurance Council of Australia; Tim Clark,

Chief Actuary, Insurance Australia Group; Karl Jones, Managing Director and Head of

Catastrophe Analytics, Willis RE; and Duncan Bone, Executive Manager of Public Policy,

Suncorp Group.

• National Continuity Planning: New rules—Old rules—Other rules? 

Panellists: Mark Crossweller, Director General, Emergency Management Australia; Brendan

Moon, CEO, Queensland Reconstruction Authority; Tony Sheehan, Commonwealth

Counter-Terrorism Coordinator; and Alexander Osborne, Co-Chairman, Communications

Sector Group, Trusted Information Sharing Network.

• Beyond Logistics—Just-in-time or Resilient Outcomes? 

Panellists: Air Vice Marshall John Blackburn (Ret’d); Brigadier Paul Retter (Ret’d), CEO

and Commissioner, National Transport Commission; and Neil Greet, Managing Director,

Collaborative Outcomes.

   Programs    29

The Risk and Resilience Program continued to produce opinion pieces and blog posts,

commission papers and make invited presentations to a range of forums on emerging issues

in this field. Topics covered during the year included the national implications of supply-chain

discontinuities, challenges to developing energy resilience in Australia, critical infrastructure

planning, and legislative options for enhancing local, state and federal coordination during

major disaster responses.

The program took up opportunities to contribute advisory services to industry and

government by participating in the work of specialist expert and advisory groups, including

the International Standards Committee TC292—Security and Resilience, working on policy

development with the Australia - New Zealand Emergency Management Committee, and

taking part in an Attorney-General’s Department Garran Strategy dialogue on enhancing the

resilience of Australian communities. The program also supported the Department of Defence

by delivering executive training on the practical application of risk and resilience concepts.

In addition, the Risk and Resilience Program enhanced recognition of the program by delivering

11 invited presentations, including four keynote presentations, to conferences and forums on

risk and resilience topics.

Recognising the value of the program’s activities, the Australian Government has extended its

sponsorship of the program for a further two years.

Strategic Policing and Law Enforcement Program

Simon Norton 

Cesar Alvarez

ASPI’s Strategic Policing and Law Enforcement Program examines the contribution of law

enforcement to national security and to broader strategic policy. The main products of the

program include analysis and policy recommendations.

The program has three main aims:

• Understand the link between law enforcement issues and national security concerns.

• Explain the contribution of law enforcement agencies to Australia’s international

strategic objectives.

• Help law enforcement agencies position themselves for the future.

Highlights in 2016-17 included the publication of four ASPI Special Reports examining

Australia’s counterterrorism financing system, overseas criminal intelligence systems,

information sharing about organised crime, and transnational crime in Sri Lanka. Other

projects covered financial crime and police diplomacy.

30    ASPI Annual Report 2016-2017    

The Strategic Policing and Law Enforcement Program has also been involved in the AUSTRAC

- Pusat Pelaporan dan Analisis Transaki Keuangan counterterrorism financing, training and

community outreach working group and presented at the 2nd Counter-Terrorism Financing

Summit in Bali. It also worked with the Australian Federal Police and NSW Police on strategy

and training.

Border Security Program

John Coyne

ASPI’s Border Security Program provides independent, policy-relevant research and analysis to

better inform government decisions and public understanding on border security and related

fields. Its research focuses on issues relevant to managing the border continuum to help to

support and facilitate legitimate trade and travel and protect the Australian community from

a range of border risks. The program concentrates on all-hazard national security threats

and risks.

The program has four objectives:

• Lift the level of Australian and regional understanding and dialogue on border security.

• Create a space and forum for the development of high-quality public policy on border

security related issues.

• Provide a means for developing Track 1.5 and Track 2 dialogue on border security.

• Create a sustained dialogue between the private and public sectors on border security.

During 2016-17, the Border Security Program made substantive contributions to each of its

four objectives. The program has been particularly active in lifting the level of public policy

dialogues and research. During the year, it made significant policy and opinion contributions

to domestic and international print, radio and television media, including 22 opinion pieces in

Australia’s media, as well as nine blog pieces. The program also contributed to and spoke at

nine domestic and international conferences.

The program’s research resulted in the production of the following reports during the year:

• Special Report—Australian border security and unmanned maritime vehicles. This report

examines the potential for unmanned maritime vehicles to expand Australia’s maritime

domain awareness and make the ADF’s and Australian Border Force’s risk management

strategies more efficient. It provides recommendations for improving the efficiency of

Australia’s maritime border security efforts.

• Strategy—America’s ‘Maginot Line’: a study of static border security in an age of agile and

innovative threats. This strategy provides a case study analysis of post-9/11 changes to

US border security policies. It examines each of America’s different borders: the friendly

   Programs    31

northern borders, the maritime borders, and the militarised southern border. It also provides

recommendations for Australia’s border security.

• Strategic Insights—The future of the Jakarta Centre for Law Enforcement Cooperation:

Indonesia’s chance to promote a new era of regional law enforcement cooperation. This

report examines whether the Jakarta Centre for Law Enforcement Cooperation should

become a truly regional body or an Indonesian Government institution.

• Special Report—Fractured Europe: the Schengen Area and European border security. This

report assesses some of the factors behind member states resorting to national rather

than collective action in response to recent challenges. It explores the role of intelligence

and institutions such as Frontex, before ultimately arguing for the creation of a European

Agenda on Border Security to provide a strategic framework for border security in Europe.

• Strategic Insights—Border security lessons for Australia from Europe’s Schengen experience.

This report explores Calum Jeffray’s key observations in his report Fractured Europe: the

Schengen Area and European border security and analyses them through an Australian and

then an ASEAN border security lens. It provides recommendations for Australian border

security policymakers based on the lessons learned from the Schengen experience. It also

examines the implications of Schengen for ASEAN member states in developing the ASEAN

Economic Community.

• Special Report—The battle for hegemony in the Middle East. The story of the Middle East

for decades to come will be about a battle for the hegemony of Sunni Islam, especially in

the Arab world, and the efforts of non-Sunni Muslims and non-Muslims to ensure that no

dominant Sunni power capable of uniting the Sunni Arab world, and ultimately the Sunni

world more broadly, emerges. Should a united Sunni Arab polity emerge, it could constitute

an existential threat to the non-Sunni, non-Arab and non-Muslim minorities of the Middle

East, especially if it unites under the banner of the more extreme interpretations of Islam.

Ultimately, Australia and other Western countries have to come to terms with their limited

role in shaping the outcomes of this battle for hegemony. This doesn’t mean that there’s

nothing to be done, but those outside the region must clinically and dispassionately consider

their interests in the region and what they can reasonably expect to achieve.

• Special Report—‘Santa Muerte’, are the Mexican cartels really coming? This report argues

that, for Australia and Asia, the menace of Mexican organised crime is no longer looming on

the horizon; it has already arrived. However, the nature of the problem in Australia and Asia

is not likely to be the same as that found in either the US or Mexico. To respond effectively

to this rising threat, Australian policymakers need to approach the issue with a more

informed perspective that engages with the complex nature of the various groups that

collectively form what is broadly considered to be Mexican organised crime. Furthermore,

the policy response to the problem will need to more agile than the measures contained in

Australia’s current National Organised Crime Response Plan.

32    ASPI Annual Report 2016-2017    

Other research on international border security cooperation; the E-diaspora; people smuggling

syndicates; big data and national security; ASEAN border disputes; and ASEAN coastguards

continued throughout 2016-17.

International Program

Lisa Sharland 

Sofia Patel

ASPI’s International Program explores some of the challenges and opportunities for Australia

as they relate to maintaining international peace and security. The program also contributes

to broader international research efforts on multilateral security issues. The International

Program aims to:

• deepen understanding within Australia and internationally of global security issues and

multilateral peace operations

• facilitate engagement among key stakeholders in government, the private sector and civil

society on issues relating to international peace and security

• provide policy advice on emerging challenges and opportunities for Australia to contribute

to efforts to maintain international peace and security.

In 2016-17, the program continued to focus on four main lines of work:

• women, peace and security

• the UN peace and security agenda, with a focus on the reform of UN peace operations and

the protection of civilians

• Australia’s engagement in UN peacekeeping

• Australia’s relationship and engagement with Africa.

The International Program engaged in analysis and commentary on women, peace and

security; preventing and countering violent extremism; peacekeeping; and emerging issues for

consideration as part of Australia’s next National Action Plan on Women, Peace and Security.

This engagement included delivering presentations at training programs and conferences

nationally and internationally, complementing activities being undertaken as part of ASPI’s

Women in Defence and Security Network. The program also worked closely with The Strategist

team to commission a series of posts on women, peace and security to coincide with

International Women’s Day on 8 March 2017. The posts were incorporated into an anthology

Insights publication, Women, peace and security: the way forward, at the end of March 2017.

The program contributed to dialogue and debate on UN peace operations reform, Australia’s

engagement in peacekeeping, and Australia’s relationship with Africa, including through:

   Programs    33

• researching and commenting on issues related to the changing security environment of UN

peace operations, developments in South Sudan, and the protection of civilians

• co-hosting a workshop with the permanent missions of Australia and Uruguay to the UN in

New York on ‘Protection of civilians and accountability’ in UN peacekeeping

• delivering presentations on such topics as the future of UN peacekeeping, the protection

of civilians, and South Sudan at the ADF Peace Operations Training Centre, Australian

Command and Staff College, and the ANU

• hosting roundtables to engage with the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade, the

Defence organisation, the Australian Federal Police and the Australian Civil-Military

Centre on Australia’s engagement in South Sudan and the Regional Assistance Mission to

Solomon Islands.

In the first half of 2017, the International Program began field research for a project titled

‘Preventing and Countering Violent Extremism in Africa: the Role of the Mining Sector’, in

cooperation with Hedayah. The project is expected to conclude at the end of 2017 ahead of

the third Australia-Africa dialogue, delivering reports and analysis on the potential role of the

mining sector in countering violent extremism in Africa.

ASPI EDUCATION

Mike Norris 

David Connery 

Janelle Chhor-Ung

ASPI Education is a new enterprise that aims to help improve judgement through short,

intense professional development courses and workshops that focus on policymaking, thinking

skills and strategic analysis. ASPI is committed to fostering the next generation of strategic

policy thinkers and plays an active role in professional development for government clients,

particularly the Department of Defence.

The courses that ASPI Education provides are highly interactive, delivered to small groups

and tailored to audience needs. Using ASPI’s significant research base covering defence and

national security, risk and resilience, counterterrorism, cybersecurity, strategic policing and

border security, ASPI Education conducts specially developed authentic learning experiences.

Those experiences use reality-based contexts in which participants grapple with exciting and

relevant policy challenges, guided by some of Australia’s most experienced policy practitioners

and thinkers.

In 2016-17, ASPI Education developed and delivered the following programs.

34    ASPI Annual Report 2016-2017    

Defence—Crafting Better Policy for Defence Professionals

Crafting Better Policy for Defence Professionals, for EL/APS staff, has two variants: strategic

policy (which examines policy from the viewpoint of Defence’s contribution to national security)

and administrative policy (which focuses on policy relating to Defence’s internal working).

The Better Policy program has two aims: to understand the Australian system for defence

policymaking and to enhance policymaking skills in a Defence context.

In 2016-17, ASPI Education delivered 28 courses, which involved 376 Defence participants,

in Canberra, Darwin, Melbourne and Sydney.

Defence—Guiding Better Policy for Defence Professionals

The Guiding Better Policy for Defence Professionals discusses how SES staff can better lead

and facilitate greater understanding of the Australian system for defence policymaking and

enhance their staff’s policymaking skills in a Defence context.

In 2016-17, ASPI Education delivered eight courses, which involved 38 Defence participants,

in Canberra.

Queensland Fire and Emergency Services—Better Policy for Emergency  Management Professionals

Better Policy for Emergency Management Professionals is designed for the fire and emergency

management professionals at national, state and territory levels.

The program has two aims: to understand policymaking from an emergency management

perspective and to enhance policymaking skills in an emergency management and community

safety context.

In 2016-17, ASPI Education delivered seven courses, which involved 119 QFES participants,

in Brisbane and Townsville.

Queensland Fire and Emergency Services—QFES Academy Strategic Planning

QFES Academy is designed to engage QFES staff in thinking about the broader understandings

and challenges facing QFES and the academy.

In 2016-17, ASPI Education facilitated six workshops, which involved 180 QFES participants,

in Brisbane.

   Programs    35

Defence—History of Australia’s Foreign Policy

The History of Australia’s Foreign Policy is a preliminary two-day short course. It aims to

provide newly engaged Defence Graduates with an understanding of the history of Australia’s

foreign policy, as preparation for the Defence Graduates Seminar.

ASPI Education completed two courses, which involved 131 Defence participants, on 24-25

August 2016 and 17-18 May 2017.

Defence—Defence Graduates Seminar

The Defence Graduates Seminar is a two-week intensive seminar comprising a series of

presentations, discussions and exercises that consider Australia’s security interests and how

Defence delivers strategic outcomes to address those interests.

ASPI Education completed two courses, which involved 131 Defence participants, on 5 and

16 September 2016 and 29 May and 9 June 2017.

36    ASPI Annual Report 2016-2017    

PAGE INTENTIONALLY BLANK

   Programs    37

CHAPTER

3

PUBLICATIONS

ASPI’s publications program offers practical and influential policy advice through publications

that are:

• accessible and readable

• accurate and authoritative

• well presented and cost effective.

The key performance indicators for the program of published research are:

• Publication of the program of major studies and annuals according to schedule and

within budget.

• Each publication meeting the following criteria to a high degree:

- independent and non-partisan

- rigorous, accurate and well informed

- innovative and original

- well presented and accessible to wide and diverse audiences

- integrated into wider national debates within government and in the public arena.

• Responses to publications from our customer groups and stakeholders are monitored by

staff and reported to the Research Committee:

- Government’s evaluation of the products, in terms of their contribution to policy

development—to be evaluated on the basis of responses and structured feedback.

- Public responses, gauged by the extent to which the publications are used and discussed

in further public comment.

In 2016-17, ASPI publications were produced in our six major formats.

The flagship publications are in the Strategy series, which provides detailed analyses of major

strategic policy questions of critical importance to Australia and its region and informed

recommendations for consideration by government and the broader community.

Strategic Insights are shorter papers providing background information or comment on specific

issues and considering policy ramifications as those issues arise in the public debate.

The Special Report series is a vehicle for the dissemination of analyses and comment on a wide

range of issues. Special reports are usually focused on specific issues that require more detailed

or quantitative information for deeper analysis.

40    ASPI Annual Report 2016-2017    

The fourth style of publication is the Yearbook series. ASPI produces an annual analysis of

the Defence budget, titled The Cost of Defence. It has made a permanent impact on the

transparency and quality of the debate on the budgetary and management aspects of the

Defence portfolio and has gained the attention of members of parliament and senators,

interested government agencies and media commentators. Through ASPI’s International

Cyber Policy Centre, we also produce the annual Cyber maturity in the Asia-Pacific region

report. This publication assesses the regional cyber landscape. ASPI’s Counterterrorism

yearbook was a new addition during 2016-17. This annual looks at those areas around the

world where terrorism and counterterrorism are in the sharpest focus.

The fifth style of publication, also introduced in 2016-17, is a distinctive design for product

from our International Cyber Policy Centre.

The sixth style is the new CT Quick Looks series. These reports provide a high-level brief on

significant terrorist incidents and counterterrorist actions. They highlight the key issues and

assess their relevance for affected stakeholders and for Australia.

ASPI also occasionally produces discussion papers for distribution within the policy community.

These reports usually deal with near-term planning and management issues and discuss

options, often including some not previously considered by officials.

Table 5 shows the number of each publication type published in 2015-16 and 2016-17.

Table 5: ASPI publications by format, 2015-16 and 2016-17

Publication type 2015-16 2016-17

Strategy 6 7

Strategic Insights 15 10

Special Report 12 17

Yearbook 3 4

Discussion paper 1 0

International Cyber Policy

Centre

- 4

CT Quick Looks - 6

Total 37 48

The Strategist posts 1,007 961

A complete list of ASPI’s 2016-17 publications is in Annex A.

   Publications    41

CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE NATIONAL DEBATE— BY PUBLICATION TYPE

The following pages describe some selected ASPI publications and outline how they have

contributed to the national debate.

Strategy

America’s ‘Maginot Line’: a study of static border security in an age of agile and  innovative threats Steven Bucci and John Coyne

8 November 2016

Borders and border security are once again becoming increasingly

important to the nation-state. Many Australians take a default position

that our coastline is our border and that border security involves

merely police, security guards and immigration or customs officials.

But Australia’s geography no longer provides the physical barrier to the

outside world that it once did.

This strategy provides a case study analysis of post-9/11 changes to US

border security policies. It examines each of America’s different borders:

the friendly northern borders, the maritime borders, and the militarised

southern border and provides recommendations for Australia’s

border security.

America’s ‘Maginot Line’ attracted mainstream media attention in

both America and Australia and was widely featured in a range of

online sites. The report was a catalyst for a small number of high-level

meetings, including discussions with representatives from Australia’s

major political parties. ASPI and Department of Immigration and Border

Protection policy staff also met several times to discuss the report and

its recommendations.

42    ASPI Annual Report 2016-2017    

Strategic in sights

AWD combat  system:  an   upgrade   for  the   Aegis James Mugg

14 September 2016

This paper examines the delivery of the Navy’s air warfare destroyers

(AWDs) and their combat systems to date and explores what upgrades

might be possible in the stated period.

We’re about to spend a lot of money completing the current three

AWDs, only to turn around and spend a lot more money upgrading

them. If the government wants to spend $4-5 billion on improving naval

capability over the next 12 years, there might be more useful ways to

spend the money.

This report received good media coverage, including from 9news.com.au

and the Adelaide Advertiser. It was also featured on an independent blog.

The future of the   Jakarta   Centre   for   Law   Enforcement  Cooperation:  Indonesia’s   chance t o   promote   a   new   era   of   regional   law   enforcement  cooperation John Coyne

21 February 2017

For 13 years, the Jakarta Centre for Law Enforcement Cooperation

(JCLEC) has been a regional rallying point for much-needed

counterterrorism capacity development and cooperation.

Since its inception in 2004, with strong bilateral support from the

Australian Government, JCLEC’s operating and donor environments

have evolved considerably. The strong relationship between the

Indonesian National Police and Australian Federal Police, which has

raised and sustained JCLEC, is in a state of decline. Regional partners and

donors are now considering JCLEC’s future.

There are some big decisions to be made, the most pressing of which is

whether JCLEC should become a truly regional body or an Indonesian

Government institution.

This report attracted mainstream media attention in Indonesia. The

report was a catalyst for several discussions between ASPI staff and

representatives from Interpol and the UN Office on Drugs and Crime on

the future of JCLEC. Additional dialogue between ASPI and Australian

Federal Police staff also resulted.

   Publications    43

Special report

The American face of ISIS: analysis of ISIS-related terrorism in the US,  March 2014 - August 2016 Robert Pape, Jean Decety, Keven Ruby, Alejandro Albanez Rivas, Jens Jessen and Caroline Wegner

2 February 2017

The Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS) is mobilising sympathisers in

the US at rates much higher than seen for previous terrorist groups,

including al-Qaeda.

To understand this new American face of ISIS, the Chicago Project

on Security and Threats study examined 112 cases of individuals who

perpetrated ISIS-related offences, were indicted by the US Justice

Department for such offences, or both, in the US between March 2014

and August 2016.

This is the first comprehensive analysis of ISIS-related cases to examine

the profiles of inductees overall, as well as to identify characteristics

associated with each of the offence types. The findings are striking and

make a valuable contribution to our understanding of the contemporary

face of ISIS-related terrorism in the US.

The Washington Post ran an editorial citing the paper and op ed pieces

by Michael Morell, former acting director and deputy director of the CIA,

and by one of the authors, Robert Pape. Professor Pape was interviewed

by CNN. There was extensive Twitter coverage, and an article on the

report by Michael Morell appeared in Foreign Policy on 2 February 2017.

44    ASPI Annual Report 2016-2017    

Annual publications

The Cost of Defence: ASPI defence budget brief, 2017-2018 Mark Thomson

19 May 2016

This report gives interested readers greater access to the complex

workings of the defence budget and promotes informed debate on

defence budget issues.

As in previous years, the 2017 paper by Mark Thomson received

extensive media coverage. The launch was attended by a capacity

crowd, including parliamentarians, the media, government officials,

members of the diplomatic community, academics and defence

industry representatives. The event was recorded and is available on our

YouTube channel for those who were unable to attend. This publication

has been heavily downloaded.

Cyber maturity in the Asia-Pacific region 2016 Liam Nevill, Zoe Hawkins, Tobias Feakin and Jessica Woodall

27 September 2016

This report assesses the approach of 23 regional countries to the

challenges and opportunities that cyberspace presents, examining their

cyber governance structures, legislation, law enforcement, and military,

business and social engagement with cyber policy and security issues.

Coming in at top of the table for the third year running is the US. South

Korea and Japan have swapped positions in second and third place, and

Australia has leapfrogged Singapore into fourth place, recovering after

dropping to fifth place in 2015. Australia’s improved position reflects

the changes taking place as part of the implementation of the new

Australian Cyber Security Strategy.

The report was launched on 27 September 2016 by Peter W Singer at

New America in Washington DC. A panel of experts, including ASPI’s

Dr Tobias Feakin, Denise Zheng from the US Center for Strategic and

International Studies and Ryan Gillis of Palo Alto Networks, discussed

the report’s findings and implications for regional cybersecurity.

ICPC also held a Canberra launch for the report on 10 November

at ASPI. The report was launched by the Hon Dan Tehan, Minister

Assisting the Prime Minister for Cyber Security. The event was

   Publications    45

attended by key policymakers, ASPI stakeholders and members of the

diplomatic community.

The report received extensive media and online coverage, including

in ZDNET, Computerworld, Intermedium, the University of Oxford’s

Cybersecurity Capacity Portal, AIM Corporate Solutions, and ARMA

Global Policy Brief.

The report was distributed to influential senior government officials

in Australia and the US, including delegates at the Australia-US Cyber

Security Dialogue. This report was a popular download.

Counterterrorism yearbook 2017 Edited by Jacinta Carroll

21 March 2017

The Counterterrorism yearbook 2 017 looks at terrorism and

counterterrorism (CT) in various regions around the world. Each chapter

examines CT developments in 2016, including the terrorist threat being

faced and how governments and others have approached CT through

policy and operations. Countries and regions covered include Australia,

Indonesia, Southeast Asia, South Asia, the Middle East, Europe, Turkey,

the UK, the US, Canada, Africa, Russia and China.

We aim to use this annual publication to promote understanding and

contribute to shared knowledge of CT.

The authors of individual pieces were Anthony Bergin, Jacinta Carroll,

Colin Clarke, Michael Clarke, Virginia Comolli, Greg Fealy, Fadi Hakura,

Peter Jennings, Shashank Joshi, Lydia Khalil, Joseph Chinyong Liow,

Olga Oliker, Raffaello Pantucci, Thomas Renard, Vern White and Susilo

Bambang Yudhoyono.

The publication was launched by Duncan Lewis, the Director-General

of Security of the Australian Security Intelligence Organisation. The

event was attended by senior members of the Australian Public Service

and military members of the diplomatic community. Feedback from

federal and state governments, embassies and think tanks is that the

publication is being used as a reference tool in defence and foreign

policy circles. The yearbook has received good media coverage, including

by ABC news (TV and radio), Sydney Morning Herald, Adelaide Advertiser,

SBS News, and the Jakarta Post.. It has been a popular download.

46    ASPI Annual Report 2016-2017    

CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE NATIONAL DEBATE— BY SELECTED TOPIC

Asian nuclear order

Publications

A shifting Asian nuclear order Rod Lyon

20 September 2016

The Asian nuclear order is increasingly coloured by complexity and

instability. It’s an order that’s still largely shaped by subregional drivers,

national priorities and a code of voluntary restraint, rather than by any

region-wide ‘managed system’. But geopolitical and technological shifts

are pulling the order in new directions.

This report paper considers four case studies—the US-China

relationship, the South Asian nuclear dynamic, the North Korean nuclear

program and the challenges confronting US extended nuclear assurance

in Asia—and the implications for Australia

Myanmar: a nonproliferation success story David Santoro

27 March 2017

Myanmar has made a nuclear nonproliferation U-turn in recent years.

Once regarded as a pariah state with connections to North Korea and

possible nuclear-weapon ambitions, it has completely changed course.

In the context of sweeping political and economic reforms that began

in 2011, Myanmar has decided to abandon its nuclear research program,

distance itself from North Korea and embrace the key instruments of

the nonproliferation regime.

This isn’t finished, however, and key challenges to further progress

loom on the horizon. The international community, particularly the US

and other Western countries, has an opportunity to help Naypyidaw

continue its efforts.

This report examines Myanmar’s nuclear past and troubled approach

to nonproliferation and its recent change of heart about the

nonproliferation regime, as well as future challenges, opportunities

and prospects.

   Publications    47

Selected posts from The Strategist

• ‘Australia, extended nuclear deterrence, and what comes after’, Rod Lyon, 2 June 2017

• ‘Chess without a queen: the tactical nuclear imbalance’, Adam Cabot, 10 February 2017

• ‘The DPRK and a nuclear no-first-use policy’, Tom Murphy, 22 July 2016

ANZUS alliance interoperability

Publication

AWD combat system: an upgrade for the Aegis James Mugg

14 September 2016

This paper examines the delivery of the AWDs and their combat systems

to date, and explores what upgrades might be possible in a given

period. Two points emerge: first, the Integrated Investment Program

figures are likely to overestimate the cost; second, delays in the AWD

Program have resulted in platforms with capabilities inferior to those

of their American-built contemporaries. Naturally, the RAN wants to

upgrade the vessels to regain parity with the US Navy. Doing so will

result in downtime for the newly commissioned fleet while the changes

are implemented.

Given the delays, it’s understandable that the RAN wants the AWDs

in service as soon as possible. A substantial change to the combat

system specifications this late in the build will have implications for cost

and schedule.

Future air combat capability

Selected posts from The Strategist

• ‘Unmanned air combat—how soon is too soon?’, Andrew Davies and Malcolm Davis,

22 July 2016

• ‘Replacing the Rhino’, Malcolm Davis, 30 September 2016

• ‘UCAS and the RAAF’s future’, Malcolm Davis, 8 August 2016

48    ASPI Annual Report 2016-2017    

Future submarines: next steps

Selected posts from The Strategist

• ‘The current cost of the Future Submarine’, Andrew Davies, 23 June 2017

• ‘The Australia-France Treaty for the Future Submarine’, Andrew Davies, 14 March 2017

• ‘Australia’s future submarine: a class with no equals’, Hans J Ohff, 16 January 2017

• ‘ASC: to sell or not to sell, that is the question’, Graeme Dunk, 20 June 2016

• ‘The deterrent value of submarines’, Andrew Davies, 16 November 2016

• ‘Making the most of the French connection’, Theo Ell, 7 February 2017

• ‘Delivering the best—DCNS responds to its critics’, Brent Clark, 7 April 2017

Implementation of UNHCR Resolution on Women in Defence and Security

Publication

Women, peace and security: the way forward Elisabeth Buchan, Amanda Fielding, Jenny Lee et al.

29 March 2017

The articles in this Strategic Insights paper, originally published on ASPI’s

The Strategist website throughout March 2017, include analysis about

what women, peace and security (WPS) means for Australia’s defence

and national security. The authors of individual pieces are Elisabeth

Buchan, Amanda Fielding, Jenny Lee, Brendan Nicholson, Sofia Patel,

Lisa Sharland, Laura J Shepherd, Amy Sheridan, Leanne Smith and

Jennifer Wittwer.

Selected posts from The Strategist

• ‘How should Australia’s WPS National Action Plan tackle terrorism?’, Sofia Patel, 29 March 2017

• ‘Peacekeeping and the WPS agenda: less talk and more action’, Leanne Smith, 27 March 2017

• ‘The WPS agenda must also be responsive to natural disasters’, Elisabeth Buchan,

16 March 2017

• ‘WPS and Talisman Sabre: learning from the past, looking to the future’, Amy Sheridan,

9 March 2017

   Publications    49

• ‘The role of the WPS agenda in countering violent extremism’, Laura J Shepherd, 8 March 2017

• ‘Implementing the WPS agenda into Defence: concept or capability?’, Amanda Fielding,

7 March 2017

• ‘There’s more than one battle for Raqqa’, Susan Hutchinson, 26 June 2017

• ‘The month in Women, Peace and Security’, Zoe Glasson, Patrick Kennedy, Madeleine Nyst

and Sophie Qin, 13 June 2017

Strategic engagement with Japan

Selected posts from The Strategist

• ‘The Australia-India-Japan trilateral: converging interests…and converging perceptions?’,

Ian Hall, 17 March 2017

• ‘Japan and Oz do the trilateral on Trump’, Graeme Dobell, 6 February 2017

• ‘A chance to get closer to Japan in the Trump era’, David Lang, 13 January 2017

Defence and civil powers interaction

Publication

Delivering ‘joined-up’ government: achieving the integrated approach to offshore  crisis management Alan Ryan

29 November 2016

The call to improve ‘joined-up’ government articulates a principle

that is the foundation of effective and efficient public administration.

Increasingly, the ability of government to achieve effects that are more

than the sum of their parts will determine whether Australia influences

its strategic environment or is merely captive to it.

Offshore crisis response requires a higher level of multiagency

interconnectedness than ever before. This level of interconnectedness

requires the adoption of transformative approaches to recruitment,

professional development, leadership and management.

The paper stresses the need for adaptable people, the importance of

capturing lessons of recent experience and provides practical actions to

strengthen joined-up government.

50    ASPI Annual Report 2016-2017    

Pacific  Island security—especially reducing militarisation of the region

Publication

Crowded and complex: The   changing   geopolitics   of  the   South   Pacific Joanne Wallis

24 April 2017

While the most important external powers in the region have

traditionally been Australia, NZ, the US and France, new powers are

increasingly active, most notably China, Russia, Indonesia, Japan and

India. South Pacific states, particularly PNG and Fiji, are emerging as

regional powers to constrain Australian influence. South Pacific states

are also more active on the international stage. If Australia is to ensure

that it’s able to respond to the complex and crowded geopolitics of the

South Pacific, it needs to prioritise the region in a clear, consistent and

sustained way in its foreign and strategic policy planning.

Australia - New Zealand bilateral defence ties

Publication

The Cost  of   Defence   2017-18

Chapter 5 New Zealand Defence Economics

Mark Thomson

25 May 2017

This report, prepared by Mark Thomson, gives interested readers greater

access to the complex workings of the Defence Budget and promotes

informed debate on Defence budget issues. This edition features a

chapter on New Zealand’s defence economics.

Selected posts from The Strategist

• ‘Australia and New Zealand: so near, yet so far’, Mark Thomson, 17 October 2016

• ‘New Zealand - Australia Defence differences—what’s the big deal?’, Robert Ayson,

24 October 2017

   Publications    51

CHAPTER

4 EVENTS

ASPI’s events program embraces a range of different audiences and tailors events for each type.

By-invitation events, which include roundtables as well as strategic dialogues, involve mainly

members of the security community, address specific issues related to policy development and

are normally conducted under the Chatham House rules.

A number of events, including the National Security Dinner series, are limited to invited

attendees who are drawn from various sections of the Australian community.

Public events, such as ASPI international conferences, are designed to allow the widest

possible audience to engage with leading Australian and international strategic thinkers,

to exchange different perspectives on strategic and security matters and to network with

like-minded attendees.

Table 6 summarises major events conducted by ASPI in 2015-16 and 2016-17. More detailed

descriptions of the events held during 2016-17 are outlined in this section, while a detailed

listing of the 2016-17 events program is in Annex D.

Table 6: ASPI events, 2015-16 and 2016-17

Events  2015-16 2016-17

Conferences 1 2

National security dinners 1 3

Dinner with the Chiefs 1 -

Defence and security luncheons 0 -

Breakfast series 4 -

Parliamentary workshops 1 -

International strategic dialogues 7 11

Roundtable discussions/forums 57 55

Public events and workshops 24 33

Other events 19 10

Total 115 114

ASPI INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE

From 6 to 8 June 2017, ASPI hosted an international conference titled ‘Building the Joint and

Integrated ADF’. The conference brought together a group of distinguished international and

Australian speakers to deliberate on enabling and integrating systems—such as intelligence,

54    ASPI Annual Report 2016-2017    

surveillance and reconnaissance systems, information and communications technology,

facilities and workforce—to ensure we get the maximum performance from the ADF’s

military platforms.

The conference was attended by senior policymakers, high-level military officials and leading

industry representatives from Australia and around the world. Topics included:

• The impact of changes in Australia’s strategic environment on Defence’s capability plan

• Policy and implementation challenges central to building the joint and integrated ADF

• The emerging operating environment

• Designing the ADF

• Building the joint capability for the ADF.

NATIONAL SECURITY DINNERS

The aim of national security dinners is to facilitate interaction between cabinet ministers

(or their Opposition and foreign counterparts), senior government officials and selected

audiences on matters of national security interest. In 2016-17, ASPI’s guest speakers were

the Hon Christopher Pyne MP, the Chief of Army and the Chief of Air Force.

INTERNATIONAL STRATEGIC DIALOGUES

ASPI supports Australian diplomacy by conducting Track 1.5 and Track 2 dialogues with

international institutions and government partners on a regular basis. In 2016-17, we

conducted 11 such dialogues.

ROUNDTABLE DISCUSSIONS AND FORUMS

ASPI hosted many roundtable discussions at our Canberra premises throughout the year,

engaging a wide range of international and Australian experts in discussions about strategic

and national security affairs. Many roundtables were convened at the request of overseas

visitors seeking direct interaction with ASPI staff. Others were initiated by ASPI in support of

our research program. Details of all the roundtables held in 2016-17 are in Annex D.

   Events    55

ASPI PUBLIC EVENTS AND WORKSHOPS

ASPI hosted many public events in the form of keynote speaker or panel discussions

throughout the year. ASPI’s public events are very popular and officially moderated and attract

media attention. Details of ASPI’s public events in 2016-17 are in Annex D.

OTHER EVENTS

From year to year, ASPI hosts a range of other events on topical issues, including panel

discussions and workshops. Further details are in Annex D.

Guests at the ASPI International Conference on ‘Building the Joint and Integrated Australian Defence Force’: Vice Admiral Tim Barrett AO CSC, Lieutenant General Angus Campbell AO DSC, Air Marshal Leo Davies AO CSC.

ASPI Chairman Kenneth Gillespie and Admiral Harry Harris, US Navy, at the public address by Admiral Harris in Brisbane.

56    ASPI Annual Report 2016-2017    

Minister for Defence Marise Payne speaking at the ASPI International Conference on ‘Building the Joint and Integrated Australian Defence Force’.

Nicole Seils, Catherine McGrath, Lisa Sharland (Head of ASPI’s International Program), Justine Saunders, Margaret Staib (ASPI Council member) attending a Women in Defence and Security Network event.

   Events    57

CHAPTER

5

CORPORATE GOVERNANCE

The ASPI Council is the governing body of ASPI and, as a Commonwealth company, reports

annually to the Australian Securities and Investment Commission. As well as meeting

legislative requirements, a governance framework guides the development of policies, plans

and strategies—covering areas such as risk, fraud and business continuity—that are approved

by Council. A number of internal policies for staff are reviewed as required or scheduled.

Since its inception, ASPI has been governed by a Council of up to nine directors with

experience, expertise and excellence in a range of professions, including in business, academia,

government and the military. Provision is also made to have Council members who are

nominees of the Prime Minister and the Leader of the Opposition, emphasising that the

institute is politically non-partisan.

COUNCIL MEETING ATTENDANCE

Table 7 lists meeting attendance by Council members throughout the year. Mr Peter Jennings is

the only executive member of the Council. All other Council members are non-executive directors.

Table 7: Attendance at ASPI Council meetings, 2016-17

19 August 

2016

24 November 

2016

10 March 

2017

26 May 

2017

Lt Gen (Ret’d) Kenneth Gillespie AC DSC CSM ü ü ü ü

Mr Peter Conran AM ü ü ü ü

Mr Peter Jennings PSM ü ü ü ü

Air Vice Marshal (Ret’d) Margaret Staib AM CSC ü ü ü ü

Professor Joan Beaumont (appointed on 20 December 2016)

ü x

Ms Jane Halton AO PSM (appointed on 20 December 2016)

ü ü

Mr Jim McDowell (appointed on 20 December 2016)

ü ü

The Hon Stephen Conroy (appointed on 31 March 2017)

ü

The Hon David Johnston (appointed on 31 March 2017)

ü

60    ASPI Annual Report 2016-2017    

CURRENT COUNCIL MEMBERS

CHAIRMAN

Lt Gen (Ret’d) Kenneth Gillespie AC DSC CSM Grad Dip Strat Studies

Kenneth Gillespie is an experienced and highly decorated national

leader. Formerly Chief of the Australian Army, he has had a diverse range

of practical experience, including military high command, diplomacy

and private and public sector leadership. He has an enviable and

successful track record for strategic review, structural reform, team

building and leadership in diverse and challenging work environments

and workforces.

Lt Gen Gillespie currently sits on several boards, both public and

not-for-profit, and provides consulting services to government

departments, corporations and small companies. He possesses a strong

network of contacts in government, defence, security and commercial

fields and has considerable experience communicating with and

building consensus among diverse stakeholder groups

Lt Gen Gillespie was appointed to the ASPI Council in January 2015 and

was appointed as ASPI Council Chairman in December 2016.

MEMBERS

Mr Peter Conran AM Solicitor (Solicitors Admission Board—Qld)

During the year, Peter Conran retired as the Director General of the

Western Australian Department of Premier and Cabinet. He is a lawyer

and has had over 30 years’ experience in senior positions with the

Western Australian, Northern Territory and Australian governments.

Mr Conran was the Secretary to Cabinet and Head of the Cabinet Policy

Unit in the office of former Prime Minister John Howard from 2003 to

2007 and a Senior Adviser in the Prime Minister’s Office from 2001 to

2003. From December 1998 to February 2001, he was employed in the

Western Australian Department of the Premier and Cabinet, first as a

consultant on native title issues and then as Deputy Director General.

   Corporate governance    61

Before that, he held various positions with the Northern Territory

Government, including Secretary to the Chief Minister’s Department

and Secretary to the Attorney-General’s Department.

Mr Conran was appointed to the ASPI Council in January 2015.

Air Vice Marshal (Ret’d) Margaret Staib AM CSC BBus, MBusLog, MA Strat Studies

Margaret Staib was previously CEO at Airservices Australia after a

distinguished career over three decades in the Royal Australian Air Force.

From January 2010, she held the position of Commander Joint Logistics.

In 2000, Ms Staib’s contribution and leadership in the field of ADF

aviation inventory management was recognised when she was

awarded the Conspicuous Service Cross. Ms Staib was a member of the

Chief of Air Force Advisory Committee.

A posting with the US Air Force at the Pentagon furthered her

experience of logistics transformation, including strategic procurement

initiatives with industry, supply-chain integration and technology.

Her service during this period was recognised with the United States

Meritorious Service Medal.

In January 2009, Ms Staib was appointed as a Member in the Military

Division of the Order of Australia. She was also recognised by Australian

industry when she received the Outstanding Contribution to Supply

Chain Management in Australia award at the 2011 Smart Supply

Chain Conference.

Ms Staib is a Certified Professional Logistician, a Fellow of the

Chartered Institute of Logistics and Transport and a Fellow of the Royal

Aeronautical Society. She was a director of the Defence Force Credit

Union from 1992 to 2005.

In May 2014, she was appointed as a director of the Commonwealth

Superannuation Corporation.

She holds a Bachelor of Business Studies, Master of Business Logistics

and Master of Arts in Strategic Studies and holds the rank of Air Vice

Marshal in the RAAF Active Reserve.

Ms Staib was appointed to the ASPI Council in January 2015.

62    ASPI Annual Report 2016-2017    

Mr Peter Jennings PSM BA (Hons), MA, MSc

Peter Jennings has worked at senior levels in the Australian Public

Service on defence and national security. Career highlights include being

Deputy Secretary for Strategy in the Defence Department (2009-12);

Chief of Staff to the Minister for Defence (1996-98) and Senior Adviser

for Strategic Policy to the Prime Minister (2002-03).

Since May 2012, Mr Jennings has expanded ASPI’s role from its original

high-quality research on defence to include research on cybersecurity;

policing and international law enforcement; border security; national

resilience; and counterterrorism studies. Now with around 40 staff and

close working relations with government, parliament and industry, ASPI

is Australia’s leading think tank on national security.

His research interests include Australian and regional defence policies,

military operations, crisis management, government decision-making

and future defence capabilities.

Mr Jennings led the External Expert Panel appointed by government

in early 2014 to advise ministers and the Defence Department on the

Defence White Paper, which was released in February 2016. He is a

member of the Australia-Germany Advisory Group appointed by the

Prime Minister and German Chancellor in 2015 to develop closer bilateral

relations. He is a member of the Advisory Group on Australia-Africa

Relations advising the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade.

Mr Jennings has previously held a number Senior Executive Service

positions in Defence, including First Assistant Secretary International

Policy Division, First Assistant Secretary Coordination and Public Affairs,

and Secretary of the Defence Audit and Risk Committee.

He was Director of Programs at ASPI between late 2003 and

January 2006 and has taught postgraduate studies on terrorism at the

Australian Defence Force Academy.

   Corporate g overnance     63

The Hon Stephen Conroy BEc (ANU)

Stephen Conroy served as a Senator for Victoria in the Australian

Parliament for more than 20 years, including as the Leader of the

Government in the Senate and as Deputy Leader of the Opposition in

the Senate.

During his time in Parliament, Mr Conroy worked in multiple portfolio

areas, most notably as the Minister for Broadband, Communications

and the Digital Economy, when he was responsible for the design and

implementation of the National Broadband Network between 2007

and 2013.

Before entering parliament, he worked at the Transport Workers Union.

In 1993, he was elected to Footscray City Council.

In November 2016, Mr Conroy was appointed as the Executive Director

of Responsible Wagering Australia.

Mr Jim McDowell LLB Laws (Hons)

Jim McDowell commenced as Chancellor of the University of South

Australia on 1 January 2016.

Born in Belfast, Northern Ireland, he completed a law degree with

honours at the University of Warwick in England in 1977. He worked

in legal, commercial and marketing roles with aerospace company

Bombardier Shorts for the next 18 years.

Mr McDowell joined British Aerospace in Singapore in August 1996. In

1999, he was appointed Regional Managing Director of BAE Systems for

Asia, following the merger of British Aerospace and Marconi Electronic

Systems and was based in Hong Kong. Upon taking over at BAE Systems

Australia, he established the company’s headquarters in Adelaide,

where he lives.

He was the CEO of BAE Systems Saudi Arabia, a $6 billion company, from

September 2011 to December 2013.

Mr McDowell is a passionate supporter of continuing education. He has

in-depth experience in corporate governance, having served, mainly

as chairman, on a range of boards, including those of the Australian

Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, the Air Warfare Destroyer

Principals Council, The du Monde Group Pty Ltd, Total Construction

64    ASPI Annual Report 2016-2017    

Pty Ltd and Australian Defence Accelerator Ltd. He is a non-executive

director of both Codan Ltd and Austal Ltd and a board member of the

Royal Automobile Association and St Peter’s College Council of Governors.

During his long career, he has lived and worked in the UK, the US, Korea,

Singapore, Hong Kong and the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.

Mr McDowell acts in a number of advisory roles to the Defence Minister

and the Department of Defence as a member of the First Principles

Review of the Department and the Expert Advisory Panel for the Future

Submarine Project. In December 2016, he was appointed as Government

Adviser for the Naval Shipbuilding Plan Development.

He was appointed to the ASPI Council in January 2017.

Jane Halton AO PSM BA (Hons) Psychology, FAIM, FIPAA, Hon FAHMS, Hon FACHSE, Hon Dr Letters (UNSW), GAICD

Jane Halton has had a 33-year public sector career, having served as

Secretary of the Department of Finance (2014-2016), Secretary of

the Department of Health (and Ageing) (2002-2014) and Executive

Co-ordinator (Deputy Secretary) of the Department of the Prime

Minister and Cabinet.

In her most recent role as Secretary of the Department of Finance,

she was responsible for a range of significant services delivered by

the department, including the delivery of the Australian Government

Budget; oversight of the financial framework of Australian Government

agencies; shareholder aspects of government business enterprises; the

ongoing management of the Australian Government’s non-defence

domestic property portfolio and key asset sales; and key projects,

including the Air Warfare Destroyer Project.

Ms Halton is currently a non-executive director of ANZ Bank, Clayton

Utz and Ngamuru. She is also a member of the Executive Board, Institute

of Health Metrics and Evaluation, University of Washington, and the

interim board of Coalition Epidemic Preparedness Innovations, and is an

Adjunct Professor at the University of Sydney and University of Canberra.

She has had significant experience in global health governance, playing key

roles in global health security, and has held leadership roles with the OECD.

Ms Halton has been awarded the Public Service Medal (2002), the

Centenary Medal (2003) and the Order of Australia (2015).

She was appointed to the ASPI Council in December 2016.

   Corporate governance    65

The Hon David Johnston BJuris

Born and educated in Perth in Western Australia, David Johnston

graduated from the University of Western Australia in 1981 with

law degrees.

He was in the Australian Parliament as a senator for Western Australia

for 15 years.

Before that he was a barrister and solicitor in Western Australia,

practising in the areas of mining and crime, and lived and worked on the

Eastern Goldfields for 12 years before returning to Perth to continue in

the law.

In parliament, he was chairman of the Senate Foreign Affairs Defence and

Trade Committee, was appointed by Prime Minister Howard as Minister

for Justice and Customs in 2007, was Opposition spokesperson on Defence

from 2009 to 2013 and was Minister for Defence in 2013 and 2014.

Mr Johnston has a strong commitment to the Australian defence

industry and the current Australian Government’s budgetary support

for naval ship and submarine building. He sits on several defence and

mining-related boards.

He was appointed to the ASPI Council in March 2017.

Professor Joan Beaumont BA (Hons), PhD

Joan Beaumont is Professor Emerita, Strategic and Defence Studies

Centre, Coral Bell School of Asia and Pacific Affairs, ANU.

Born in Adelaide, South Australia, she completed a Bachelor of Arts

with Honours in 1969 at the University of Adelaide. She was awarded

a British Commonwealth scholarship in 1971 and completed her PhD in

the Department of War Studies, King’s College, University of London,

in 1975.

Returning to Australia, she took up an academic career in history,

working at La Trobe, Deakin and Monash universities between 1976 and

2008. From 1998 to 2008, she was Dean of Arts at Deakin University.

In 2008, Professor Beaumont moved to the ANU, where she served as

Director of the Faculty of Arts and Dean of Education in the College

of Arts and Social Sciences, before joining the Strategic and Defence

Studies Centre in the College of Asia and the Pacific.

66    ASPI Annual Report 2016-2017    

Professor Beaumont is an eminent historian of Australia in the two

world wars, Australian defence and foreign policy, the history of

prisoners of war, and the memory and heritage of war.

Her publications include the critically acclaimed Broken nation:

Australians and the Great War (Allen & Unwin, 2013), the joint winner of

the 2014 Prime Minister’s Literary Award (Australian History), the 2014

NSW Premier’s Prize (Australian History), the 2014 Queensland Literary

Award for History, and the Australian Society of Authors’ 2015 Asher

Award. Her other books include Ministers, mandarins and diplomats:

Australian foreign policy making, 1941-1969 (ed., 2003); Australia’s

war, 1939-45 (ed., 1996); Gull Force: survival and leadership in captivity,

1941-1945 (1988); and Comrades in arms: British aid to Russia, 1941-45

(1980). From 2011 to 2013, she led the research team for the Department of

Veterans’ Affairs commemorative website, The Thai-Burma Railway and

Hellfire Pass .

Professor Beaumont is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences of

Australia, a Fellow of the Australian Institute of International Affairs,

and a member of the Editorial Advisory Board of the Department of

Foreign Affairs and Trade.

She is currently funded by the Australian Research Council to research a

history of the Great Depression and the legacy of World War I in Australia

and, with Mick Dodson and eight other historians, a history of Australian

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in the defence of Australia.

She was appointed to the ASPI Council in December 2016.

   Corporate governance    67

COUNCIL COMMITTEES

Audit Committee

The functions of the ASPI Audit Committee include reviewing the appropriateness of ASPI’s

financial reporting; performance reporting; risk oversight and management system; and

internal control system.

The committee’s members in 2016-17 were:

• Jenny Morison, Morison Consulting (retired as Chairman on 28 February 2017)

• Kate Freebody, Cogent Consulting (appointed as Chairman from 1 March 2017)

• Geoff Brown, Chief Audit Executive, Department of Defence

• Air Vice Marshall (Ret’d) Margaret Staib AM, CSC, ASPI Council member (appointed on

10 March 2017).

The Audit Committee invites the Executive Director and Director Corporate of ASPI and a

representative from the Australian National Audit Office to its meetings.

During 2016-17, the committee met four times.

Research Committee

The ASPI Research Committee comprises senior ASPI staff, Council members and at least one

senior representative from the Department of Defence. Under the current funding agreement,

a portion of the funds received from the Department of Defence is directed to mutually agreed

Defence-specific projects. The Research Committee met once during 2016-17.

68    ASPI Annual Report 2016-2017    

PAGE INTENTIONALLY BLANK

   Corporate governance    69

CHAPTER

6

FINANCIALS

ASPI DIRECTORS’ REPORT

Australian Strategic Policy Institute Limited

DIRECTORS’ REPORT

The directors of the Australian Strategic Policy Institute Limited (ASPI) present this report on the financial year ended 30 June 2017.

Directors

The names of each person who has been a director during the year and to the date of this report are listed below. Each director has been in office for the whole financial year to the date of this report unless otherwise stated.

Lt Gen (Ret’d) Kenneth Gillespie AC DSC CSM (Chairman)

Mr Peter Jennings PSM

Mr Peter Conran AM

AVM (Ret’d) Margaret Staib AM, CSC

Ms Jane Halton AO, PSM Appointed on 20 December 2016

Mr Jim McDowell Appointed on 20 December 2016

Prof Joan Beaumont Appointed on 20 December 2016

The Hon Stephen Conroy Appointed on 31 March 2017

The Hon David Johnston Appointed on 31 March 2017

Company Secretary

The following people held the position of the ASPI Company Secretary during the financial year:

Ms Kathryn Edwards ceased as Company Secretary on 26 May 2017. Mr Glen Bortolin was appointed as Company Secretary on 26 May 2017.

Principal Activities

The principal activity of ASPI during the financial year was to:  encourage and inform public debate and understanding of Australia’s strategic and defence policy choices;  provide an alternative source of policy ideas to government;  nurture expertise in defence and strategic policy; and  promote international understanding of Australia’s strategic and defence policy perspectives.

Operating Results

The operating result for 2016-17 was a surplus of $334,029 (2015-16: surplus of $202,325).

Review of Operations

Revenue has increased by $650,863 from the previous financial year, due mainly to increased sponsorship, commissioned income and event related income. Correspondingly, expenses were up by $519,159 from the previous financial year due to increased program operations and additional administrative overheads.

72    ASPI Annual Report 2016-2017    

LEVEL 2, 40 MACQUARIE STREET, BARTON ACT 2600

P: + 02 6270 5100 ABN 77 097 369 045 www.aspi.org.au www.aspistrategist.org.au

Significant Changes in State of Affairs

No significant changes in ASPI’s state of affairs occurred during the financial year.

After Balance date Events

There were no after balance date events that have occurred and need to be brought to account in the financial statements at 30 June 2017.

Future Developments

ASPI expects to maintain a steady growth in output and activities, in the context of a tight fiscal environment.

Environmental Issues

ASPI’s operations are not regulated by any significant environment regulation under a law of the Commonwealth or of a State or Territory.

Options

No options over issued shares or interests in ASPI were granted during or since the end of the financial year and there were no options at the date of this report.

Indemnifying Officers or Auditor

ASPI’s insurance policy with Comcover includes cover for Directors' and Officers’ Liability.

Proceedings on Behalf of ASPI

No person has applied for leave of Court to bring proceedings on behalf of ASPI or intervene in any proceeding to which ASPI is a party for the purpose of taking responsibility on behalf of ASPI for all or any part of those proceeds.

ASPI was not a party to any such proceeding during the year.

Auditor Independence Declaration

The auditor‘s independence declaration for the year ended 30 June 2017 was received on 1 September 2017.

Signed in accordance with a resolution of the Board of Directors.

Lt Gen (Ret’d) Kenneth Gillespie AC DSC CSM Chairman 1 September 2017

   Financials    73

P: + 02 6270 5100 ABN 77 097 369 045 www.aspi.org.au www.aspistrategist.org.au

ANAO INDEPENDENT AUDIT REPORT

INDEPENDENT AUDITOR’S REPORT

To the members of Australian Strategic Policy Institute Limited

Opinion

In my opinion, the financial report of Australian Strategic Policy Institute Limited for the year ended 30 June 2017 is in accordance with the Corporations Act 2001, including:

(a) giving a true and fair view of Australian Strategic Policy Institute Limited’s financial position as at 30 June 2017 and of its performance for the year then ended; and

(b) complying with Australian Accounting Standards and the Corporations Regulations 2001.

The financial report of Australian Strategic Policy Institute Limited, which I have audited, comprises the following statements as at 30 June 2017 and for the year then ended:

• Statement of Comprehensive Income; • Statement of Financial Position; • Statement of Changes in Equity;

• Cash Flow Statement; • Notes to the financial statements, comprising a Summary of Significant Accounting Policies and other explanatory information; and • Directors’ Declaration.

Basis for Opinion

I conducted my audit in accordance with the Australian National Audit Office Auditing Standards, which incorporate the Australian Auditing Standards. My responsibilities under those standards are further described in the Auditor’s Responsibilities for the Audit of the Financial Report section of my report. I am independent of Australian Strategic Policy Institute Limited in accordance with the Corporations Act 2001 and the relevant ethical requirements for financial report audits conducted by the Auditor-General and his delegates. These include the relevant independence requirements of the Accounting Professional and Ethical Standards Board’s APES 110 Code of Ethics for Professional Accountants to the extent that they are not in conflict with the Auditor-General Act 1997 (the Code). I have also fulfilled my other responsibilities in accordance with the Code.

I confirm that the independence declaration required by the Corporations Act 2001, which has been given to the directors of Australian Strategic Policy Institute Limited, would be in the same terms if given to the directors as at the time of this auditor’s report.

I believe that the audit evidence I have obtained is sufficient and appropriate to provide a basis for my opinion.

Other Information

The directors are responsible for the other information. The other information obtained at the date of this auditor’s report is the director’s report for the year ended 30 June 2017 but does not include the financial statements and my auditor’s report thereon.

My opinion on the financial report does not cover the other information and accordingly I do not express any form of assurance conclusion thereon.

In connection with my audit of the financial report, my responsibility is to read the other information identified above and, in doing so, consider whether the other information is materially inconsistent with the financial report or my knowledge obtained in the audit, or otherwise appears to be materially misstated.

If, based on the work I have performed, I conclude that there is a material misstatement of this other information, I am required to report that fact. I have nothing to report in this regard.

74    ASPI Annual Report 2016-2017    

INDEPENDENT AUDITOR’S REPORT

To the members of Australian Strategic Policy Institute Limited

I have audited the accompanying financial report of Australian Strategic Policy Institute Limited, which comprises the Statement of Financial Position as at 30 June 2015, the Statement of Comprehensive Income, Statement of Changes in Equity, Cashflow Statement and Schedule of Commitments for the year then ended, Notes to and forming part of the Financial Statmements, comprising a Summary of Significant Accounting Policies and other explanatory information, and the Statement by the Directors, Executive Director and Company Secretary.

Directors’ Responsibility for the Financial Report

The directors of the Australian Strategic Policy Institute Limited are responsible for the preparation of the financial report that gives a true and fair view in accordance with Australian Accounting Standards and the Corporations Act 2001 and for such internal control as is necessary to enable the preparation of the financial report that gives a true and fair view and is free from material misstatement, whether due to fraud or error.

Auditor’s Responsibility

My responsibility is to express an opinion on the financial report based on my audit. I have conducted my audit in accordance with the Australian National Audit Office Auditing Standards, which incorporate the Australian Auditing Standards. These Auditing Standards require that I comply with relevant ethical requirements relating to audit engagements and plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial report is free from material misstatement.

An audit involves performing procedures to obtain audit evidence about the amounts and disclosures in the financial report. The procedures selected depend on the auditor’s judgement, including the assessment of the risks of material misstatement of the financial report, whether due to fraud or error. In making those risk assessments, the auditor considers internal control relevant to the company’s preparation of the financial report that gives a true and fair view in order to design audit procedures that are appropriate in the circumstances, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the company’s internal control. An audit also includes evaluating the appropriateness of the accounting policies used and the reasonableness of accounting estimates made by the directors, as well as evaluating the overall presentation of the financial report.

GPO Box 707 CANBERRA ACT 2601 19 National Circuit BARTON ACT Phone (02) 6203 7300 Fax (02) 6203 7777

Directors’ Responsibility for the Financial Report

The directors of Australian Strategic Policy Institute Limited are responsible for the preparation of the financial report that gives a true and fair view in accordance with Australian Accounting Standards and the Corporations Act 2001 and for such internal control the directors determine is necessary to enable the preparation of the financial report that gives a true and fair view and is free from material misstatement, whether due to fraud or error.

In preparing the financial report, the directors are responsible for assessing Australian Strategic Policy Institute Limited’s ability to continue as a going concern, disclosing matters related to going concern as applicable and using the going concern basis of accounting unless the directors either intend to liquidate the company or to cease operations, or has no realistic alternative but to do so.

Auditor’s Responsibilities for the Audit of the Financial Report

My objective is to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial report as a whole is free from material misstatement, whether due to fraud or error, and to issue an auditor’s report that includes my opinion. Reasonable assurance is a high level of assurance, but is not a guarantee that an audit conducted in accordance with the Australian National Audit Office Auditing Standards will always detect a material misstatement when it exists. Misstatements can arise from fraud or error and are considered material if, individually or in the aggregate, they could reasonably be expected to influence the economic decisions of users taken on the basis of the financial report.

As part of an audit in accordance with the Australian National Audit Office Auditing Standards, I exercise professional judgement and maintain professional scepticism throughout the audit. I also:

• Identify and assess the risks of material misstatement of the financial report, whether due to fraud or error, design and perform audit procedures responsive to those risks, and obtain audit evidence that is sufficient and appropriate to provide a basis for my opinion. The risk of not detecting a material misstatement resulting from fraud is higher than for one resulting from error, as fraud may involve collusion, forgery, intentional omissions, misrepresentations, or the override of internal control. • Obtain an understanding of internal control relevant to the audit in order to design audit procedures that are

appropriate in the circumstances, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the company’s internal control. • Evaluate the appropriateness of accounting policies used and the reasonableness of accounting estimates and related disclosures made by the directors. • Conclude on the appropriateness of the directors’ use of the going concern basis of accounting and, based on

the audit evidence obtained, whether a material uncertainty exists related to events or conditions that may cast significant doubt on the company’s ability to continue as a going concern. If I conclude that a material uncertainty exists, I am required to draw attention in my auditor’s report to the related disclosures in the financial report or, if such disclosures are inadequate, to modify my opinion. My conclusions are based on the audit evidence obtained up to the date of my auditor’s report. However, future events or conditions may cause the company to cease to continue as a going concern. • Evaluate the overall presentation, structure and content of the financial report, including the disclosures, and

whether the financial report represents the underlying transactions and events in a manner that achieves fair presentation.

I communicate with those charged with governance regarding, among other matters, the planned scope and timing of the audit and significant audit findings, including any significant deficiencies in internal control that I identify during my audit.

I also provide the directors with a statement that I have complied with relevant ethical requirements regarding independence, and to communicate with them all relationships and other matters that may reasonably be thought to bear on my independence, and where applicable, related safeguards.

Australian National Audit Office

Garry Sutherland Audit Principal Delegate of the Auditor-General Canberra 1 September 2017

   Financials    75

LtGen (Ret’d) Kenneth J Gillespie AC DSC CSM Chairman Australian Strategic Policy Institute Limited Level 2, Arts House

40 Macquarie Street BARTON ACT 2600

AUSTRALIAN STRATEGIC POLICY INSTITUTE LIMITED FINANCIAL REPORT 2016-17 AUDITOR’S INDEPENDENCE DECLARATION

In relation to my audit of the financial report of the Australian Strategic Policy Institute Limited for the year ended 30 June 2017, to the best of my knowledge and belief, there have been:

(i) no contraventions of the auditor independence requirements of the Corporations Act 2001; and

(ii) no contravention of any applicable code of professional conduct.

Australian National Audit Office

Garry Sutherland Audit Principal

Delegate of the Auditor-General

Canberra

1 September 2017

76    ASPI Annual Report 2016-2017    

INDEPENDENT AUDITOR’S REPORT

To the members of Australian Strategic Policy Institute Limited

I have audited the accompanying financial report of Australian Strategic Policy Institute Limited, which comprises the Statement of Financial Position as at 30 June 2015, the Statement of Comprehensive Income, Statement of Changes in Equity, Cashflow Statement and Schedule of Commitments for the year then ended, Notes to and forming part of the Financial Statmements, comprising a Summary of Significant Accounting Policies and other explanatory information, and the Statement by the Directors, Executive Director and Company Secretary.

Directors’ Responsibility for the Financial Report

The directors of the Australian Strategic Policy Institute Limited are responsible for the preparation of the financial report that gives a true and fair view in accordance with Australian Accounting Standards and the Corporations Act 2001 and for such internal control as is necessary to enable the preparation of the financial report that gives a true and fair view and is free from material misstatement, whether due to fraud or error.

Auditor’s Responsibility

My responsibility is to express an opinion on the financial report based on my audit. I have conducted my audit in accordance with the Australian National Audit Office Auditing Standards, which incorporate the Australian Auditing Standards. These Auditing Standards require that I comply with relevant ethical requirements relating to audit engagements and plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial report is free from material misstatement.

An audit involves performing procedures to obtain audit evidence about the amounts and disclosures in the financial report. The procedures selected depend on the auditor’s judgement, including the assessment of the risks of material misstatement of the financial report, whether due to fraud or error. In making those risk assessments, the auditor considers internal control relevant to the company’s preparation of the financial report that gives a true and fair view in order to design audit procedures that are appropriate in the circumstances, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the company’s internal control. An audit also includes evaluating the appropriateness of the accounting policies used and the reasonableness of accounting estimates made by the directors, as well as evaluating the overall presentation of the financial report.

GPO Box 707 CANBERRA ACT 2601 19 National Circuit BARTON ACT Phone (02) 6203 7300 Fax (02) 6203 7777

STATEMENT BY DIRECTORS

STATEMENT BY THE DIRECTORS, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR AND COMPANY SECRETARY

In our opinion:

a) the financial statements and notes of the Company are in accordance with the Corporations Act 2001 and:

i) give a true and fair view of the Company's financial position as at 30 June 2017 and of the Company's performance for the year ended on that date; and

ii) comply with the Accounting Standards, the Corporations Regulations 2001, and other mandatory professional reporting requirements; and

b) there are reasonable grounds to believe that the Company will be able to pay its debts as and when they become due and payable.

This declaration is made in accordance with a resolution of the directors.

Lt Gen (Ret’d) Kenneth Gillespie AC DSC CSM Chairman 1 September 2017

Peter Jennings PSM Executive Director 1 September 2017

Glen Bortolin Company Secretary 1 September 2017

   Financials    77

LEVEL 2, 40 MACQUARIE STREET, BARTON ACT 2600

P: + 02 6270 5100 www.aspi.org.au ABN 77 097 369 045

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

Australian Strategic Policy Institute Ltd STATEMENT OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME for the year ended 30 June 2017

Notes 2017 2016

$ $

NET COST OF SERVICES

Expenses

Employee benefits 1.1A 3,819,858 3,791,797

Suppliers 1.1B 2,892,122 2,383,870

Depreciation and amortisation 2.2A 321,784 299,985

Disposal and write down of assets 1.1C - 38,953

Total expenses 7,033,764 6,514,605

OWN SOURCE INCOME

Own source revenue

Sale of goods and rendering of services 1.2A 7,267,966 6,666,433

Interest 1.2B 77,576 50,457

Foreign exchange gains 1.2C 71 40

Other gains 1.2D 22,180 -

Total own-source revenue 7,367,793 6,716,930

Net contribution by services 334,029 202,325

Surplus attributable to the Australian Government 334,029 202,325

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

78    ASPI Annual Report 2016-2017    

Australian Strategic Policy Institute Ltd STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL POSITION as at 30 June 2017 Notes 2017 2016

$ $

ASSETS

Financial assets Cash and cash equivalents 2.1A 2,867,773 2,134,848

Trade and other receivables 2.1B 243,649 194,104

Prepayments 2.1C 64,464 41,956

Total Financial assets 3,175,886 2,370,908

Non-financial assets Property, Plant and Equipment 2.2A 342,309 563,721

Intangibles 2.2A 59,047 56,966

Total non-financial assets 401,356 620,687

Total assets 3,577,242 2,991,595

LIABILITIES

Payables Suppliers 2.3A 258,247 176,480

Other payables 2.3B 188,535 261,174

Unearned Income 2.3C 814,361 529,520

Total payables 1,261,143 967,174

Provisions Employee provisions 3.1A 819,863 867,374

Other provisions 2.3D 285,631 280,471

Total provisions 1,105,494 1,147,845

Total liabilities 2,366,637 2,115,019

Net assets 1,210,605 876,576

EQUITY

Contributed equity 172,060 172,060

Retained surplus 1,038,545 704,516

Total equity 1,210,605 876,576

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

   Financials    79

Australian Strategic Policy Institute Ltd STATEMENT OF CHANGES IN EQUITY for the year ended 30 June 2017

2017 2016 2017 2016 2017 2016

$ $ $ $ $ $

Opening balance

Balance carried forward from previous period 172,060 172,060 704,516 502,191 876,576 674,251

Comprehensive income Surplus/(Deficit) for the period - - 334,029 202,325 334,029 202,325

Closing balance as at 30 June 2017 172,060 172,060 1,038,545 704,516 1,210,605 876,576

Contributed equity Retained earnings Total equity

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes. The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

80    ASPI Annual Report 2016-2017    

Australian Strategic Policy Institute Ltd CASH FLOW STATEMENT for the year ended 30 June 2017 Notes 2017 2016

$ $

OPERATING ACTIVITIES Cash received Annual funding 3,442,000 3,358,000

Sale of goods and rendering of services 4,418,048 3,496,508

Interest 98,729 28,271

Total cash received 7,958,777 6,882,779

Cash used Employees (3,881,165) (3,748,818)

Suppliers (3,089,452) (2,405,770)

Net GST paid (152,853) (131,607)

Total cash used (7,123,470) (6,286,195)

Net cash from operating activities 2.3E 835,307 596,584

INVESTING ACTIVITIES Cash used Purchase of property, plant and equipment (102,382) (295,285)

Total cash used (102,382) (295,285)

Net cash (used by) investing activities (102,382) (295,285)

Net increase in cash held 732,925 301,299

Cash and cash equivalents at the beginning of the reporting period 2,134,848 1,833,549

Cash and cash equivalents at the end of the reporting period 2,867,773 2,134,848

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

   Financials    81

Australian Strategic Policy Institute Ltd OVERVIEW

The Basis of Preparation

New Accounting Standards

Adoption of new Australian Accounting Standard requirements

Future Australian Accounting Standard requirements

Taxation

ASPI is a Commonwealth Government wholly owned not for profit company established in 2001. It is one of Australia's leading independent research bodies in the area of strategic and defence policy.

ASPI is exempt from all forms of taxation except fringe benefits tax (FBT), the goods and services tax (GST) and payroll tax.

The financial report of the Australian Strategic Policy Institute (ASPI) Limited for the year ended 30 June 2017 was authorised for issue in accordance with a resolution of the directors.

The financial statements are general purpose financial statements, which have been prepared in accordance with the requirements of the Corporations Act 2001, Australian Accounting Standards, and interpretations issued by the Australian Accounting Standards Board and Urgent Issues Group that apply for the reporting period.

The financial statements have been prepared on an accrual basis and are in accordance with the historical cost convention. Except where stated, no allowance is made for the effect of changing prices on the results or the financial position. Cost is based on the fair values of the consideration given in exchange for assets.

The financial statements are presented in Australian dollars and values are rounded to the nearest dollar.

No accounting standard has been adopted earlier than the application date as stated in the standard. All other new standards or interpretations that were issued prior to the sign off date and are applicable to the current reporting period did not have a material effect, and are not expected to have a future material effect, on ASPI's financial statements.

The financial report complies with Australian Accounting Standards.

All other new standards or interpretations that were issued prior to the sign off date and are applicable to future reporting periods are not expected to have a future material impact on ASPI's financial statements.

82    ASPI Annual Report 2016-2017    

Australian Strategic Policy Institute Ltd FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE This section analyses the financial performance of the company for the year ended 2017

2017 2016

$ $

1.1 - Expenses

1.1A - Employee benefits

Wages and salaries 2,975,090 2,844,802

Superannuation 420,606 412,522

Long service leave - 103,629

Annual leave 235,377 235,866

Other employee expenses 188,785 194,978

Total employee benefits 3,819,858 3,791,797

Accounting policy Accounting policies for employee related expenses is contained in the People and relationships section.

1.1B - Suppliers

Goods and services supplied or rendered Auditors remuneration 32,000 37,000

Consultants 580,708 295,016

Contractors 56,461 82,521

Communications 379,890 375,919

Travel 573,551 519,768

IT services 48,036 50,735

Office management & activities 602,426 474,431

Other 23,540 57,949

Total goods and services supplied or rendered 2,296,612 1,893,339

Goods supplied 1,561,103 1,366,566

Services rendered 735,509 526,773

Total goods and services supplied or rendered 2,296,612 1,893,339

Other suppliers Operating lease rentals in connection with Minimum lease payments 562,574 460,708

Workers compensation expenses 32,936 29,823

Total other suppliers 595,510 490,531

Total suppliers 2,892,122 2,383,870

Leasing commitments

ASPI has an operating lease in place for office accommodation at Level 2 40 Macquarie Street Barton ACT 2600. The term of the lease is for three years commencing 1 October 2015 with annual inflationary rate increases.

   Financials    83

Australian Strategic Policy Institute Ltd FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE This section analyses the financial performance of the company for the year ended 2017

2017 2016

$ $

Commitments for minimum lease payments in relation to non cancellable operating leases are payable as follows:

Within 1 year 698,333 677,675

Between 1 to 5 years 175,791 872,286

Total operating lease commitments 874,124 1,549,961

Accounting policy Operating lease payments are expensed on a straight line basis which is representative of the pattern of benefits derived from the lease assets.

1.1C - Disposal and write down of assets

Disposal and write down of property, plant and equipment - 38,953

Total disposal and write down of assets - 38,953

84    ASPI Annual Report 2016-2017    

Australian Strategic Policy Institute Ltd FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE This section analyses the financial performance of the company for the year ended 2017

2017 2016

$ $

1.2 - Own Source Revenue

1.2A - Sale of goods and rendering of services

Goods and services Core funding 3,442,000 3,358,000

Commissioned Income 2,296,709 2,197,970

Sponsorship Income 1,110,782 859,053

Events 329,609 216,196

Subscriptions 10,455 33,473

Publication Sales 17 1,741

Miscellaneous Income 78,394 -

Total sale of goods and rendering of services 7,267,966 6,666,433

Accounting policy Revenue from the sale of goods is recognised when:

a) the risks and rewards of ownership have been transferred to the buyer; b) ASPI retains no managerial involvement or effective control over the goods. The stage of completion of contracts at the reporting date is determined by reference to services performed to date as a percentage of total services to be performed. Receivables for goods and services, which have 30 days terms, are recognised at the nominal amounts due less any impairment allowance account. Collectability of debts is reviewed at end of the reporting

period. Allowances are made when collectability of the debt is no longer probable.

1.2B - Interest

Deposits 77,576 50,457

Total interest 77,576 50,457

1.2C - Foreign Exchange Gains

Non-speculative 71 40

Total foreign exchange gain 71 40

1.2D - Other Gains

Long service leave 22,180 -

Total other gains 22,180 -

   Financials    85

Australian Strategic Policy Institute Ltd FINANCIAL POSITION This section analyses the company's assets used to conduct its

operations and the operating liabilities incurred as a result. 2017 2016

$ $

2.1 - Financial Assets

2.1A - Cash and cash equivalents

Cash on hand or on deposit 2,867,773 2,134,848

Total cash and cash equivalents 2,867,773 2,135,148

Accounting policy Cash is recognised at its nominal amount. Cash and cash equivalents include: a) cash on hand; b) demand deposits in bank accounts with an original maturity of 3 months or less that are readily

convertible to known amounts of cash and subject to insignificant risk of changes in value; and c) cash in special accounts.

2.1B - Trade and other receivables

Goods and services receivables Goods and services 243,649 182,913

Other - 11,191

Total goods and services receivables 243,649 194,104

Total trade and other receivables 243,649 194,104

Trade and other receivables expected to be recovered No more than 12 months 243,649 194,104

Total trade and other receivables 243,649 194,104

Trade and other receivables aged as follows: Not overdue 199,033 135,170

Overdue by 0 to 30 days 7,100 26,885

31 to 60 days 850 -

61 to 90 days - -

more than 90 days 36,666 32,049

Total trade and other receivables 243,649 194,104

Accounting policy Trade and other receivables that have fixed or determinable payments and that are not quoted in an active market are classified as 'receivables'. Receivables are measured at amortised cost using the effective interest method less impairment.

2.1C - Prepayments

Event related prepayments 12,255 8,677

Other prepayments 52,209 33,279

Total prepayments 64,464 41,956

86    ASPI Annual Report 2016-2017    

Australian Strategic Policy Institute Ltd FINANCIAL POSITION This section analyses the company's assets used to conduct its operations and the operating liabilities incurred as a result.

2.2 Non-Financial Assets Reconciliation of the opening and closing balances of property, plant and equipment for 2017

Furniture and Fittings $

Leasehold Improvements $

Plant and Equipment $

Tota

l

property plant and equipment $

Computer software $ Web Site

$

Total

intangibles $

Total $

As at 1 July 2016 Gross book value 101,725 1,132,055 227,309 1,461,089 10,927 166,675 177,602 1,638,691

Accumulated depreciation (72,532) (637,485) (187,352) (897,369) (10,927) (109,709) (120,636) (1,018,005)

Total as at 1 July 2016 29,193 494,570 39,957 563,720 - 56,966 56,966 620,686

Additions

Purchase

- - 58,704 58,704 - 43,750 43,750 102,454

Depreciation (6,657) (234,717) (38,741) (280,115) - (41,669) (41,669) (321,784)

Disposal - - - - - - - -

Write down of assets - - - - - - - -

Total as at 30 June 2017 22,536 259,853 59,920 342,309 - 59,047 59,047 401,356

Total as at 30 June 2017 represented by Gross book value 94,098 1,132,055 238,936 1,465,089 10,927 210,425 221,352 1,686,441

Accumulated depreciation and impairmen

t

(71,562) (872,202) (179,016) (1,122,780) (10,927) (151,378) (162,305) (1,285,085)

Total as at 30 June 2017 represented by 22,536 259,853 59,920 342,309 - 59,047 59,047 401,356

2.2A - Reconciliation of the opening and closing balances for Property, Plant and Equipment and Intangibles

   Financials    87

Australian Strategic Policy Institute Ltd FINANCIAL POSITION This section analyses the company's assets used to conduct its operations and the operating liabilities incurred as a result.

2.2 Non-Financial Assets Reconciliation of the opening and closing balances of property, plant and equipment for 2016

Furniture and Fittings $

Leasehold Improvements $

Plant and Equipment $

Tota

l

property plant and equipment $

Computer software $ Web Site

$

Total

intangibles $

Total $

As at 1 July 2015 Gross book value 100,122 852,368 252,226 1,204,716 10,927 166,675 177,602 1,382,318

Accumulated depreciation (68,905) (386,841) (183,307) (639,053) (10,927) (68,040) (78,967) (718,020)

Total as at 1 July 2015 31,217 465,527 68,919 565,663 - 98,635 98,635 664,298

Additions

Purchase

6,441 279,687 9,198 295,326 - - - 295,326

Depreciation (3,627) (250,644) (4,045) (258,316) - (41,669) (41,669) (299,985)

Disposal

- - (1,499) (1,499) - - - (1,499)

Write down of assets (4,838) - (32,616) (37,454) - - - (37,454)

Total as at 30 June 2016 29,193 494,570 39,957 563,721 - 56,966 56,966 620,687

Total as at 30 June 2016 represented by Gross book value 101,725 1,132,055 227,309 1,461,089 10,927 166,675 177,602 1,638,691

Accumulated depreciation and impairmen

t

(72,532) (637,485) (187,352) (897,369) (10,927) (109,709) (120,636) (1,018,005)

Total as at 30 June 2016 represented by 29,193 494,570 39,957 563,721 - 56,966 56,966 620,687

2.2A - Reconciliation of the opening and closing balances for Property, Plant and Equipment and Intangibles

88    ASPI Annual Report 2016-2017    

Australian Strategic Policy Institute Ltd FINANCIAL POSITION This section analyses the company's assets used to conduct its

operations and the operating liabilities incurred as a result.

Accounting policy

Assets are recorded at cost on acquisition.

Asset Recognition Threshold

Depreciation

2017 2016

Property, plant and equipment 2 to 15 years 2 to 15 years

Impairment

Derecognition

Intangibles

Software is amortised on a straight line basis over its anticipated useful life. The useful lives of ASPI's software are 3 to 4 years (2016: 3 to 4 years). All software assets were assessed for indications of impairment as at 30 June 2017.

ASPI acquired assets at no cost from the Department of Defence in 2001/2002. These assets were initially recognised as contributions by owners at their fair value at the date of acquisition.

Purchases of property, plant and equipment are recognised initially at cost in the statement of financial position, except for purchases costing less than $1,000, which are expensed in the year of acquisition.

The initial cost of an asset includes an estimate of the cost of dismantling and removing the item and restoring the site on which it is located. This is particularly relevant to 'make good' provisions in property leases taken up where there exists an obligation to restore the property to its original condition. These costs are included in the value of leasehold improvements with a corresponding provision for the 'make good' recognised.

Depreciable property plant and equipment assets are written off to their estimated residual values over their estimated useful lives to ASPI using, in all cases, the straight line method of depreciation.

Depreciation rates (useful lives), residual values and methods are reviewed at each reporting date and necessary adjustments are recognised in the current, or current and future reporting periods, as appropriate.

Depreciation rates applying to each class of depreciable asset are based on the following useful lives:

All assets were assessed for impairment at 30 June 2017. Where indications of impairment exist, the asset's recoverable amount is estimated and an impairment adjustment made if the asset's recoverable amount is less than its carrying amount.

The recoverable amount of an asset is the higher of its fair value less costs of disposal and its value in use. Value in use is the present value of the future cash flows expected to be derived from the asset. Where the future economic benefit of an asset is not primarily dependent on the asset's ability to generate future cash flows, and the asset would be replaced if ASPI were deprived of the asset, its value in use is taken to be its depreciated replacement cost.

An item of property, plant and equipment is derecognised upon disposal or when no further future economic benefits are expected from its use or disposal.

ASPI's intangibles comprise purchased software, an internally developed database and website. These assets are carried at cost less accumulated amortisation and accumulated impairment losses.

   Financials    89

Australian Strategic Policy Institute Ltd FINANCIAL POSITION This section analyses the company's assets used to conduct its

operations and the operating liabilities incurred as a result. 2017 2016

$ $

2.3 - Payables

2.3A - Suppliers

Trade creditors 145,947 51,985

Accruals 112,300 124,495

Total suppliers 258,247 176,480

No more than 12 months 258,247 176,480

258,247 176,480

Settlement terms for suppliers is usually within 30 days of invoice date.

2.3B - Other payables

Salaries and wages 115,538 136,516

Superannuation - 1,615

GST liabilities 4,640 -

Lease incentive 68,357 123,043

Total other payables 188,535 261,174

Other payables expected to be settled

No more than 12 months 188,535 138,131

More than 12 months - 123,043

Total other payables 188,535 261,174

2.3C - Unearned Income

Unearned Income 814,361 529,520

Total unearned income 814,361 529,520

Income has been received in advance for sponsorship of ASPI programs for the financial year 2017/2018.

Suppliers expected to be settled

Total suppliers

90    ASPI Annual Report 2016-2017    

Australian Strategic Policy Institute Ltd FINANCIAL POSITION This section analyses the company's assets used to conduct its

operations and the operating liabilities incurred as a result. 2017 2016

$ $

2.3D - Other provisions Provision for restoration 285,631 280,471

Total other provisions 285,631 280,471

Other provisions expected to be settled No more than 12 months 285,631 -

More than 12 months - 280,471

Total other provisions 285,631 280,471

280,471

Additional provision made -

Unwinding of discount 5,160

285,631 Total as at 30 June 2017

ASPI currently has one (2016: 1) agreement for the leasing of premises which have provisions requiring the restoration of the premises to their original condition at the conclusion of the lease. ASPI has made a provision to reflect the present value of this obligation.

As at 1 July 2016

   Financials    91

Australian Strategic Policy Institute Ltd FINANCIAL POSITION This section analyses the company's assets used to conduct its

operations and the operating liabilities incurred as a result. 2017 2016

$ $

2.3E - Cash Flow Reconciliation

Reconciliation of cash and cash equivalents as per statement of financial position and cash flow statement

Cash and cash equivalents as per Cash flow statement 2,867,773 2,134,848

Statement of financial position 2,867,773 2,134,848

Discrepancy - -

Reconciliation of net cost of services to net cash from operating activities

Net contribution by/(cost of) services 334,029 202,325

Adjustments for non-cash items Depreciation / Amortisation 321,784 299,985

Disposal and write down of non financial assets - 38,953

Foreign Exchange (Gain)/Loss (71) ( 40)

321,713 338,898

Movements in assets and liabilities

Assets Decrease/(Increase) in Net receivables (49,545) 841,335

Decrease/(Increase) in Prepayments (22,508) (1,754)

Liabilities Increase/(Decrease) in Supplier payables 81,767 13,232

Increase/(Decrease) in Other payables (72,639) (62,849)

Increase/(Decrease) in Unearned income 284,841 (919,307)

Increase/(Decrease) in Provisions (42,351) 184,704

Net cash from operating activities 835,307 596,584

92    ASPI Annual Report 2016-2017    

Australian Strategic Policy Institute Ltd PEOPLE AND RELATIONSHIPS This section describes a range of employment and post

employment benefits provided to our people and our

relationships with other key people.

2017 2016

$ $

3.1 - Employee Provisions

3.1A - Employee provisions Annual leave 368,453 393,785

Long service leave 451,410 473,589

Total employee provisions 819,863 867,374

Employee provisions expected to be settled No more than 12 months 358,570 218,574

More than 12 months 461,293 648,800

Total employee provisions 819,863 867,374

Accounting policy

Leave

The liability for defined benefits is recognised in the financial statements of the Australian Government and is settled by the Australian Government in due course. This liability is reported in the Department of Finance's administered schedules and notes.

ASPI makes employer contributions to the employees' defined benefit superannuation scheme at rates determined by an actuary to be sufficient to meet the current cost to the Government. ASPI accounts for the contributions as if they were contributions to defined contribution plans.

Liabilities for short term employee benefits and termination benefits expected within twelve months of the end of the reporting period are measured at their nominal amounts.

Other long term employee benefits are measured as net total of the present value of the defined benefit obligation at the end of the reporting period.

The liability for employee benefits includes provision for annual leave and long service leave. The leave liabilities are calculated on the basis of employees' remuneration at the estimated salary rates that will be applied at the time the leave is taken, including ASPI's employer superannuation contribution rates to the extent that the leave is likely to be taken during service rather than paid out on termination. The estimate of the present value of the liability takes into account attrition rates and pay increases through promotion and inflation.

Superannuation

ASPI's staff are members of the Public Sector Superannuation Scheme, or the PSS accumulation plan (PSSap) or other superannuation funds held outside the Australian Government. The PSS is a defined benefit scheme for the Australian Government. The PSSap is a defined contribution scheme.

   Financials    93

Australian Strategic Policy Institute Ltd PEOPLE AND RELATIONSHIPS This section describes a range of employment and post

employment benefits provided to our people and our

relationships with other key people.

3.2 - Directors and Senior Management Personnel Remuneration

2017 2016

$ $

Short term employee benefits Salary 271,218 268,167

Performance bonuses 46,509 46,509

Total short term employee benefits 317,727 314,676

Post employment benefits Superannuation 53,087 53,587

Total post employment benefits 53,087 53,587

Other long term employee benefits Annual leave 17,407 9,825

Total other long term employee benefits 17,407 9,825

Total senior executive remuneration expenses 388,221 378,088

One Council member was remunerated for sitting on both the Council and the Audit Committee of ASPI for 2017.

8 of the 9 executives are part time Council members and the remaining member is the full time Executive Director of ASPI. Remuneration for both Council members and the Executive Director are subject to Remuneration Tribunal Determinations.

The total number of directors and senior management personnel that are included in the above table are 9. (2016: 7)

Key management personnel are those persons having authority and responsibility for planning, directing and controlling the activities of the entity, directly or indirectly. ASPI has determined the key management personnel to be its Council members and the Executive Director. Key management personnel remuneration is reported in the table below:

94    ASPI Annual Report 2016-2017    

Australian Strategic Policy Institute Ltd PEOPLE AND RELATIONSHIPS This section describes a range of employment and post

employment benefits provided to our people and our

relationships with other key people.

3.3 - Related Party Disclosures

ASPI is a Commonwealth Government wholly owned not for profit company. Related parties to this entity are ASPI's Council members and Executive Director.

Related party relationships

Refer to Note 3.1 Employee Provisions for details on superannuation arrangements with the Public Sector Superannuation Scheme (PSS) and the PSS accumulation plan (PSSap). A key management personnel was a Director of the Commonwealth Superannuation Corporation which is trustee to the PSS and PSSap superannuation schemes.

Transactions with related parties Given the breadth of Government activities, related parties may transact with the government sector in the same capacity as ordinary citizens. Such transactions include the payment or refund of taxes, receipt of a Medicare rebate or higher education loans. These transactions have not been separately disclosed in this note.

The following transactions with related parties occurred during the financial year:

ASPI received corporate sponsorship from Saab Australia Pty Ltd for an amount of $50,000 at which time a key management personnel was a Non Executive Director in the firm. There is no balance outstanding at year end.

ASPI transacts with other Australian Government controlled entities consistent with normal day-to-day business operations provided under normal terms and conditions, including the payment of workers compensation and insurance premiums. These are not considered individually significant to warrant separate disclosure as related party transactions.

   Financials    95

Australian Strategic Policy Institute Ltd MANAGING UNCERTAINTIES This section analyses how ASPI manages financial risks

within its operating environment.

4.1 Contingent Assets and Liabilities

ASPI had no contingent assets or contingent liabilities as at 30 June 2017.

Accounting policy

2017 2016

$ $

4.2 - Financial Instruments

4.2A - Categories of financial instruments

Financial assets Loans and receivables Cash at bank 2,867,473 2,134,548

Cash on hand 300 300

Receivables for goods and services 243,649 182,913

Total loans and receivables 3,111,422 2,317,761

Financial liabilities Financial liabilities measured at amortised cost Trade creditors 145,947 51,985

Accrued supplier expenses 112,300 124,495

Total financial liabilities measured at amortised cost 258,247 176,480

4.2B - Net gains or losses on financial assets

Loans and receivables Interest revenue 77,576 50,457

Net gains on loans and receivables 77,576 50,457

Net gains on financial assets 77,576 50,457

(As at 30 June 2016, ASPI was involved in a legal matter brought against the company and a staff member. The case was concluded during the year 2016-2017.)

Contingent liabilities are not recognised in the statement of financial position but are reported in the notes. They may arise from uncertainty as to the existence of a liability or represent a liability in respect of which the amount cannot be reliably measured. Contingent liabilities are disclosed when settlement is greater than remote.

There is no interest income from financial assets not at fair value through the Statement of Comprehensive Income for 2017 or 2016.

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Australian Strategic Policy Institute Ltd MANAGING UNCERTAINTIES This section analyses how ASPI manages financial risks

within its operating environment.

Accounting policy

Financial Assets

a) financial assets at fair value through profit and loss;

d) loans and receivables.

Impairment of Financial Assets

Financial liabilities are classified as other financial liabilities. Financial liabilities are recognised and derecognised upon trade date. Supplier and other payables are recognised at amortised cost. Liabilities are recognised to the extent that the goods or services have been received (and irrespective of having been invoiced).

ASPI classifies its financial assets in the following categories:

b) held to maturity investments;

c) available for sale financial assets; and

The classification depends on the nature and purpose of the financial assets and is determined at the time of initial recognition. Financial assets are recognised and derecognised upon trade date.

Financial assets held at cost - if there is objective evidence that an impairment loss has been incurred, the amount of the impairment loss is the difference between the carrying amount of the asset and the present value of the estimated future cash flows discounted at the current market rate for similar assets.

Financial Liabilities

Financial assets are assessed for impairment at the end of each reporting period.

   Financials    97

Australian Strategic Policy Institute Ltd MANAGING UNCERTAINTIES This section analyses how ASPI manages financial risks within its operating environment.

4.2C - Credit risk

Credit quality of financial assets not past due or individually determined as impaired

Not Past Due Nor Impaired 2017 $

Not Past Due Nor Impaired 2016 $

Past Due or Impaired 2017 $

Past Due or Impaired 2016 $

Cash at bank 2,867,473 2,134,548 - -

Cash on hand 300 300 - -

Trade and other receivables 199,033 135,170 44,616 58,934

Total 3,066,806 2,270,018 44,616 58,934

Ageing of financial assets that were past due but not impaired for 2016-2017

0 to 30 days $ 31 to 60 days $

61 t o 90 days $

90+ days $

Total $

Trade and other receivables 7,100 850 - 36,666 44,616

Total 7,100 850 - 36,666 44,616

Ageing of financial assets that were past due but not impaired for 2015-2016

0 to 30 days $ 31 to 60 days $

61 t o 90 days $

90+ days $

Total $

Trade and other receivables 26,885 - - 32,049 58,934

Total 26,885 - - 32,049 58,934

ASPI has some exposure to credit risk in respect to receivables for goods and services rendered. However, the majority of loans and receivables are cash. The maximum exposure to credit risk is the risk that arises from potential default of a debtor.

ASPI holds no collateral to mitigate against credit risk.

ASPI manages its credit risk by entering into contractual arrangements for supplies where the monetary consideration is significant, and through adoption of policy and procedures guiding debt recovery techniques.

This amount is equal to the total amount of receivables for goods and services (2016-17: $243,649 and 2015-16: $182,913). ASPI has assessed the risk of default on payment as nil.

98    ASPI Annual Report 2016-2017    

Australian Strategic Policy Institute Ltd MANAGING UNCERTAINTIES This section analyses how ASPI manages financial risks within its operating environment.

4.2D - Liquidity risk

ASPI has an interest bearing financial asset, being cash at bank. Cash at bank is subject to a floating interest rate. It is considered that the impact of changes in the market interest rate would have an immaterial effect on ASPI's profit and loss.

ASPI's financial liabilities consist only of payables.

It is highly unlikely that ASPI will encounter difficulty in meeting obligations associated with its financial liabilities as it is substantially funded under a funding agreement with the Department of Defence. ASPI supplements its funding with income from sales of goods and services. In addition, ASPI has adopted internal procedures to ensure there are appropriate resources to meet financial obligations and timely payments are made.

ASPI has no past experience of default.

ASPI's financial liabilities for 2017 are all payable within 1 year. ASPI's financial liabilities for 2016 were all payable within 1 year.

4.2E - Market risk

ASPI holds basic financial instruments that do not expose it to certain market risks. ASPI has very minor exposure to 'currency risk' or 'other price risk'. In addition, ASPI has no interest bearing financial liabilities.

   Financials    99

Annexes

Annex A

ASPI PUBLICATIONS

STRATEGIES

Improving on zero: Australia and India attempt strategic convergence Graeme Dobell

12 August 2016

From Hollywood to Bollywood? Recasting Australia’s Indo-Pacific   strategic geography Andrew Phillips

12 October 2016

America’s ‘Maginot Line’: a study of static border security in an age of agile and  innovative threats Steven Bucci and John Coyne

8 November 2016

Defence White Papers at 40 Peter Edwards

13 December 2016

After Mosul: Australia’s strategy to counter the Islamic State Ash Collingburn

20 December 2016

Dragon and eagle entangled: Sino-US military exchanges, 2001-2016 Jingdong Yuan

31 January 2017

Tiptoeing around the nine-dash line: Southeast Asia after ASEAN Peter Chalk and Amelia Long

28 February 2017

102    ASPI Annual Report 2016-2017    

STRATEGIC INSIGHTS

Assessing the South China Sea award Sam Bateman, Allan Behm, Anthony Bergin, Jay L Batongbacal, William Choong, Helen Clark,

Malcolm Davis, Peter Jennings, Amelia Long, Donald Rothwell and Feng Zhang

26 August 2016

AWD combat system: an upgrade for the Aegis James Mugg

14 September 2016

ASPI at 15 Kim Beazley, John Howard, Peter Jennings, Stephen Loosley, Robert O’Neill, Mark Thomson,

Elsina Wainwright and Hugh White

31 October 2016

Delivering ‘joined-up’ government: achieving the integrated approach to offshore  crisis management Alan Ryan

29 November 2016

France and security in the Asia-Pacific: from the end of the first Indochina conflict   to today Nicolas Regaud

12 December 2016

Trump and strategic change in Asia William T Tow

20 January 2017

The future of the Jakarta Centre for Law Enforcement Cooperation: Indonesia’s  chance to promote a new era of regional law enforcement cooperation John Coyne

21 February 2017

Women, peace and security: the way forward Elisabeth Buchan, Amanda Fielding, Jenny Lee et al.

29 March 2017

Upgrade or replace: a cost comparison of Australian warship service lives Alastair Cooper and James Mugg

13 April 2017

   Annexes    103

Border security lessons for Australia from Europe’s Schengen experience John Coyne

9 May 2017

SPECIAL REPORTS

Opportunities abound abroad: optimising our criminal intelligence system overseas Phil Kowalick and David Connery

7 July 2016

Australian border security and unmanned maritime vehicles James Mugg, Zoe Hawkins and John Coyne

13 July 2016

Deterrence in cyberspace: different domain, different rules Liam Nevill and Zoe Hawkins

27 July 2016

A shifting Asian nuclear order Rod Lyon

20 September 2016

Transnational crime in Sri Lanka: future considerations for international cooperation Mitchell Sutton and Serge DeSilva-Ranasinghe

10 October 2016

The wattle and the olive: a new chapter in Australia and Israel working together Anthony Bergin and Efraim Inbar

31 October 2016

For the right reasons, in the right ways (Part 1): a four-nation survey of information  sharing about organised crime David Connery

30 November 2016

Digital land power: the Australian Army’s cyber future Zoe Hawkins and Liam Nevill

21 December 2016

Detect, disrupt and deny: optimising Australia’s counterterrorism financing system Simon Norton and Paula Chadderton

23 December 2016

104    ASPI Annual Report 2016-2017    

The American face of ISIS: analysis of ISIS-related terrorism in the US, March 2014 -  August 2016 Robert Pape, Jean Decety, Keven Ruby, Alejandro Albanez Rivas, Jens Jessen and

Caroline Wegner

2 February 2017

The Sultanate of Women: exploring female roles in perpetrating and preventing  violent extremism Sofia Patel

13 February 2017

The Australia-US Cyber Security Dialogue Tobias Feakin, Liam Nevill and Zoe Hawkins

17 March 2017

Myanmar: a non-proliferation success story David Santoro

27 March 2017

Crowded and complex: the changing geopolitics of the South Pacific Joanne Wallis

24 April 2017

ASPI - KAS 2nd Australia-Europe Counter-Terrorism Dialogue, 3-4 November 2016,  Canberra Jacinta Carroll and Beatrice Gorawantschy

27 April 2017

The battle for hegemony in the Middle East Einat Wilf

22 May 2017

Fractured Europe: the Schengen Area and European border security Calum Jeffray

9 May 2017

ICPC

Cyber norms and the Australian private sector Jessica Woodall

23 November 2016

   Annexes    105

Policy brief—Cyber information sharing: lessons for Australia Liam Nevill

4 May 2017

Securing democracy in the Digital Age Zoe Hawkins

29 May 2017

Australia’s Cyber Security Strategy: execution and evolution Zoe Hawkins and Liam Nevill

31 May 2017

CT QUICK LOOKS

Bastille Day terrorist attack in Nice, 14 July 2016 Jacinta Carroll and Ashley Collingburn

31 August 2016

Terrorist attack in Minto, 10 September 2016 Jacinta Carroll

30 September 2016

New York and New Jersey terrorist attacks, 17 September 2016 Ashley Collingburn and Jacinta Carroll

30 September 2016

Counterterrorism action: Bankstown, 12 October 2016 Jacinta Carroll and Ash Collingburn

26 October 2016

Operation Marksburg and CT arrest in Young, 28 February 2017 Jacinta Carroll and Micah Batt

11 April 2017

Westminster attack, London, 22 March 2017 Jacinta Carroll and Micah Batt

1 June 2017

106    ASPI Annual Report 2016-2017    

ANNUALS

Cyber maturity in the Asia-Pacific region 2016 Tobias Feakin, Jessica Woodall, Liam Nevill and Zoe Hawkins

27 September 2016

Counterterrorism yearbook 2017 Edited by Jacinta Carroll

21 March 2017

The cost of Defence: ASPI Defence Budget brief 2017-2018 Mark Thomson

25 May 2017

DISCUSSION PAPERS

No ASPI discussion papers were produced in 2016-17.

THE STRATEGIST (ASPI’S BLOG)

961 posts by 237 individual authors.

July 2016-June 2017

   Annexes    107

Annex B

ARTICLES AND BOOK CHAPTERS BY ASPI STAFF

Peter Jennings

• ‘Perspective from Australia’, ASEAN Focus Magazine Special Issue on South China Sea

Arbitration; Responses and Implications, July 2016, 8:22

• ‘Strengthening America’s troubled Asian Alliances: an opinion from Australia’ in

Lindsay W Ford (ed.), in Advice for the 45th US President: opinions from across the Pacific

(38-41), Asia Society Policy Institute, December 2016

• ‘Prospects for the Australia Indonesia defence relationship’, in Tim Lindsey and Dave McRae

(eds), Strangers next door? Australia and Indonesia in the Asian century, forthcoming (2018)

Anthony Bergin

• ‘Australia-Japan and the Indian Ocean blue economy’, in David Brewster (ed.), Indo-Pacific

maritime security: challenges and cooperation (70-74), National Security College, Canberra,

July 2016

• ‘Correcting for market failure in terrorism insurance’, The Interpreter, 31 October 2016

• ‘Australia’s oceans strategy and the 2017 Foreign Affairs White Paper’, Australian Journal of

Maritime & Ocean Affairs, March 2017, 9:56-63

• ‘Health preparedness and Australian counterterrorism strategy’, Security Solutions Magazine,

May 2017

Tobias Feakin

• ‘Opportunities and pitfalls in the Asia-Pacific digital economy’, in Navigating the Digital Age:

the definitive cybersecurity guide for directors and officers—Australia (1-15), Forbes Insights,

September 2016

Andrew Davies

• ‘Australia’s naval shipbuilding plans: guided by strategy or industry?’, Australian Naval

Review, 2016, 1:39-52

108    ASPI Annual Report 2016-2017    

Andrew Davies and Christopher Cowan

• ‘Australia and Canada—different boats for different folks’, On Track (the journal of the

Conference of Defence Associations Institute, Canada), 42-46

Malcolm Davis

• ‘Space and the third offset in the post-post-Cold War period—lessons for Canada And

Australia’, On Track (the journal of the Conference of Defence Associations Institute, Canada),

47-53

Liam Nevill

• ‘Challenging opportunities for the Asia-Pacific’s digital economy’, in Cherian Samuel, Munish

Sharma (eds), Securing cyberspace: international and Asian perspectives, Institute for

Defence Studies and Analyses, New Delhi, 2016

Jacinta Carroll

• ‘Australia’s experience of Daesh-linked and directed extremism’, in Rohan Gunaratna,

Beatrice Gorawantschy, Megha Sarmah, Patrick Rueppel (eds) Countering Daesh

extremism—European and Asian responses, Konrad-Adenauer-Stiftung, 2016

David Lang

• ‘Australia, the TPP and US engagement in Asia-Pacific’, in Acuity (chartered accountants’

magazine), February 2017

John Coyne

• ‘Foreign bribery in ASEAN’ and ‘International foreign bribery enforcement and prosecution

cooperation in ASEAN’, chapters 4 and 12 in Association of South East Asian Nations’ (ASEAN)

foreign bribery handbook, UN Office on Drugs and Crime, 2017

   Annexes    109

Annex C

OPINION PIECES BY ASPI STAFF

July 2016

‘Australia’s role in ASEAN’s drug tsunami’, John Coyne, Australian Institute of International

Affairs online, 5 July 2016

‘Australia’s migration system needs to go through security’, John Coyne, The Huffington Post ,

5 July 2016

‘Australia must help fight the death penalty in Asia’, John Coyne, Crikey, 7 July 2016

‘The two national security threats that should be at the top of government’s to-do list’,

Anthony Bergin, Sydney Morning Herald, 8 July 2016

‘Chilcot Iraq Inquiry report is flawed but painfully necessary’, Peter Jennings, The Australian,

11 July 2016

‘South China Sea: no way to save face in hiding from The Hague’, Anthony Bergin,

The Australian, 14 July 2016

‘Might doesn’t make right in the South China Sea’, Peter Jennings, Herald Sun, 15 July 2016

‘Lessons we can learn in coping with a mass attack’, Anthony Bergin, The Australian, 18 July 2016

‘Latest terror attack points to a more sophisticated global threat’, Peter Jennings, The Australian,

18 July 2016

‘Desperate measures: what the Bastille Day attack tells us about IS’, Jacinta Carroll, ABC News

online, 18 July 2016

‘Middle East policy takes a dangerous wobble’, Jacinta Carroll, Sunday Telegraph, 18 July 2016

‘Ausgrid strategic risks must be tested’, Peter Jennings, Australian Financial Review, 21 July 2016

‘Speculation is rife that Vladimir Putin’s government is behind the cyber hacking’, Tobias Feakin

and Liam Nevill, Australian Financial Review, 29 July 2016

August 2016

‘After Istanbul, airport security and Islamist extremism will both grow’, Peter Jennings,

The Weekend Australian, 1 August 2016

110    ASPI Annual Report 2016-2017    

‘An increase in drug seizures doesn’t mean a decrease in drugs’, John Coyne, Huffington Post

Australia, 5 August 2016

‘A harder national security test needed for foreign investment’, Peter Jennings, The Weekend

Australian, 8 August 2016

‘We should “trust but verify” on China’s investment plans’, Paul Barnes, Australian Financial

Review, 10 August 2016

‘Terrorism: What do attacks in Europe Mean for Australia?’, Jacinta Carroll, Australian Institute

of International Affairs online, 19 August 2016

‘Charities, non-profits: how to cut the risk of terror financing’, Paula Chadderton and

Simon Norton, The Australian, 23 August 2016

‘Reset needed for Australia China relations’, Peter Jennings, The Australian, 23 August 2016

‘How Australia needs to adapt to face the inevitable disruptions heading our way’, Paul Barnes

and Anthony Bergin, Sydney Morning Herald, 25 August 2016

‘Going to war can’t wait for MPs’, Anthony Bergin, Australian Financial Review, 29 August 2016

September 2016

‘China’s soft power has a hard edge’, Peter Jennings, The Australian, 5 September 2016

‘One of us? Turnbull treads a delicate path at Pacific leaders forum’, Richard Herr and

Anthony Bergin, The Australian, 9 September 2016

‘Aussie businessmen want sub plans sunk’, Peter Jennings, 2GB Steve Price, 14 September 2016

‘Looking after little fish key to managing oceanic real estate’, Anthony Bergin, The Australian,

19 September 2016

‘Politics podcast: Peter Jennings on Turnbull’s trip to the US’, Peter Jennings, The Conversation,

19 September 2016

‘Domestic terror threats to remain after ISIS defeat’, Jacinta Carroll, The Wire, 28 September 2016

‘The Border Force strike is an unacceptable risk to airport security during the school holidays’,

John Coyne, Sydney Morning Herald, 28 September 2016

October 2016

‘Shaming Beijing over the Spratlys needs to be a green button issue’, Anthony Bergin,

The Australian, 6 October 2016

   Annexes    111

‘Border Force needs new powers to avoid border farce’, John Coyne, The Huffington Post ,

14 October 2016

‘Does Australia have a split personality when it comes to China?’, Peter Jennings, ABC Radio

National: Between the Lines, 21 October 2016

‘Muslim families can’t be expected to turn their backs on teens who have done the wrong

thing’, John Coyne and Lydia Shelly, The Age, 24 October 2016

‘Battle to reclaim Mosul from IS may have repercussions for years’, Jacinta Carroll, ABC The

World, 26 October 2016

‘With Duterte dealing with China, Australia should offer advisers’, Anthony Bergin and Malcolm

Davis, The Australian, 31 October 2016

November 2016

‘A potential mass migration nightmare on our doorstep’, John Coyne, The Huffington Post ,

1 November 2016

‘Muslim preacher Thorne denies being terror cell leader’, Jacinta Carroll, ABC 7:30,

9 November 2016

‘Election outcome should prompt alliance worries’, Peter Jennings, Sydney Morning Herald,

9 November 2016

‘Japan: stability in Abe’s office is crucial to regional security’, David Lang, The Australian,

10 November 2016

‘Donald Trump won’t be to blame for any increase in terror attacks’, Jacinta Carroll, Sydney

Morning Herald, 14 November 2016

‘Time to take America seriously if we want the alliance’, Peter Jennings, The Weekend Australian,

14 November 2016

‘Migration, crime and terrorism: correct figures but wrong message’, Jacinta Carroll, Sydney

Morning Herald, 23 November 2016

‘Close ports to Sea Shepherd or risk sharing guilt for its vigilantism’, Julia Jabour and

Anthony Bergin, The Australian, 23 November 2016

‘Jakarta: Rohingya’s last hope’, John Coyne, The Jakarta Post, 24 November 2016

‘Syria bombing report shows the limits of air power’, Peter Jennings, The Australian,

30 November 2016

112    ASPI Annual Report 2016-2017    

December 2016

‘Defence must regard climate change as a serious security issue’, Anthony Bergin,

The Australian, 2 December 2016

‘Weakness no option in this battle’, Peter Jennings, Herald Sun, 21 December 2016

January 2017

‘Trump’s F-35 tweets a worrying signal for West’s air defences’, Malcolm Davis, The Australian,

2 January 2017

‘A government that’s underwhelmed by disaster’, Anthony Bergin, Australian Financial Review,

12 January 2017

‘A chance to get closer to Japan in the Trump era’, David Lang, The Australian, 13 January 2017

‘After Turkey, Islamic State refocuses on global terror’, Peter Jennings, The Australian,

13 January 2017

‘More needed to stop terrorism financing’, Simon Norton and Paula Chadderton,

Sydney Morning Herald, 30 January 2017

‘Xenophobic migration bans won’t prevent terrorism In America’, John Coyne, The Huffington

Post, 31 January 2017

February 2017

‘Huge cocaine busts don’t affect drug supply. We need another way’, John Coyne, The Sydney

Morning Herald, 8 February 2017

‘Reassessing US refugee suspension’, Jacinta Carroll, Australian Institute of International Affairs,

Australian Outlook, 9 February 2017

‘Australia and Indonesia: Indispensable Partners in Counterterrorism’, Jacinta Carroll, IAPS

Dialogue, 17 February 2017

‘The tourism industry needs to meet the security industry half way’, John Coyne, Hurriyet Daily

News, 20 February 2017

‘Weakness is not an option in this struggle for our culture and society against terror attacks’,

Peter Jennings, Sydney Morning Herald, 20 February 2017

‘Benjamin Netanyahu’s visit is a chance for Australia to forge stronger ties with Israel’, Anthony

Bergin, Sydney Morning Herald, 21 February 2017

   Annexes    113

March 2017

‘Synergies at stake in better ties with Israel’, Anthony Bergin, The Australian, 3 March 2017

‘Regional relationships could secure US alliance’, Amelia Long, The Australian, 3 March 2017

‘London attack reaction showcases the best of the West’, John Coyne, The Daily Telegraph,

24 March 2017

‘Policymakers are focussing on drugs Australians aren’t taking’, John Coyne and Madeleine Nyst,

The Huffington Post (AU), 28 March 2017

‘Australia needs to toughen up on China relations’, Peter Jennings, The Weekend Australian,

28 March 2017

‘School deradicalisation programs should include study of different religions’, Anthony Bergin,

Sydney Morning Herald, 30 March 2017

April 2017

‘Listen to border on security’, John Coyne, El Paso Times, 10 April 2017

‘Time to overhaul the FIRB’, Peter Jennings, The Weekend Australian, 10 April 2017

‘No easy options over North Korea’, Peter Jennings, The Weekend Australian, 18 April 2017

‘North Korean aggression’, Peter Jennings, The Conversation, 26 April 2017

‘Citizenship test reinforces important Australian liberal democratic values’, Anthony Bergin,

Australian Financial Review, 26 April 2017

‘Veterans embodying Anzac spirit on daily basis’, John Coyne, The Daily Telegraph, 26 April 2017

114    ASPI Annual Report 2016-2017    

May 2017

‘An intrepid encounter for Trump and Turnbull’, Peter Jennings, Herald Sun, 1 May 2017

‘Lindt siege report could change the way our cops work’, John Coyne, Sydney Morning Herald,

22 May 2017

‘Are we ready? Healthcare preparedness and mass casualty events’, Anthony Bergin and

Paul Barnes, Policy Forum, 24 May 2017

‘Manchester terror attack and how to keep Australian public places safe from terror’,

Jacinta Carroll, Australian Financial Review, 25 May 2017

‘The delicate balance between security and inaction’, John Coyne, The Huffington Post ,

26 May 2017

‘Protecting crowded places from terror’, Anthony Bergin, APPS Policy Forum, 29 May 2017

‘Independent National Security Legislation Monitor submission’, Jacinta Carroll, Independent

National Security Monitor, 30 May 2017

June 2017

‘Twisted beliefs driving Islamist butchers’, Anthony Bergin, The Australian, 9 June 2017

‘Putting citizenship on the line in the war on terror’, John Coyne, The Huffington Post ,

9 June 2017

‘Terrorists are using encryption. Our laws need to keep up with the technology’, Jacinta Carroll,

Sydney Morning Herald, 13 June 2017

‘Protecting the UAE’s borders’, John Coyne, The National—UAE, 13 June 2017

‘Terror is a task for all our federated resources’, Anthony Bergin, Australian Financial Review,

14 June 2017

‘Medium, likely, probable: why we need to revamp our terror threat levels’, John Coyne,

The Huffington Post , 15 June 2017

   Annexes    115

Annex D

ASPI EVENTS

Conferences

No. Date Name of conference

1 22 November

2016

ASPI - Australian Army Hybrid Warfare Conference

2 6-8 June 2017 ASPI International Conference: Building the Joint and Integrated ADF

National security dinner

No. Date Guest Speaker

1 19 July Chief of Air Force

2 23 March The Hon Christopher Pyne MP

3 29 June Chief of Army

International strategic dialogues

No. Date Name of dialogue

1 26-30 September ICPC - Center for Strategic and International Studies Dialogue

2 24 October Australia - New Zealand Track 1.5 Dialogue

3 31 October-

1 November

ASPI - Begin-Sadat Center for Strategic Studies Beersheba

Dialogue

4 2-4 November ASPI - Konrad-Adenauer-Stiftung

5 28-29 November ASPI - Foreign Policy Community of Indonesia Lombok Dialogue

6 6-7 December ASPI - Stiftung Wissenschaft und Politik

7 12-13 December ASPI - China Institutes of Contemporary International Relations

Track 1.5 Dialogue

8 22-23 February ASPI - S. Rajaratnam School of International Studies Australia-

Singapore Dialogue

116    ASPI Annual Report 2016-2017    

No. Date Name of dialogue

9 22 March Australia-US-Japan Trilateral

10 27-28 March ASPI - China Institute for International Strategic Studies Track 1.5

Dialogue

11 27-28 March ASPI - Japan Institute of International Affairs Australia-Japan

Track 1.5 Dialogue

Roundtables

No. Date Name of event

1 18 July Bill Searcy, Vice President for Global Justice, Law Enforcement and

Border Security, Unisys

2 25 July US Congressional Staff Delegation

3 27 July Mr Tom Tugendhat MP

4 5 August Mr Andrew Scobell

5 15 August Raffaello Pantucci, Royal United Services Institute

6 16 August ANU Law of the Sea

7 17 August Dr Jeffrey Record

8 18 August Professor Teruhiko Fukushima

9 22 August Lt General Anthony Crutchfield

10 24 August South Sudan

11 25 August A practitioners insight into Iraq, 2015

12 30 August Resilience Roundtable

13 31 August Simon Henderson

14 20 September French Senate Commission of Foreign Affairs, Defence and

Armed Forces

15 21 September Assistant Secretary Frank Rose, US Department of State

16 27 September Mr Heath Fisher

17 7 October Dr Alexey Muraviev

18 7 November Lt General (Ret’d) Han Hong Jeon, President, Korea Institute for

Defence Analyses

   Annexes    117

No. Date Name of event

19 7 November Korean Institute for Unification Education

20 7 November H.E. Mr Ebrahim Rahimpour, Deputy Minister of Foreign Affairs of

Iran

21 8 November Lt Colonel David Garside

22 9 November Taiwan Military Delegation

23 15 November Mr Michal Kolodziejski

24 21 November Ambassador-designate to Tokyo, the Hon Richard Court

25 24 November Dr Philip Karber

26 29 November Institute for National Security Strategy, Republic of Korea

27 29 November China Institute of International Studies

28 9 December Joint Concepts Briefing

29 1 February Mr John Davis

30 9 February Major General Roger Noble

31 14 February General Sir Adrian Bradshaw KCB OBE

32 15 February Strategic Analysis Directorate (Anstra) of the Indonesian Ministry

of Defence

33 16 February French Parliamentarians Delegation

34 20 February Associate Professor Dr Kumar Ramakrishna

35 9 March Ambassador Martin Kimani

36 21 March United Arab Emirates National Defence College

37 21 March Major General Mitch Mitchell, Director of Development, Concepts

and Doctrine Centre, UK

38 21 March Mr RN Ravi

39 24 March Volkmar Klein, Konrad-Adenauer-Stiftung

40 30 March Regional Assistance Mission to Solomon Islands

41 4 April Party External Relations Commission, Vietnam

42 5 April APAC Country Risk Team, JP Morgan

43 11 April Dutch Defence Attaches

44 12 April North Korea Discussions

118    ASPI Annual Report 2016-2017    

No. Date Name of event

45 26 April Professor Ulf Sverdrup

46 8 May Pakistan Roundtable

47 11 May Global Voices Delegation

48 17 May Professor Valerie Hudson

49 1 June Mr Jean-Christophe Belliard

50 14 June Pacific Island Business Leaders

51 20 June Dr Farah Al-Siraj

52 20 June Human Rights Watch

53 21 June Mr Gerard Ho Wei Hong

54 26 June Drs Jim Przystup and Thomas X Hammes

55 28 June Admiral Harry Harris

Small group discussions

No. Date Name of event

1 3 August Leon E Panetta

2 10 August US Elections panel members

3 17 August ICPC Advisory Board

4 15 September The Hon Peter Dutton MP

5 12 October Sir Iain Lobban

6 10 November The Hon Dan Tehan MP

7 15 November Risk and Resilience with Insurance Panel Guests

8 9 March Chief of Navy

9 4 May Dr Mark Maybury

10 6 June International Conference

   Annexes    119

Public events - panel discussions / publication launches / program launches

No. Date Name of event

1 21 July A conversation with Roman Quaedvlieg APM, Australian Border

Force Commissioner

2 2 August A conversation with the Hon Margaret Stone, Inspector-General of

Intelligence and Security

3 4 August Women in Defence and Security Network (WDSN) Networking

4 10 August Panel discussion: US Election and Australian Consequences

5 15 September ASPI-Unisys public event with the Hon Peter Dutton MP

6 21 September Panel discussion: National Continuity Planning

7 28 September A conversation with Dr Nathalie Tocci

8 20 October WDSN panel discussion: Women, Peace and Security

9 10 November Publication launch: Cyber Maturity Index

10 15 November Panel discussion: Climate change and natural disasters

11 16 November Publication launch: Global Terrorism Index 2016

12 22 November Sydney panel discussion: Australia-US Relations in the era of

Donald Trump

13 13 December WDSN event: A conversation with Kathryn Campbell CSC

14 24 February Publication launch: Tallinn manual 2.0

15 21 March Publication launch: Counterterrorism yearbook 2017

16 22 March Panel Discussion: Japan-US-Australia trilateral relationship

17 30 March WDSN panel discussion: Women in the ADF

18 20 April A conversation with Senator Nick Xenophon

19 31 May Publication launch: Australia’s Cyber Security Strategy: execution

and evolution

20 15 June WDSN panel discussion: Freedom of speech in a fake news world

21 20 June Brisbane public event: Admiral Harry Harris, Commander of

PACOM

120    ASPI Annual Report 2016-2017    

Workshops, masterclasses and other

No. Date Name of workshop

1 14 July Chief of Army forum

2 14 July ASPI mentoring workshop

3 1 September ASPI-RMIT symposium: Jobs, growth and innovation in

Defence industry

4 26 October Risk and resilience seminar

5 2 November Defence strategic dialogue with the Hon Richard Marles MP

6 23 November Private sector view on Australia’s international cyber strategy

7 14 December ASPI - Department of Immigration and Border Protection

bi-annual meeting

8 15 December Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade White Paper 2017

seminar

9 8 February ASPI - National Institute for Defense Studies 2017 Defence

Exchange Program

10 15 March State of the Region masterclass

11 18 May Media masterclass

12 25 May Launch dinner: 2017-2018 Defence Budget Brief, The Cost

of Defence

   Annexes    121

Annex E

KEY ROLES AT INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCES

Staff member Conference

Peter Jennings Attended and chaired session at the Australian American Leadership

Dialogue (Honolulu)

Gave the keynote dinner address to the Australia/Israel and Jewish Affairs

Council - Institute of Security and International Studies conference on

‘Islamist movements and Middle East turmoil: lessons and implications for

Asia’ (Bangkok)

Led the Australian delegation to Berlin for the first Track 1.5 dialogue with

Stiftung Wissenschaft und Politik

Gave lecture at the Japan Institute of International Affairs (Tokyo) on

‘Australian security policy for the maintenance of the rules-based regional

order in the Indo-Pacific’

Andrew Davies Delivered a discussion paper on intelligence cooperation at the

Quadrilateral Dialogue at the Heritage Foundation (Washington DC)

Presented to Daily Telegraph Cyber Security Conference, Royal United

Services Institute and Polish think tanks (London and Warsaw)

Delivered the inaugural US-Australia Cyber Track 1.5 dialogue the Center

for Strategic and International Studies (Washington DC)

Zoe Hawkins Gave four lectures at the International Conference on Security in the

Indian Ocean (New Delhi and Chennai)

Anthony Bergin Presented at ‘Geopolitics of Cyber in Asia’ conference (Paris)

Liam Nevill Presented on the role of middle powers in international cyber policy

discussions at the Global Cyberspace Governance in the ICANN

Post-Transition Era Seminar (Shanghai)

Malcolm Davis Asia-Pacific Counter-Terrorism Financing Summit—presented to plenary

session on ASPI research into countering terrorism financing and the

progress of the summit’s Education and Training Working Group (Bali)

122    ASPI Annual Report 2016-2017    

Staff member Conference

Jacinta Carroll Presented on ‘Communication challenges in the time of hybrid conflicts’

as part of international panel at the 6th NATO-Asia-Pacific Dialogue,

‘Interconnected security—the Asia-Pacific and NATO’ (Tokyo)

Presented on Daesh extremism and radicalisation at the 1st Asia-Europe

Counter Terrorism Dialogue (Singapore)

Presented twice (on foreign bribery typologies and liability of legal

persons) at the ASEAN Foreign Bribery Conference (Bangkok)

John Coyne Gave an address at the Intelligence sharing against foreign bribery and

corruption, liability of legal persons, International Business Integrity

Conference (Jakarta)

Gave an address on ‘Public sector cooperation in security’ at the World

Tourism Forum (Istanbul)

Gave 2 addresses at the Migrant Smuggling Symposium and Law

Enforcement Security Symposium (El Paso) on people smuggling and law

enforcement cooperation.

   Annexes    123

Annex F

ACHIEVING ASPI’S PURPOSES

This table outlines how ASPI worked in 2016-17 to achieve our purposes, as listed in the

corporate plan. It provides either specific information or references to the relevant chapter of

the annual report.

Purpose How do we 

measure 

achievement?

What we achieved in 2016-17

Conduct and

publish research

The number and

type of publications

and blog posts

produced by ASPI,

together with

examples of how

the publications

have contributed to

the national debate

Over six series of publications, 48 publications

were produced. There were 961 blog posts

on The Strategist from 237 individual authors.

Information about the contribution to the

national debate of some of ASPI’s publications

is in Chapter 3 of this report.

Provide an

alternative source

of strategic policy

ideas and advice

Participation

in government

advisory

committees and

expert panels

ASPI staff have been invited to participate in

four government advisory committees and

expert panels.

Submissions to

parliamentary

inquiries

ASPI provided nine submissions to

parliamentary inquiries. A list of the

submissions is in Chapter 1.

124    ASPI Annual Report 2016-2017    

Purpose How do we 

measure 

achievement?

What we achieved in 2016-17

Stimulate public

discussion

Number and range

of ASPI public

events

ASPI conducted 114 events during 2016-2017.

A list of the events is in Chapter 4.

Published opinion

pieces

Eighty-four opinion pieces written by ASPI staff

were published.

Examples of

media coverage

contributing to the

national debate

Examples of media commentary are in

Chapter 3.

Website, blog and

social media usage

Information and graphs of social media usage

are in Chapter 1.

Promote

international

understanding

Ranking in

University of

Pennsylvania’s

Global Go To Think

Tank Index

Information about ASPI’s ranking in the

University of Pennsylvania’s Global Go To Think

Tank Index is in Chapter 1.

Invitations to speak

at international

conferences

ASPI staff attended more than 20 international

conferences as speakers. See Annex E for more

details.

Links with overseas

think tanks

Information about ASPI’s links to other think

tanks is in Chapter 1.

International

Visiting Fellowships

ASPI hosted one international, five seconded

and six appointed Visiting Fellows.

Participation in

and hosting of

international

dialogues.

ASPI hosted 11 Track 1.5 and Track 2 dialogues,

and staff attended 11 dialogues. A list of the

dialogues is in Chapter 1.

   Annexes    125

Purpose How do we 

measure 

achievement?

What we achieved in 2016-17

Develop expertise Number of interns

whom ASPI

supports

ASPI has an internship program that engages

four interns on a six-monthly rotation.

Published pieces by

interns

Examples of reports, publications and blogs

with sole and co-authorship by interns in

2016-17 include:

Publication—Women, peace and security: the

way forward

Strategist post—‘The month in Women, Peace

and Security’ (first of ongoing monthly series)

Weekly wraps—Air, Land, Sea and Space.

Participants in

ASPI—Education

courses

ASPI conducted 53 courses. A detailed list is in

Chapter 2.

126    ASPI Annual Report 2016-2017    

Annex G

INDEX OF ANNUAL REPORT REQUIREMENTS

This index is included to meet the requirements of s 28E of the Public Governance, Performance

and Accountability Rule 2014.

Content Location in 

the Rule

Location in 

this report

ASPI’s purposes s 28E(a) Chapter 1

Responsible minister s 28E(b) Chapter 1

Ministerial directions and government policy orders s 28E(c) - (e) Not applicable

Information about directors s 28E(f) Chapter 5

Organisational structure s 28E(g) Chapter 1

Location of organisation s 28E(h) Chapter 1

Corporate governance s 28E(i) Chapter 5

Related entity transactions s 28E(j) - (k) Not applicable

Significant activities and changes affecting the company s 28E(l) Not applicable

Judicial decisions and decisions by administrative tribunals s 28E(m) Not applicable

Reports by the Auditor-General, parliament,

Commonwealth Ombudsman, Australian Information

Commissioner or Australian Securities and Investments

Commission

s 28E(n) Not applicable

Information from subsidiaries s 28E(o) Not applicable

Index identifying of requirements of Section 28E s 28E(p) Annex G

* The audited financial statements have been prepared in accordance with the requirements

under the Corporations Act 2001 - refer to Chapter 6.

   Annexes    127

Annex H

ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS

ADF Australian Defence Force

APS Australian Public Service

ASEAN Association of Southeast Asian Nations

AWD air warfare destroyer

CIA Central Intelligence Agency

CTPC Counter-Terrorism Policy Centre

EL Executive Level

ICPC International Cyber Policy Centre

JCLEC Jakarta Centre for Law Enforcement Cooperation

NATO North Atlantic Treaty Organization

QFES Queensland Fire and Emergency Services

RAAF Royal Australian Air Force

RAN Royal Australian Navy

UN United Nations

WDSN Women in Defence and Security Network

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   Annexes    129

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130    ASPI Annual Report 2016-2017    

Some recent ASPI events