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Settler arrivals figures for 1995-96



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M - e d i a R e l e a s eThe Hon. Philip Ruddock MR Parliament House, Canberra ACT 2600M n ite r for !m r ig ru l or and Multicultural Affairs. Telephone. (0(5) 277 7860 Facsimile. (06; 273 4144iv.P8 6 4 'S 6 CSETTLER ARRIVALS FIGURES FOR 1995-96Settler arrivals figures released today provide further support for the Government's moves to restore balance to the migration program, the Minister for Immigration and Multicultural Affairs, Philip Ruddock announced today.Mr Ruddock seid the Department of Immigration and Multicultural Affairs' report Immigration Update, June Quarter 1996, showed that in 1995-96, a total of 99,139 new settlers arrived ir Australia - the largest intake of migrants since 1991-92, and 13.4 per cent more than in 1994-95."The Government has announced a smaller migration program for 96-97, however, we must remember that this trend will continue for another six to nine months before the new prog 'am begins to affect settler arrival figures," Mr Ruddock saidBy c o u n ty of birth, the major source countries were New Zealand (12.4 per cent), United Kingdom (11.4 per cent) and China (11,3 per cent)."Arrival:-: under the Family Migration Category increased by more than a quarter to be 46.9 per cent of the tola·, while arrivals under the Skill Category decreased proportionately to 20 2 per cent," Mr Ruddock said."The Coalition hits sought to redress the Imbalance created by the previous Government by increases in ihe number of skilled migrants in the Independent and business skills categores.""We recognise an improved focus on skills, including in parts of the family stream, will help ensure more of our migrants can contribute to and share in Australia's growth."Mr Ruddock said arrivals under ihe Humanitarian Program increased by 1.4 per cent to 12,824 ::r 13 9 per cent of the total. Two thirds of arrivals under the Humanitarian Program were from Former Yugoslavia and the Middle East which remain priority areas for 1998-37. '"In terms of increases to the populut:on, the net permanent gain for 1995-96 was 70.469, because there were 28,670 permanent departures In 1995-96.This compares with a net permanent gain of 60,480 for 1994-95," Mr Ruddock said. ! Ii\\1!tiii2.2 S e p te m b e r 1996MEDIA CONTACT Steve Ingram 0419 278 715 (06)277 7860o

Main Features:

' 1

Sc tiler Arrivals

L't the 1995-96 financial year:

L.l In Total

• Tlit' number of senior arrivals was 99.139, a 13.4 pe:· cent increase over the same period in 1994-95.

LI By Eligibility Cate gory • There wet e 66,973 arrivals under the Migration (non-Hurtanitarian) Ihogram an increase, of 16.0 per rent over the previous year with the:

major increase bring in the Family category (+2 5.3 pn cent).

• Arrival"; under the. Humanitarian Program toL-illed 13,324 an increase of 1,4 per cent over the previous year.

• Non-Pro $ am Migration categories, comprising mainly New Zealand Citizens, Increased by 14.1 per cent to IS,338.

LI By Occup ition

« 43.0 pet c ent of fill senior arrivals reported an occupatio i prior to their a rrm l in Australia while 47.3 per cent were not in the labour force arid 6.7 pt r cent were not in employment.

• The major occupation groups of settler

arrivals t ho reported an occupation prior to arrival were Professionals (32.7 per cent), Tradespei sons (1.6.0 per cent) and Managers and Administrators (13 9 per cent)

Cl By Region'Country of Birth « On a regional basis, Europe & the Former USSR (26.7 per cent) was the largest

contributor followed by Northeast Asia (18.8 per cent),. Oceania (16.4 per cent) and Southeast Asia (13.3 per cent).

* The largest increases occurred in Northeast Asia (+88.6 per cent) which was due primarily to a 203.3 per cent increase in the number of China-bom), Oceania (+19.4 per cent) and

Africa (excluding North Africa) (+12.1 per cent). Southeast Asia (-11.5 per cent) was the only region to record a significant decrease in arrivals over the previous year.

« New Zealand (12.4 per cent) was the largest single birthplace group followed by the United Kingdom (11.4 per cent) and China (11.3 per cent).

U By State or Territory of Intended Residence

* New South Wales remained the most popular State for settler Arrivals with 44.7 per cent intending to settle there, up from 43.5 per cent in 1994-95.

* New South Wales and Queensland were the only two States to record an increase in their share of settlers when compared with the previous year.

S E T T L E R A R R IV A L S BY E L IG IB IL IT Y C A TEG O R Y AND R E G IO N O F BIRTH Financial Year 1995-90 Pci Ccal

Os -aaia Europe Si Soviheai.t

lh

USSR

N orCn.iit Asia

i n i l e z a

Sc'yihcrn Asia

Northern, The

South, MidtfU

Centra! East and

Americ.i A fried

B All Othci

— Humanitarian

3 Sb!I H Family

Research and Statistics Branch · DMA

- 2

* Permanent D£[iartuire>

[n he financial y a r 1995 96· C.l In Total

• The nurct er of permanent departures was 2S.670, ajt irureasc of 6.4 per cent over 1994-95.

C .l By Cour.oy • 38.4 per C

• Of the 17 ,665 p-enilanent departures who were bom overseas, 34.4 per cent were bo.m in New 2ea’and ail 1 20.4 per cent were from the United Bun» d o rr.

• The main countries of intended residence were Nev, Zealand (34.2 per cent), the United Kingdom (18.2 per cent), the United States of America (8.2 per cent.) and Hong Xor.g (5 5 pe r cent).

Net P erm anent 'Crain

Ln '.lie financial year 1995 96:

□ In Total

• Australia's net permanent gain was 70.469 an increase of " 6.5 per cent over 1994-95.

C.) By Country of Birth

• The top source regions were Europe & the Former USSR (28.9 per cent). Northeast Asia (23.7 pier cent) and Southeast Asia (17.2 per cent).

• The top three source countries w'ere China (14.9 per cent), the United Kingdom (10 9 per cent) and New Zealand (8.8 per cent).

PERMANENT ARRIVALS AND DEPARTURES BY REGION OF BIRTH Financial Year 1995-96

Peri D i; (Ό00)

.to

Perm anent A rrivals

O c e a n i a E u r o p e

Thf. F o r m e r U S S R A s i a M i A s i a £ a sl L /A 'tvifica A j n e r i d , ( c x e l .

N c r th C e n tra l N o r t h

A t r i a A m e ric a & A f r i c a ;

t h e C a r i b b e a n

(flu dgrati.in Vpd5l6 I i. e Quliter ' 995

9

1.4. S i-t t l e r A r riv als by E l ig ib il it y Ca teg o r y FinancialI Year______________

ELI GIB!] ΓΓΥ CATEGORY! a) 1993-94 1994-95 1995-96

N o . 91. N o , % N o . %

1 F A M l ' . Y

- P re re u n c i a l

S p o i l t CS & F i a n c e e s 1 8 , 0 9 - i 5 . i l 2 1 ,0 1 2 2 4 .1 2 6 ,7 3 2 2 7 . 0

P a it m iS 3 ,8 6 0 5 5 4 , 3 8 0 5 .0 7 ,2 6 8 7 .3

O l l i e r 3 „ 5 l 9 .5.0 3 ,7 1 8 4 3 4 ,3 5 5 4 . 4

- C o r c e s s i o n a l 8 ,1 0 7 1 1 .6 7 , 9 3 8 9.1 8 ,1 0 3 8 .2

T o t a l 3 3 , 5 3 0 4 8 . 1 3 7 , 0 7 8 4 2 . 4 4 6 , 4 5 8 4 6 . 9

2 . S K I L L

- E m p l o y e r N o m i n a t i o n S c h e m e 1 , 7 9 0 2 .6 1 ,9 3 9 2 2 2 ,5 1 3 2 3

- B u t i i n e s s S t a lls 1 ,7 7 0 2 -5 2 ,0 8 7 2 . 4 4 ,2 7 0 4 .3

• D i s c i n g j i s h e d T a l e n t s 6 3 0 .1 7 8 0 .1 9 4 0 .1

- I n d t ip i n d e n t 9 ,1 7 1 13.1 1 6 ,1 0 6 1 8 .4 1 3 ,1 3 1 1 3 .2

T o t a l 1 2 , 7 9 4 1 8 . 3 2 0 , 2 1 0 2 3 . 1 2 0 , 0 0 8 2 0 . 2

3 . s p e c i a l e l i g i b i l i t y 3 4 9 0 . 5 4 3 4 0 . 5 5 1 1 0 . 5

T O T A L M I G R A T I O N P R O G R A M ( 1 - 3 1 4 0 , 7 2 3 6 7 . 0 5 7 , 7 2 2 6 6 , 0 6 6 , 9 7 7 6 7 . 6

4 . H U N L V U T A M K N P R O G R A M

■ R c f ln j e t ; 3 ,8 4 5 5 J 4 ,0 0 6 4 . 6 4 , 0 6 0 4.1

■ S p c :; eil H u m a n it a r ia n 27 5 6 3 3 .7 3 /7 7 4 4 .3 3 ,6 1 7 3 .6

- Sp<>: i l A s s i s t a n c e 4 ,9 4 2 7 .: 5 ,8 5 2 6 .7 6 ,1 4 7 6 2

T o t a l 1 1 , 3 5 0 1 6 3 1 3 , 6 3 2 1 5 . 6 1 3 , 8 2 4 7 3 . 9

5 N O N - P R O G R A M M I G R A T I O N

■ N e w Z e a la n d C i t i z e n s 9 , 6 1 6 1 3 .8 1 3 ,6 1 8 1 5 .6 1 6 ,2 3 4 1 6 .4

- O t h e r 2 ,0 7 9 3 .0 2 ,4 5 6 2 .8 2 ,1 0 4 2 .1

T o t a l 1 1 , 6 9 5 1 6 8 1 6 , 0 7 4 1 8 . 4 1 8 , 3 3 8 1 8 . 5

I O T A ] . 6 9 , 7 ( 5 8 1 0 0 . 0 8 7 , 4 2 8 1 0 0 . 0 9 9 , 1 3 9 1 U 0 .0

(:i tM 4>| Usatory Notes

T

Rese.veh and Statistics Branch · D tSiA