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Presentation of the trophy to the winning A.C.T school in the Australian War Memorial's Anzac Day competition, Canberra, Thursday, 6 August 1998: address on the occasion.



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ADDRESS BY SIR WILLIAM DEANE

GOVERNOR-GENERAL OF THE COMMONWEALTH OF AUSTRALIA

ON THE OCCASION OF THE PRESENTATION OF THE TROPHY TO THE

WINNING A.C.T. SCHOOL IN THE AUSTRALIAN WAR MEMORIAL’S ANZAC

DAY COMPETITION

CANBERRA

THURSDAY, 6 AUGUST 1998

It is a delight for Helen and me to be here today for the presentation of the ACT “Anzac Day Schools Trophy” on this the 83rd Anniversary of the Battle of Lone Pine.

On 11 November this year, it will be 80 years since the end of the First World War. With the passage of time, the great battles of that War such as Lone Pine - and, even the battles of the Second World War such as Tobruk and Kokoda - are fast becoming events with which few living Australians had direct contact. Indeed, even the grandparents of most of the girls from Canberra Girls Grammar School here today would not have been bom when the First World War came to an end. Nonetheless, the battles, the suffering and the losses of that first Great War in which our country was engaged remain of profound significance to us all.

The Australian War Memorial Foundation’s Anzac Day Schools Program is a marvellous way to build links between young Australians and those events of our nation’s military history. Through the program, young Australians work to raise funds for our national War Memorial which is our national monument to all who died in those past wars and which embodies our national covenant to the cause of peace.

The Memorial itself is a unique national achievement. The stories which it tells - of momentous events and courageous men and women - demonstrate the heights, in peace as well as war, that we can attain as a people. The horror, the loss and the carnage and the unlived and unfulfilled lives of young men and young women which it records reminds us of both the awfulness of war and our national commitment to peace. Most important of all

is the fact that the Memorial’s Hall of Memory, with its tomb of an unknown Australian soldier brought back from a foreign battle field where he died, represents the true heart of our nation.

It is of great importance that the link between the Memorial and young Australians be fostered and strengthened. The pupils from some 330 schools across our country who

have worked to raise funds for the Memorial have all significantly contributed to a strengthening of those links. I congratulate and than them all.

In particular, we are gathered here today to award the ACT Anzac Day Schools Trophy to the Junior School of Canberra Church of England Girls Grammar School. I warmly congratulate Mrs Fraser, the Head of the Junior School, and all her teaching staff for organising the school’s efforts in support of the Memorial. Most of all, I congratulate and thank all you girls who have worked so hard to raise funds for the Memorial. You have brought great distinction upon your school by your efforts. Well done.

And now, with great pleasure, I present the Anzac Day Schools Trophy for the ACT to Canberra Church of England Girls Grammar Junior School.