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Prime Minister's visit to Japan and China



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ΟM E W S R E L E A S ENQΜ/1 64 D A V E 7 November 1 973 PRIME MIKI-HTER1S VISIT TO JAPAN AND CHINA

Attached is the text of a statement

to the House of Representatives by the

Prime' Minister, Mr.' Y/hitlam,' on Wednesday,

7 November, 1973, concerning his visit to

Japan and China. ■

1

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ΓΛΤΕΜΕΜ? TO. THE HOUSE O P ; - .^.ESENTATIVES BY THE PRIME MINISTER"';;"·

MR. E.G. VmiTLhU, Q . C -..L M.P IvEDNRSRAY 7 . lij_7 3_

VISIT TO .Tr'jY'·^7 ^':D ΟΗΙΙιλ

I seek leave to make <· brief statement on the. visit by ...

srt.ain O f my Ministerial co /.leagues _ and me uo* Japan and C h i n a . ■

The Ministerial .delegct'-2-on v° Japan > f°-L t-ne .second

:straiia-Japan Ministerial <’ onunittee,.· was ι-he largest and

>st senior ever to represenf· Australia ab.·.oad. My visit to

:kinc was- the first bv any / ustralian Prime Minister Both

sits were marked by great on 0 0 ch s i d e s ; .both, visits

:re characterised by franknoh5 -and firmness -t-rom both sides;

•th visits notably advanced bhe inheresvs 01 Ausx.r«.lia and ■

r friendship and understand.··1^ with' these two 9reat neighbours, .

pan and' China. ■ " . ' . · . . .

On the visit to Japan - λ 1 °·Î· ^^ October to j! O^ucoei -

was accompcinied by the M i n i h

e Minister for Primary I n d u y trY and the Minister for Minerals and.

21-gy. On the visit to Chin^ “ from 31 October to 4 November - .·

•/as accompanied by the Trea ' - irer and vbe Minister for Nor i.nern .

zelopment. In both ■ countris s mY colleagues and I were supported

senior officials, . ' · · ■ · '

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I firmly believe that t;-': vlslu vill ptove uo ta or

'sidorable importance and vn , UG " u° tbe whole o*. Ausu. alia,

•h Jap a n , we have both broad/-neu and. 11101 e c.Learlv d m i n w i

A u s t r a 1 i a n - Ja p3 r.vise r e l a t :■ 'n pb 10 a n a - 01 m^d* a h X j - n y ~s

continuing and future devc · °Pi1ftenu Î¥ θα1·0 a h e a d , .

. 0 :

In C h i n a ! consider that - 0/ visit symbolised the successful

lag of a generation of lost convict. bcuseun Aust.id3 1..1 a».... l: : . . . . ·

- - populous nation on earth. · '

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. !

■ Japan is our major .tr.adinQ - partner in the world and China. ' ■ .

is the only one of the world's five major powers with w h i c h , · , · . .

until last December, we have not had any meaningful or regular . .

o f f i c i a l ' contact. . · . · . . · . ■ ; , '

· v . . · ' · * . . ‘ ' · · · ' - . '

.In Japan, the talks with Prime .Minister Tanaka and Foreign-

Minister Ohira, and the wide-ranging and very- frank and '····' . · ·

substantial discussions at the Ministerial Committee Meeting., '

have broadened the Australian-Japanese understanding which is Vital

• to both countries. ' ' - ’ · ' ’. · '

. I believe that any misunderstanding that existed in Japan

about the nature of the Government's policies on minerals and'· '

energy- and on overseas investment' have now been cleared away.'- . '

•Likewise, any uncertainties the Japanese may have felt about the. ·

reliability of Australia as a long-term supplier of the raw materials

which are essential to Japan has also been dispe.13.ed. · · '

: In J a p a n , too, I believe that va3.xiab.le understandings have

been reached about the long-term access for Australian primary ' '

products to the important and growing Japanese m a r k e t . ' - " '

. The exceptionally close and important relations between

Japan and Australia are to be expressed in a broad bilateral

treaty. Mr. Tanaka .readily accepted my suggestion, and- himself

announced that the Treaty be called the Treaty of Kara - bearing -

the title of Japan's ancient capital, which -1 also visited. :

It will be identified as the Nippon - Av s hr a .ia Relations Agreement

KARA. Australian and Japanese officials, will very soon begin

detailed discussion on the Agreement. · ' ."- - . '

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. . I believe the Treaty of Kara will -be seen as- one' of the

historic' treaties which Australia.will have entered into.

- 3 - ,

H o n o u r a b l e m e m b e r s w i l l n o t e t h a t we h a v e a l s o a g r e e d to

e n t e r i n t o t w o f u r t h e r a g r e e m e n t s w i t h J a p a n - a C u l t u r a l

A g r e e m e n t a n d a n a g r e e m e n t o n t h e p r o t e c t i o n of m i g r a t o r y a n d ' .

o t h e r b i r d s - a s w e l l as' t o c o n d u c t w i d e - r a n g i n g o f f i c i a l d i s c u s s i o n s

or: a n u m b e r o f i s s u e s i n c l u d i n g a c c e s s f o r a g r i c u l t u r a l p r o d u c t s ,

t a r i f f s , a n d - m i n e r a l s a n d e n e r g y m a t t e r s , i n c l u d i n g u r a n i u m .· ' . ■

Via h a v e a l s o a g r e e d to r e n e w t h e .Agreement o n C om m er c e' w i t h J a p a n , ·

w h i c h w a s last' r e v i s e d i-n 1963. There, w a s a u s e f u l e x c h a n g e o f '

v i e w s o n d e v e l o p m e n t s i n P a p u a N e w G u i n e a in w h i c h t h a t c o u n t r y ' s

l-iinister f o r D e f e n c e a n d F o r e i g n R e l a t i o n s , Mr. M a o r i K i k i ,

p a r t i c i p a t e d . ·

" I b e l i e v e m y v i s i t to C h i n a w a s m o s t v a l u a b l e in r e s t o r i n g :

’ ■ . ■ · · . . i

b a l a n c e t o o u r f o r e i g n p o l i c y a n d i n d i v e r s i f y i n g o u r f o r e i g n . i

r e l a t i o n s . I h a d n o l es s t h a n 11 h o u r s o f . f o r m a l t a l k s w i t h P r e m i e r f

. . · · · ■

C h o u E n - l a i a n d o v e r an h o u r w i t h C h a i r m a n M a o T s e t u n g . As ■ |

H o n o u r a b l e m e m b e r s will, a p p r e c i a t e , i n t h e e x t e n s i v e t i m e a c c o r d e d · j

to me by Premier Chou the discussions extended over a very wide . i

r a n g e of international issues of interest to· both countries. · l

I believe that we now have a much greater understanding

cf Chinese attitudes on these issues. ' . Ϊ believe, too, that on the

Chin e s e side, there is now a much clearer and first-hand understanding

r-f our policies. While there were areas of agreement, there were -a l s o issues on which our policies differed and, in such cases, 1 - ■

d i d net hesitate to put our position fully.and frankly to my Chinese : :

hoses. For example, I reaffirmed .at the highest level the Australian \

G o v e r n m e n t 's determined opposition to nuclear testing in the j

a o m e s p h e r e . Our differences on these and other matters were

d i s c u s s e d on a basis'of mutual respect. : .

Ϊ believe that the warmth, of the reception I and my party

received in Peking demonstrates that China, like Japan recognises,

to a greater extent than some Australians m a y 'believe, the growing

importance of Australia as s middle -power, especially in the. A · · ?..:·a

a m i Pacific region. · · I . . ' -

' · .As Honourable Members will k n o w , important and valuable ·

arrangcmonto were made for the sale to China of up .to 30C-, CGG

tons of sugar per year for a three to five year period - commenclr.c·

in 1975. . ' · " ; ; . i ■ ' · . '

Arrangements were also made for the active promotion of

closer consultations between Australian and Chinese officials .

and for a program of visits in both directions. The Australian

and Chinese Foreign Ministers ax~e to exchange visits at times ■

' to be determined in 1974. It was also"agreed .that we should develc

a planned program of cultural, scientific, and technological

•exchanges between Australia and China, and that representative

missions in these fields would be exchanged in 1974. .

■ Honourable Members will be pleased to know- that an' '

understanding in principle was reached between the -two-sides " . ·

on travel from China to Australia by relatives of Australian

citizens"of Chinese descent and Chinese citizens residing in .

Australia. This should facilitate family reunions. .

. ' I believe that ray visit will give new direction and '

increased momentum to our existing relationship with Japan and

will lead to the development of a more meaningful relationship ·

ana a continuing dialogue with China which, for so long, - for ·

much too long - has been a closed book to this country.

I would like to pay tribute in the Parliament to the tireless

efforts of the Australian Embassies in Tokyo and Poking during ov:.

visit. The ambassadors a n d 'their staffs performed, under .

considerable pressure, in a · manner of which Australia s h o u l d ·be

proud. 1 would also like to record here my appreciation of tun­

objective anti constructive advice tendered to my ministers ana me

by the senior officials who accompanied' us from A u s t r a l i a . · .

. . I table the Communique- issued in Tokyo after my v i e v no

Japan as Prime - M i n i s t e r , the Joint Communique adopted by ‘

Australia-Japan Finis tori a 1 Committee, my " sf at ewouu to tea " · '

Cornu.u tea set':.!::.: out the G overnment 1 s p o l i c y on foreign - :.w. '·-· - ·

;!.n Australia, and the Joint" Press Communique . issued in.Po-tng on .

1 bov-Aibcr. " . . " · ■ ■