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Statement on Korea



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M/102

STATEMENT ON KOREA

D A T E

24 June 1973

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■ 'The Prime Minister and Minister for Foreign Affairs,

Mr Whit lam, has welcomed the important foreign policy cha.nges

announced yesterday by President Park Cliung-Hee of the Republic,

of Korea,

The Prime Minister said today that the Australian

Government shared President Park:* s viev.r U'at in oresent conditions

the peaceful reunification of Korea must be a long-range objective

■ In the meantime,. we bad to face the reality of two

governments in the Korean peninsula with very different economic

structures and social systems. . . ·

• Australia believed that the international community

could best contribute to peaceful co-existence and eventual

•reconciliation between North and South by accepting the reality

of two governments, admitting them to international organisations

ana cooperating with them on the widest possible basis* · ·

. Mr Whit lain particularly welcomed President Park's

announcement that his Government would not oppose North

Korea's participation in international organisations and that

it had no objection to the entry into the United Nations of

both the DPRK and the ROIC. ·

This constructive gesture reflected the realities of

the present and would, in Australia's view, contribute to the

achievement of a lasting peace on the Korean peninsula by

removing some of the bitterness which had for- so long .

characterised relations between the ROIC and the .DPRl'C, · ' · I

Australia stood ready, Mr Whitlam said, to support the

entry of both governments to the United Nations, if that

was their wish. Australia also favoured participation by

North Korea in any General Assembly debates about Korea

prior to membership. .

The Prime Minister referred to the President's

stated intention to continue the dialogue with North Korea

and said that the unification talks, although likely to be

slow in producing results, would stand a better chance of

success if the international community·cooperated with both

governments in creating an atmosphere that was conducive to 7j

fruitful negotiation. The President had spoken of South !

Korean willingness to enter into relations with countries

with different ideologies. Mr Whitlam hoped that the DPRK

and its friends would respond to this initiative

constructively. · . '