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Excerpt of Speech Delivered by Ian Sinclair



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EXCERPT OF SPEECH DELIVERED BY THE R T . HON. IAN SINCLAIR, MP ,

AT THE BRADFIELD FORUM, KILLARA GOLF C L U B , S Y D N E Y , 1.00 P.M.,

FRIDAY, 27 FEBRUARY, 1981

The situation is arising where serious consideration must be

given for all the normal private sector "hire and fire" .

provisions to be applied to those failing to provide the

public services for which they are e m ployed.

All those who have the protection of Public Service type

employment conditions must realise they risk losing all their

special job protection and employment conditions if they

engage in irresponsible strike activities.

In the present Qantas strike and in the recent radar technicians

strike we have been witness to small groups of well paid

specialists creating major disruptions to a basic public service

Both groups deny the public even a basic provision of any

service at all by labelling all those who might help out in

a situation as "scabs". .

In the stewards dispute this has been backed up by the supposed

might of the A.C.T.U.

The provision of "staff" labour to maintain essential services

has become an issue to which all employers in the public

sector must now face up to in the same way in which the private

sector and the semi-government areas took on this issue in

years gone by.

A few "staff" radar technicians could have greatly diminished

the inconvenience to the public during that strike which lasted

a total of six weeks.

Qantas has laudably taken on the stewards and the A.C.T.U. by

maintaining services with "staff" employees.

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Even the militant power worker . unions in N.S.W. and Victoria

accept the fact that staff officers maintain power supplies

during strikes. .

In the private sector newspapers are produced by staff and

certain essential work in oil refineries is continued by

staff during strikes. .

If similar provisions are. not accepted by all the union

leaders whose members work in providing services to the

p u b l i c , then it is time that the "permanency” provided to

offset the "no strike" tradition be reviewed, and "hire and

fire" provisions of private industry re-established.

Those who provide public services are only granted special

protection of their job situations when they continue to ’ ยท * .

fully serve the public.

Once they use withdrawal of their labour to militantly score

minor industrial points when alternate procedures are

available, then they must be considered to have cast aside

the job security that Public Service previously considered

sacrosanct.