Note: Where available, the PDF/Word icon below is provided to view the complete and fully formatted document
New CSIRO wildlife research laboratory in Darwin



Download PDFDownload PDF

COMMONWEALTH SCIENTIFIC AND INDUSTRIAL RESEARCH ORGANIZATION

P.O. Box 225, Dickson, A.C.T. 2602

INFORMATION FOR THE PRESS

1 Canberra

3.7.72

For immediate release

NEW CSIRO WILDLIFE RESEARCH LABORATORY IN DARWIN

The Minister for Education and Science, Mr Malcolm Fraser, will

open the F. C. Pye Wild life Research Laboratory in Darwin today

(3 July 1972).

The $318,000 Laboratory was financed to the extent of $103,000

from funds provided by Mr F. C. Pye, a prominent New South Wales

grazier to support research relating broadly to the pastoral

industry.

The balance came from the Commonwealth Government.

The laboratory building, 6700 square feet in area, was designed

by the Commonwealth Department of Works, Darwin and built by

John Holland Constructions Pty Ltd»

The new Laboratory will allow the CSIRO Division of Wildlife

Research to station a team of wildlife biologists permanently

in the tropical areas of Australia for the first time.

It also will strengthen the Division's collaborative work with

the Primary Industries Branch and the Forestry, Fisheries,

Wildlife and National Parks Branch of the Northern Territory

Administration.

The main aims of the new Darwin Laboratory are to determine

the distribution and abundance of wildlife species in

different regions and habitats, to assess the importance

of wildlife species to man and to study the relationships

of species to their environment.

The research programmes will include studies of feral stock,

native rats, which appear periodically in plague proportions,

the effects of habitat change on animals, and surveys of

Northern Territory fauna.

2

2

x.

A study of the ecology and control of wild pigs is already

under way.

Other domestic animals gone wild in the region include

buffalo, banteng and other cattle, horses and donkeys. ;

Wild stock compete with domestic cattle for forage, affect

wildlife habitats and are potential hosts for exotic animal

diseases. .

The Laboratory's research is expected to make a significant

contribution to the pastoral industry in the north.

The Darwin Laboratory should also become a valuable base

for conducting surveys of the distribution and habitat

requirements of native animals and birds.

This information is important in planning for wildlife

sanctuaries, which have an important part in the tourist

industry, and in studying bird migrants to Australia and

their possible role in the transmission of human and stock

diseases.

For further information please contact: Mr Η. P. Black,

CSIRO Head Office,

Limestone Avenue,

CAMPBELL. A.C.T. 2601

Telephone: 484257

· (Home: 485 215)