Note: Where available, the PDF/Word icon below is provided to view the complete and fully formatted document
Noise reduction strategy for Kingsford Smith Airport



Download PDFDownload PDF

M in ister for Transport and Communications Senator Gareth Evans Q.C.

19 August 1988

89/88

NOISE REDUCTION STRATEGY FOR KINGSFORD SMITH AIRPORT

A new noise reduction strategy for Kingsford Smith Airport,

designed to greatly reduce aircraft noise over suburbs on

approaches to and surrounding the airport, will come into

operation on 30 October.

The central elements of the strategy, which has been developed

through extensive consultation with Councils from surrounding

areas over the past six weeks, include:

- new limitations on runway use, aircraft types and new noise

abatement procedures during the 11pm - 6am curfew hours;

- the establishment of a Curfew Monitoring Committee, including

a majority of members from local Councils (one of whom will be

the chairperson);

- two noise measurement studies to compare the old and new

arrangements;

- a preliminary evaluation of the impact of the new

arrangements, with the arrangements to be terminated if the

preliminary results of the noise measurement studies indicate

they hold no prospect for providing any improvement over the

existing arrangements; and

- if the trial continues, a full review after 12 months.

The new arrangements will be incorporated into regulations which

will contain offence provisions and penalties for breaches. A

more detailed summary of the new arrangements is at ATTACHMENT A.

- 2 -

The new curfew arrangements must be seen against the background

of the approach that the Government is taking to the airport

needs of the Sydney basin. This has three elementss

- the Government strongly believes that long suffering

residents in the vicinity of KSA cannot and should not

bear the whole burden of meeting the continued major

growth of domestic and international aviation that will

occur up to the turn of the century and beyond;

- it is Government policy not to build a third runway at

KSA; and

- Badgery's Creek will be built as Sydney's Second

Airport.

Badgery's Creek

The Government has allocated funds to acquire the necessary land

at Badgery's Creek, and our whole focus, in looking for a

rational long-term solution to Sydney's airport needs, is on

accelerating the phased development of Badgery's Creek.

I am presently awaiting the report of a Commonwealth/State Task

Force which has been established to advise on the best ways to

meet the future airport needs of the Sydney region and to provide

advice on precisely how this acceleration of phased development

at Badgery's Creek might be achieved.

However, based on the information currently available to me, it

is my strong view that the most appropriate way of ensuring that

there is sufficient airport capacity to meet the future needs of

Sydney is to commence the phased development of Badgery's Creek.

- 3 -

I believe we have now reached the position where we should

commence work as soon as possible on construction of the first

phase of developing Badgery's Creek.

When I have received the report of the Task Force, I will take a

submission to Cabinet outlining in more detail the overall Sydney

Basin planning question, setting out financing options for the

first phase, and seeking a commencement of work during 1989.

The first phase would be a substantial general aviation facility

comprising three 1000 metre runways capable of supporting in

excess of 400,000 movements per year. The broad order of cost of

phase one is $10-15M.

The second phase would involve the addition of a 1600 metre

runway and services infrastructure (including a terminal) which

would enable operations by commuter and non-jet aircraft up to

F27/F50 size, and also serve some business jets and under most

conditions be adequate for F28 or BAel46 operations. This phase

would cost broadly an additional $15-25M.

The necessary land for the first and second phases of

construction can, with some adjustment of purchasing priorities,

be acquired within existing Government forward spending estimates

by 1990.

The third phase would involve the the construction of a new 2600

metre runway to accommodate domestic trunk operations. This phase

could cost $50-60M for B737 operations or $180-200M for B767/A300

operations. (At this stage of development the 1600 metre runway

would be converted to a taxiway parallel to the new runway).

The fourth phase would involve the upgrading of the airport to

full international standard.

4

If construction is commenced in 1989, a substantial general

aviation facility could be operational by 1993. This would

provide a much needed increase in general aviation capacity in

the Sydney region and would cater for traffic displaced from

Bankstown by the progressive transfer of light aircraft traffic

from KSA.

Action to displace general aviation aircraft from KSA, at least

at peak times, has now become necessary to relieve congestion,

and the FAC will be announcing measures to achieve this later

this year.

Construction of a general aviation facility at Badgery's Creek

would also enable, subject to further detailed planning and

economic analysis, the eventual closure of Hoxton Park aerodrome

and free this land for residential development or other purposes.

Development of subsequent phases at Badgerys Creek would of

course be in response to further industry demand.

No Third Runway for KSA

I have examined a range of options that have been proposed for

possible runway developments at KSA - involving close, medium and

wide spaced parallel runways of varying lengths - and do not

accept any of them.

On the advice provided to me it is clear that the only option

that would be operationally feasible and which would actually

provide a significant increase in airport capacity is a medium

spaced parallel runway; this would involve constructing a new

runway 2000 metres into Botany Bay, parallel to and some 1000

metres to the east of the existing north-south runway.

- 5 -

Initial estimates suggest that this option would cost around $300

million. Such a runway would have a major ecological impact on

Botany Bay, quite apart from any environmental impact on

residents from the additional traffic in a new location.

It is clear that the phased development of Badgery's Creek offers

a more cost-effective and ecologically sound solution, as well as

one much more likely to be acceptable to Sydney residents, to the

airport needs of Sydney.

* * * *

SYDNEY

Further information: John Stanton (062) 77 7200

ATTACHMENT A

NEW NOISE REDUCTION STRATEGY FOR SYDNEY AIRPORT

1. A major new noise reduction strategy for the llpm-6am night­ time curfew period will come into operation at Sydney (Kingsford Smith) Airport from 30 October 1988.

2. The new arrangements, which will result in a significant reduction in both the overall amount and distribution of night-time aircraft noise over Sydney, involve:

- new limitations on runway use;

- new limitations on aircraft types;

- new noise abatement procedures;

- new curfew monitoring arrangements;

- two new noise measurement studies to compare the old and new arrangements; and

- a preliminary evaluation of the impact of the new arrangements to be conducted after six months experience, and a full review after twelve months.

3. The new arrangements will be incorporated into regulations which will contain offence provisions and penalties for breaches.

Runway Use

4. No aircraft landings or take-offs will be permitted by any aircraft, jet or propellor driven, between 11pm and 6am on the runways to the north, west or east of Sydney Airport: landings will be required to be on runway 34 from Botany Bay and take-offs from runway 16 toward Botany Bay

- this will completely remove aircraft noise from overflying aircraft during these hours from all suburbs between Sydenham and Leichhardt, between Banksia and Hurstville, and between Mascot and Eastlakes.

Presently both propeller driven and certain small jet aircraft can operate from any runway during the curfew hours.

5. No scheduled or charter passenger services (whether domestic or international) will be allowed to operate on any runway between 12 midnight and 5am, irrespective of whether the aircraft meet the new noise certification standards

6. Strict numerical limits will be set on the number of scheduled passenger services permitted to operate (with low noise aircraft on the Botany Bay runway only) during the 11pm - midnight and 5am-6am periods:

2

- during the preliminary evaluation period (ie October '88-March '89) a maximum average of two international movements (takeoffs or landings) between 11pm and midnight, and two international landings between Sam

and 6am;

- during the extended review period (ie April '89 - October '89), a maximum average of two international movements (takeoffs or landings) between 11pm and midnight, and six international landings between Sam

and 6am.

These operations will enable noise data to be compiled for the preliminary evaluation in six months, and comprehensive data for the full review proposed in twelve months time.

7. While freighter aircraft, both jet and propellor driven, will be permitted to operate through the night as at present (though only on the Botany Bay runway in future), the total number of such movements is expected to significantly diminish with the operation of low noise but higher capacity

freighter aircraft (see paragraphs 22 and 23 below). The experience of freight operations will be closely monitored and subject to review in 12 months (see paragraph 17 below).

- this should significantly reduce noise levels especially during the period 12 midnight to Sam; and will allow future growth in the air freight market to be met by small additional numbers of BAel46 or A300

flights rather than by large numbers of flights by small aircraft with limited freight capacity.

Further details are provided in Attachment 1, paragraphs 3 to 5 and paragraphs 23 to 27.

Aircraft Types

8. Jet aircraft which do not meet new international noise certification standards will not be permitted to operate on any runway at KSA between 11pm and 6am

- among the jet aircraft excluded will be B-727s, DC9s, BAG 1-lls, F28s, B-707s and early model B-747s.

9. After 1 January 1990 the only propeller driven aircraft permitted to use the airport during the curfew hours will be those meeting new international noise certification standards. (There are no present curfew restrictions on

such aircraft and a notice period is necessary to enable adjustment of propeller freight operations).

Further details are provided in Attachment 1, paragraphs 8 to 13

3

Noise Abatement Procedures

10. New noise abatement procedures to apply under the improved curfew arrangements will be:

(a) takeoffs on runway 16 (towards Botany Bay) will commence from the intersection with taxiway 'C' which is just north of the intersection with the east-west runway;

(b) aircraft will be required to use reduced power after take-off? and

(c) landing aircraft will be required to keep the use of reverse thrust to an absolute minimum.

11. Detailed new procedures will be introduced to monitor the use of reverse thrust to ensure the noise abatement procedures are adhered to by landing aircraft (Attachment 4 refers).

Curfew Monitoring Arrangements

12. A new Curfew Monitoring Committee will be established to monitor the operation of the new curfew arrangements. The Committee will comprise ten representatives from local Councils (one of whom will chair the Committee) and

representatives from the Federal Airports Corporation, the Civil Aviation Authority, the Department of Transport and Communications, Qantas, Ansett and Australian Airlines. The

Civil Aviation Authority will provide the secretariat to the Committee, and will provide to all members on a monthly basis comprehensive data on all aircraft movements between 11pm and 6am together with recorded noise levels and reports

of the use of reverse thrust by landing aircraft (see Attachment 4). The Committee will also receive regular reports on the progress of the two noise measurement studies described in paragraphs 13 to 17 below.

Noise Measurement Studies

13. Two new noise measurement studies will be undertaken to compare noise exposure during the existing curfew arrangements with the noise exposure under the new arrangements.

Further details are provided in Attachment 1, paragraphs 6 and 7 and in Attachment 4.

- 4 -

14. A General Noise Measurement Study (described in Attachment 2) will be undertaken by acoustic engineers Challis and Associates Pty Ltd at an estimated cost of the order of $115,000. Qantas, Australian Airlines, Ansett and the

Federal Airports Corporation have indicated they will each contribute up to $25,000, and three Councils (Marrickvilie, Rockdale and Botany) will each contribute $5,000. The Civil Aviation Authority will support the study by providing staff to assist Challis and Associates with the analysis of the noise data.

15. Noise measurements of movements permitted under the existing curfew arrangements will be taken during the periods between August and October 1988, and measurements of the new arrangements will be taken over corresponding periods in

1989, so that both sets of measurements will cover comparable seasonal and weather conditions.

16. The second study is a Runway Noise Measurement Study (described in Attachment 3) to be undertaken by the Civil Aviation Authority, using its existing Sydney Airport Noise Monitoring System. The study will measure ambient noise

levels during curfew hours in the suburbs around Sydney Airport and the possible contribution to these noise levels from aircraft operations on runway 16/34, with particular attention to reverse thrust noise from landing aircraft.

17. Officers conducting the Runway Noise Measurement Study will liaise with the consultant to local councils (Mr Tony Williams) and provide data to him as it is progressively obtained during the study. Comments and analysis provided

by the consultant will be incorporated into the final report.

Further details are provided in Attachments 2 and 3.

Review of the New Arrangements

18. A preliminary evaluation of the impact of the new curfew arrangements will be conducted after six months experience and a full review after twelve months. Both will draw upon the General Noise Measurement Study to be conducted by Challis and Associates, the Runway Noise Measurement Study being undertaken by the Civil Aviation Authority, the experience of the monitoring of the use of reverse thrust by

landing aircraft, and the views of the new Curfew Monitoring Committee.

5

19. In the event that after six months of operation of the new arrangements the preliminary results of the two Noise Measurement Studies indicate that they have no prospect for providing any improvement over the existing arrangements,

they will be terminated, subject to a period of notice of six months to enable a wind down of operations.

20. It is presently anticipated that a full twelve months experience of operations under the new curfew arrangements will be needed to allow the two noise studies to record data over sufficient periods of time to cover comparable seasonal

and weather conditions under both the old and new curfew arrangements. An extended period of time is also required to gain a true measure of the level of operations under the

new arrangements. Scheduled freight operators require time to consider investment in new equipment and to make adjustments to their operating patterns. International airlines similarly need long lead times to adjust their operating patterns.

21. The review will be conducted in close consultation with local Councils and will be commenced when the report of the General Noise Measurement Study becomes available, which will be required to be submitted within two months of the

completion of the final noise measurements. Issues the review will examine will include: whether quotas are required to limit the number of aircraft operations; the level of compliance with curfew conditions; and the adequacy of penalties and monitoring procedures.

Expected Number of Aircraft Operations

22. Timetable filings submitted by Australian and Ansett and foreshadowed by Qantas on behalf of all the international airlines flying to Australia, indicate that once the new timetables come into full effect, there will be a marginal increase in the average number of aircraft movements between

11pm and Sam each night from 20.3 to 21.7; however there will be a significant drop in the number of flights between 12 midnight and Sam from a nightly average of 12 under the current arrangements to a likely average of between 5 and 6

per night under the new arrangements.

23. The changes proposed by the airlines are:

(a) Ansett propose to make 2 landings and 2 take offs each night between 11pm and Sam using a BAel46 freighter aircraft and Australian plan 1 landing and 1 take off each night with an A300 freighter;

- these flights would replace some 84 movements per week (an average of 12 per night) currently made by aircraft such as Argosys, F27s, Westwind jets and a variety of smaller propeller driven aircraft; and

· - · , - · · : ! · , » ;

• :· - i ί . ■

6

- the overwhelming majority of the movements that will be withdrawn (some 68 of the 84 per week) currently occur between 12 midnight and Sam.

(b) The international airlines will be permitted during the period November 1988 and March 1989 to schedule an average of only two movements (takeoffs or landings) per night between 11pm and midnight and two landings between Sam and

6am each day; for the timetable period April to October 1989 they will be permitted to schedule an average of only two movements (takeoffs or landings) per night between 11pm and midnight each night and six landings between Sam and 6am

each day.

(c) the international airlines also anticipate that on average there will be approximately one off-schedule arrival between 11pm and midnight and another arrival between Sam and 6am each day.

Further details are provided in Attachment 1, paragraphs 17 to 2 2.

Attachments

1 Details of New Curfew Arrangements 2 General Noise Measurement Study 3 Runway Noise Measurement Study 4 Monitoring of Use of Reverse Thrust

N.B. COPIES OF THESE ATTACHMENTS MAY BE OBTAINED FROM THE MINISTER'S OFFICE (062) 77 7200, OR THE DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATIONS, PUBLIC AFFAIRS SECTION, (062) 68 7522