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Migration figures still higher than in any other period of recession



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Philip Ruddock MP Federal M ember for D undas Shadow Minister for Immigration and Ethnic Affairs

Electorate Parliam ent House

Tel: (06) 277 4343 Fax: (06) 277 2062

Tel: (02) 858 1011 Fax:“(02) 804 6739

MIGRATION FIGURES STILL HIGHER THAN IN ANY OTHER PERIOD OF RECESSION

Figures released by the Bureau of Immigration Research only confirm that the net permanent gain to the population ao a result of migration movements in 1991-92, has fallen to the lowest level in five years.

A net gain of over 78,000 in the last financial year still represents a higher intake than in any previous recession of much lesser magnitude than this one.

For example in the recession in the early sixties, net migration gain fell to between 58,000 to 68,000. In the recession of 1982-83 levels fell to 54,766 only to recover to higher levels in 1986. (See attached table).

The figures for 1991-92 still understate net immigration. With the introduction of a two-year provisional entry permit for spouses and de-facto partners, an estimated 11,000 people per year will not show up in the figures until accepted fot\permanent entry at the end of the two year permit.

Furthermore, unless the Government makes a clear decision on the fate of the Chinese nationals on four year temporary entry permits, a further 20,000 could be added to the net outcome.

These numbers are still unacceptably high in the midst of the worst recession in sixty years. The Government should be acting swiftly to adopt the Coalition's proposals to significantly reduce the program.

14 September 1992

COMMONWEALTH

PARLIAMENTARY LIBRARY MICAH

1947-89 4 Yedr -

; *

Population size Population growth N atural increase Net migration

no. % no. % no. %

1947 7 638 000 1 19 982 1.60 108 916 1.45 11 205 0.15

1948 7 792 500 154 502 2.02 101 137 1.32 53 365 0.70

1949 8 045 600 253 105 3.25 106 001 - 1.36 147 104 1.89

1950 8 307 500 261 911 3.26 112 404 1.40 149 507 1.86

1951 8 527 900 220 426 2.65 .... 111 510 „.l-34 108 916 1.31

1952 8 739 600 211 662 2.48 120 053 1.41 91 609 1.07

1953 8 902 700 163 117 1.87 122 047 1.40 -4 1 0 7 0 0.47

1954 9 089 900 187 250 2.10 120451 1.35 66 799 0.75

1955 9 311 800 221 889 2.44 125 641 1.38 96 248 1.06

1956 9 530 900 ' 219 046 2.35 126 045 1.35 93 001 1.00

1957 9 7 4 4 100 213 216 2.24 135 405 1.42 77 811 0.82

1958 9 947 400 203 271 2.09 138 781 1.42 64 490 0.66

1959 10 161 000 2 1 3 6 1 0 2.15 137 764 1.38 75 846 0.76

1960 10391 900 230 952 2.27 141 862 1.40 89 090 0.88

1961 10 642 700 209 683 2.02 151 025 1.45 58 658 0.56

1962 10 846 100 203 405 1.91 144 413 1.36 58 992 0.55

1 ?63 11 055 500 209 423 1.93 141 306 1.30 68 117 0.63

1964 11 280 400 224 947 2.03 129 131 1.17 95 816 0.87

1965 11 505 400 224 979 1.99 123 650 1.10 101 329 0.90

1966 11 704 800 199 435 1.73 119 210 1.04 80 225 0.70

1967 11 912 300 2 0 7 4 1 0 1.77 126 593 1.08 80 817 0.69

1968 12 145 600 233 329 1.96 131 359 1.10 101 970 0.86

1969 12 407 200 261 635 2.15 143 680 1.13 117 955 0.97

1970 12 663 500 256 252 2.07 144 468 1.16 111 784 0.90

1971 13 198 400 244 772 1.93 165 712 1.31 79 060 0.62

1972 13 409 300 210 908 1.60 155 209 1.18 56 320 0.43

1973 13 614 300 205 056 1.53 136 848 1.02 67 493 0.50

1974 13 832 000 217 634 1.60 129 344 0.95 87 248 0.64

1975 13 968 900 136 903 0.99 123 991 0.90 13 515 0.10

1976 14 110 100 144 226 1.01 115 148 0.82 34 030 0.24

1977 14 281 500 171 426 1.21 1 17 501 0.83 68 027 0.48

1978 14 430 800 149 297 1.05 1 15 756 0.81 47 397 0.33

1979 14 602 500 171 651 1.19 1 16 561 0.81 68 61 1 0.48

1980 14 807 400 204 889 1.40 116 832 0.80 100 940 0.69

1981 15 054 100 2 & 083 1.67 126 839 0.86 121 785 0.82

1982 15 288 900 227 352 1.56 125 124 0.83 102 228 0.68

1983 15 483 500 187 430 1.27 132 664 0.87 54 766 0.36

1984 15 677 300 184 626 1.25 126 515 0.82 58 111 0.38

1985 15 900 600 223 300 1.42 126 100 0.80 89 300 0.57

1986 16 139 000 238 500 1.50 128 400 0.81 107 400 0.68

1987 16 398 900 259 900 1.61 126 600 0.78 133 300 0.83

1988 16 697 000 298 000 1.82 126 300 0.77 i 7 1 .700 1.05

1989 16 957 100 260 100 1.56 126 600 0.76 1 3 3 500 0.80

Λ 'ore: A new method of estimating population size applied from 1971 (see ABS 1986). Net migration prior to 1971 was estimated on both net interstate and overseas migration. After 1976. adjustments for ‘category jumpina’ are included. Source: ABS (19S6) & ABS (19S9a).' "

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