Note: Where available, the PDF/Word icon below is provided to view the complete and fully formatted document
Buthelezi - Australia can help with federalism experience



Download PDFDownload PDF

MEDIA RELEASE SENATOR ROBERT HILL LEADER OF THE OPPOSITION IN THE SENATE SHADOW MINISTER FOR FOREIGN AFFAIRS Friday, August 7 70/92

£!•jVVii'4CiEZI - AUSTRALIA CAM HELP WITH FEDERALISM EXPERTSHOE

Mangosuthu Buthelezi, President of Inkatha Freedom Party and Chief Minister of Kwazulu, has raised with a Federal Coalition delegation the possibility of Australian input to the peace and democracy process in South Africa in the form of advice on its federalism experience.

Shadow Foreign Minister and Leader of the Opposition in the Senate, Senator Robert Hill, who is visiting South Africa with Mr Jim Carlton MP and Senators Bronwyn Bishop and Rod Kemp, said one of the critical issues in the development of a New

South Africa was a Constitution which gave confidence to various major interest groups such as the Zulu people.

"One option being considered favourably by Chief Buthelezl and others is a federalist structure not dissimilar to Australia," Senator Hill said.

"The Chief said it would be useful if negotiators in South Africa became more aware of the Australian constitutional experience, particularly in the relationship of power and responsibility between the government of the Commonwealth and

those of the States.

"The Australian Government could provide Australian constitutional experts to brief negotiators, or invite such negotiators to visit Australia to examine first hand our constitutional experience.

"However, the views of Chief Buthelezi are unlikely to interest the Australian Government which has developed a favoured relationship with the A.N.C. and effectively snubbed the Chief and the I.F.P.

"The Australian Government refuses to invite Buthelezi to visit Australia whilst readily inviting the A.N.C. leadership and executive.

"The Hawke/Keating Government's policy of picking winners between the key players in South Africa has been counter­ productive to the process of change and should be abandoned.

"A change of policy could commence with an invitation to a small multi-party multi-racial delegation from South Africa to study the Australian constitutional experience. It would be a modest but useful contribution Australia could make to

democratic change in South Africa."

(ends)

Enquiries t Claude Rakisits on (06) 277 3178

COMMONWEALTH PARLIAMENTARY LIBRARY MICAH