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Fewer male drivers killed in road accidents



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Bob Brown , J r „ Minister i or Land transport 295/91 13 August 1991

FEWER MALE DRIVERS KILLED IN ROAD ACCIDENTS

Road deaths in Australia during July fell 12.7 per cent compared with July 1990, but among car drivers the long­ term improvement has been limited to men.

Releasing the July road toll figures today, Federal Land Transport Minister, Bob Brown, said 178 people died as a result of road crashes, compared with 204 the previous July.

Mr Brown said figures for all road users for the 12 months to July showed 15.6 per cent fewer road deaths compared with the previous year.

'However, the size of the long-term reduction has not been equal among all road users. In the 12 months to July, deaths among male drivers fell by 18.1 percent, while among women drivers the decline was only 0.8 per cent.'

In July, South Australian road deaths fell by 38.1 per cent followed by New South Wales, down 28.9 per cent. The ACT was fatality-free in July, compared with five road deaths in July 1990. The Tasmanian road toll rose from one to

four, and Queensland's toll rose by 32.3 per cent to 41 deaths.

'The rise in road fatalities in Queensland and Tasmania shows we cannot afford to be complacent about the general downward trend in the road toll1, Mr Brown said.

The number of fatalities in July in each state was: NSW 59, Vic 39, Qld 41, SA 13, WA 14, Tas 4, NT 8 and the ACT 0.

The total of 178 comprised 72 drivers, 58 passengers, 30 pedestrians, 18 motorcyclists and their passengers and no bicyclists.

'Victoria showed the biggest improvement — 25.8 per cent, followed by New South Wales with a fall of 20.3 per cent and Western Australia with an improvement of 19.1 per cent', Mr Brown said.

'In the 12 months to July, Tasmania's road toll rose 33.9 per cent and the number of road fatalities in the ACT rose 12.5 per cent.'

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