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Aircraft noise - Brisbane



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-X AUSTRALIA,.,L·

M inister for Shipping and Aviation Support

7 June 1991 23/91

AIRCRAFT NOISE - BRISBANE

The report of the Task Force to review operation and planning of Brisbane Airport to minimise the impact of aircraft noise on surrounding communities was today released by the Minister for Shipping and Aviation Support, Senator Bob Collins.

The Task Force, established on 21 June 1989 in response to reaction by the community against aircraft noise from the then newly developed Brisbane Airport had representatives from the community, the aviation industry and all three

spheres of government.

Senator Collins endorsed the findings of the Task Force and has authorised implementation of its recommendations immediately.

"This report should lead to a better understanding of the airport's operation and provide a greater appreciation of operational and planning issues which affect the level of noise impact," Senator Collins said.

A summary of the Task Force's conclusions and recommendations are attached.

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TASK FORCE CONCLUSIONS

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* Aircraft generally remain within expected flight corridors.

* Expectations about the proportion of aircraft operating over Moreton Bay have not been realised.

* Introducing quieter jets has led to a reduction in noise levels.

* Brisbane Airport has significantly less aircraft noise impact than other comparable Australian airports.

* The ANEF system provides a scientific measure of noise exposure level and is a valuable tool for land use planning purposes.

* Aircraft noise monitoring should be conducted in Brisbane.

* A simulated single event over-fly programme may be used for comparing the noise impact of alternative aircraft tracks.

* The existing runway system is estimated to have the capacity to cater for forecast traffic until at least the year 2010.

* There are no operational reasons why the 14/32 secondary runway should not be used.

* Development of the 14/32 runway would incur additional capital and operating costs without increasing capacity.

* A parallel runway would approximately double capacity.

* Noise impact of a 14/32 runway is less than that for a 01/19 runway.

* Overflight of residential areas at heights lower than 3000 feet can not be avoided in some cases.

* Potential for noise reduction exists if aircraft taking off over the Bay are required to reach an altitude of at least 5000 feet before crossing the coast.

* There are two aircraft flight paths which could be modified to reduce overall noise impact. Only one, from the north, would have sufficient benefit to warrant amendment.

* Better community awareness of the airport is needed.

* Land use controls on land near the airport should be maintained.

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TASK FORCE RECOMMENDATIONS

1. The Federal Airports Corporation (FAC) begin a comprehensive review of runway development options by the year 2000 to allow for sufficient planning, design, environmental and economic assessment, public consultation

and construction time before the existing runway system reaches estimated capacity, forecast in 2010. Timing for the review might be revised if, in annual revision of forecasts, evidence is produced that traffic demands and/or runway capacity are significantly different to those now predicted.

2. The FAC lift restrictions on using the 14/32 secondary runway by larger jets up to B737 which are able to operate on a weight limited basis and that the performance of the runway be monitored by the FAC.

3. The Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) design and publish Standard Instrument Departures (SIDs) associated with the use of the 14/32 runway where required, and that design should follow guidelines established by the Task Force and modified by recommendation 5.

4. The assumptions and conclusions leading to current assessment of benefits/disbenefits of upgrading the 14/32 runway to 2600m be reviewed before proceeding with runway developments.

5. The practice of directing as many aircraft operations as practicable over Moreton Bay in preference to residential areas is to continue. The procedure for jet aircraft taking off over the Bay is to incorporate the requirement to reach

an altitude of 5000 feet before flying over residential , areas. In any event jet aircraft should not be descended below 3000 feet until over water.

6. Jet aircraft from the north landing on runway 01 should, where possible, be directed by Air Traffic Control (ATC) to commence final approach at or south of the Brisbane River.

7. The need for effective community consultation on airport operation and planning be formally recognised. The preferred method is to re-establish a sub-committee of the Brisbane Airport Consultative Committee (BACC), with membership similar to that of the Task Force, including

community groups, the three spheres of government, the industry, the FAC and the CAA.

8. Monitoring aircraft noise levels in affected suburbs be continued and expanded where necessary by adding further monitoring stations to those provided in 1990 and by ad hoc monitoring of specific noise problems using portable

equipment. Results of monitoring should be used by the CAA to evaluate adherence to prescribed operational procedures. This monitoring should be in consultation with the sub­ committee of the BACC.

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9. The Queensland Government and local government commitment to enforce land use controls - based on the Australian Standard - be continued to maintain use of land surrounding the airport which is compatible with airport

operations and development. To the extent that land use controls cannot secure protection, and projected demographic and other evidence suggests, aircraft flight paths over land should be reviewed periodically by the CAA.