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Hawke going the Whitlam way



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MEDIA RELEASESENATOR FRED CHANEY DEPUTY LEADER OF THE OPPOSITION LEADER OF THE OPPOSITION IN THE SENATE Y -

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HAWKE GOING THE WHITLAM WAY

"The Hawke-Keating government is very much on the nose around Australia and the odour bears a marked similarity to that which surrounded the demise of Labor's last federal administration", the Deputy Leader of the Opposition,

Senator Fred Chaney, said today.

"There is definitely more than a whiff of Whitlam in the air as we watch this tired and out of touch government stumble directionless towards the inevitability of defeat", he told a Liberal Party lunch in Perth.

"Indeed, the extraordinary events of the past few weeks if anything tend to make the death throes of Whitlam and Co look almost orderly.

"The bizarre exchanges between a travelling Prime Minister and a testy just-returned Treasurer are but the latest manifestations of the near chaos which marks the government's economic policy making process.

"Over the past few weeks we've seen an increasingly desperate Prime Minister prepared to flirt with just about anything in an effort to make it look as though he cares about the mess he's got Australia into.

"And just about every time he's floated another band-aid solution he's been shot down in flames by harder heads like the Treasurer, Senator Walsh or Senator Button.

"Labor's economic policy-making process looks like a cross between a fairground mirror maze and a roundabout as Ministers toy with and then dump options.

"We're under no illusion about the increasingly sceptical way in which the electorate views all politicians", he said.

"But the antics of the Labor government are in a class of their own.

"Having sought to shift the blame for everything that's happened to anybody but itself, Labor is now seen to have nowhere to go.

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"The Australian people are tired of politicians making promises they don't keep and looking for scapegoats.

"That's why Andrew Peacock yesterday put down an achievable and rational six point plan for economic reform which contrasts so sharply with Labor's bungling.

"This program calls for increased productivity through a more flexible industrial relations system, a reduced tax burden, smaller government and less regulation, a major privatisation initiative, significant microeconomic reform, reduced protection for domestic industry and promotion of a

freer world trading environment."

Perth 23 June 1989 Contact: Keith Kessell (09) 325 8179