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Research funding for Queensland to aid fight against depression.



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Media Release Dr Michael Wooldridge Minister for Health and Aged Care

MW115/2000 21 November 2000

RESEARCH FUNDING FOR QUEENSLAND TO AID FIGHT AGAINST DEPRESSION The battle against the serious problems of anxiety and depression affecting Australian children will be helped with one of a raft of National Health and Medical Research Council grants for 2001 to Queensland researchers, Federal Health Minister, Dr Michael Wooldridge announced today.

New NHMRC funding for 62 projects in Queensland is worth $6.3 million, part of a total national package of $230.3 million in health and medical research grants.

A grant of $110,000 has been made for the first year of a three-year project headed by Griffith University's Dr Paula Barrett which will examine the onset and course of anxiety and depression, the most common forms of psychological distress affecting Australian children.

"This NHMRC grant recognises the urgent need to tackle these seriously disabling disorders, which may continue to affect children as they grow into adulthood while also aiding the fight against the depression epidemic now affecting today's adults," Dr Wooldridge said.

Other projects to receive NHMRC funding announced today include:

$49,000 for the first year of a two-year University of Queensland study of brain rhythms in bipolar mood disorder, an illness affecting between one and two per cent of the population;

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$155,000 for the first year of a three-year study at the University of Queensland of the "wiring" of the brain during development of the embryo, aiming to gain knowledge for use in establishing strategies for repairing brain cells following injury;

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$85,000 for the first year of a three-year project at Prince Alexandra Hospital (University of Queensland) looking at possible new therapeutic agents for treating squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck, one of the most frequent causes of cancer worldwide.

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Dr Wooldridge said these projects were part of a significant investment in the future health of Australians to which the medical and health research community makes a very valuable contribution.

Media Contact:

Serena Williams, Dr Wooldridge's office (02) 6277 7220; 0411 261 627

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©Commonwealth of Australia, 2000

Published on Commonwealth Department of Health and Aged Care web site 22 November 2000 Commonwealth Department of Health and Aged Care URL: http://www.health.gov.au/mediarel/yr2000/mw/mw20115.htm