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Kelly finally acts to build on Labor's anti-doping achievements.



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Media Release

 

SENATOR KATE LUNDY

SHADOW MINISTER FOR SPORT AND YOUTH AFFAIRS

SHADOW MINISTER ASSISTING ON INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

SENATOR FOR THE AUSTRALIAN CAPITAL TERRITORY

 

Kelly finally acts to build on Labor’s anti- doping achievements

 

The Shadow M inister for Sport, Senator Kate Lundy, has welcomed today’s Anti-Drugs in Sport initiative, saying it is about time that the Federal Sports Minister acted on the measures established by the Labor Party.

 

“The Coalition’s record on this issue has been pitiful. Former Liberal Sports Minister Andrew Thomson reneged on an election promise to appoint an anti-sports drug envoy and Jackie Kelly refused to attend the IOC drug conference in Switzerland earlier this year,” Senator Lundy said.

 

“Finally the Minister is doing something to build on Labor’s efforts to eliminate the use of banned substances in sport.

 

In 1990 Labor established the Australian Sports Drug Agency (ASDA) as the primary agency conducting comprehensive drug testing programs and it has been very successful in deterring athletes from taking prohibited substances. ASDA estimate that 99 per cent of athletes have been deterred from participating in banned doping practices since its establishment under a Labor Government.

 

“Drugs have been used in sport since the time of the ancient Greeks, however international efforts to eliminate their use only seriously began in 1960. In fact, the IOC did not become actively committed to anti-doping policies until the 1968 Mexico Olympic Games, which were the first to initiate a schedule for testing for banned substances.

 

Senator Lundy has previously highlighted the groundbreaking research conducted by two University of Queensland researches, Professor Ross Cuneo and senior research scientist Jennifer Wallace, who helped develop the first test for growth-hormone abuse in athletes.

 

“I hope that the IOC recognises the importance of this breakthrough in drug testing and provides the necessary funding to the JOG Medical Commission to help Australia ensure that the Sydney 2000 Games are fair and that no competitor has an unfair advantage.” Senator Lundy said.

 

13 May 1999

 

45/99

 

Contact: Simon Tatz on 6277 3334 or 0418 488295

 

 

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