Note: Where available, the PDF/Word icon below is provided to view the complete and fully formatted document
Speech to Australian Palliative Care Conference, Melbourne



Download PDFDownload PDF

NICK CHAMPION MP

SHADOW PARLIAMENTARY SECRETARY FOR HEALTH MEMBER FOR WAKEFIELD   SPEECH TO THE AUSTRALIAN PALLIATIVE CARE CONFERENCE

 

MELBOURNE  

WEDNESDAY, 2 SEPTEMBER 2015   *** CHECK AGAINST DELIVERY ***

I acknowledge the traditional owners of the land on which we meet - the Kulin Nations - and, in a spirit of reconciliation, pay my respects to their elders past and present.   I would also like to acknowledge Liz Callaghan and all the other Palliative Care professionals who have taken the time to meet with me on a number of occasions to discuss the ways forward for Palliative Care.   I have to say, when I was promoted into the role of Shadow Parliamentary Secretary for Health, I was a little challenged about the topic of Palliative Care.   It’s not that I was unfamiliar with death - I lived with my grandfather in the last years of his life.   He lived to the age of 97, and died the day after his birthday party.   A birthday party which all his friends and relatives attended, and even included a small brass band for entertainment.   We joked that he had attended his own wake. The epitome of a good death.   My father’s death, which occurred in the year of my first election to Parliament, was not such a happy story.   He died from alcoholism, alone and in pain, and his body was not found for several weeks. The antipithis of a good death.   Having experienced a death of a loved one doesn’t prepare you for addressing your own.   Death is an inevitable part of life, but it is a confronting subject.

  It’s a modern cultural taboo that we all must overcome.   Because until we get used to talking about death, we will not as a society properly utilise palliative care or advanced care planning to its full potential.    Well managed Palliative care is a great model of how health care should be done.   It is patient centred.   It is multidisciplinary and it considers the whole person - their spirituality, their personality and their needs as they face their end of life.   The professionals who work in this field have my utmost respect. You are all compassionate and caring.   You manage what is for families one of the most stressful and painful experiences of their lives.   And somehow, at times, you manage to make a great loss a rewarding journey.   A shared experience and give so much back to the families you work with.   The Australian Labor Party has a strong commitment to Health Care. And we have a great understanding of the importance of Palliative Care.   I am sure many of you saw Tanya Plibersek’s article on Mamamia back in March.   It was a very personal story of her own experience. The experience of her father’s death.   I dare to say there is no greater advocate in the Parliament of developing the world’s best palliative care for Australia than the Deputy Leader of the Opposition.   And you couldn’t ask for a more passionate advocate than Tanya.   In Government, Tanya demonstrated her commitment to Palliative care when she was Health Minister.   One example was Labor’s investment in the Better Access to Palliative Care in Tasmania Program.   It involved a significant trial of a Hospice@Home through the Hobart District Nursing Service.   In March, I travelled to Tasmania to talk to some of those who are involved in the trial.   It was particularly good to talk to families.   And I was particularly moved when talking to Api and Vince Bocchino about how they cared for Vince's father, Pasquale Bocchino, in the last stages of his life.   It was particularly interesting to hear Pasquale's story.

  Coming from Italy, a musician, he could not speak English, so he ended up working in the building trades.   A loss for Australian music, but a gain for Australian construction, a story so familiar in the story of Australian migration.   He made a great contribution to the country. It was tremendous to hear how this program helped Api, Vince and their family look after their father.   It gave Pasquale the same dignity at his death that he had during his life. That is what palliative care is all about. And I am sure you all have similar stories of how you have helped families at what is a difficult time.   Working in Palliative Care must be incredibly rewarding.   Without you many Australians would face this challenge in pain, with confusion and without adequate support.   It is important at this conference, as I understand you will be doing tomorrow night, to celebrate the work you all do and the importance it holds in our health care system.   However, the system you work in has challenges.   The national palliative care strategy is five years old and needs to be reviewed.   The system doesn’t do enough to recognise marginalised groups.   People with disabilities struggle to access palliative care services and there are particular access and health equity issues for those with intellectual disabilities.   The LGBTI community, as another example, still encounter barriers to services.   Culturally and linguistically diverse communities remain outside the system. Barriers of language, barriers of understanding about what palliative care is and how it can help the individual remain a real struggle to overcome.   And Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people also remain on the outside of our system.   It is important that we recognise and provide services particularly for them.   And the growing burden of Chronic Disease will mean more people are reliant on palliative care services into the future.   So while we remain in the policy development phase for Palliative Care, I can assure you that a Federal Labor Government will not shy away from these challenges.   And you can be assured we will work with you to develop policies that are fit for the future while we are in opposition and while we are in government.  

So I encourage you to get in touch with me if there are any ideas you have for how to make things better.   Can I end by saying we only get one chance for Australians to die well and we must do all we can to ensure a good death is the right of all Australians.   ENDS   MEDIA CONTACT: RICHARD BROOKS 0409 285 296