Note: Where available, the PDF/Word icon below is provided to view the complete and fully formatted document
Transcript of interview with Linda Mottram: ABC 702 Sydney Mornings: 2 September 2015: China Free Trade Agreement



Download PDFDownload PDF

SENATOR THE HON DOUG CAMERON SHADOW MINISTER FOR HUMAN SERVICES SENATOR FOR NEW SOUTH WALES

E&EO TRANSCRIPT RADIO INTERVIEW ABC 702 SYDNEY MORNINGS WITH LINDA MOTTRAM WEDNESDAY, 2 SEPTEMBER 2015   SUBJECT/S: China Free Trade Agreement   LINDA MOTTRAM: Senator Doug Cameron, Labor Senator, was listening too and I gather was not entirely happy with Simon Crean’s position. Doug Cameron, good morning.

SENATOR DOUG CAMERON, SHADOW MINISTER FOR HUMAN SERVICES:  Good morning. No I am far from happy with Simons’ position. 

MOTTRAM: OK, but it sounds logical to me, you don’t want to throw the baby out with the bathwater so let’s use the committee process to iron out any problems that do exist.

CAMERON:  Yes that’s right and I agree with that part, that we should not be signing any agreement that means Australian jobs are under threat. Simon spoke about confusion and misunderstanding, I think Simon was a bit confused and just doesn’t understand Chapter 10 - “the movement of natural persons” clause and he doesn’t seem to understand the investment facilitation agreement . There are significant problems with both these clauses because it talks about visas ­ “they shall be granted” and it talks about labour market testing not being required. So I’m happy to have the parliamentary process undertaken but it should be done without any misunderstanding, and that is if we sign off on this agreement, Chinese companies that invest in projects of $150 million and more can bring their own labour in and that’s a significant problem for tradespeople around this country.

MOTTRAM: ABC Fact Check had a look through this and they said yes there could issues here, but one of the points their experts made was that in dealing with labour agreements, the Immigration Department is pretty fastidious and there are some requirements here even if they are not the ones that you are suggesting would be better. Surely the Department is going to look after the best interests of the country.

CAMERON: I certainly don’t agree with that proposition and I don’t think any of the workers around the country in chicken processing plants and in 7­ Eleven’s would be arguing that the Immigration Department is fastidious in ensuring that these visas are properly implemented. That is far from the truth. We can’t even look after the situation we have at the moment with these visas so I don’t think we should be imposing another significant problem on jobs in this country by

simply giving the Immigration Department the right to determine whether projects can bring workers in without labour market testing. That should not be an option.

MOTTRAM:  Do you think China would walk away from this agreement if the existing labour conditions are not included?

CAMERON:  I don’t think it’s a matter of who walks away from the agreement. The agreement must be in the national interest. The agreement cannot force Australia to become simply a quarry, a farm and a tourist destination. The agreement must be in the interests of people who have served their apprenticeships, who are engineering tradespeople who are working on major projects around the country. And I have to say to you that the investment facilitation agreement will mean that the Chinese companies can bring workers in on food, agribusiness, resource and energy, transport, telecoms, power supply generation, the environment and tourism.

These are massive swathes of the Australian economy subject to this agreement. We have to get it right.

MOTTRAM:  OK, but the argument goes Doug Cameron that there is so much happening in China, we are now getting access to areas of services that are the new jobs of the future, there will be a quid pro quo for this.

CAMERON:  Well I don’t think there’s a quid pro quo for destroying the lives of existing Australian tradespeople and say we may get jobs in the future. I asked the Parliamentary Library to give me details of how the claims that were made for previous trade agreements came up against reality. They said they couldn’t do it, it was far too complex and I think the claims that are made for jobs generated on these trade agreements far exceed the reality.  The benefits are always pushed as being far greater than the downside. Labor supports trade agreements, we support trade agreements, but it can’t be done at the expense of Australian jobs.

MOTTRAM: Doug Cameron, thank you for your time. 

ENDS

MEDIA CONTACT: LUKE WHITINGTON 0422 265 775