Note: Where available, the PDF/Word icon below is provided to view the complete and fully formatted document
Transcript of joint doorstop interview: Brisbane: 1 September 2015: Labor's Fair Work Taskforce - Brisbane hearing



Download PDFDownload PDF

  

LISA CHESTERS MP

CHAIR, LABOR’S FAIR WORK TASKFORCE FEDERAL MEMBER FOR BENDIGO  

SENATOR CHRIS KETTER SECRETARY, LABOR’S FAIR WORK TASKFORCE LABOR SENATOR FOR QUEENSLAND   E&OE TRANSCRIPT PRESS CONFERENCE BRISBANE TUESDAY, 1 SEPTEMBER 2015   SUBJECT/S: Labor’s Fair Work Taskforce ­ Brisbane Hearing  

LISA CHESTERS, CHAIR, LABOR’S FAIR WORK TASKFORCE: Thanks very much for coming  today,  I’m  Lisa  Chesters  I’m  the  Federal  Member  for  Bendigo  and  the  Chair  of Labor’s Fair Work Taskforce and I’m joined here today with Senator for Queensland, Chris Ketter  who’s  the  Secretary  of  the  Taskforce  and  Susan  Lamb  who’s  one  of  Labor’s Candidates  in  the  upcoming  election  and  Jacqui  Pedersen,  another  candidate  in  the upcoming election.

Labor has established the Fair Work Taskforce to travel around the country and do what the Abbott Government is not doing, engaging with workers listening to workers and finding out what’s actually going on in Australian workplaces. We’ve been travelling around the country, kick started in Tasmania, held hearings in Victoria, the Northern Territory and this week we’re in Queensland. Starting today in Brisbane, then moving to Townsville and then to Rockhampton and what we are hearing in all these hearings, particularly here in Queensland is that Queensland is not immune to unemployment and underemployment. We’re hearing from workers the direct impact of this government’s lack of focusing on jobs. Whether it is in the meatworks Industry and the explosion in temporary workers that is happening and labour hire or whether it be in retail, we know that this government is no friend of working people. Their Productivity Commission report that they’ve released, their hearings start in my home electorate on Friday and what we know is that they are going after penalty rates, the penalty rates that help people makes ends meet. We’ll hand over to those workers to explain exactly what’s happening. The Taskforce will keep travelling around the country, listening to workers and  hearing  their  stories  making  sure  that  in  any  review  of  the  Fair  Work  Act  that  it’s balance. We’re doing the Government’s work for them because their refusing to work and talk with working people. I’ll now hand over to Chris Ketter, the Secretary to say a few words.

CHRIS  KETTER,  SECRETARY,  LABOR’S  FAIR  WORK  TASKFORCE  :  Senator  Chris

Ketter, I’m the Secretary of Labor’s Fair Work Taskforce and as Lisa has indicated, we are listening  to  workers  and  what  they’ve  got  to  say  about  our  existing  industrial  relations system.  What  we  know  about  this  federal  government  is  that  it’s  in  their  DNA  to  attack penalty rates and the industrial relations system, it’s something that Labor has fought very proudly built up over the course of 100 years and is serving the interests of workers well. We’re listening to them, they’re telling us of the importance of penalty rates to their families and to supplement their family incomes and it’s essential to people’s standard of living that they have these penalty rates. We’re talking about people in retail for example, who are earning  around  $18  or  $19  an  hour  if  they’re  an  adult,  so  the  loss  of  penalty  rates  on Sundays is a huge impost and it means that families suffer as a result of that. So we’re listening to the ordinary Australian stories and we see that these changes that have been proposed as WorkChoices Mark II. This Government is coming after the penalty rates and the working conditions of ordinary working people and the job of the Taskforce is to talk to people and hear what they’ve got to say.

SUSAN  LAMB:  In  my  local  area  of  Longman,  this  Government  isn’t  really  listening  to workers and their families, they need to know that workers need to have good safe and secure employment and that’s what helps grows their families.

JACQUI PEDERSEN: The hearing of stories of workers in my electorate of Petrie helps to emphasise how important penalty rates are for families to retain their work life balance and we  need  to  protect  penalty  rates  for  these  families  and  ensure  that  all  of  their  working conditions are retained.

CHESTERS: Are there any questions?

REPORTER: Nationally, what types of numbers are we talking about that could be affected by this decision if it finally comes down?

CHESTERS: In the retail sector and in the hospitality sector, there the two sectors that the Government  has  singled  out  for  penalty  rate  cuts  in  their  own  Productivity  Commission Review employs tens of thousands of workers, these are people in your local Coles, your local Safeway, these are people also working in smaller stores, small businesses. What we’re hearing, not just from the workers but from those small businesses it’s creating friction within the workplace because people don’t know how they’re going to fill their rosters on the Sundays and on the Saturdays if these penalty rates are cut.

REPORTER: So what does this government aim to do in the retail sector in particular just in line with people being unpaid or underpaid, particularly the 7/11 case?

CHESTERS: In relation to 7/11 that’s just an example of just what happens when you don’t have good workplace relations laws to investigate what’s going on, so it was Labor’s Fair Work Ombudsman who exposed this problem that we have in our 7/11s and now there needs to be immediate action. We’ve seen deadset silence from the Government, there’s been no action on what they propose to do. What’s happened in 7/11 is an example of why we need to have strong workplace laws. But then why we need to then back them up with good laws in other areas, like in relation to franchising and in relation to temporary work visas. These are important for international students who come here to study but then are exploited by their employer. One media outlet referred to it as modern slavery, what’s really sad is that we’re hearing that it’s not just in 7/11 but in lots and lots of other workplaces and industries around the country, these workers deserve to be paid the wages that Australians are paid and they should not be used to undercut those wages and conditions that we have here in this country.

REPORTER: So what do you aim to do about that?

CHESTERS:  Well  this  company  and  these  people  involved  now  that  there’s  been  an investigation there needs to be a prosecution, these people need to be back paid, they need to be paid properly, there’s a model clearly problem with the franchisee model and that’s something that other elements of the government will look at but no employer should be able to  underpay  their  workers  in  this  way.  Given  it  is  so  widespread,  I  call  on  the  Federal Government  to  look  into  the  international  student  visa,  people  are  only  supposed  to  be working 20 hours a week on that student visa, how is that these people have been able to work more than that? These workers have been brave to speak up and share their story now the Government needs to act and clean up this problem, not just in 7/11 but across the economy.

REPORTER: Senator, we’ve heard that there’s other examples of this have you heard that as well and do you think there are other chains involved or is it just one off operators do you think, because with 7/11 the interest was because it’s a major chain.

KETTER: It’s a major chain but it’s based very much on a franchising model, so it’s quite possible that there are other franchisees in other franchise systems which have similar types of issues. I think the 7/11 case is one of the most aggresses examples because it seems to be systemic across the whole of the system and so I think you’d be hard pressed to find an example as bad as that one, but I’m sure that there are other systems that probably need to be looked at and I’m sure there are many franchise orgs out there now taking a close look at their systems and I would encourage people to see that this is a good time to take stock of what you are doing. It’s time to start treating workers with respect and with dignity. Just coming back to a question that was asked before, this Productivity Commission Report is all about reducing Sunday penalty rates in retail, hospitality and the entertainment area and so what we’re talking about here is creating a second class of citizen in the retail industry where the social life, the family time of workers in that industry for some reason are worth less than those times for other workers, so it’s a second class system. Labor will never support an arrangement where workers are treated worse than other workers in our society.

REPORTER: What do you say to those in the hospitality industry and indeed the tourism industry  that  Sundays  and  that  are  when  they  do  their  business  and  it’s  hurting  them particularly when it’s a public holiday and they’ve got extra wages and can’t afford to open. I mean this is the argument

KETTER: Well it’s interesting, we’ve just been taking evidence from Professor John Quiggan from the University of Queensland, who’s telling us that there is no evidence that penalty rates are in fact a burden on the economy. Yes, we’ve heard some business people talking about the impact of penalty rates on their restaurants etc. What normally happens is there is an opportunity for surcharges to be placed if a business feels particularly affected they can take some steps and I think Australians do not mind if they pay a little bit extra on a weekend if they’re going to a restaurant, because we as Australians respect that everybody should have the right to have family time or social time on the weekend and if you are giving up your family life or your social life then you should be paid a bit extra to recognise that. It just comes back to treating people with dignity and respect.

CHESTERS: What we’re also wanting to acknowledge too is that the Prime Minister and the Productivity Commission and some of the people in the industry are only talking about the Sunday rate and the public holiday rate, they are not talking about the very low rates of pay on Monday through to Friday and cutting penalty rates will essentially cut peoples. That’s what we’re hearing when we travel around the country is that’s what people will be forced to give up if they lose their Sunday penalty rates and their public holiday penalty rates. It’s not luxuries but money for the kids sport, that little bit that they put aside to pay for the kids’ basketball or the kids’ ballet. To me that’s not a luxury; to me that’s just living and what the Government doesn’t want to talk about is what people actually take home in these industries.

The cries from hospitality industry are just looking at trying to reduce wages their not actually looking at the impact that he will have on their actual employees. Any cut that they take home in income pay will have a knock on effect in regional economies and a knock on effect in local economies. You take the money out of the pockets of families and they just won’t be able to afford to live.

REPORTER: Just on the 7/11 situation and the calls for a prosecution, how important is that in terms of the deterrent to ensure that other employers aren’t doing the same thing.

CHESTERS: It’s very important when this level of exploitation occurs that we see action, there are currently 1.8 million temporary workers in Australia, that’s a combination of 457 visas, 417 visas, known as the backpackers and international students and what we are hearing weekly if not daily is report after report from various industries about exploitation that’s occurring. What the Government has done by not acting has created an underclass of workers  in  this  country  that  are  undercutting  and  putting  pressure  on  Australians  and Australian jobs. Why is it that 7/11 have gone to employ overseas international students as opposed to the young Australians looking for work, we now know it’s because their cheaper and they’ve taken advantage of them being guests in this country and paid them less than they should. It’s really up to the Government to clean up this, it’s happening weekly we are hearing reports about this it’s time the Abbott Government acted to clean up this mess.

REPORTERS: Do you think the students who have broken their visas should be prosecuted or deported?

CHESTERS: No students in this situation, I believe are the innocent victims and if we start to deport people for speaking out when they’ve been exploited in their workplaces then all it would  do  is  that  people  would  go  underground  and  not  speak  up.  The  people  who  are speaking up need to be protected and supported so we can clean up what’s going on in some of Australia’s workplaces and what we’re hearing as we travel around the country it’s not just 7/11, it’s not just retail, it’s happening in almost every single industry, meat works, agriculture, hospitality, retail, cleaning, security, it’s hard to find an industry where we are not meeting and hearing stories of overseas workers or migrant workers being exploited in this way.

ENDS

MEDIA CONTACT: NATHAN LEGGE (KETTERS) 0411 360 528