Note: Where available, the PDF/Word icon below is provided to view the complete and fully formatted document
Business warned not to blame carbon price for unrelated price hikes



Download PDFDownload PDF

 

THE HON GREG COMBET AM MP  Minister for Climate Change and Energy Efficiency  Minister for Industry and Innovation   

THE HON MARK DREYFUS QC MP  Parliamentary Secretary for Climate Change and Energy Efficiency  Parliamentary Secretary for Industry and Innovation  Cabinet Secretary 

 

JOINT MEDIA RELEASE 

GC 205/12   16 July 2012

 

BUSINESS WARNED NOT TO BLAME CARBON PRICE FOR UNRELATED PRICE  HIKES    Businesses have been cautioned not to mislead customers by claiming recent price hikes in  state government waste levies are as a result of the carbon price coming into effect.    There are a range of factors behind the cost increase for disposal of waste, including state  government levies.    The NSW Government should ensure that residents across the state are aware of the real  reasons behind its decision to raise waste levies.    The NSW Government waste levy has gone up around 15 per cent in metropolitan Sydney -  thanks to the O’Farrell Government lifting its waste levy to $95.20 a tonne at metropolitan  landfill sites. This rise is completely unrelated to the carbon price, but also began on 1 July  2012.  Unlike the Gillard Labor Government, Premier O’Farrell has not provided assistance  to households for any cost impacts of this waste levy hike. 

By contrast, the impact of the carbon price on domestic waste collection is as little as 13  cents per week if best practice methods are adopted. More broadly, it’s important to  remember that the carbon price has a very modest impact in our economy - increasing the  CPI by just 0.7 per cent.     To meet this small impact the Gillard Government is providing households with assistance in  the form of tax cuts, higher family payments and increases in pensions and other benefits,  providing an average of $10.10 per week. Six million Australian households are receiving  assistance that meets their average expected price impact, while four million households  are receiving assistance that exceeds their average price impact by 20 per cent.    If businesses make false carbon price claims, they run the risk of breaching the Competition  and Consumer Act and could be subject to a $1.1 million fine for misleading consumers.   

If consumers or small businesses have any concerns about false carbon claims, they can call  the ACCC hotline on 1300 303 609 or visit www.accc.gov.au/carbon.   

  Media Contact: Gia Hayne (Mr Combet) 02 6277 7920; Giulia Baggio (Mr Dreyfus) 0400 918  776